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Romeo And Juliet
by William Shakespeare
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Cont ent s
Part One: TheMontaguesandtheCapulets....................................................3
Part Two: TheGardenof theCapulets............................................................8
Part Three: ThePrinceof Cats...................................................................... 12
Part Four: Fortune'sFool...............................................................................17
Part Five: MyLady'sDead!.......................................................................... 21
Part Six: WithaKiss, I Die...........................................................................26
Track1: Part One ListeningActivity5...................................................... 30
Track2: Part Two ListeningActivity6..................................................... 31
Track3: Part Three ListeningActivity4....................................................34
Track4: Part Four ListeningActivity5..................................................... 35
Track5: Part Five ListeningActivity7......................................................36
Track6: Part Six ListeningActivity4....................................................... 37
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Part One: The Montagues and the Capulets
In the beautiful city of Verona, there were two families—the Montagues
and the Capulets. They hated

each other. They had hated each other for
hundredsof years.
Oneday, twoservantsof thehouseof Capulet werewalkinginthestreets.
'If I meet any man or womanfromthehouseof Montague, I'll pushthem
out of theway,' saidSampson.
'No, you'll runaway,' laughedhisfriend, Gregory.
'Don't worryabout that,' saidSampson. 'I will standandfight.'
J ust then, two servants fromthe house of Montague came into the same
street.
Sampson took out his sword

and bit his thumb

at them. This was a
great insult

. Thetwogroupsof servantsbegantofight.
'TheMontagues arebetter than theCapulets,' shouted theservants of the
Montagues.
'Our masters, theCapulets, arebetter,' shoutedtheservantsof theCapulets.
Then Benvolio, a member of the Montague family, arrived. He tried to
makepeace.
'Stop, fools

! Putawayyour swords.'
But no-onelistenedto him. Theservants continuedfightingandBenvolio
took out hisswordto stopthem. ThenTybalt arrived. HewasaCapulet, the
mostdangerousmember of thefamily. Helovedfighting.

hated:

sword:

thumb:

insult:

fools: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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'Benvolio, you have drawn your sword

. Now you must fight with me.
Lookatyour death!'
'I amonlytryingtoseparatethesefools,' repliedBenvolio.
'Putawayyour swordor useittohelpmekeepthepeace.'
'Peace!' snarled

Tybalt. 'I hatetheword. I hateall Montagues and hate
you!' Withthosewords, TybaltattackedBenvoliowithhissword.
ThenLordandLady Capulet arrived. LordCapulet was oldbut hewanted
tofighttoo.
'Bringmemysword,' heshouted.
'Youaretoo oldto fight,' saidLady Capulet. 'Youdon't needasword, you
needacrutch

.'
Then Lord and Lady Montague arrived. Lord Montague was swinging

hisswordalthoughhiswifetriedtostophim.
More and more people came. Soon everyone was fighting. It was very
dangerous. Atlast, thePrinceof Veronaarrived. Hewasveryangry.
'Stopfighting! I want peaceinmy city! Dropyour weapons

, or youwill
all die! This is the third time that your families have been fighting in the
streets.
'LordCapulet andLordMontague, you areoldbut you arenot wise. You
must promisenot to fight. LordCapulet, comewithmenow. Wemust talk.
Lord Montague, come to see me this afternoon. If your two families fight
again, youwill bothdie!'
EveryonewentawayexcepttheMontagues. Thefightwasover.

drawn your sword:

snarled:

crutch:

swinging:

weapons: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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'Howdiditbegin?' LordMontagueaskedBenvolio.
'The servants were fighting. I drew my sword to stop them. Then Tybalt
arrived. Hebeganfightingwithme. Sooneveryonewasinvolved

.'
'Whereismyson, Romeo? Ishesafe?' askedLadyMontague.
'I sawhimthismorning, anhour beforethesunrise,' repliedBenvolio.' He
waswalkingaloneinthefields. Hesawmebuthedidn'twantmycompany

.
Hewentintotheforest.'
LordMontaguenodded

. 'Peoplehaveoftenseenhimthereinthemorning.
Hecries. Thenhecomes homeandlocks himself inhis room. Heshuts out
thedaylightandspendsall histimealoneinthedark. Somethingiswrong.'
'Haveyouquestionedhim?'
'Yes, buthegivesnoanswer.'
'But look, he is coming now,' said Benvolio. 'I will ask him about his
problems.'
'I hope he will answer you. We will leave you to speak privately

,' said
LordMontague.
Romeowasonhiswaybackfromtheforesttothecity.
'Goodmorning, cousin,' saidBenvolio.
'Itisasadmorning,' repliedRomeo.
'Why?Whyareyour dayssadandlong?'
'I am...'
'Inlove?'
'Out...'
'Outof love?'

involved:

company:

nodded:

privately: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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'Out of my lady's favour. I love her but she does not love me. Love is a
terrible thing, Benvolio. I love and I hate. Love comes fromnothing. It is
heavy andlight, serious andfoolish, hot andcold, sick andhealthy. Areyou
laughingatme?'
'No, I amsadbecauseyouaresad.'
'Loveisamadness

