May 24, 2013 Joanne LaBaw, Task Monitor United States Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Sixth Avenue, Mail

Stop ECL-112 Seattle, Washington 98101 Re: Contract Number: EP-S7-06-02 Technical Direction Document Number: 13-04-0002 West Salem Preliminary Assessments

Dear Ms. LaBaw: Enclosed please find the Final Quality Assurance Plan for the West Salem Preliminary Assessment site, which are located in Salem, Oregon. If you have any question regarding this submittal, please call me at (206) 624-9537. Sincerely, ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT, INC.

Linda Ader START-3 Project Leader cc: Derek Pulvino, Project Manager, E & E, Seattle, Washington

Linda Ader Mark Woodke Renee Nordeen

206-406-3411, lader@ene.com, E & E 720 Third Ave, Suite 1700, Seattle, WA 98104 206-624-9537, mwoodke@ene.com, E & E 720 Third Ave, Suite 1700, Seattle, WA 98104 206-624-9537, rnordeen@ene.com , E & E 720 Third Ave, Suite 1700, Seattle, WA 98104 TBD

Site Assessment Project Leader START Quality Assurance Reviewer Analytical Coordinator

No Yes Yes

TBD

Laboratory contact

No

3. Physical Description and Site Contact Information:
Site Name Site Locations

Property Sizes

Site Contacts Nearest Residents Primary Land Uses Surrounding the Site

West Salem PAs, Various Locations (Walker Middle School, 7th and Patterson Ballfield, Wallace Marine Park, West Salem High School, and Orchard Heights Park) 1075 8th Street NW, Salem OR (Walker Middle School) 800 Block of 7th Street NW, Salem, OR (7th and Patterson Ballfields) 200 Glen Creek Road NW , Salem, OR (Wallace Marine Park) 1776 Titan Drive. NW, Salem, OR (West Salem High School) 1201 Orchard Heights Road NW (Orchard Heights Park) (See Figures 1 and 2) Minto-Island Road SW (Minto-Brown Island Park, Background Location) 15.3 acres (Walker Middle School, See Figure 3) 0.9 acres (7th and Patterson Ballfields, See Figure 4) 100.41 acres (Wallace Marine Park, See Figure 5) 60.99 acres (West Salem High School, See Figure 6) 27.89 acres (Orchard Heights Park, See Figure 7) NA (Minto-Brown Island Park, See Figure 8) Various Phone Number: Various Adjacent properties Direction: All Mixed commercial and residential (Walker Middle School, 7th and Patterson Ball Fields, Wallace Marine Park), and residential (West Salem High School and Orchard Heights Park).

4. The proposed schedule of project work follows:
Activity QAP Review/Approval Mobilize to / Demobilize from Site Sample Collection Laboratory Sample Receipt Laboratory Analysis Data Validation Estimated Start Date Estimated Completion Date Comments

4/30/2013 6/10/2013 6/10/2013 6/12/2013 6/12/2013 6/20/2013

5/23/2013 6/14/2013 6/14/2013 6/19/2013 7/3/2013 7/5/2013
For logistical purposes, the project does not propose using Saturday delivery 7-day turnaround for CLP. NAREL TAT is 30 days with prelim data as it is available. Assumes 7-day turnaround for CLP validation and NAREL as final data

5. Historical and Background Information
Describe briefly what you know about the site that is relevant to sampling and analysis for this investigation.

The sites included in this work plan are locations where the EPA is conducting Preliminary Assessments (PA) in response to petitions that were submitted by a number of people concerned over multiple occurrences of osteosarcoma (a rare form of bone cancer) in the West Salem area of Oregon. The properties listed above were selected for inclusion in the PA during discussions that took place between the EPA, parents of the children who contracted osteosarcoma, and other interested parties; and were all identified as areas where the children had frequented. To date, no clear causal link has been identified between these incidences of osteosarcoma and environmental factors or exposures. Acknowledging the complex, multivariate nature of cancer risk and onset, and that this assessment is not intended to represent an epidemiological study, review of available literature suggests that Page 2 of 17

exposure to radium may result in an elevated risk profile for osteosarcoma. The most common radium isotope (Radium 226) decays by alpha particle emission with accompanying gamma radiation. Although the linkage appears more tenuous, other theories suggest a positive correlation may exist between exposure to radon gas and osteosarcoma. While there are no known sources of radium in the West Salem study area, indoor radon concentrations for West Salem are among the highest documented in Oregon. At present, all of the properties included designated for these PAs are currently developed whether with structures or for recreational use. In general, prior to these developments, much of the West Salem area was cultivated orchard land. While the specific pesticides, fertilizers, or other materials used at these orchard areas is not currently known, based on conversations with local citizens, leadarsenate may have been used in the area, though its use was not widespread. Other pesticides typically used at orchards in the area have reportedly contained copper and sulfur. The City of Salem obtains drinking water from a surface water source (North Santiam River) located approximately 18-miles southeast and upgradient of the properties included in this PA. That water is provided/made available to more than 177,000 customers. In accordance with the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the City of Salem actively monitors drinking water quality. Parameters tested for include inorganic, microbiological, radioactive, and other disinfection (i.e., chlorination) related constituents. During this testing, the water district collects samples from the Geren Island Treatment Facility, the water distribution network, and from end user (i.e., taps) locations. According to the 2012 water quality report, none of the parameters tested for were present at concentrations in excess of the EPA’s published SDWA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). With respect to the radiologic testing, a ground water sample was collected from the one “backup” well located in the West Salem area and tested for the presence of radium. Radium levels in this well were 0.26picocuries per liter (pCi/L), well below the EPA’s MCL of 5-pCi/L. It should also be noted that although this well is tied into the water district’s system, as the previously mentioned surface water source provides ample supply, the well is not used. In addition, while the City also operates an underground aquifer storage and recharge system; the design and construction of the distribution network (i.e. connection locations, hydraulic gradients) essentially prevent water from the aquifer storage system being provided to individuals within the West Salem study area. Private drinking water wells have been documented in the West Salem area, and are expected to provide drinking water to a very limited number of residences. As previously mentioned, indoor radon levels in the Salem area have been documented to be amongst the highest in the state of Oregon. More specific to the two schools included in these assessments (Walker Middle School and West Salem High School), the Salem School District implemented a radon screening protocol, beginning in 2001. This screening involved placing a radon test kit in an interpreted “worst case” location within individual schools. Following on from that screening, entire school buildings were then sampled, focusing first on locations where radon was detected, then other nearby buildings and facilities. In January of 2013, more extensive radon testing was performed at Walker Middle School and West Salem High School. Testing included deployment of 44 radon test kits at Walker Middle School and 92 test kits at West Salem High. All of the radon test kits were placed in rooms that were in contact with or below the ground surface. For Walker Middle School, testing revealed the highest radon level to be 1-pCi/L of air, below the 4 pCi/L action level established by the EPA. For West Salem High, with two exceptions radon levels were typically less than 2.0-pCi/L of air again, below the EPA established radon action level. The two exceptions were two lower level classrooms (Room B105B at 5.8-pCi/L and B117 at 4.9-pCi/L). In response, school maintenance personnel have worked to better seal cracks and trench plates in the floors and adjust the air supply to increase air circulation in the rooms such that both rooms are under “positive pressure”. These measures have been followed by continued radon monitoring. This monitoring has documented radon level exceedances, and to the START’s knowledge work is ongoing. A search of environmental database listing for the sites in the vicinity of the properties included in this PA revealed numerous listings, the majority of which are located in the industrial/commercial area in th the vicinity of the Walker Middle School, 7 and Patterson, and Wallace Marine Park locations. Releases and contamination issues documented in this area are not considered to represent conditions significantly different than what may be encountered in most any industrially developed area. These listings generally consist of releases of various petroleum products, solvents, and heavy Page 3 of 17

