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ADVANCE BAKING

Baking is a food cooking method that uses prolonged dry heat by convection, rather than by thermal radiation, normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones. The most common baked item is bread but many other types of foods are baked. Heat is gradually transferred from the surface of cakes, cookies and breads to their centre. As heat travels through , it transforms dough into baked goods with a firm dry crust and a softer center. Baking can be combined with grilling to produce a hybrid barbecue variant, by using both methods simultaneously or one before the other, cooking twice.

HISTORY OF BAKING
The first evidence of baking occurred when humans took wild grass grains, soaked them in water, and mixed everything together, mashing it into a kind of broth-like paste. The paste was cooked by pouring it onto a flat, hot rock, resulting in a bread-like substance. Later, this paste was roasted on hot embers, which made bread-making easier, as it could now be made anytime fire was created. The Ancient Egyptians baked bread using yeast, which they had previously been using to brew beer. Bread baking began in ancient Greece around 600 BC, leading to the invention of enclosed ovens. Ovens and worktables have been discovered in archaeological digits from turkey(Hacilar) to Palestine (Jericho) and these date from about 5600 BCE. Baking flourished in the Roman Empire. In about 300 BC, the pastry cook became an occupation for Romans (known as the pastillarium). This became a respected profession because pastries were considered decadent, and Romans loved festivity and celebration. Thus, pastries were often cooked especially for large banquets, and any pastry cook who could invent new types of tasty treats was highly prized. Around 1 AD , there were more than three hundred pastry chefs in Rome and Cato wrote about how they created all sort of diverse foods , and flourished because of those foods. Eventually, the Roman art of baking became known throughout Europe, and eventually spread to the eastern parts of Asia. From the 19th century, alternative leavening agents became more common, such as baking soda. Bakers often baked goods at home and then sold them in the streets. This scene was so common that Rembrandt, among others, painted a pastry chef selling pancakes in the streets of Germany, with children clamoring for a sample. In London, pastry chefs sold their goods from handcarts. This developed into a system of delivery of baked goods to households, and demand increased greatly as a result. In Paris, the first open-air caf of baked goods was developed, baking became an established art through the entire world.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

BAKING IN THE PHILIPPINES


Spanish Missionaries

Many believe that in the early 17th century, the Spanish missionaries when occupying the Philippines, they introduced the country to baking. Wheat was used often by the missionaries and this is when in turn introduced into the diet of many of The Filipinos. It is said that they often used it in baking which was later copied by the locals. The Spanish missionaries were also thought to have brought many other new foods to the country such as peppers, corn and potatoes.

Mr.Aquaver Natividad Uy

Others are adamant that it was in fact a man named Mr.Aquaver Natividad Uy who really founded baking in the Philippines. He came over from China and as he was a baker he believed that introducing bakery to the Philippines would be very beneficial and so set about showing the locals the whole baking process and the materials and ingredients needed.

It may well be the case that both made their mark in how baking developed in the Philippines. As with many introductions it took an outsider to show the way and the importance of baking, which has since been vital in every Filipino's life.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

BAKING TOOLS
A successful baker must have the right equipment to transform raw ingredients into a perfect cake. Cake Mixers - if you want to make cakes often, invest in a heavy duty mixer as it is a worthwhile buy. Make sure it has a whisk, a dough hook and a paddle attachment. A handheld mixer is handy for fillings and beating eggs but it cannot take a heavy duty mixing. Mixing Bowls if you do not have a cake mixer, you can always mix the batter the old-fashioned way. Get a mixing bowl and whisk away the ingredients. Wooden Spoons they come in handy when not using an electric mixer to mix the ingredients together. Spatula useful when scraping batter from the mixing bowl. Measuring spoons and cups your teacup or the coffee teaspoon isnt the right tools. Cups and spoons are available in standard sizes, making measuring small amounts more accurate. Oven all ovens are different. Get to know your oven well. Accurate oven temperature is an important factor to the success of a cake. Test oven temperature with an oven thermometer. Scales get an accurate set of scales for good and consistent result. Common kitchen scales are the digital and spring scales. A digital scale is advised for those who have difficulty in reading measurement from manual scales. If you decide on a digital scale, look for one which is able to switch from grams to ounces. Sifter they will remove any lumps in flour or icing sugar. Sieves are used to aerate flour which in turn makes cake lighter. Cake tins they come in various shapes and sizes. You can buy the basic tins and rent odd-shaped tins to save space. Check with you local baking supply store to see if they rent tins.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

