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Akay na may Kulay

A guide for expressive activities in schools or temporary classrooms at a time of need
A summary of resources and a starter compilation of teachers contributions Our Goal: Build enough age appropriate activities for a month. To finish this task we need contributing teachers, translators and artists. Volunteer at drive@jeepneed.org

Create a Child Friendly Space
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What Is a Child Friendly Space?
A child friendly space: ! Allows children to express their feelings, socialize, and play which reduces stress and develops a sense of returning to normal. ! Provides structure and routines for the youth at a time with limited resources. ! Can serve as a day care while parents are busy with reconstruction. ! Is a channel for relief and recovery services for children like feeding programs, psychosocial support and medical care.

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Activities by Developmental Stage 1. Identify Space
The Child Centered Space can be in a tent, a cleared out abandoned building, under a tree, in a gym or a temporary classroom. Below are guide questions to identify the space. ☐ Does the community agree that this is a necessary space for children? ☐ Can children easily reach this space? ☐ Can facilitators easily reach this space? ☐ Is it safe and clean? ☐ Is there space for children to move and play games? ☐ Are food and water nearby? ☐ What do we do if a child gets hurt or comes in sick? ☐ Do we have an agreement with the owner of the space on how long and for what it will be used for?

2. Find Facilitators
A facilitator is a trusted person who has experience with groups of young people and can manage a large group of children. This can be a parent, an older teenager, teacher or a volunteer. They must have the students’ respect and have their well being in mind at all times. ☐ Do we have enough facilitators that can speak the student’s Mother Tongue? If not, facilitators may have to find students or parents who can help translate to other students. Are there willing volunteers? ☐ Are we able to find enough facilitators for necessary times? What should we do to adjust to their availability? ☐ Do we have enough facilitators per age group? If not, should we decrease the number of students by focusing on an age group?

Activities to do with Students
Let Children Draw
DO allow children to draw what they want and express themselves in a non-judgmental and friendly atmosphere. DO NOT judge or grade drawings.
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Let drawings be expressive when it is what the child wants to draw, not what he or she is told to draw. Drawing can build feelings of pride and accomplishment, and help to ! communicate past experiences and feelings.

Children can also create drawings in groups of two or more. They can agree on a picture or theme and work cooperatively to make the drawing. After the children have finished the drawing, you can ask if they would like to say what their drawing is about.
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Let Children Tell Stories
Let children tell their own stories in small groups (of about 4-6 children),.! The facilitator can start the story by asking the children to name a place and two animals. The children then complete the story by taking turns, each telling a sentence until the story is complete.

Activities to do with Students
! ! ! ! Socializing with other children can help build self-esteem by mastering new skills. Playing is one ! way for children to gain a sense of control over difficult experiences related to the emergency. ! ! Play allows children to relax and have fun.! ! !

Let Children Play

Let Children Act
Drama is a medium of transmitting painful or feared messages and works well in a group setting. Let children come together in a group to develop a story, organize roles, and perform for one another or a larger audience. Children ages 6-12 After listening to a story, have the children take turns acting out the various characters including people, animals and even non-living objects. The audience sits in a circle and the performers act out the story inside the circle as one child tells the story. After the story, the children in the audience can ask questions about the story. Youth, ages 13 and older Create a drama about an issue that is relevant to them. They can perform it for the younger children and/or the community. Older participants can also organize drama activities for younger children.