metals. While both Walker Middle School and Hanard Machine were listed in these databases, these listings were related to releases discovered during removal of underground storage tanks (USTs) that had stored petroleum products. As a result of chlorine cylinder leaks at the onsite pool, Walker Middle school was also listed as a “HAZMAT” site. Database listings in residential areas were generally related to heating oil tank removals. Gould Battery/GNB was also listed in the database report in relation to a petroleum release, and a spill(s) of lead oxide; after participating in the Oregon’s Voluntary Cleanup Program and filing an environmental covenant that limits use of that site to industrial purposes, the GNB site was granted a No Further Action status. More specific information on current and historic use and development of the five separate sites included in this PA is provided below. Walker Middle School (Figures 2 and 3): This site includes six tax lots developed with the middle school buildings, an assortment of athletic playfields, and vehicular infrastructure including driveways and parking lots. A city operated swimming pool is also located on the property; however the pool has been closed in the recent past as a result of city budget shortfalls. Based on a review of historic aerial photos, assessor records, and discussions with site knowledgeable individuals, the school was first constructed in the late 1950’s/early 1960’s and underwent a major expansion in the mid-1990’s. Prior to construction of the school, a 1955 dated aerial photo depicts the school site as a cleared and predominantly grass covered lot, with an east-west oriented running track visible on the west side of the property, several smaller access drives on the central and northwest corner of the site, and several smaller buildings constructed on the site. Details regarding construction or use of those smaller structures were not readily available. An earlier plat map of the site drawn prior to construction depicted a drainage ditch crossing the site from east to west. Current site conditions are considered typical for public school buildings; concrete block bearing and exterior walls define the majority of the structure, with a slab-on-grade foundation, a central boiler that supplies hot-water/steam for convective heat, and interior finishes consisting of gypsum board, cellulose ceiling panels, vinyl floor tiles, and carpet. The school has wood shop and science classrooms, but not automotive or metal working spaces. The two laboratory science classrooms include a front desk/table with running water and natural gas, and non-reactive countertops. Chemicals are stored in a room located between the two classrooms. As classes were in session, this room was not accessed during a recent site visit. Exterior areas at the school were primarily grass-covered, with asphalt drives and parking areas, and landscaping at near-building locations. The site is a generally flat alluvial plain; a steep embankment abuts the northern margin of the site, and is interpreted to locally coincide with the northern limits of the Willamette River’s historic meanders. Surface water drainage is handled by storm-sewer catchments observed in the paved areas across the site. A small fence-enclosed, and apparently man-made, wetland is located on the north side of the property. The Willamette River is located approximately one-half of a mile to the south/southeast. Surrounding property is predominantly residential, with single- and multi-family dwellings constructed north, south, and west of the site. Industrial/commercial development is located to the east/southeast. The nearest businesses include a boat storage/repair company; a transmission repair shop; and Hanard Machine which provides precision machining work. An additional machine shop, and a steel sales and processing business are located further to the southeast. Until the mid- to late-1990’s, Gould Battery had been located on the south side of the steel business.
th 7 and Patterson Ballfields (Figure 2 and 4): This ballfield site is a portion of a single tax parcel that has been owned and occupied by Hanard Machine since 1995. Although there is no record of prior development in the locations occupied by the ballfields, the lot as a whole includes three buildings that were constructed sometime between 1936 and 1950. Over time, the nearest of these buildings has expanded westward, and now abuts the eastern edge of the ballfield area. A 1936 dated aerial photo shows the entire Hanard Machine property cleared and covered with lowvegetation. The 1950 dated aerial photograph depicts what appears to be a baseball diamond at the location of the current ballfields, and the eastern-most portion of the building currently occupied by Hanard Machine.

Prior to Hanard Machine’s 1995 acquisition of the property, this site had been owned and occupied by Page 4 of 17

