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U N D E R S TA N D I N G

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SERVING SIZE

Servings will vary from item to item. The best way to compare different products is by looking at the quantity per 100g or the percentage of your Recommended Daily Intake. That way youre comparing a consistent value across all labels and products.

CALORIES/KJ/ENERGY
Quick Guide to calories/KJ per serving: 40 calories/168 KJ= Low 100 calories/420 KJ = Moderate 400+ calories/1680 KJ = High

T E E EAOR ES M TH F O

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PROTEIN

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Servings per Package: 5 Serving Size: 3 cookies (32g/1.1oz) Average Quantity per Serving Energy Protein Fat Total Saturated Trans Cholesterol Total Carbohydrate Sugars Dietary Fibre Sodium 130 calories 2g 5g 2g 0g 0mg 20g 12g Less than 2g 170mg

Approximately 50g per day5. Protein is an important nutrient needed for the growth and repair of cells and for supplying essential amino acids (the bodys building blocks). Meat, chicken, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, dried beans, lentils, dairy and soy products are all great sources.

Less than 20g per day1. Fats that are solid at room temperature increase risk of heart disease and cholesterol levels2.

SATURATED FAT

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TRANS FAT

CHOLESTEROL
Less than 300mg per day1. Bad cholesterol (LDL) contributes to blocked arteries and risk of heart disease2.

Less than 2g per day (or as little as possible). Trans fats increase the levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and decrease the levels of good cholesterol (HDL)3.

Example: Pack of cookies

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SUGARS AS CARBOHYDRATE
Less than 50g per day4. Labels show total carbohydrate value and also how much of that value is made up of sugar. Sugar significantly increases energy content of food, too much energy in, and not enough out ends in weight gain and/or obesity.

SODIUM

FIBRE

No more than 2,400 mg per day1. Too much salt may increase the risk of developing high blood pressure - a risk factor for heart disease.

*Daily value recommendations are based on a 2000 Calorie/8360KJ diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your energy needs.
References: 1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2013). Labelling & Nutrition. Access: www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm266853.htm 2. National Heart Foundation of Australia. (2010). Understanding Fats and Cholesterol. Access: www.heartfoundation.org.au/sites/HealthyEating/ understandingfatsandcholesterol/Pages/default.aspx 3. Mozaffarian, D et al. (2006). Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med. 13;354(15):1601-13 4. World Health Organization. (2003). Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. WHO Technical Report Series 916.Geneva. Access: www.whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/WHO_TRS_916.pdf 5. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids (2002/2005). Food and Nutrition Board. Institute of Medicine. National Academies. Access: www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10490

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25-30g per day5. Not only does it keep you feeling fuller longer, it is critical to keeping your digestive system healthy.