Oven gloves it is essential that you have a good set of gloves when removing anything hot from the oven. Wire racks once your cakes are out from the oven, you need to cool them on wire racks. They allow cakes to breathe. Timer a reliable timer is important to know when a cake is done. Cake tester it is inserted into the centre of the cake as a test for doneness. If you do not have a cake tester, a toothpick will do the trick. Apron to protect your clothing Greaseproof paper line tins to prevent cakes from sticking to the pan Graduated measuring cups are used to measure liquid pourable ingredients. They are marked with lines to show amounts. Whisk is a non-electronic hand mixer. When you are not yet ready to buy a hand mixer or stand mixer, this is what you need. Pastry brush pastry brushes are useful when you apply egg wash, moisturize cakes with syrups, or brush loose crumbs from cake tops. They are made with soft nylon, unbleached hog bristles or silicone. Baking sheet are essential on baking cookies. You can get a standard cookie sheet that had edges without sides to make it easier to slide into the oven.

BAKING INGREDIENTS AND ITS USES


Baking powder is probably the most common aerating agent in baked products like cakes. It is made up of bicarbonate of soda and cream of tartar. Baking powder is a chemical aeration agent. Eggs are another basic ingredients in many baked products. They provide structure, aeration, flavor and moisture. They also tenderize cakes and add colour and nutritive value. Fats and oils generally, fats are solid while oils are liquid. Fats come from a variety of plants and animals. Oils mostly come from plants. In baking, butter, margarine , shortening and oils are commonly used. Their main functions are to shorten or tenderize the product to trap air during creaming and so aerate the Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 4

cake during baking to give good volume and texture, to assist with layering in puff pastry, to help prevent curdling by forming an emulsion, and to add flavor. They also provide some nutritive value. It is important to add the correct amount of fat as too much far will make the baked product greasy and unpleasant to eat, too little fat will leave you with a product that lacks flavor and stales quickly. Flour is the ingredient on which most baked [products are based. Flour is made up of starch, protein, sugar and minerals. The protein content decides what the end use of the flour will be. 1. Bread Flour it contains 11.8% protein and has more gluten which in effect, produces a tougher product. It is used in breads and sweet dough like donuts and pate choux. 2. All-purpose Flour it contains 10.5% [protein. This is made from whole or white flour. It also has less gluten and is commonly used in pie doughs, cookies and others. 3. Cake Flour it contains 7.5% protein. This produces the lightest product. It is used in cakes, light muffins and others. Starches look like flour, but they have finer grains. Starches thicken and became firm when heated. As they thicken and set they absorb moisture which in turn causes the liquid to gel. 1. Amylase they are best thickeners. a. Cornstarch it is first mixed with cold water or sugar before cooking. It reaches its maximum thickness at about 205F. b. Wheat flour its finished product is cloudy. It contains more protein, which adds flavor to your baked product. c. Arrowroot it comes from the tropical plant maranta. It thickens better than cornstarch and reaches its maximum at 195F. d. Tapioca it comes from the cassava root and gives an undesirable texture. It comes in pearl form and reaches its maximum thickness at about 195F. 2. Amylopectin it sets clearer and looser. a. Waxy maize it is used in fruit fillings. b. Modified starches they are artificially treated. c. Instant starches they thicken with cold liquid. No cooking is needed here. d. Gums gum tragacanth is used in gum paste for modeling and decoration. Gum Arabic is used to stabilize frozen desserts. Sugar s is a sweetener which can also ba called sucrose. It is the by-product of sugar cane. Sugar as used in baking, comes in different forms. But all of them contain the two molecules which make up sugar: glucose(dextrose) and levulose(fructose). Glucose is the least sweet and fructose is twice as sweet as glucose. 1. Sugar this is processed sugar, which means molasses has already been removed from it. Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 5