. Goodbye, cousin.'
'Tell me, whodoyoulove?'
'I loveawoman.'
'I knowthat. Butwho?'
'I love sweet Rosaline. She is beautiful, intelligent

and good. But she
doesnotloveme.'
'Forgether. Therearemanyother girls.'
'No, I cannever forgether.'
LordCapuletdecidedtohaveaparty.
'I will inviteall theimportantpeoplefromVerona. ButnottheMontagues. '
Hewantedhisdaughter, J uliet, tomeetParis, alordfromVerona, thefriend
of thePrince. HehopedshewouldmarryParisinthefuture. Hecalledfor his
servant.
'Hereisalistof names. Goandinvitetheguests

.'
Theservant met Romeo andBenvolio in thestreet. Hedidnot know that
theywereMontagues.
'Canyouhelpme?' heasked. '] can't readthenamesonthispieceof paper.'
'Look, Romeo. Rosalinewill beattheparty.'
'I haveanidea,' saidRomeosuddenly

.

madness:

intelligent:

guests:

suddenly: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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Meanwhile

, Lady Capulet was talking to J uliet, her thirteen-year-old
daughter. J uliethadanoldnursewholookedafter her

.
'You will meet Paris at the party,' Lady Capulet told J uliet. 'Perhaps you
will marryhimoneday.'
'Mother, I amtooyoungtogetmarried,' repliedJ uliet.
'I wouldlovetoseemy littleJ uliet married,' saidtheNurse. 'Youwill have
happydaysandhappynights.'

Meanwhile:

looked after her:
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Part Two: The Garden of the Capulets
Romeo went to the party with Benvolio and his friend, Mercutio. They
wereall wearingmasks

. It wasverydangerousfor theMontaguesandtheir
friendstogotoapartyinthehouseof theCapulets.
'I cannot wait

to seefair

Rosaline,' saidRomeo as they approached

thehouse.
LordCapulet welcomedthem. 'Comein, gentlemen. Danceanddrink and
eat. Enjoy yourselves.' He did not recognise the son of his enemy, Lord
Montague.
He spoke to all the guests. 'Now, girls, dance to the music. When I was
younger, I whispered

sweet things intheears of theladies. But nowI am
old. Mydancingdaysarefinished. I will sit herewiththeoldpeopleandtalk
aboutthepast.'
Astheywent intothehouse, RomeosawJ uliet for thefirst time. Heforgot
Rosaline! Hefell inlove!
'Whoisthatlady?' askedRomeo. 'Sheismorebeautiful thanthemoon. She
islikeabrightjewel

inthedarkness. Sheislikeadove

amongcrowshas
never loveduntil now.'
But Tybalt recognised Romeo's voice. 'It is a Montague. Bring me my
sword. Itisagreatinsult for aMontaguetocomeheretolaughat our party. I
will kill him.'

masks:

I cannot wait:

fair:

approached:

whispered:

jewel:

dove: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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'What'sthematter, Tybalt?' askedLordCapulet. 'That maninthemask isa
Montague, uncle.'
'Becalm, Tybalt. IsitRomeo? HehasagoodreputationinVerona. Thisisa
party. I wantnotrouble

inmyhouse. Lethimenjoyhimself.'
'No, uncle. Heisour enemy.'
'Don't becheeky

, youngman. I amthemaster inthishouse. Youmust do
asI say.'
TybaltdidnotagreebuthedidnotwanttomakeLordCapuletangry. 'I will
leavetheparty. I cannotstayherewithaMontagueintheroom. ButI will not
forget. Romeowill haveagoodtimetonightbuttomorrowhewill pay!'
Romeo went toJ uliet andtalkedto her. Hedidnot knowwho shewas. He
tookher handgentlyinhis.
'Mylipsarereadytokissyou,' hesaidsoftly.
'I donotknowyou,' protested

J uliet.
'I mustkissyou,' insisted

Romeo.
'HereI am,' saidJ uliet. 'Mylipsarehere.'
Romeo kissedJ uliet. Hekissedher asecondtime. ThentheNursecameto
takeJ uliettoher mother.
'That is J uliet. Sheis aCapulet,' theNursetoldRomeo. Romeo was very
surprisedandupset

. Hewas inlovewiththedaughter of theenemy of his
family.
'Quickly, let's go,' said Benvolio. 'It is dangerous here.' J uliet asked the
Nurse, 'Whoisthatyoungman?' 'ThatisRomeo. HeisaMontague.'

trouble:

cheeky:

protested:

insisted:

upset: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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J ulietwasalsoverysurprisedandupset. Shewasinlovewiththesonof the
enemyof her family.
'Wecannever getmarried,' shethought.
Aftertheylefttheparty, MercutioandBenvoliolookedforRomeo.
'Look! Heisthereintheshadows

. Whatishedoing?' saidMercutio.
'Heisjumping

thewall. Heisgoingintothegardenof theCapulets.'
Mercutio called out. 'Romeo! Madman! Lover! He is going to look for
Rosaline.'
'Quiet!Youwill makehimangry,' saidBenvolio. 'Hisloveisblind

.'
Mercutiolaughed. 'Goodnight, Romeo. Heisprobablysittingunder atree,
dreamingaboutthatgirl. Heismad.'
MercutioandBenvoliowenthome. Thenightwassilent.
Inthedarkgarden, Romeosuddenlysawalight. J uliet wasstandingonher
balcony. 'Sheis beautiful,' hethought. 'Her eyes arestars. They givelight to
thenight. Herglovetoucheshercheek