Asten-Hill. According to a representative of Hanard Machine, Asten-Hill, now Asten-Johnson, had manufactured textile products such as “dryer-sheets” for use by the pulp/paper production business. While the exact process or materials used at the Salem location is not currently known, based on legal proceedings against other Asten-Hill dryer-sheet manufacturing locations, asbestos can be associated with the manufacture of these dryer-sheets. Earlier Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps show the property occupied by a “felt manufacturing” business (1978) and a “flax textile” business (1950). Again, little detail is currently available with regard to the processes, resources used, or potential contaminants that may have been associated with these businesses. At the time of the site reconnaissance, the ballfields were fence enclosed, predominantly grass covered, with exposed soils only present in baseball diamond infield areas. No disturbed vegetation, odors, or other similar conditions were noted during site review. The site and immediate vicinity is a generally flat alluvial plain; a steep embankment is located several hundred feet to the north, and is interpreted to locally coincide with the northern limits of the Willamette River’s historic meanders. Surface water drainage is handled by storm-sewer catchments observed in the roadways bracketing the site. The Willamette River is located approximately one-half of a mile to the south/southeast. When necessary, the ballfields are irrigated with city water. No hose bibs or drinking water fountains are provided at the ballfield. Nearby land surrounding the property is used for both residential and industrial purposes, with singleand multi-family dwellings constructed to the west; and industrial/commercial development to the immediately north, east, and south. The nearest businesses include a boat storage/repair company and a transmission repair shop, both to the north; and a machine shop and a steel sales and processing business to the south. Until the mid- to late-1990’s, Gould Battery had been located on the south side of the steel business. Hanard Machine’s facilities directly east of the site provide precision machining work for a variety of manufacturing uses According to company representatives, machining work involves turning, lathing, and/machining of metals delivered to the shop. No foundry, smelting, or other extractive refining work is performed onsite. Wallace Marine Park (Figure 5): During community meetings, attendees discussed concerns regarding potential exposure risks at Wallace Marine Park. Wallace Marine Park occupies nine separate tax lots and approximately 101 acres of land along the western bank of the Willamette River. While a reconnaissance of the park did not occur in conjunction with visual reviews of other sites, based on a review of aerial photos and information published online by the Salem Parks Department, Wallace Marine Park includes a variety of sports fields, open and forested park land, a boat ramp, floating docks, riverfront beaches, walking trails, picnic areas, and play equipment. Community concerns appeared to relate at least in part, to the park’s location within the Willamette River floodplain, and the attendant risk posed by sediment deposition during flood events. While no specific contaminants were cited in conjunction with such sediment deposition, some discussion of upriver historic landfills occurred. Prior to use as a park, historic aerial photos depict the site as either agricultural or undeveloped and vegetated land between 1954 and 1975. In 1984, development of the central baseball/softball field complex was visible. Use of the site as a park was consistent from that date forward. Surrounding land use was similarly rural/agricultural residential on western abutting properties through 1995, when the predominant land use began a transformation to a more commercially oriented pattern. Land on the opposite side of the Willamette River was developed with relatively dense commercial and residential structures from the time of the earliest available aerial photograph (1954). Other upriver land uses have also included the Boise Cascade Paper Mill. Originally operating as Oregon Pulp and Paper, that operation was located on the eastern bank of the Willamette River, approximately ½ mile upriver from the southern edge of the park. At the earliest periods of operation, “cooking liquor” effluent from that plant was reportedly discharged to the Willamette River; from 1960 to 1985, these wastes were redirected, and disposed of in unlined settling ponds located on the northern end of Minto-Brown Island, approximately ½ mile upriver from the southern park edge. Remnants of those ponds remain visible in a 2002-dated aerial photograph (Figure 1). By 2007, paper mill operations had discontinued, and the property was sold to private development interests.

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The Brown Island Demolition Landfill is also located upriver from Wallis Marine Park and the PA sites more generally. At present, the full extent of landfill operations are not known, nor have details on wastes historically disposed of at that site been reviewed. West Salem High School (Figure 6): West Salem High School occupies a single parcel that includes approximately 54 acres of land. This parcel is developed with the school building, athletic fields, and other parking and school related infrastructure. Regarding the athletic fields, these fields extend from the school parcel onto two adjacent lots owned by the City of Salem Parks Department; use of these athletic fields is shared by the parks department and school district. The school itself includes one interconnected, multi-story building. Based on a review of historic aerial photos, assessor records, and discussions with site knowledgeable individuals, the school was constructed in the early 2000’s. Prior to construction of the school, aerial photos depict the property as undeveloped, with fruit orchards visible on the site back through at least 1954. Between 1954 and school development, the number of fruit trees on the property decreased, with those areas cleared of fruit trees being grass covered, and/or vegetated. Assessor records list the prior usage of the school property as a cherry orchard and for grain cultivation. Prior to school development, other structures noted on the site were limited to several small buildings located near the east central margin and northwest corner of the school/ballfields property. Assessor records identify the eastern of these structures as residential but do not provide information on the western structures. Current site conditions are again considered typical for public school buildings; concrete block bearing and exterior walls supported with metal columns and trussing define the majority of the structure, with a slab-on-grade foundation, a central boiler that supplies hot-water/steam for convective and forced-air heat, and interior finishes consisting of gypsum board, cellulose ceiling panels, vinyl floor tiles, and carpet. Based on available information, the school does not include automotive or metal working spaces. Four laboratory science classrooms were noted, with two on the ground-floor and two on the second story. These classrooms include lab benches with running water and natural gas, and nonreactive countertops. A utility trench runs through the floor of the two ground level laboratory classrooms. Chemicals used in each pair of laboratory classroom are stored in a room located between the two classrooms. The chemicals are segregated on shelving dependent on chemical type (i.e., inorganic, organic, sulfates, acetates, etc.). The storage rooms also have flammable and acids storage cabinets. Evidence of spills or releases was not observed on the floors. Exterior areas at the school were primarily grass-covered, with asphalt drives and parking areas, and landscaping at near-building locations. The site is located at one the crests on the locally rolling terrain, with the gradient generally sloping away from the site in all directions. Under bedding geology is Grande Ronde Basalt, which can measure up to 400- to 600-feet thick. Surface water drainage in parking areas is predominantly managed by stormwater catchment basins observed in the paved areas across the site. A surface water drainage trench/swale was also observed at the eastern edge of the eastern parking lot, separating the parking area from the softball/baseball fields to the east. The trench/swale drains to the south, and apart from a localized area of standing water, was dry at the time of START’s site walk. Otherwise, surface water runoff in the area would appear to be collected by either Glen Creek which runs to the south or an unnamed drainage channel mapped to the north of the site that also empties into Glen Creek. Glen Creek drains into the Willamette River, which is located approximately 2.5 miles “downstream” from the site. Surrounding property is residential, predominated by single-family dwellings. Similar to the site, this surrounding property was agricultural before residentially developed. The nearest industrial/commercial land use is approximately 1.25 miles southeast of the site, in the vicinity of the th Walker Middle School/7 and Patterson sites. Orchard Heights Park (Figure 7): Orchard Heights Park is a single parcel that includes approximately 28 acres of land; three additional parcels owned by the City are located along the southeast border of the site and while it’s not apparent whether those are formerly part of the park, one of these lots was noted to be used as a “pea patch” garden at the time of the site reconnaissance. Park development includes tennis and basketball courts, baseball diamonds, a swing set/play area, various trails and footbridges, and a dog off-leash area. The park as a whole is a combination of cleared and forested land. Based on a review of historic aerial photos and assessor records, use of the site as a park appears to have begun sometime between 1975 and 1984. Prior to use as a park, Page 6 of 17

the property appears to have been an undeveloped and predominantly cleared parcel. In the earliest photo (1954), the southwest portion of the site appears to have been used as an orchard. Trees planted in a grid remained visible in this same area up until sometime between 1987 and 1994. Current site conditions are generally as described in the previous paragraph with a mixture of cleared and forested land interspersed with the various athletic fields, trails, and other recreational areas. A paved driveway and parking lot provide access to the property from Orchard Heights Road, located along the southern property margin. The site is located in a small, northern sloping valley area, with the surrounding land sloping towards the site from the east, south, and west. Glen Creek transects the site on a north-south alignment. Under bedding geology is Grande Ronde Basalt, although the site’s valley location would likely lend itself to the presence of more erosional, alluvial, and ancestral wetland type surficial deposits. Surface water drainage in parking areas is managed by storm-sewer catchment basins observed in the paved areas. Other drainage features noted included a catchment basin at the northwest corner of the baseball diamond area; a plastic drainage conduit discharging to Glen Creek; and smaller hand-dug ditches along the uphill edges of several trails. The source of water running from the conduit was not apparent. Other than runoff captured by the parking lot and ballfield catchment basins, surface water runoff would be expected to discharge to Glen Creek via sheet flow. Glen Creek flows to the north, discharging to the Willamette River approximately 2.7 miles “downstream” from the site. Surrounding property is residential, predominated by single-family dwellings. Historically, much of this developed area appears to have been agricultural/orchard land. The nearest industrial/commercial land use is approximately 0.6 miles south-southeast of the site, along the Willamette River.

