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PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development

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Handout 1 DEVEL PMENT ! R SURVIVAL AND PR GRESS A teacher can and should advance in professional expertise and knowledge throughout his or her career, and such advencances do not depend on formal courses or external input. You have within your own teaching routine the main tools for personal progress: your own experience and your reflections on it, interaction with other teachers in your institution. Teacher development takes place when teachers, working as individuals or in a group, consciously take advantage of such resources to forward their own professional learning. Ongoing teacher development is important not only for your own sense of progress and professional advancement in some situations it may even make a crucial difference !etween survival and dropping out. The first year of teaching, for example, can !e very stressful. This is true particularly, though not only, of those teaching large heterogeneous classes of children or adolescents in schools. "ifficult first years cause some new teachers to leave the profession and even many of those who remain find their original confidence and optimism significantly, if temporarily, undermined. #$y own experience of this is descri!ed in the %otes.& There is also a pro!lem of professional survival n later years of one's career, caused !y the phenomenon known as (!urn)out'. This is not so much a feeling of failure as one of disillusionment, !oredom, loss of momentum. *urn)out usually comes on gradually, although it may !e accelerated !y personal crises such as family or financial pro!lems. +ometimes !urn)out may !e ended only !y retirement or a change of profession, !ut it may also !e prevented or cured !y deli!erate action on the part of the teacher. ,ostant teacher development and progress can forestall or solve pro!lems caused !y !oth first) year stress and later !urn)out. $ore positively, it is a necessary contri!utor to your success and sactisfaction in professional work today, and to your career in the future as teacher and-or in other allied professions: materials writer, trainer, author, researcher. .eference /r, 0. #1223& A Course in Language Teaching: Practce and Theory. ,am!ridge /niversity 0ress: ,am!ridge, 4ngland #p. 516&

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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Han"o#t $ %&at is professional "evelopment' is a continuous and individual process of trying to understand ourselves and our practice so as to !ecome the !est teacher we can. involves rethinking and 7uestioning old !eliefs. involve change in attitudes, !eliefs and practice.

%&( "evelop professionall(' 8 To gain new professional knowledge and skills 8 To provide a sense of inner sactisfaction 8 To remain well informed a!out new development 8 To prevent (!urn)out' or overcome stress and feelings of negativity 8 To gain independence and a!ility to make own professional decisions 8 To advance our career and increase chance of promotion Ho) "evelop professionall(' 9n order to develop, teachers need: greater awareness of their own practice willingness to change #!elief, approach to teaching, use of material:& to increase knowledge a!out teaching to increase language proficiency In"ivi"#all(* to read a!out new teaching ideas and trying them out to attend short courses to reflect on the results to try to solve a pro!lem in your work to keep a learning ;ournal to write articles for professional maga<ines Colla+orativel(* to o!serve each other and give feed!ack team teaching colla!orative pro;ect work professional discussion with colleagues

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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curriculum innovation pro;ects: Han"o#t , .ead the following extracts and answer the 7uestions: 1. What are they? 2. What is the purpose of each?

E-tra.t / Thursday, $arch 1= 6:5> arrived at school-read and answered email 6:?@ checked 04AT news on the internet 2: 1@ read the education news 2:5> went to a coffee shop #waited 1> mins& 1>:>> met +ue- talked a!out her lesson pro!lems 1>:5> got !ack to school - helped Bim with a lesson plan for teaching reading skills

E-tra.t $ 5>-?-C>11. Tea.&in0 Rea"in0 "uring these three lessons 9 have known what is the importance to give opportunity to predict a!out the text, to see the pictures in the text or to look at the title !efore reading e.g. we know children are not empty vessels so if we get them to predict the idea or to think a!out the picture or to look at the title or su!headings it helps children to read. They can guess something related to the text even if it is very little. *ut we #teachers& always read the text !y ourselves then we allow children to read. +ometimes they imitate me. *ut we never think that if we always read first children will !e dependent on the teacher.