—I wouldliketobeherglove!'
J uliet began to speak to the night. She did not know that Romeo was
listening.
'Ah, Romeo,' shesighed

.
'Speakagain, angel,' hewhispered.
'0 Romeo, Romeo! Why is your name Romeo? Let's change our names.
Thenwecanlove. Forget that youareaMontague. Or, if youloveme, I will
notbeaCapulet. MontagueandCapuletareonlynames. A rosecanhaveany
name. Italwayssmellssweet.'

shadows:

jumping:

blind:

cheek:

sighed: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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Romeocalledout. 'I will changemynameforyou.'
'Who'sthere?' askedJ uliet. 'Whoislisteninginthemiddleof thenight?'
'I will nottell youmynamebecauseitisyourenemy.'
'I knowyour voice. AreyouRomeo? But howdidyouget over thegarden
wall?'
'Lovegavemewings

. Nowallscanshutoutlove.'
'If myfamilyfindyou, theywill murderyou.'
'Thenighthidesme. I amsafe. Lovehassentmeheretoyou.'
Romeo andJ uliet talkedtogether. Romeo knewJ uliet'ssecret — sheloved
him. Theydecidedtogetmarriedsecretly.
'Will youbetrue?' askedJ uliet.
'Yes, mydarling,' repliedRomeo. 'I promisebythemoon.'
'But themoonchanges. Will your lovechange?' 'Never. I will always love
you. Doyouloveme?'
'I toldthenight that I lovedyouandyouheardme. But I wishI hadbeen
silent.'
'Haveyouchangedyourmind

?'
'No, my love is as deep as the sea. But I must go. The Nurse is calling.
Goodnight, Romeo.'
'Goodnight, J uliet.'
TheNursecalled: 'J uliet! J uliet!'
'I'mcoming, Nurse. Goodnight.'
'Goodnight.'
'It is very sadandvery sweet to say goodnight. But tomorrow, wewill be
married.'

wings:

changed your mind:
12 / 38
Part Three: The Prince of Cats
Romeo went to seeFriar

Laurence, his friendandteacher. Thesunwas
rising andit was abeautiful morning. TheFriar was working inhis garden.
Hewasanexpert gardener whoknewall theplants— thepoisonous

ones,
themedicinal

ones, thegoodandthebadones.
'Friar,' saidRomeo, 'I wanttogetmarried.'
'ToRosaline?' askedtheFriar.
'No, I haveforgottenRosaline. Sheis nothing to me. I loveJ uliet andshe
lovesme. Youmusthelpus. Wewanttogetmarriedtoday.'
'What? I seethatyoungmen'sloveisnotintheirheartsbutintheireyes!'
'ButFriar, youoftentoldmethatI wasfoolishtoloveRosaline. J ulietismy
truelove.'
'Well, perhaps your marriage will make the Capulets and the Montagues
friends. ItisagoodthingforVerona. I will helpyou.'
BenvolioandMercutiowerelookingforRomeointhestreetsof Verona.
'Poor Romeo,' saidBenvolio. 'His heart is broken. Rosalinedoes not love
him.'
'That's not his only problem,' replied Mercutio. 'Tybalt has challenged

him. Hehassentalettertohishouse. Hewantstofighthim.'
'ButTybaltisdangerous.'
'Yes. TybaltisthePrinceof Cats. Heisanartistwithhissword

. Romeois
alamb

. Hewill die.'

friar:

poisonous:

medicinal:

challenged:

an artist with his sword:

a lamb: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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'HerecomesRomeo.'
'Heisalreadydead. Rosalinehaskilledhimwithher coldeye! Tohim, she
is morebeautiful thanCleopatra. Sheis themost beautiful womanthat ever
lived. Loversarefools!'
MercutiocalledtoRomeo. 'Wheredidyougolastnightaftertheparty?You
ranawayfromus.'
'Excuseme. I wasbusy.'
'Busy with Rosaline, eh? Forget love, Romeo. Remember your friends.
Friendshipismoreimportantthanlove.'
'Butlook,' saidMercutio, 'herecomesafatoldwoman.'
ItwastheNurse. J uliethadsenthertofindRomeo.
'I mustspeakalonewithyou, sir,' shesaid.
Mercutiolaughed.
'Isthisyournewgirlfriend?' heasked.
'Goaway,' saidRomeo.
'Now, Nurse, whatdoyouwant?'
'First of all, I want you to promisethat you will bekind to J uliet. Sheis
veryyoung. Youmustnothurther.'
'I loveher.'
'Thenwhatdoyouwantmetotell her?'
'Tell J uliet to come to Friar Laurence's cell

this afternoon. Wewill get
marriedthere.'
'I love J uliet, sir. I remember when she was a little child. Look after her
whenyouareherhusband.'
TheNursewent back toJ uliet whowaswaitinganxiously. Shetoldher the
news.

cell:
14 / 38
'Tell your parents that youaregoingtopray

,' saidtheNurse. 'Thengoto
seeFriarLaurence.'
Thetwo lovers got ready

for their secret wedding. Intheafternoon, the
sunwasshining. RomeowentsecretlytoFriarLaurence'scell.
'Thedayisbright,' saidtheFriar. 'Itisasignthatthefuturewill behappy.'
'I donotcare

if I dietomorrow. ItisenoughthatJ ulietismine.'
'Don't be so passionate. It is better to love moderately