2. Brown sugar this is refined white mixed with refined molasses. This is normally [packed when measured. 3. Raw sugar/Turbinado/Demerara this is steamed, cleaned and unwhitened sugar crystals. 4. Maple syrup this is sugar that comes from the maple tree. 5. Honey this is a natural sweetener made by bees with 40% fructose and 30% glucose. This is 25% sweeter than sucrose and contains 15% water. Sugar can be substituted with honey. Example: 1 c sugar = + 2 T honey 6. Corn Syrup this is derived from corn. The cornstarch is broken down by an acid and is transformed into sugar. 7. Glucose this is also made from corn and is used in candy-making and sugar work. This prevents crystallization(solidifying of liquid sugar) and is the least sweet of the sugars. Inverted sugar an acid-like tartaric acid or cream of tartar is added to sucrose and this breaks the sucrose into two parts. Consequently, this will turn the sugar into liquid form and will retain moisture more effectively. Fats or Shortening oils and fats are basically the same. The only difference is that oil is liquid while fat is solid. Oils usually come from vegetables. On the other hand, fats usually come from either animal or vegetable sources. Fats are used in making breads and quick breads, in deep frying and in lubrication. 1. Shortening this is 100% fat. It is called shortening because it shortens the production of gluten which in effect, produces a more tender product. a. Regular this is used in creaming when making icing, quick breads and pie. b. High Ratio this is used for high ratio cakes. It is called high ratio because it is made for the purpose of being able to retain more liquid and sugar. This in effect makes the shelf-life of a product longer and the cost cheaper. 2. Butter - this is 80% fat, 15% moisture and 5% milk solids. Salt is added to butter as a preservative. It has a characteristic called `melt-in-your-mouth which differentiates butter from margarine. This is made from the milk of a cow. 3. Margarine this is artificial butter made from a variety of hydrogenated oils, in margarine, fat is 85% and milk solids are 5%. 4. Lard this is derived from animal fat and is used in savory pastries and pie dough. It also does not melt right away because it has a high melting point. Milk and Cream Products all these products come from cows milk. They come in different forms and they contain different amounts of fat. 1. Whole milk this contains 3 % butter fat,8 % solids and about 88 % water. 2. Non-fat milk this simply means it does not contain fat. 3. Low-fat milk it contains 2% fat. 4. Evaporated milk it is heated to 200F, thus most of the water is evaporated from it. It has a cooked taste. 5. Condensed milk it contains 40% sugar. Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 6

6. Sour Cream it has 18% fat. It also has lactic acid(milk + calamansi juice or vinegar) 7. Yogurt it is made from low-fat milk and contains lactic acid. 8. Cream cheese it has 35 % fat. It is also called unripened cheese. 9. Cream in order to whip cream, it must contain at least 28% fat. There are two kinds of cream: light and heavy. Light cream contains 30% fat, while heavy cream contains 35% fat. Eggs - are the by-product of a birds reproductive system. They come in different sizes and colors. Eggs are made up of protein which has the ability to aid in combining fat and liquids. Leavening Agents can come in block or powder form. They are usually added to the dough to enable it to rise, because leavening agents have the ability to produce carbon dioxide when exposed to heat. These agents are the ones responsible for making your dough and cake rise. There are of two kinds : natural and chemical. 1. Natural these are the products of moisture, temperature, and a food source. They produce carbon dioxide and alcohol. a. Yeast is a natural leavening agent. This is grown in molasses and is available in three forms: aa. Fresh this is slightly dehydrated and compressed. It can be added directly to a recipe. This form is preferred by chefs because of easy handling. bb. Active dried this is 92% dehydrated. This can keep for years, but it has to be rehydrated in 100F warm water before using. cc. Instant this can also be added directly to the dry ingredients, but must not come in contact with moisture before mixing. 2. Chemical this kind of leavening agent is usually in powder form and is used in the production of cakes,quick breads and others. a. Baking Soda this contains alkali and sodium or potassium bicarbonate. It produces carbon dioxide when it comes in contact with moisture and acid. Products made with baking soda should be baked immediately. b. Baking Powder this is baking soda plus acid and a little amount of starch which is added to prevent lumping. Baking powder has a more controlled action compared to baking soda. Baking powder ha s a more controlled action compared to baking soda. It reacts upon contact with moisture and then it reacts again when in contact with heat. Gelatin is derived from animal tissue, usually from pigs skin and bone. It is an incomplete protein which has the ability of solidifying liquid when added to a liquid mixture. This is used in products or fillings which do not need to be put in Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 7