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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E-tra.t /: "aily diary 0urpose: to remind yourself of past events in your day such as appointments-meetings-events E-tra.t $: Aearning Bournal 0urpose: ) To reflect on your learning during the course so as to make sense of new ideas and gain new insights ) To keep a record of interesting ideas gained from the course

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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Han"o#t 1 Introduction to Learning Journals

Purpose To encourage and develop skills of reflection on your own learning To practice professional writing skills in 4nglish To keep a record of interesting-important ideas, o!servations from the course To gain insights into your ways of thinking a!out the course To identify areas of potential confusion for you To reflect on your learning during the course so as to make sense of new ideas and gain new insights

Procedures 1. You will keep a learning ;ournal during the course, which is a record of important ideas or issues which you note down each week. Drite it up in more detail later in the day or in the evening. C. $ake at least one entry per week in your ;ournal. You can include more if you wish. These diary entries will !e used during the course. They are important sources of ideas and insights a!out your learning as a teacher. 5. The trainer will read your weekly ;ournal in order to get feed!ack a!out your thinking and learning. The trainer will write comments to you and you are encouraged to respond. ?. Dhen you want to make an entry in your learning ;ournal, put the date and mention the topic or the session or the experience you want to reflect a!out. @. Eeep the comments as a record of your learning

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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Han"o#t 2

Learnin0 3o#rnal entries


Here are t)o e-amples of learnin0 3o#rnal entries from tea.&ers4 Compare t&em4 1. Dhat kind of information do they provideF C. Dhat is different a!out themF 5. Dhich extract gives evidence that the writer is trying to make sense of the ideas for herselfF E-tra.t A: +usan. Bournal entry after she had a session on the use of games with children. $arch 15, C>>5 9t is no dou!t that children like playing games !ecause games are fun. Games gives us a clear demonstration on how to play language games effectively. Games are not only used to cheer children up, !ut also to provide chances for children to learn 4nglish and practice in a funny way. 9'd like to summari<e some points on how to play games effectively. Hirstly teacher should give clear instruction when playing games. Games need to !e short, easy to carry out and easy to explain. +o giving instruction is a crucial stage. The teacher must ensure that clear instructions are given !efore and during the game: +econdly:: E-tra.t 5: Dinnie. Bournal entry after she had a session on children's characteristics. Ban C1st, C>>5 Yesterday we had a discussion a!out the characteristics and instincts of children which they !ring to the classroom. The most difficult instinct for me to understand is I,hildren go for meaningJ. 9 couldn't get the meaning of how and what to give children a meaningful situation. 9 couldn't even give an example of it. 9n the evening of yesterday, 9 read some !ooks carefully and discussed with my colleagues so that 9 worked it out. ,hildren have a good instinct to interpret the meaning of a situation which the teacher presented to them. Dhy can they do itF They use their experiences from their everyday lives to guess the meaning or to make sense of situations. 9t made me surprised that the reason why 9 couldn't get the idea of the instinct was !ecause 9 teach children language in an opposite way to this #instinct&. Hor example, while teaching a sentence pattern IKow manyFJ to children they always speak in such a wrong way IKow many !ird-!allFJ and then 9 immediately stop them and correct I!irds-!allsJ without any support. 9 a word 9 really focus on the form of the language rather than the meaning !ut children focus on the meaning.

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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1. Dhat kind of information do they !oth provideF ) they !oth refer to the topic or idea they want to talk a!out ) they !oth contain some description C. Dhat is different a!out themF ) 4xtract A is ;ust a description. 9t is a summary-recall of all the point from the session attended ) 4xtract * descri!es something she could not understand, how she went a!out trying to understand and how she understood the concept in the end. +he then went on to analyse why she was not a!le to understand the concept, suing her previous experience to provide the evidence. 5. Dhich extract gives evidence that the writer is trying to make sense of the ideas for herselfF E-tra.t 5. +he moves from ;ust knowing something to really understanding the concept more deeply !y relating it to her own experience. To do this she has had to recogni<e her ideas in order to link the new idea to previous knowledge. +he also comments on the process !y which she reached her new understanding. E-tra.t A4 The teacher is aware of the topic !ut does not move !eyond the surface. + he has not significantly deepened her understanding of the topic.

PRIMARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING Professional Development


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Han"o#t 6
%&at 7in"s of t&in0s s&o#l" (o# )rite in (o#r learnin0 3o#rnals' comment on something which pu<<led you or you are not clear a!out make a link !etween what you learned in one of the units and what you intend to do as a teacher comment on an idea-techni7ue which you think you will use in your teaching ;o! the future comment on a training activity or techni7ues used !y your trainer which you found interesting-helpful or one which did not work and explain the reasons for your reaction comment on working with other participants L a positive or negative experience and your explanation talk a!out some 7uestions which unit-topic has raised in your mind

Senten.e prompts for )ritin0 learnin0 3o#rnals


Today/Yesterday we had a topic on. The main ideas were.. I was puzzled by. because. I was interested in.because Today I learned about.., however I think it would not work in the teaching context o !ietnam because. I en"oyed the group task aboutbecause. I did not en"oy working in groups when we did the task about . It did not work because