. Then love will
last

longer.'
AtlastJ ulietarrived. Shewasverynervous. SowasRomeo.
They were very young but very much in love. Friar Laurence was like a
fathertothem. Hetookthemintohiscell andtheyweremarried.
Meanwhile, BenvolioandMercutiowerewalkinginthestreets of Verona.
'Let'sgohome,' saidBenvolio. 'TheCapuletsareoutinthestreets. If wemeet
them, wewill havetofight. Inthishotweather, youngmendomadthings.'
'Don'tworry. Wearesafe.'
'HerecometheCapulets. Tybaltisthere!'
'ThePrinceof Cats. I amnotafraid.'
TybaltapproachedMercutio. 'I wanttospeakwithyou.'
'Doyouwanttospeakortofight?'
'You are not a Montague but a friend of Romeo. That makes you my
enemy.'
'Becareful,' said Benvolio. 'Wearein thepublic streets. If you fight, the
Princewill beangry.'

pray:

got ready:

I do not care:

moderately:

last: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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Atthatmoment, Romeocamebackfromhissecretwedding.
'Fight, youvillain

!' ShoutedTybalt.
Romeodidnot want tofight becauseTybalt wasJ uliet'scousin. 'I amnot a
villain. ButI will notfightwithyou.'
Mercutio was angry because he thought that Romeo was a coward

. He
tookouthisownsword.
'Whatdoyouwant?' askedTybalt.
'I wantoneof yourninelives, Princeof Cats! '
'I will fightyouasRomeoistooafraidtofight,' agreedTybalt.
RomeocamebetweenMercutioandTybaltastheybegantofight.
'Stopfighting. ThePrincewill beangry. Hewill punishyou. Stopfighting!
Stop, Tybalt! Stop, goodMercutio!' shoutedRomeo.
But Tybalt took theopportunity to kill Mercutio. Theswordpassedunder
Romeo'sarmashestoodbetweenthem. ThenTybaltranquicklyaway.
Mercutiogroaned

. 'Aaaaagh! I amhurt. I amdying. Romeo, thisquarrel

betweenyourfamilieshaskilledme.'
'Areyoubadlyhurt?' askedRomeo.
'A scratch

, ascratch. It'senough. Bringmeadoctor.'
'Bebrave, Mercutio. Itcannotbesobad.'
'Look for metomorrow in my grave

. ThePrinceof Cats has killed me.
Whydidyoucomebetweenus?'
'I wantedtohelp...'

villain:

coward:

groaned:

quarrel:

scratch:

grave: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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Mercutiofell tothegroundanddied. ItwasRomeo'sfault

. Hisfriendwas
dead.

fault: www.nel777.blogspot.com
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Part Four: Fortune's Fool

Atthatmoment, Tybaltreturned.
'Boy!' shoutedTybalt. 'YoucameherewithMercutioandyouwill dieashe
did!'
Romeowassoangrythat helost control. Hetookout hisswordandfought
withTybalt. Hekilledhim.
'Hekilledmyfriend. Nowheisdead. HeiswithMercutio. J uliet, your love
mademeacowardbutnowI ambrave.'
Benvolio took his arm. 'Romeo, youmust escape. Thepeoplearecoming.
ThePrincewill punishyouwithdeath

.'
'Oh, I amFortune'sfool!' Withthosewords, Romeoranaway.
Soon, thecitizens arrived, followedby thePrince. They sawMercutioand
Tybaltlyingdeadontheground.
'Wherearethepeoplewhobeganthisfight? ' AskthePrinceangrily.
'I cantell youthecompletestory,' promisedBenvolio.
'Oh Tybalt!' screamed

Lady Capulet. 'My brother's child. He has been
murdered. A Montaguemustdieforthis.'
'Romeo wanted to stop the fight,' explained Benvolio. 'But Tybalt killed
Mercutio. ThenRomeokilledTybalt.'
'Heislying

!' saidLadyCapulet. 'HeisaMontague. RomeokilledTybalt.
SoRomeomustnotlive.'
'RomeokilledTybalt. ButTybaltkilledMercutio,' saidthePrince.
'Mercutio was Romeo's friend,' agreedLordMontague. 'Romeo was right

fortune's fool:

punish you with death:

screamed:

lying: www.nel777.blogspot.com
18 / 38
tokill hisfriend'skiller.'
ThePrincespokeseriously. 'No! It is wrong to kill. Webanish

Romeo
fromVerona! If I findhiminthecity, hewill die! Wemust not showmercy

tomurderers.'
ThosewerethePrince'sfinal words. RomeohadtoleaveVeronaandnever
return.
J uliet was waiting for Romeo, her new husband. Shewanted thenight to
comequicklysothat theycouldbetogether. But whentheNursearrived, she
broughtbadnews.
'Heisdead!'
'Whoisdead?'
'I sawthebodywithmyowneyes. Heisdead.'
'What? IsRomeodead?'
'No, Tybalt is dead. Romeo has killed him. Romeo is banished, he must
leaveVerona.'
'DidRomeokill mycousin? Heisavillain. ButI lovehim.'
J ulietwasveryunhappy.
'Yourfatherandmother arecryingforTybalt,' theNursetoldher.
'I will cry for himtoo,' saidJ uliet. 'But I will cry longer for Romeo. I will
neverseehimagain. I will kill myself.'
'No,' saidtheNurse. 'Romeo is hiding

withFriar Laurence. I will bring
himtoyou.'
'Yes, Nurse, bring himto me quickly. Givehimthis ring. Hemust come
andsayhislastgoodbye.'