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Activities by Developmental Stage
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Children 4-5 Years Old
Young preschool children may be very frightened by the events they have witnessed during an emergency. They must be helped to understand what has happened and to manage their fears. GUIDELINES ! Allow children to attend with their caregivers. ! Let children express their fears through play and stories. ! Reassure children that they are cared for and loved. ! Manage your own personal distress. ! Provide a calm, safe, and predictable environment. SAMPLE ACTIVITIES ! • Telling stories to the children • Singing songs • Clapping games • Rhythm games with simple instruments like sticks and bells • Group circle games • Free drawing • Learning numbers, letters, and colors • Simple puzzles • Free play
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Activities by Developmental Stage

School-Age Children (7-12 years)
Children in this age group need to reestablish a predictable routine. Activities should provide opportunities for emotional and also incorporate non-formal education. This helps create normalcy and build important life skills such as cooperation. GUIDELINES ! Post the daily activities for the week at children’s eye level. ! Post the rules of behavior and make sure children know them ! Provide opportunities for children to discuss their feelings and fears, ! Provide reassurance that they are important, cared for and protected. ! Play structured games and sports so that children have a chance to have fun in ways that are safe ! Help children participate in positive solutions to community problems SAMPLE ACTIVITIES • Literacy and numeracy skills • Sports • Group games • Free drawing • Storytelling • Drama • Art activities (using clay, mask making) • Music
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Activities by Developmental Stage

Youth Ages 13-18
Youth are learning and defining their roles and responsibilities and planning for their future. They are able to realize the effects of a disaster on their future. Teenagers are also able to plan, make decisions and organize. GUIDELINES ! Make sure that youth have their own time for meaningful activities. ! Invite youth to: help organize activities for younger children, take on responsibilities in the community for projects and develop and perform dramas for the community on relevant issues. ! Consider facilitating literacy courses and life skills workshops about communication and cooperation ! Provide time to discuss issues with other that can help them process their experiences. YOUTH SHOULD BE ! Treated in a respectful manner ! Safe from exploitation ! Free to speak their minds ! Able to feel useful SAMPLE ACTIVITIES FOR YOUTH AGES 13-18 Use drama, song and dance to spread health and safety messages Hold meetings to find ways to solve community problems Create sports teams, dance and drama clubs Find age-appropriate ways to earn money

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Child Friendly Space Day 1 Activities: Create a Safe Space
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Checklist of tasks in a Temporary Class Setting
☐ Register facilitators who will take down name, gender and age of

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children. Also note visible vulnerabilities that may have to be addressed through another intervention: such as sickness, severe malnutrition and extreme withdrawal. ☐ Group children by age and organize into groups of 50 for two facilitators. Suggested age groups: 3-5, 6–8, 9–12, 13—18. ☐ Conduct activities below. ☐ Discuss any intervention for vulnerable students and student participation at the end of the day. ☐ Prepare for next day’s activities (no more than 45 minutes).

FACILITATOR’S CHECK LIST ☐ Our space is clean and safe. ☐ We have enough space for everyone. ☐ Other facilitators are on the way. ☐ I am familiar with the flow of activities.

Day 1 Activities
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Reminders
1. Do not hurry or rush activities 2. Accept the participants exactly as they are. Develop a friendly relationship. Do not judge, criticize, or tease students 3. Treat everyone equally, avoid showing favoritism, even if you are a parent and your own children are participants. 4. Encourage discussion by asking questions and follow up questions. Allow students to develop their own voice. Do not speak for students 5. Be sympathetic, but remain professional. Answer questions objectively.

NOTES
! Conduct the class in a circle, sitting or standing. ! This contains 2-3 hours of activities per age group. ! Adapt each activity to the needs of the age group. 1. Facilitated Free Play: Throwing Smiles 2. Anchoring: Calm Breathing 3. Main Activity: Story Circle 4. Closing: Circle of Gifts
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PARTS

Day 1 Activities
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1. Facilitated Free Play: Throwing Smiles
Outcomes: Make the participants comfortable in a new environment. Allowing time for free play provides a smooth transition into entering the activity area. It also serves as a grace period for participants who arrive late.
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1. Ask everyone to have a “serious face.” 2. Explain the rules of the game: “No talking or smiling until the smile is wiped off of someone’s face and thrown at you. When you “catch” a smile, introduce yourself (while smiling), then make the wiping motion across your mouth and “wipe the smile” off your face. Hold it in your hand, then throw it at another participant.” 4. Start by smiling and introducing yourself, then throwing the smile at one participant. 5. The game continues until everyone has a chance to introduce themselves. *If everyone in the activity area knows each other, you may choose to skip Throwing Smiles and go on to anchoring after you discuss the rules and expectations.!