the oven to set. Just like starch, gelatin is first heated to liquefy, then mixed with the combined ingredients, and is then chilled to solidify. Cream of Tartar is tartaric acid with the addition of starch is added to tartaric acid is to prevent it from caking. Cream of tartar is usually used in meringues. It inverts sugar, whitens and stabilizes egg whites, and reacts with baking soda contained in baking powder. Flavoring there are many ingredients which can be used to flavor cakes, icings, mousses and cakes syrups. 1. Rum this comes from sugar cane. It is a universal liquor which means it can be used for anything. 2. Brandy this comes from grapes. 3. Grand Mamier this is orange-flavored brandy. 4. Kirschwasser this is distilled from cherries. 5. Amaretto this is almond-flavored liquor. 6. Kahlu / Tia maria this is coffee-falvored liquor.

BREAD
BREAD is a baked staple food, basically made from flour, liquid and other ingredients. Kinds of Breads Breads may be classified according to the type of leavener it contains. a. Yeast Bread or bread that uses yeast as leavener. b. Quick Bread or bread that uses a chemical agent as leavener. Ingredients in making Bread a. Flour Bread flour, all purpose flour or combination of both may be used in making bread. Flour with more gluten has an advantage in the stretching of the dough. This type of flour can withstand extensive kneading, rolling and molding, processes that are used in handling the bread dough. b. Leavener Yeast is the leavener that gives volume to the bread. c. Liquid Water is generally used: To activate the yeast To help develop the gluten in the dough To dissolve other ingredients Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 8

Milk is also used alone or in combination with water: It increases the nutritive value of the bread It contributes good texture and flavor It helps dissolve other ingredients It serves as food for the yeast during the fermentation process.

d. Other ingredients Sugar Acts as foods for the yeast during fermentation Improves flavor of the bread Gives color to the crust Salt Gives desirable flavor to the bread Controls period of fermentation, the more salt added, the longer the fermentation time, or the rising of the dough. The absence of salt causes poor flavor and quick rising. Shortening may be butter, margarine or vegetable shortening Serves as food to the yeast Makes the dough easy to handle during kneading Contributes to the elasticity of the dough and Improves the bread texture and flavor.

Fillings or toppings may be placed in the bread. Choose one that will improve the general characteristics of the bread. They must not make the bread compact, soggy or unattractive.

METHODS OF MIXING BREAD


Methods of Mixing Bread Dough a. Straight dough method in this method, all the ingredients are mixed together at one time. After kneading, the dough is set aside for a single fermentation. Products made from the straight dough method are not fine in texture and cannot be kept for long. b. Sponge dough method in this method, there are two mixing and the two fermentation periods. In the first mixing, parts of the ingredients are mixed and allowed to bubble (first fermentation). This dough is called sponge. The remaining portions of ingredients are then added to the sponge and mixed into a sifter dough. The dough then undergoes the process of kneading, rolling and Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 9

molding. When the dough is elastic, second fermentation is allowed to take place. Advantage of the Sponge Dough Method over the Straight Dough Method a. Baked products produced are softer than those that were done using the straight dough method; b. Sponge dough has more tolerance in case of delay, the sponge can wait longer than the straight dough without considerable lost of bread quality; c. Bake products have finer texture; and d. Baked products retain their shapes better.