banish:

mercy:

hiding:
19 / 38
RomeowastalkingtoFriar Laurence. 'Everythingisfinished. I must leave
Veronaandnever seeJ ulietagain. Evenacator adogor amousemaylookat
J uliet. ButI cannot. Givemepoisonoraknifetokill myself.'
'Youaremad. ThePrincehasshownmercy. Heletsyoulive.'
'Youareold, Friar. ButI amyoungandinlove. I wanttodie.'
'No, bebrave. Youmust go to Mantua. Youwill besafethere. I will send
you news about J uliet. Oneday, you will betogether again. But hereis the
Nurse.'
'HowisJ uliet?' Romeoaskedherimmediately.
'She cries and cries. First, she calls out Tybalt's name, then she calls for
Romeo. Thenshefallsonherbed.'
'Tonight, gowiththeNurse,' saidtheFriar. 'SeeJ ulietforthelasttime.'
Romeo went back to thehouseof theCapulets. TheNursetook himinto
thegarden. Nobodysawthem.
'Hereisaladder,'! shesaid. 'Climbupandgothroughthewindow.'
SoRomeospenthismarriagenightwithJ uliet.
Downstairs, in the house of the Capulets, Lord and Lady Capulet were
talking. LordPariswaswiththem.
'I will talktoJ uliet. Shewill marryyounextWednesday...'
'That'stoosoon,' saidLadyCapulet.
'OnThursday then. Tybalt is dead. Theremust besomething goodfor the
Capuletfamily—J uliet'swedding! I amherfather. Shewill doasI say.'
PariswasveryhappybecausehelovedJuliet. LordCapulet toldhiswifeto
seeJ uliet inthemorning. Shemust preparefor her marriage. Her parentsdid
not know that J uliet was already marriedto Romeo, thekiller of her cousin
Tybalt.
'I wishitwasThursdaytomorrow,' saidParis.
20 / 38
'Well, goodbyeuntil then,' saidLordCapulet. 'On Thursday, my daughter
will marryyou. I promise.'
Inthemorning, Romeo left J uliet. Hehadto escapeto Mantuabeforethe
Princefoundhim.
'Must yougo?' askedJ uliet. 'It is still night. Thenightingale

is singing,
notthelark

.'
'Lookatthesky. Thesunisrising. ButI wanttostay.'
'Go. It is dangerous for youhere. But I want youto stay. Goodbye, sweet
Romeo. Will I everseeyouagain?'
'Goodbye. I will thinkof youeverysecondof theday.'
Theykissed. ThenRomeoclimbeddowntheladder.
'I canseeonlybadluckinthefuture,' saidJ uliet. 'I seemtoseeyoudead.'
'Oursadnessmakesusthinkinthisway. I will writeeveryday. Goodbye.'
'Please, God, sendhimbacktomeagain.'

nightingale:

lark:
21 / 38
Part Five: My Lady's Dead!
Earlynext morning, Lady Capulet visitedJ uliet inher bedroom. 'Daughter,
areyouawake?'
'Itisveryearly. I amnotwell,' answeredJ uliet.
'Areyoustill cryingfor your cousinTybalt? It isgoodtocry. But nowit is
timetostop.'
'Letmecrymoreformypoorcousin.'
'Well, reallyyoushouldcrybecauseRomeo, hiskiller, isstill alive.'
'Yes, mother. I wishI couldseeRomeonowand... kill him.'
'I will sendaservanttoMantuatopoisonhim,' promisedLadyCapulet. 'He
will not livelong. But J uliet, I havegoodnewsfor you. Youwill get married
toParisearlynextThursdaymorning. Thenyouwill behappy.'
'No, mother. It is impossible. I don't want to get marriedso soon. Tell my
father this. As you know, I hate Romeo. He has killed my cousin. But I'd
rather

marryRomeothanParis.'
'Herecomesyourfather. Tell himyourself.'
'What?' saidLordCapulet. 'Areyoustill crying?Wife, haveyoutoldherthe
news?'
'Yes. Thelittlefool thanksyoubutshewon'tmarryParis.'
LordCapuletwasveryangry. 'LordParisisaveryfinegentleman. Thisisa
greatopportunity.'
'Thankyou, father, butI will notmarryhim.'
'Areyoutooproud

tomarryhim? Put onaweddingdressnext Thursday
andgowithParistothechurch. If youdon't, I'll pull youtherebythehair.'