Day 1 Activities
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2. Anchoring: Calm Breathing
Outcomes: Increase focus. Transition from free play to calming down. In time, Calm Breathing will become Deep Breathing, which is a relaxation technique that will increase calm and presence of mind.

Explain that as we breathe, our lungs tell our heart to slow the beating so that the lungs can work better. Also explain that every time they feel scared, angry, nervous, worried, or tense, they can do Calm Breathing to lessen the anxiety. 1. Take a slow breath through the nose. Breathe into the belly so that the stomach expands like a balloon as you take in air. Count to 4 seconds. 2. Hold your breath for 2 seconds. 3. Exhale slowly through the mouth, about 4 seconds. 4. Wait 5 seconds, and then repeat the cycle. ! It is important that there is waiting time between exhaling and inhaling, to regulate the amount of oxygen intake and to prevent fainting. Younger students can count out loud at first then count quietly. 5. Repeat 5 – 8 times. *Use this technique until the children become familiar with it, perhaps for a week or two weeks, before starting variations.
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Day 1 Activities
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3. Main Activity: Story Circle
Outcomes: Encourage self-expression and building on the ideas of others. Develop skills to communicate thoughts. Show participants they are in a safe place where they will be heard without being judged.

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Sit! in a circle. Explain that we will ‘write’ a story together. One person will start and each person will add a new part to the story that is connected to what the last person said. We will accept anything anyone adds to the story and respect each other by listening without interrupting.

It is important that all participants are accepted as they are. All contributions to the story must be accepted.
In large groups, step in every so often to restate or “recap” the story so far. Limit the contributions to 1 to 2 sentences. In small groups, the story may go two or more rounds before an ending is reached. In the 3 – 5 year old age group, “lead” the story by asking questions or asking for descriptions. Start the story with, “One morning ______(name of character) woke up and…”

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The participant to your left continues the story then stops and looks to the next participant on their left.! ! Continue the story until all have participated and the last person is told to give the story a happy ending.! !

Day 1 Activities
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4. Closing: Circle of Gifts
Outcomes: Teach participants that gifts also come in the form of intentions. Create a space that encourages students to be expressive. Build an atmosphere of gratitude. Start by thanking everyone for participating and introduce the game by saying, “It’s time to give each other gifts.” 1. Explain that the gifts we will be giving each other will come from our minds and hearts, and not from the store. 2. Start by miming using the gift. For example, if it is a biscuit, pretend to open the package, pull out a biscuit, and take a bite. 3. Give the invisible gift to a participant, who must also use the gift, and mime a thank you, by nodding, or giving a slight bow. 4. The participant then gives another participant a gift. Repeat until everyone has received something. 5. Close by saying see you next time or applauding everyone’s participation.

Child Friendly Space Day 2 Activities: Routine and Ritual
Reminders
1. Do not hurry or rush activities 2. Accept the participants exactly as they are. Develop a friendly relationship. Do not judge, criticize, or tease students. 3. Treat everyone equally, avoid showing favoritism, even if you are a parent and your own children are participants. 4. Encourage discussion by asking questions and follow up questions. Allow students to develop their own voice. Do not speak for students 5. Be sympathetic, but remain professional. Answer questions objectively.!

Include the following routines for short periods throughout the day. Brainstorm: In groups, ask children for ideas of an activity to include in the daily schedule. Group Sharing: Bring the children together as a large group. Select a child from each group to present their group’s ideas for activities to the larger group. Fact Sharing: Facilitators provide information on food, health and other organizational issues. Preparation: Choose Student Helpers that are rotated each day to help facilitators prepare the space for the next class.!
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1. Welcoming ! 2. Facilitated Free Play 3. Anchoring: Calm Breathing 4. Main Activity: Story Circle, with actions 5. Closing: Circle of Gifts!