6. Conceptual Site Model
Example: Contaminant: Mercury Transport Mechanism: vapor moving on air currents Receptors: people living in the house

Contaminants: Radium, Target Analyte List Metals, Semivolatile Organic Compounds, Pesticides, and Polychlorinated Biphenyls Transport Mechanisms: Airborne deposition, sediment transport, and surface water sheet-flow. Receptors: Direct contact, ingestion.

7. Decision Statement
Examples: 1) Determine whether surface contamination exceeds the established action level; 2) Determine appropriate disposal options for contaminated materials.

The decision(s) to be made from this investigation is/are to: 1. Determine if contaminants of concern are present and available to receptors at the target properties included in this investigation. 2. Determine if there is elevated radiologic activity at the sites included in this investigation.

8. Action Level
State the analyte, concentration, and units for each selected action level. Describe the rationale for choosing each action level and its source (i.e. MTCA, PRG, ATSDR, etc.) Example: The action level for total mercury in soil is 6.7 mg/kg (from Regional Screening Level residential).

In accordance with CERCLIS requirements, analytical data from target samples will be compared to that obtained from samples collected from an unaffected “background” location. As a secondary point of comparison, analytical methods will be selected that allow for comparison to Oregon Risk Based Criteria (RBC) Screening levels for the residential direct contact/ingestion scenario and/or EPA Regional Screening Levels (RSL). Site action levels and laboratory reporting limits are included in Attachment A.

II. Data Acquisition and Measurement Objectives
9. Site Diagram and Sampling Areas
Page 7 of 17

A Sampling Area is an area within in which a specific action will be performed. Examples : 1) Each drum on the site is a Sampling Area; 2) Each section of sidewalk in front of the residence is a Sampling Area; 3) Each sampling grid section is a Sampling Area.

Soil samples will be collected from target locations at four individual properties (Walker Middle School, 7th and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, Wallace Marine Park) included in this project. Sediment samples will be collected from Walker Middle School, Orchard Heights Park and Wallace Marine Park. These sites are each considered unique sampling areas. The site diagrams for each facility to be sampled are attached as Figures 3 through 7. All sites will be screened for the presence of gamma radiation, which can be indicative of the presence of Radium 226.

10. The Decision Rules
These can be written as logical If…, Then.. statements. Describe how the decisions will be made and how to address results falling within the error range of the action level. Examples: 1) In the Old Furnace Sampling Area, the soil in the area around the furnace structure will be excavated until sample analysis with XRF shows no mercury concentrations in surface soil above the lower limit of the error associated with the action level, 18.4 mg/kg. 2) If the concentrations of contaminants in a SA are less than the lower limit of the error associated with the action level, then the area may be characterized as not posing an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment and may be dismissed from additional RP activities. The area may be referred to other Federal, State or Local government agencies.

The following statement(s) describe the decision rules to apply to this investigation: The soils and sediments at Walker Middle School, 7th and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, Wallace Marine will be sampled. If the results are above RBCs, RSL, or “significant” as defined by CERCLA, additional sampling and/or remedial action may be recommended. If screening indicates that radiation levels are higher at the sites in question, then additional characterization may also be recommended.

11. Information Needed for the Decision Rule
What information needs to be collected to make the decisions – this includes non-sampling info as well: action levels, climate history, direction of water flow, etc. Examples: Current and future on-site and off-site land use; wind direction, humidity and ambient temperature; contaminant concentrations in surface soil.

The following inputs to the decision are necessary to interpret the analytical results:  Analytical sample results for both target and background locations;  Field screening data from gamma survey;  Current and future on-site land use;  RBCs (See Attachment A); and  RSLs (See Attachment A).

12. Sampling and Analysis
For each SA, describe: 1. sampling pattern (random, targeted, scheme for composite) 2. number of samples, how many to be collected from where, and why 3. sample type (grab, composite) 4. matrix (air, water, soil) 5. analytes and analytical methods 6. name and locations of off-site laboratories, if applicable.

Walker Middle School (Figure 3): Up to 10 targeted soil and/or sediment samples will be collected from the site, including at least one soil sample from each area of exposed soil on the baseball infields, and one sediment sample from the fence enclosed wetland area on the property. The remaining samples will be collected as warranted from areas of exposed soil identified during sampling. Soil samples will be analyzed at a Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) laboratory under EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 for SVOCs (low and SIM level soil detection limits), Pesticides, and PCBs; for TAL Metals under EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 for ICP-MS; and for radium at the EPA National Analytical Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL). In addition, the two athletic field areas and the grass covered area on the north side of the school will be field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter inputting data to the VIPER system. The field screening will proceed using parallel transects spaced at approximately 25-foot intervals. 7 and Patterson Ballfield (Figure 4): Up to 4 targeted soil samples will be collected from the site, including at least one soil sample from each area of exposed soil on the baseball diamond infields. The remaining samples will be collected as warranted from areas of exposed soil identified during sampling. Soil samples will be analyzed at a CLP laboratory under EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 for SVOCs (low and SIM level soil detection limits), Pesticides, and PCBs; for Page 8 of 17
th