I'd rather:

Are you too proud: www.nel777.blogspot.com
22 / 38
'Goodfather, listentome.'
'Don't argue

withme. Gotothechurchnext Thursday. I'mgladwehave
nomorechildrenlikethis.'
'Pleasedon'tbeangrywithmylittleJ uliet, sir,' saidtheNurse.
'Shutup, youfatoldfool!'
'Becalm,' LadyCapulettoldhim.
'I havedecided. If youdon'tobeyme

, I will throwyououtinthestreet.'
Whenherparentshadgone, J ulietaskedtheNurseforadvice

.
'I alreadyhaveahusbandthatI love. WhatshouldI do?'
'Well, Romeo is not here. Paris is a fine gentleman, it's true. He is more
handsomethanRomeo. ForgetRomeoandmarryParis.'
'Doyouspeakfromyourheart?'
'Of course,' saidtheNurse.
J ulietrealisedthatshecouldnottrust

theNurse.
ShewenttoFriarLaurencetoaskhisadvice.
TheFriar wasveryworried. Pariswastalkingtohimandhadtoldhimthat
hewouldmarryJ uliet.
'Doessheloveyou?' askedtheFriar.
'I don't know. Wehaven't talked about lovebecausesheis weeping

for
hercousin'sdeath. Butourmarriagewill makeherhappyagain.'
'Butlook, herecomesJ uliet.'
'Welcome, my lady and my wife,' said Paris. 'Have you come to tell the
Friarthatyouloveme?'

argue:

obey me:

advice:

trust:

weeping:
23 / 38
'I cannot answer that,' said J uliet. 'But please, let me talk to the Friar
privately.'
When they werealone, theFriar toldJ uliet to behappy. 'If youarebrave
enough, I have a plan that will help you and Romeo. You will be together
again.'
'WhatmustI do?I will doanythingforRomeo, myhusband.'
'GohomeandagreetomarryParis.'
'No! I cannot.'
'Listencarefully. OnWednesdaynight, gotoyour bedroomalone. Takethis
bottleanddrink theliquid. It is aspecial potion

. Youwill sleep for forty-
two hours. Your family will think that youaredead. They will carry youto
thetomb

of theCapulets. Meanwhile, I will sendamessagetoRomeo. He
will comesecretly tothetomb. Whenyouwakeup, youcanescapetogether.
Areyoubraveenoughtodothis, J uliet?'
'Givemethebottle, Friar. Lovewill givemestrength.'
J uliet went home. LordandLady Capulet werevery happy whenshetold
themthat shehadmet Parisat Friar Laurence'scell andthat shewouldmarry
him.
'NowI amgoingtomy roomtopray. Donot comewithme, Nurse, I want
tobealone.'
In her room, J uliet looked at the bottle of mysterious liquid which Friar
Laurencehadgivenher.
'I amafraid. Perhaps it is poison. Or perhaps I will wakeinthetomb and
Romeo will not bethere. I will bealoneinthemiddleof all thedeadbodies
withmydeadcousin, Tybalt. Itwill beterrible.'

potion:

tomb: www.nel777.blogspot.com
24 / 38
Bravely

, J ulietpickedupthebottleandraisedittoherlips.
'Romeo, Romeo, I drinktoyou!'
Shedrank. Shefell onthebedandslept.
Thenext morning, it wasThursday. TheNursecametowakeher upfor her
marriage. 'You lazy girl,' shesaid. 'You mustn't liein bed on your wedding
day... Help! Help! Mylady'sdead!'
LordandLadyCapuletrantotheirdaughter'sroom.
'She'sdead, she'sdead, she'sdead,' criedLadyCapulet.
'Her bodyiscold. I cannotspeak,' saidLordCapulet.
Atthatmoment, ParisandFriarLaurenceenteredthehouse.
'IsJ ulietreadytogotothechurch?' askedtheFriar.
'OhParis,' saidLordCapulet, 'deathhastakenyourwife.'
TheNursebegantocry.
'O terrible day! O sad day! O horrible day! There has never been such a
blackday. Osadday! Ounhappyday!'
'Donot besad,' saidtheFriar. 'J uliet isinHeaven. Sheishappier therethan
whenshewasalive.'
'Theweddingmustbecomeafuneral

,' I saidLordCapulet.
'Tell the musicians to play sad tunes

. Put the wedding flowers on my
daughter'sbody.'
LordandLadyCapulettookJ uliettothetombof theCapulets.
TheNurse, LordParisandFriarLaurencefollowedherbody.
TheFriarwastheonlyonewhoknewthesecret— J ulietwasalive. Hewas
thinking: 'I have sent Friar J ohn to Mantua to tell Romeo to come back to

bravely:

funeral:

tunes: www.nel777.blogspot.com
25 / 38
Verona. Hewill beherewhenJ ulietwakesup.'
26 / 38
Part Six: With a Kiss, I Die
Romeowasinthecityof Mantua.
'I havebeen dreaming about J uliet. I was deadbut when shekissedmeI
became a king. Even a dreamof love is sweet: This dreamhas made me
happy.'
At that moment, his servant Balthasar, found him. Hehad comewith the
latestnewsfromVerona.
'Balthasar! What is thenews fromVerona? Haveyougot letters fromthe
Friar?Howismymother?Howismyfather?HowisJ uliet?'
His servant replied sadly. 'J uliet is dead. She lies in the tomb of the
Capulets. '
'What! Getmesomehorses. I will ridetoVeronatonight.'
WhenBalthasar hadgone, Romeomadehis plans. 'I will gotothetomb. I
will kissher for thelasttime. ThenI will drinkpoison. If J ulietisdead, I will
die too.' He began to think carefully. 'There is an apothecary

who has a
shop near here. He is very poor. If I pay himwell, he will sell me some
poison.'
SoRomeowenttotheapothecaryandgavehimsomegold.
'Hereisthepoison. Itisenoughtokill twentymen.'
In themiddleof thenight, Paris was at thetomb of theCapulets. Hehad
cometoputflowersonJ uliet'sgrave.
'SweetJ uliet,' saidParis, 'I will visityour graveeverynightandcryfor you.
Butsomeoneiscoming. I will hideandwatch... '
Romeoarrivedatthetombwithhisservant.
'Givethis letter to my father tomorrowmorning, Balthasar. Nowgo away.