Day 2 Activities
1. Welcoming
Outcomes: Make them feel welcomed to put them at ease.
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Welcome the children into the activity area by shaking hands. A smile and a ”Good morning/afternoon ________ (insert name of child).”

2. Facilitated Free Play
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Outcomes: Help the session gain momentum and get them more comfortable with each other. Encourage them to play – ideally something with movement that they have played before, like habulan. Play along with them.

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Day 2 Activities

3. Anchoring: Calm Breathing
Outcomes: Increase focus. Transition from free play to calming down. In time, Calm Breathing will become Deep Breathing, which is a relaxation technique that will increase calm and presence of mind. Explain that as we breathe, our lungs tell our heart to slow the beating so that the lungs can work better. Also explain that every time they feel scared, angry, nervous, worried, or tense, they can do Calm Breathing to lessen the anxiety.
1. Take a slow breath through the nose. Breathe into the belly so that the stomach expands like a balloon as you take in air. Count to 4 seconds. 2. Hold your breath for 2 seconds. 3. Exhale slowly through the mouth, about 4 seconds. 4. Wait 5 seconds, and then repeat the cycle. ! It is important that there is waiting time between exhaling and inhaling, to regulate the amount of oxygen intake and to prevent fainting. Younger students can count out loud at first then count quietly. 5. Repeat 5 – 8 times. *Use this technique until the children become familiar with it, perhaps for a week or two weeks, before you get started on variations.
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Day 2 Activities

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4. Main Activity: Story Circle, with actions
Outcomes: Encourage self-expression. Lessen the fear of being judged. Increase the capability to address their issues.

This is a variation of the Story Circle from Day 1. Participants will s tand in a circle. 1. Start with your sentence, but instead of merely saying it, act it out using body movements and facial expressions. ! “One morning, ______ (insert name of character) woke up and felt _________ (insert feeling word, like happy or sad) because…” 2. Stop at “because…” and have the participant continue the story with the reason for the feeling. Then add to the story. ! Ask a question, if you must, such as, “what will ______ (character) do today?” 3. The story continues until all have participated. Allow the last participant to contribute any ending. ! Every so often ask a participant how the character feels. ! At the end of the story, ask each participant how they feel about the story. 4. Take note of the different feelings, and explain that it is normal for people to have different sorts of feelings. Provide an example of one of your experiences, and tell them about the different things you felt throughout. In large groups, the facilitator may have to step in every so often, to restate or “recap” the story so far.

In small groups, the story may go two or more rounds before an ending is reached.

Day 2 Activities
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5. Closing: Circle of Gifts ! ! ! Outcomes: Improve the capacity for gratitude. This is the first step to ! ! changing perspectives, about “looking at the bright side”. After such ! tragedy, do not expect them to change right away, and do not rush them. ! ! ! Stand in a circle. Explain that gratitude is also a feeling. Before the gift giving, go around the circle and ask each participant what they are thankful for.
Then continue by saying it’s time to give each other gifts. (Refer to Circle of Gifts from Day 1)

Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities
Reminders 1. Do not hurry or rush activities 2. Accept the participants exactly as they are. Develop a friendly relationship. Do not judge, criticize, or tease students. 3. Treat everyone equally, avoid showing favoritism, even if you are a parent and your own children are participants. 4. Encourage discussion by asking questions and follow up questions. Allow students to develop their own voice. Do not speak for students 5. Be sympathetic, but remain professional. Answer questions objectively.

WELCOMING Welcome the children into the activity area by shaking hands as they enter or arrive. A smile and a “Good morning/afternoon ________ (insert name of child)” will be enough. It would also help at this point to compliment the child or ask about their week.

Immediate outcome: To put the child at ease and make them feel acknowledged.