TAL Metals under EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 for ICP-MS; and for radium at the EPA NAREL. In addition, the property will be field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter. Field screening will proceed using parallel transects spaced at approximately 25-foot intervals. Wallace Marine Park (Figure 5): Up to 10 targeted soil samples will be collected from the site, including at least one soil sample from areas of exposed soil on the baseball diamond infields. The remaining samples will be collected as needed from areas of exposed soil identified during sampling. In addition, five sediment samples will be collected at the property boundary along the Willamette River shoreline, guided by the apparent level of use (i.e. samples will be biased for collection at areas where greater use is noted). Soil and sediment samples will be analyzed at a CLP laboratory under EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 for SVOCs (low and SIM level soil detection limits), Pesticides, and PCBs; and for TAL Metals under EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 for ICP-MS. A select number of soil samples will be analyzed for radium at the EPA NAREL. In addition, the two central grass fields and softball/baseball areas will be field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter. The field screening will proceed using parallel transects spaced at approximately 25-foot intervals in these areas. West Salem High School (Figure 6): The athletic field areas on the eastern and southern portion of the site as well as the gravel parking area on the northwest corner of the site will be field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter. Field screening will proceed using parallel transects spaced at approximately 50-foot intervals. Orchard Heights Park (Figure 7): Up to 5 targeted soil samples and 3 targeted sediment samples will be collected from the site. These will include at least one soil sample from each area of exposed soil on the baseball infield(s), with the remaining samples to be collected as warranted from areas of exposed soil identified during field screening for radium. The three sediment samples will be collected along/within Glen Creek shoreline, guided by the apparent level of use (i.e. samples will be biased for collection at areas where greater use is noted) approximately evenly spaced intervals within Glen Creek. Soil and sediment samples will be analyzed at a CLP laboratory under EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 for SVOCs (low and SIM level soil detection limits), Pesticides, and PCBs; and for TAL Metals under EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 for ICP-MS. A select number of soil samples will be analyzed for radium at the EPA NAREL. In addition, the athletic fields and play areas on the park will be field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter. The gamma field screening will proceed using parallel transects spaced at approximately 25-foot intervals. Background Location (Figure 8): To represent background conditions, soil and sediment samples will be collected from the Minto-Brown Island Park, located along the Willamette River. At its closest point the park is located approximately one-mile upriver from Wallis Marine Park. Actual sample locations will be selected based on accessibility. Sampling will include the collection of one soil sample and one sediment sample to be analyzed at a CLP laboratory under EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 for SVOCs (low and SIM level soil detection limits), Pesticides, and PCBs; and for TAL Metals under EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 for ICP-MS. As per the recommendation of EPA NAREL lab director, eight background samples (4 soil and 4 sediment) will be collected for radium analysis by the NAREL. One approximately 100’x200’ area will be selected for field screened using a Ludlum gamma meter. This area will be field screened using parallel transects spaced at approximately 25-foot intervals.

13. Applicability of Data

(place an X in front of the data categories needed, explain with comments)

Do the decisions to be made from the data require that the analytical data be: 1) definitive data, 2) screening data (with definitive confirmation) or 3) screening data (without definitive confirmation)? __X_A) Definitive data is analytical data of sufficient quality for final decision-making. To produce definitive data on-site or off-site, the field or lab analysis will have passed full Quality Control (QC) requirements (continuing calibration checks, Method Detection Limit (MDL) study, field duplicate samples, field blank, matrix spikes, lab duplicate samples, and other method-specific QC such as surrogates) AND the analyst will have passed a Precision and Recovery (PAR) study AND the instrument will have a valid Performance Evaluation sample on file. This category of data is suitable for: 1) enforcement purposes, 2) determination of extent of contamination, 3) disposal, 4) RP verification or 5) cleanup confirmation.

Comments: Given the high level of public interest and potential for follow-on work stemming from this project, data generated by fixed lab analysis would need to be definitive. Page 9 of 17

__B) Screening data with definitive confirmation is analytical data that may be used to support preliminary or intermediate decision-making until confirmed by definitive data. However, even after confirmation, this data is often not as precise as definitive data. To produce this category of data, the analyst will have passed a PAR study to determine analytical error AND 10% of the samples are split and analyzed by a method that produced definitive data with a minimum of three samples above the action level and three samples below it. Comments: _X__C) Screening data is analytical data which has not been confirmed by definitive data. The QC requirements are limited to an MDL study and continuing calibration checks. This data can be used for making decisions: 1) in emergencies, 2) for health and safety screening, 3) to supplement other analytical data, 4) to determine where to collect samples, 5) for waste profiling, and 6) for preliminary identification of pollutants. This data is not of sufficient quality for final decisionmaking.

Comments: Data generated by field screening instruments will be screening level only. This data is expected to support and/or be supported by confirmatory fixed lab analysis. Equipment will be appropriately calibrated during use. No MDL study will be performed.

14. Special Sampling or Analysis Directions
Describe any special directions for the planned sampling and analysis such as additional quality controls or sample preparation issues. Examples: 1) XRF and Lumex for sediment will be calibrated before each day of use and checked with a second source standard. 2) A field blank will be analyzed with each calibration to confirm the concentration of non-detection. 3) A Method Detection Limit determination will be performed prior to the start of analysis so that the lower quantitation limit can be determined. 4) If particle size is too large for accurate analyses, the samples will be ground prior to analysis. If the sample contains too much moisture for accurate analyses, the sample will be decanted and air dried prior to analysis.

Field screening will involve the use of a Ludlum Model 44-20 detector and 2241 meter. This combination provides an approximately 6-foot wide “viewing” window. The Ludlum will be set to output data to a VIPER data collection device. The VIPER allows for correlation of field collected sample data to locational data collected concurrently using GPS units. Operational checks of the Ludlum will be performed using an appropriate check source with 1 microcurie of Cesium-137 based on previous AUM sites. While this data is being developed in its own right, findings from the gamma survey will be used to guide selection of locations for follow-on soil sampling for radium analysis. For comparative purposes, “elevated” gamma levels used to identify sampling locations will be defined in comparison to both other site specific readings, and more broadly as compared to background levels detected at the Minto-Brown Island Park. For reference, HRS regulations define “elevated” gamma levels as greater than or equal to 2 times the site specific background level. That said, HRS regulations also require gamma readings be taken 1 meter from a potential source. As this data is being generated for screening purposes and focused on identifying the presence/absence of gamma emitters, the 1-meter screening distance requirement may not be met during this study.

15. Method Requirements
[Describe the restrictions to be considered in choosing an analytical method due to the need to meet specific regulations, policies, ARARs, and other analytical needs. Examples: 1) Methods must meet USEPA Drinking Water Program requirements. 2) Methods must achieve lower quantitation limits of less than 1/10 the action levels.3) Methods must be performed exactly as written without modification by the analytical laboratory.]

Methods must have sufficiently low CRQLs or Method Reporting Limits to allow for data to be compared with RSL and/or RBC levels presented in Attachment A.