apothecary: www.nel777.blogspot.com
27 / 38
Don'ttrytostopme. I amstrongerthantigersortheroaring

sea.'
Romeousedastrongmetal bar toopenthetomb. Pariswaswatching. 'This
is Romeo, who murdered J uliet's cousin. He has come here to damage the
tomb. I will arrest him!' PariscalledtoRomeo. 'YouareaMontague, theone
whokilledTybalt. Youmustdie!'
'I donotknowyou,' saidRomeo. 'Goawayif youwanttolive. Donot fight
withme. I amdesperate

.'
'I arrestyou, murderer!' saidParis. Theybegantofight.
Romeofoughtlikeamadman. HewasstrongerthanParisandkilledhim.
'Put my body with J uliet,' cried Paris as hedied. Romeo knelt down

' to
lookathisface.
'It is Paris! Balthasar toldmethat hewantedto marry J uliet. Weareboth
unlucky. ButwhereisJ uliet?I mustlookatherbeautyforthelasttime.'
Romeowentinsidethetomb. HesawJ ulietlyingthereandthoughtthatshe
wasdead.
'Ohmylove, mywife! Deathhaskissedyou. Butyouarestill beautiful.
Deathisjealous. Hekeeps

youhereashislover. I will alsostayhere. But
let meholdyouinmyarms. I loveyou.' RomeoheldJ uliet. Hetookacupof
poisonoutof hispocketandraisedittohislips.
Outside, someone was calling him: 'Romeo! Romeo!' He kissed J uliet.
'Withakiss, I die.'
Meanwhile, Friar J ohnhadcometoFriar Laurence's cell. 'Haveyougiven
mylettertoRomeo, FriarJ ohn?'

roaring:

desperate:

knelt down:

keeps: www.nel777.blogspot.com
28 / 38
'No, Friar Laurence. I didnot reach

Mantua. Therewas plague

inone
of thevillagesontheroadandthesoldiersdidnotletmepass.'
'What! Thisisbadnews. If J uliet wakeswhenRomeoisnot there, shewill
beafraid. I mustgotoher.'
FriarLaurencehurried

tothetomb. HemetBalthasar.
'I can seealight inthetomb. Who is looking among theskulls

andthe
worms

'?'
'Itismymaster, Romeo.'
'Howlonghashebeenthere?'
'Half an hour. I was sleeping but I dreamt therewas a fight between my
master andanotherman.'
'I mustgotohim. Romeo! Romeo!'
But when the Friar went inside the tomb, Romeo had already drunk the
poison. Hewasdead.
Inside the tomb, it was cold and dark. J uliet woke up and saw the Friar.
'WhereisRomeo?' sheasked.
'He is dead,' replied the Friar. 'Paris is also dead. But we must go. The
Watchman

is coming. Come with me. I will takeyou to thenuns

who
will letyoulivewiththem.'
'No, I will staywithRomeo,' saidJ uliet.
TheFriarlefther. J ulietheldRomeoinherarms.
'I will drink poisontoo— but thecupis empty. Let mekiss his lips. They

reach:

plague:

hurried:

skull:

worms:

Watchman:

nuns: www.nel777.blogspot.com
29 / 38
are still warm. But I can hear people coming.' Outside the tomb, the
Watchmanwasapproaching. 'Quick, hereisRomeo'sdagger. Letmedie!'
J ulietstabbed

herself andfell.
Everyonearrivedatthetombof theCapulets. Itwastoolate.
RomeoandJ uliethadbothdied. Their greatlovestorywasfinished.
'Hereisthebodyof Paris,' saidtheWatchman. 'Andherearethebodiesof a
boyandgirl.'
'J uliet" criedLordCapulet. 'Thereisbloodandadagger. Our onlydaughter
isdead. ThisisaterribledayfortheCapulets.'
Lord Montague spoke: 'Last night, my wife died from a broken heart
becauseRomeo was banishedfromVerona. Nowheis dead, poisoned. This
isaterribledayfortheMontagues.'
'I can explain everything,' said the Friar. 'It is all a mistake, a terrible
mistake. They lovedeachother. TheNurseandI helpedthemtoget married
secretly. Nowtheyaredead.'
FinallythePrincespoke.
'My friends Mercutio andParis aredead. Tybalt is dead. Romeo andJ uliet
aredead. Thisisaterribledayfor Verona. LordMontagueandLordCapulet,
shakehands. Yourfamiliesmustbefriends. Lovewill changetheworld!'