Long-term outcome: Regularly greeting and complimenting participants acknowledge their individuality, and makes them feel special. With time, this will help increase self-confidence

Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities

FACILITATED FREE PLAY Snake Tag or Habulan Ahas Choose a one of the older children to be it or taya. As the it tags another child, the one tagged will hold one hand of the it, as he becomes part of the “snake.” They now work together to tag other children. Each child that gets tagged becomes part of the snake. The game finishes when all the participants form one big snake. NOTE: To prevent unnecessary roughness and injuries, encourage the children to take care of each other. Any part of the snake that falls or gets accidentally injured is detached from the snake and is considered “untagged.” Children who are injured in the tagging process are also considered untagged. This rule encourages the children to take precaution when tagging. Immediate outcome: Introduce the idea of working together.

Long-term outcome: Helps build trust, especially in terms of working together in the healing process.

Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities

ANCHORING: CALM BREATHING Before you start this activity, allow the children to get a drink of water. 1. Take a slow breath through the nose. Breathe into the belly so that the stomach expands like a balloon as you take in air. Count to 4 seconds. 2. Hold your breath for 2 seconds. 3. Exhale slowly through the mouth, about 4 seconds. 4. Wait 5 seconds, and then repeat the cycle. ! It is important that there is waiting time between exhaling and inhaling, to regulate the amount of oxygen intake and to prevent fainting. Younger students can count out loud at first then count quietly. 5. Repeat 5 – 8 times. 6. Take a short break. This will give you time to prepare the space for the next activity.

Remind everyone that they can use this breathing technique to calm themselves every time they feel scared, angry, nervous, worried, or tense.

Immediate outcome: Reduce the rush of the previous physical activity; and help the transition between activities.

Long-term outcome: Helps build trust, especially in terms of working together in the healing process.

Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities

MAIN ACTIVITY: Obstacle Course Materials: ! Blindfolds for half of the participants ! Found objects: boxes, chairs, etc. Place them on the ground, evenly spaced, like a grid.

For this activity, pair younger children with older ones.

Immediate outcome: Encourages participants to be responsible for each other.

1. Have all the participants stand on one side of the obstacle course. Explain that for this activity, and older child will be partnered with a younger child. 2. Distribute the blindfolds and have the older child put the blindfold on the younger one. 3. Explain that the “seeing” child will lead the “blind” one through the obstacle course.

Long-term outcome: Helps build trust, especially in terms of working together in the healing process.

Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities

MAIN ACTIVITY: Obstacle Course 4. Each pair will weave through the course; from an assigned starting point (one side of the grid) to the finishing point (the opposite side of the grid). 5. If somebody trips, or bumps into an obstacle, the pair has to go to the end of the line and wait for their turn to start over. 6. Start with one pair, and as soon as they are a safe distance from the starting point, a second pair may continue. 7. This goes on until the last pair has successfully gone through the obstacle course. If the play space is wide enough, two to three pairs may start at the same time. If the group consists of mostly older kids (ages 9 and above), the obstacles may be placed more randomly, and farther apart. If there are safe structures in the area, you may incorporate these into the obstacle course. Start

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Child Friendly Space Day 3 Activities

CLOSING: CIRCLE OF GRATITUDE After all the pairs have gone through the obstacle course, ask everyone to help clear the area to prepare for the next activity. Thank them for helping. Once the area is clear, take a water break, if necessary. (If the children to calm down more, you may do the calm breathing exercise). 1. Everyone will sit in a circle. Point out how the participants took care of each other during the obstacle course and habulan ahas; point out specific examples (which you observed) if necessary. Explain that we are all here to take care of each other. 2. Proceed to say that instead of giving each other “gifts”, they will give each other “Thank Yous.” 3. Start by thanking one particular child. Be specific. For example, Thank you for helping me clear the obstacles. 4. The child then goes to someone else to thank them. 5. This continues until everyone gets thanked (including the facilitator!) Immediate outcome: The session ends on a “feel-good” note. This is also a reinforcement of the power of gratitude.

Long-term outcome: In time, this activity is meant to instill a more positive mindset.