16. Sample Collection Information
[Describe any activities that will be performed related to sample collection]

The applicable sample collection Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or methods will be followed and include: Surface and Shallow Subsurface Soil Sampling SOP Aquatic Sediment Sampling SOP Field Activity Logbooks SOP Environmental Sample Handling, Packaging, and Shipping SOP Sampling Equipment Decontamination SOP

17. Optimization of Sampling Plan (Maximizing Data Quality While Minimizing Time and Cost)
[Describe what choices were made to reduce cost of sampling while meeting the needed level of data quality. Example: The XRF will be used in situ whenever possible to achieve accurate results. Reproducibility and accuracy of in situ XRF analyses

Page 10 of 17

will be checked by collecting, air drying, analyzing and comparing five in situ samples at the start of sampling. Where interferences are suspected, steps will be taken to eliminate the interferences by mechanisms such as drying, grinding or sieving the samples or analyzing them using the Lumex with soil attachment.]

The selection of soil sampling locations for radium will be guided by results of gamma survey work performed at the sites in question, with radium samples collected from areas/locations where elevated gamma levels were measured (if any). If no elevated gamma levels are identified during field screening, samples will still be collected for confirmatory fixed lab analysis to verify “negatives,” or the presence of gamma emitting radionuclides at levels below the field screening devices detection levels.

Page 11 of 17

The format for sample number identification is summarized in Table 1. Sample collection and analysis information is summarized in Table 2. Table 1 SAMPLE CODING Project Name: West Salem Cancer Cluster PAs Site ID: 10ZZ

SAMPLE NUMBER (1)
Digits 1,2,3,4 5,6,7,8 Description Year and Month Code Consecutive Sample Number (grouped by SA as appropriate) Code (Example) 1323 (2013 June 9-15) 4001 (First sample of SA)

LOCATION ID (2)
1,2 Sampling Area BG – Background WM – Walker Middle School SP – 7th and Patterson WP – Wallace Marine Park OH – Orchard Heights Park RS - Rinsate WH – West Salem High School 01 – First sample of Sampling Area SD – Sediment SS – Surface Soil QC – Quality Control

3,4 5,6

Consecutive Sample Number Matrix Code

Notes: (1) The Sample Number is a unique, 8-digit number assigned to each sample. (2) The Location ID (Station Location / Scribe Location) is an identifier that is used to identify each sample or sample location.

Page 12 of 17

Table 2. Sampling and Analysis
#/type of Sample Containers per Sample

Analyte or Parameter

Maximum Number of Field Samples

Method Number

Sampling Area

Method Quant. Limit

Action Level

Preservative

Data Quality

Hold Time

Sampling Pattern

Field Screen Lab Analysis

Soil All Decision Areas Walker Middle School, th 7 and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, and Wallis Marine Park Walker Middle School, th 7 and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, and Wallis Marine Park Walker Middle School, th 7 and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, and Wallis Marine Park

Targeted

NA

Screening

NA

Gamma Field Survey SVOC + SIM

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Cesium 137 Check Source 2 Duplicates

Soil

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

30

EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 SIM or EPA SW-846 8270

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

14 days to extraction 40 days to analysis

Lab Analysis

Soil

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

30

TAL Metals including mercury

EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 ICPMS + CVAAS or EPA SW846 6000/7000 Series

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

28 days Hg; 180 days all other metals

2 Duplicates

Lab Analysis

Soil

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

30

Pesticides & PCB Aroclors

EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 Pest and ARO or EPA SW-846 8081/8082

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

14 days to extraction 40 days to analysis

2 Duplicates

Page 13 of 17

Field QC

Sample Type

Data Quality

Matrix

Lab Analysis

Walker Middle School, th 7 and Patterson, Orchard Heights Park, and Wallis Marine Park

Soil and/or Sediment

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

23

Lab Analysis

Orchard Heights Park and Wallis Marine Park Orchard Heights Park and Wallis Marine Park Orchard Heights Park and Wallis Marine Park Rinsate

Sediment

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

9

Gamma Spectroscopy screen with 21 day ingrowth. Radium 226 and Radium 228 confirmatory analysis on those samples with detects during screening SVOC+ SIM

NARELGAM-01 (Similar to EPA 901.0) NARELRa226Eichrom by Alpha Spectroscopy NARELRa228-05 (Similar to EPA 904.0) EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 SIM or EPA SW-846 8270 EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 ICPMS + CVAAS or EPA SW846 6000/7000 Series EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 PEST and ARO or EPA SW-846 8081/8082 EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 (Low) or EPA SW-846 8270 EPA CLP SOW ISM01.3 ICPMS + CVAAS or EPA SW846 6000/7000 Series EPA CLP SOW SOM01.2 Pest and ARO or EPA SW-846 8081/8082

NA

8.7 pCI/g (gamma) 0.04 pCI/g (Radium 226) 2 pCI/g (Radium 228)

1 kg of soil in plastic or glass containers

NA 2 Duplicates

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

14 days to extraction 40 days to analysis 28 days Hg; 180 days all other metals

1 Duplicate

Lab Analysis

Sediment

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

9

TAL Metals including mercury

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

1 Duplicate

Lab Analysis

Sediment

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

9

Pesticides & PCB Aroclors

RBCs/RSLs, see attachment

See attachment

1 x 8oz glass

NA

14 days to extraction 40 days to analysis 7 days to extraction 40 days to analysis 28 days Hg; 180 days all other metals

1 Duplicate

Lab Analysis

Water

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

2

SVOC

NA

See attachment

2 x 32oz amber

NA

NA

Lab Analysis

Rinsate

Water

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

2

TAL Metals including mercury

NA

See attachment

1x1liter poly

Nitric Acid pH < 2

NA

Lab Analysis

Rinsate

Water

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

2

Pesticides & PCB Aroclors

NA

See attachment

2 x 32oz amber

NA

7 days to extraction 40 days to analysis

NA

Page 14 of 17

Lab Analysis

Rinsate

Water

Targeted

Grab

Definitive

2

Gamma Spectroscopy screen with 21 day ingrowth. Radium 226 and Radium 228 confirmatory analysis on those samples with detects during screening

NARELGAM-01 (Similar to EPA 901.0) NARELRa226Eichrom by Alpha Spectroscopy NARELRa228-05 (Similar to EPA 904.0)

NA

4.4 pCI/L (gamma) 0.02 pCI/L (Radium 226) 1 pCI/L (Radium 228)

4x1 liter glass or plastic

NA

NA

NA

Note: For matrix spike and/or duplicate samples, no extra volume is required.