stabbed:
30 / 38
Track 1: Part One ListeningActivity 5
The Queen of the Fairies
Look at the sentences below. You will hear a conversation between
Romeo and his friend Mercutio. Decide if each sentence is correct or
incorrect. If it is correct, put a tick (√) in the box under A for YES. If it is
not correct, put a tick (√) in the box under B for NO.
1. MercutiothinksthatRomeoisdeeplyinlove.
2. RomeodreamtaboutJ ulietlastnight.
3. QueenMabisareal person.
4. MercutiosaysthatQueenMabkeepsusawake.
5. MercutiosaysthatQueenMabvisitsgirls, soldiersandlovers.
6. MercutiothinksthatQueenMabisverypowerful.
A B
□ □
□ □
□ □
□ □
□ □
□ □
31 / 38
Track 2: Part Two ListeningActivity 6
The Party
There are some questions in this exercise. For each question there
three picture. As you listen to the recording choose the correct picture
and tick (√) in the box below it.
32 / 38
33 / 38
8. What is the reporter's question?
9. What is the correct answer?
34 / 38
Track 3: Part Three ListeningActivity 4
The Nurse and Juliet
The Nurse has returned from the city where she has seen Romeo. Juliet
wants to know the news but the Nurse makes her wait. Listen carefully.
Write down Juliet's questions.
Juliet: Where ?
Why ?Ah, she'shere.
Have ?
Nurse: I amverytired. I haverunfromthetown. Mybonesache.
Juliet: What ?
Nurse: Well, I haveseenRomeo. Heishandsome, youngandpolite. But
have you had dinner yet?
Juliet: Nurse, don'taskstupidquestions.
What ?
Nurse: Myheadaches. I amverytired.
Juliet: I amsorryforyou.
ButsweetNurse, what ?
Nurse: Hesays…Whereisyourmother?
Juliet: She'sinthehouse. Butpleasebequick.
Is ?
Nurse: Don't beangry. I haverunall over thecityfor you. Next time, goand
askRomeoyourself.
Juliet: SweetNurse, pleasetell me.
Did ?
Nurse: HewantstomarryyouatFriarLaurence'scell thisafternoon.
Juliet: Aaah! Thankyou, Nurse.
35 / 38
Track 4: Part Four ListeningActivity 5
Four Zodiac Signs
You will hear some talking about horoscopes. For each question, put a
tick (√) in the correct box.
1. Capricornswill A □ beverysuccessful inlove.
B □ fall inlove.
C □ travel tointerestingplacesinthiscountry.
2. Cancerswill have A □ asimilar social lifetoCapricorns.
B □ aworsesocial lifethanCapricorns.
C □ amuchbetter social lifethanCapricorns.
3. ForLeos, itwill beagoodyearfor A □ loveandsocial life.
B □ workandtravel.
C □ loveandhealth.
4. Therewill bebrokenhearts A □ for Libransbornafter thenewmoon.
B □ for all Librans.
C □ for someLibrans.
5. Ingeneral, Libransmaywell have A □ abadyear.
B □ agoodyear.
C □ abadfirst half of theyear.
6. Thehoroscopesinclude A □ marriage, social lifeandtravel.
predictionsabout B □ work, loveandmoney.
C □ work, loveandsocial life.
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Track 5: Part Five ListeningActivity 7
True or False
You will hear twelve statements about the story repeated twice.
ELEVEN of them are not completely true. For each one, write down the
truth.
Forexample, if youhear: RomeowasMercutio'sbrother.
write: RomeowasMercutio'sfriend.
Becareful! ONE of thestatementsistrue.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
37 / 38
Track 6: Part Six ListeningActivity 4
Lines from Shakespeare
You will hear some famous lines from Shakespear's original play.
Remember that Shakespeare wrote 400 years ago, so the language is old-
fashioned and difficult! Which character is speaking? Can you decide at
which moment in the story?
a. : Thou* wasttheprettiestbabethate'rI nursed.
AnI mightlivetoseethee* marriedonce, I havemywish.
*Thou, thee, thy: oldformsof 'you, you, andyour'.
b. : ForyouandI arepastourdancingdays.
c. : Itseemsshehangsuponthecheek* of night.
Asarichjewel inanEthiope'sear.
*cheek: the side of the face.
d. : Myonlylovesprung* frommyonlyhate!
*sprung: (past participle of 'to spring') come from.
e. : Butsoft, whatlightthroughyonder* windowbreaks?
Itistheeast, andJ ulietisthesun.
*yonder: that
f. : Seehowsheleanshercheekuponherhand.
O, thatI wereagloveuponthathand
ThatI mighttouchthatcheek!
g. : ORomeo, Romeo, whereforeartthou* Romeo?
Denythyfatherandrefusethyname.
*Wherefore art thou: Why are you called…
h. : What'sinaname?Thatwhichwecall arose
38 / 38
Byanyotherwordwouldsmell assweet.
i. : O, swear* notbythemoon, th'inconstantmoon*
*swear: promise seriously.
*th'inconstant moon: the changeable moon.
j. : Goodnight, goodnight. Partingissuchsweetsorrow
ThatI shall saygoodnighttill itbemorrow.
k. : Youngmen'slovethenlies
Nottrulyintheirhearts, butintheireyes.
l. : A plagueo' bothyourhouses.*
Theyhavemadeworms' meatof me.
*houses: here, families.
m. : Forneverwasastoryof morewoe*
Thanthisof J ulietandherRomeo.
*woe: sadness.
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