Page 15 of 17

Table 3. Common Sample Handling Information
Analysis Type Metals SVOC + SIM PCB Pesticides Radionuclides Lab Analysis Metals + Hg SVOCs / PAHs PCB Aroclors Chlorinated Pesticides Gamma Spectroscopy Screen with 21 day in growth; Radium 226 and 228 confirmation Matrix Solid Solid Solid Solid Solid Analytical Method EPA 6000 / 7000 Series EPA 8270D EPA 8082 EPA 8081 NAREL-GAM01 (Similar to EPA 901.0) NAREL-Ra226Eichrom by Alpha Spectroscopy NAREL-Ra22805 (Similar to EPA 904.0) EPA 6000 / 7000 Series EPA 8270D EPA 8082 EPA 8081 NAREL-GAM01 (Similar to EPA 901.0) NAREL-Ra226Eichrom by Alpha Spectroscopy NAREL-Ra22805 (Similar to EPA 904.0) Container Type Glass Jar Glass Jar Glass Jar Glass Jar Glass or Plastic Jar or Plastic Bag Minimum Volume 200 g 8 ounces 8 ounces 8 ounces ~ 500 g 1 kg (requeste d) Preservative n/a n/a n/a n/a none Temperature/ Storage <6 C <6 C <6 C <6 C n/a
o o o o

Hold Time 28 days Hg 180 days all other metals 14 days none 14 days n/a

Source SW-846 ch. 3 / ISM01.3 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 Method/SOP

Metals SVOC + SIM PCB Pesticides Radionuclides

Metals + Hg SVOCs / PAHs PCB Aroclors Chlorinated Pesticides Gamma Spectroscopy Screen with 21 day in growth; Radium 226 and 228 confirmation

Water Water Water Water Water

Plastic Glass Jar Glass Jar Glass Jar Glass or Plastic Jar

1 liter 2 liters 2 liters 2 liters 4 liters

HNO3 to pH <2 n/a n/a n/a HNO3 to pH <2

<6 C <6 C <6 C <6 C n/a
o o o

o

28 days Hg 180 days all other metals 7 days 7 days 7 days n/a

SW-846 ch. 3 / ISM01.3 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 SW-846 ch. 4 / SOM01.2 Method/SOP

Key:
C EPA g HNO3 n/a PCBs = Celsius = Environmental Protection Agency = grams Nitric Acide = not applicable = polychlorinated biphenyls RCRA SVOCs SW-846 TAL = Resource Conservation and Recovery Act = Semivolatile organic compounds = EPA Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods = Target Analyte List

Page 16 of 17

III. Assessment and Response
A Sample Plan Alteration Form (SPAF) will be used to describe project discrepancies (if any) that occur between planned project activities listed in the final QAP and actual project work. The completed SPAF will be approved by the SAM/Task Monitor and QAC and appended to the original QAP. Corrective actions will be assessed by the sampling team and others involved in the sampling and a corrective action report describing the problem, solution, and recommendations will be forwarded to the Task Monitor and EPA QA..

IV. Data Validation and Usability
The sample collection data will be entered into Scribe and Scribe will be used to print lab Chains of Custody. Results of field and lab analyses will be entered into Scribe as they are received and uploaded to Scibe.net when the sampling and analysis has been completed. The Scribe COC XML file will be uploaded to the CLP SMO Portal for all TR-COCs on the day of each sample shipment. Each shipment notification sent to the R10 RSCC will include the Scribe COC XML file and Custom Data view .XLS required files. The .bac file will be provided to the EPA R10 RSCC at project closeout, including all final lab data. 18. Data Validation or Verification will be performed by: Performed by: E and E QA Reviewer TechLaw QA Reviewer EPA Region 10 QA Office MEL staff Other: NAREL 100% NAREL data 100% CLP data I Data Verification and Validation Stages IIA IIB III IV Verification Other:

Page 17 of 17

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013, NAVTEQ 2010.

Orchard Heights Park West Salem High School Wallace Marine Park

7th and Patterson Ballfields/Hanard Machine

Walker Middle School

Gould Battery

Historic Boise Cascade Settling Pond Remnants Former Boise Cascade Brown Island Demolition Landfill Minto Brown Island Park

&

ecology and environment, inc.
Global Environmental Specialists Seattle, Washington

0

0.25

0.5

Approximate Scale in Miles

WEST SALEM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Salem, Oregon

Figure 1 VICINITY OF SITES
Date: 5/17/13 Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig1

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Glen Creek Rd NW

Boat Storage/Repair

Transmission Shop
NW

t 9th S

7th and Patterson Ballfields/Hanard Machine

Walker Middle School

Machine Shop/Steel Sales Business
Mu

rlar

&

WEST SALEM ecology and environment, inc. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Global Environmental Specialists Salem, Oregon Seattle, Washington

erso Patt

W eN k Av

n St

Gould Battery

NW

S sett Bas

t NW

0

200

400

Approximate Scale in Feet

Date: 5/9/13

Figure 2 WALKER AREA INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SITES
Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig2

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Lavona Dr NW

Boat Storage/Repair

Approximate Property Boundary

Athletic Field Wetland
n St erso Patt

Grass Covered Area

Walker Middle School

NW

Athletic Field
th Ger

S 8th

W tN

&

ecology and environment, inc.
Global Environmental Specialists Seattle, Washington

W St N
0 100 200 Approximate Scale in Feet

WEST SALEM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Salem, Oregon

Figure 3 WALKER MIDDLE SCHOOL
Date: 5/9/13 Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig3

Base Image Source: Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Approximate Property Boundary Boat Storage/Repair

9th S

t NW
rlar Mu

eN k Av
W

Hanard Machine Walker Middle School
n erso Patt

Ball Field

&

ecology and environment, inc.
Global Environmental Specialists Seattle, Washington

NW Ave

7th

W St N

0

50

100

Approximate Scale in Feet

WEST SALEM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Salem, Oregon

Figure 4 7TH AND PATTERSON
Date: 5/9/13 Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig4

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Wallace Marine Park

Cameo St NW

Baseball/Softball Field

Glen Creek Rd NW

South Grass Field
Moyer Ln NW

Approximate Property Boundary

22

99E

221

C en ter S

t Br

idge
0 400 800

Approximate Scale in Feet

&

WEST SALEM ecology and environment, inc. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Global Environmental Specialists Salem, Oregon Seattle, Washington

Figure 5 WILLACE MARINE PARK
Date: 5/9/13 Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig5

Fron t St

North Grass Field

NE

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Orchard Heights Rd . NW

Parking Area

Approximate Property Boundary
Titan Dr NW

West Salem High School Drainage Trench/Swale

Approximate Area Owned by Parks Dept.

East Athletic Field

South Athletic Field

Daisy Ln NW

&

ecology and environment, inc.
Global Environmental Specialists Seattle, Washington

0

200 Approximate Scale in Feet

400

WEST SALEM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Salem, Oregon

Figure 6 WEST SALEM HIGH SCHOOL
Date: 5/9/13 Drawn by: AES 10:START-3\13040002\fig6

Doaks Ferry Rd. NW

Base Image Source: USGS 2013, Microsoft Corp. 2013.

Approximate Location of Glenn Creek

Approximate Property Boundary

Or ch ar d
NW Rd ts igh He

Hope Ave NW

Play Area Orchard Heights Park
Westhaven Ave NW

Athletic Field

Pea Patch

0

200 Approximate Scale in Feet

Kenard St NW
400
10:START-3\13040002\fig7

&

WEST SALEM ecology and environment, inc. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS Global Environmental Specialists Salem, Oregon Seattle, Washington

Figure 7 ORCHARD HEIGHTS PARK
Date: Drawn by: AES 5/17/13

Figure 8
&

ecology and environment, inc.
Global Environmental Specialists Seattle, Washington

WEST SALEM PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT Salem, Oregon
Date: 5/9/13

MINTO-BROWN PARK (BACKGROUND LOCATION)
Drawn by: 10:START-3\13040002\fig 8 AES

Attachment A. Contract Required Quantitation Limits and Risk-Based Levels
Analyte Name CAS Number Units 7429-90-5 7440-36-0 7440-38-2 7440-39-3 7440-41-7 7440-43-9 7440-47-3 7440-48-4 7440-50-8 7439-89-6 7439-92-1 7439-92-1 7487-94-7 7440-02-0 7782-49-2 7440-22-4 7440-28-0 7440-62-2 7440-66-6 12674-11-2 11104-28-2 11141-16-5 53469-21-9 12672-29-6 11097-69-1 11096-82-5 309-00-2 12789-03-6 72-54-8 72-55-9 50-29-3 60-57-1 115-29-7 72-20-8 76-44-8 1024-57-3 319-84-6 319-85-7 58-89-9 8001-35-2 83-32-9 98-86-2 120-12-7 1912-24-9 56-55-3 100-52-7 50-32-8 205-99-2 µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg µg/kg CRQL ODEQ RBC EPA RSL 77000000 31000 390 15000000 160000 70000 120000000 23000 3100000 55000000 400000 400000 23000 1500000 390000 390000 780 390000 23000000 3900 140 140 220 220 220 220 25 2400 1700 1700 29 370000 18000 100 53 70 380 440 4700000 29 1600 2000 1400 1700 30 370000 18000 110 53 77 270 520 440 3400000 7800000 17000000 2100 150 7800000 15 150

TAL Metals (µg/kg)
Aluminum Antimony (metallic) Arsenic, Inorganic Barium Beryllium and compounds Cadmium (Diet) Chromium, Total Cobalt Copper Iron Lead and Compounds Lead and Compounds Mercury, Inorganic Salts Nickel Soluble Salts Selenium Silver Thallium (Soluble Salts) Vanadium, Metallic Zinc (Metallic) 20000 1000 500 390 5000 15000000 500 160000 500 39000 1000 1.2E+08 500 1000 3100000 10000 500 1800000 500 400000 500 500 2500 500 390000 500 250 1000 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 170

PCBs (µg/kg)
Aroclor 1016 Aroclor 1221 Aroclor 1232 Aroclor 1242 Aroclor 1248 Aroclor 1254 Aroclor 1260

Pesticides (µg/kg)
Aldrin Chlordane DDD DDE, p,p'DDT Dieldrin Endosulfan Endrin Heptachlor Heptachlor Epoxide Hexachlorocyclohexane, AlphaHexachlorocyclohexane, BetaHexachlorocyclohexane, Gamma- (Lindane) Toxaphene

SVOCs (µg/kg)
Acenaphthene Acetophenone Anthracene Atrazine Benz[a]anthracene Benzaldehyde Benzo[a]pyrene Benzo[b]fluoranthene µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170

µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) 23000000 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 (3.3 ) Page 1
A

150 15 150

Benzo[k]fluoranthene Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate Butyl Benzyl Phthalate Caprolactam Chloroaniline, pChloronaphthalene, BetaChlorophenol, 2Chrysene Cresol, pCresol, p-chloro-mDibenz[a,h]anthracene Dibutyl Phthalate Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3'Dichlorophenol, 2,4Diethyl Phthalate Dimethylphenol, 2,4Dinitrophenol, 2,4Dinitrotoluene, 2,4Dinitrotoluene, 2,6Dioxane, 1,4Fluoranthene Fluorene Hexachlorobenzene Hexachlorocyclopentadiene Hexachloroethane Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene Isophorone Methylnaphthalene, 2Naphthalene Nitroaniline, 2Nitroaniline, 4Nitrobenzene Nitroso-di-N-propylamine, NNitrosodiphenylamine, NPentachlorobenzene Pentachlorophenol Phenol Pyrene Trichlorophenol, 2,4,5Trichlorophenol, 2,4,6Note:
Key: µg/kg = micrograms per kilogram CAS = Chemical Abstract Service
A

207-08-9 111-91-1 111-44-4 117-81-7 85-68-7 105-60-2 106-47-8 91-58-7 95-57-8 218-01-9 106-44-5 59-50-7 53-70-3 84-74-2 91-94-1 120-83-2 84-66-2 105-67-9 51-28-5 121-14-2 606-20-2 123-91-1 206-44-0 86-73-7 118-74-1 77-47-4 67-72-1 193-39-5 78-59-1 91-57-6 91-20-3 88-74-4 100-01-6 98-95-3 621-64-7 86-30-6 608-93-5 87-86-5 108-95-2 129-00-0 95-95-4 88-06-2

µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 330 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 100 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 (3.3 ) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 ) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 330 µg/kg 330 µg/kg 330 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 330 µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170 (3.3 A) µg/kg 170 µg/kg 170
A A

1500

35000

1500 180000 210 35000 260000 31000000 2400 6300000 390000 15000 6100000 6100000 15 6100000 1100 180000 49000000 1200000 120000 1600 61000 4900 2300000 2300000 300 370000 12000 150 510000 230000 3600 610000 24000 4800 69 99000 49000 890 18000000 1700000 6100000 44000

14000

15

61000 2300000 3100000 260 19000 150

4600

890 1700000 44000

The number in parenthesis is the the CRQL for SIM analysis

CRQL = Contract Required Quantitation Limit EPA = Environmental Protection Agency MCL = Maximum Contaminant Level PCBs = Polychlorinated Biphenyls RBC = Risk-based Cleanup Level for residential direct contact/ingestion scenario (State of Oregon) RSL = Regional Screening Level SIM = Select Ion Monitoring SVOCs = Semivolatile Organic Compounds TAL = Target Analyte List

Page 2

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