STEPS IN BREAD MAKING


Preparation of bread may be done by hand, machine, or a combination of hand and machine. a. Assemble all utensils and measure all ingredients accurate. Scald milk if necessary and cool to required temperature. Hot milk when added to yeast mixture will kill the yeast. b. Prepare the yeast mixture by following accurately the specified amounts in the recipe. Be sure to have the correct water temperature. c. Mix the ingredients following the straight dough or sponge method. Proper mixing will slowly develop the gluten. d. Kneading, folding and pulling of the dough will make it elastic and velvety smooth to touch. e. Place the dough in a large bowl and cover it with a clean towel. Let the dough rise in place free from draft. Observe proper temperature and time as these will affect the dough. Rising gives us a young or an old dough. f. When the dough has doubled in size, punch it down. This is done by pressing your clenched fist into the center of the dough. g. Prepare the dough for baking by dividing the dough into the required pieces, shaping or molding and placing the shaped dough into the pan. h. In some cases, like in ensaymada, the rolled dough is brushed with melted butter, then rolled like a cigar and placed in the molds. i. Let the dough rise and rest in the pans. Bake in a pre-heated oven. Cool bread completely before packing and storing. Mixing Process in Bread Making It is important because of the following reasons: a. Mixing distributes the yeast cells uniform in the dough; Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao 10

b. It distributes the sugar which is food for the yeast; it makes the dough smooth and free from lumps; and c. It develops the gluten properly. Rising the Dough The period of rising in the dough starts when the yeast is mixed with the other ingredients until the yeast is killed during baking. When the yeast reacts chemically with sugar, carbon dioxide gas is released. This gas is trapped in the gluten in the youth, thus making the dough expand or rise. Punching of Dough The dough is punched down to release some of the carbon dioxide gas trapped inside. This will also relax the expanded gluten in the dough. Resting the Dough The dough is made to stand for a while before baking to: Allow the dough to regain the lost carbon dioxide released during punching; Attain proper volume; Allow the gluten in the dough to mellow; and Improve the grain and texture of the bread. Guidelines in Bread Making When baking breads, remember; a. The ability of flour to absorb liquid varies. Even if the recipe calls for a specific measure of flour, you must be able to determine when to add enough flour to make dough. Too much flour will result in a tough. b. Make sure that the temperature of the liquid is in accordance with the specified temperature in the recipe. Liquid at a room temperature higher than is required in the recipe can kill the yeast, while liquid at a lower temperature will delay the yeast growth. c. Let the dough rise in a warm (80F to 85F) place, free from draft.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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d. The dough has doubled in bulk or size when an indentation remains after fingers are pressed lightly and quickly into dough. e. Fermentation or the rising period can produce young or old dough. A young dough is not sufficiently fermented and conditioned; while an old dough is allowed to ferment longer than the required time.These doughs are not desirable because they will produce poor quality bread. Experience will tell you when dough is properly fermented. f. Bake dough in a pre-heated oven. Arrange the pan so there is room for air circulations over the pans. g. A loaf is done when it sound shallow when trapped on the bottom or sides. It should look well-risen and nicely browned.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Butterscotch Cookies

Ingredients 2 lemons, washed and dried 2 cups plus 3/4 cup granulated sugar 2 1/4 sticks cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2 inch pieces 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 cups all-purpose flour 4 large eggs, lightly beaten Confectioners' sugar, for sifting Directions Step 1 Slice lemons as thinly as possible; remove seeds. Toss slices with 2 cups sugar; transfer mixture to a flat resealable plastic container. Place in the refrigerator overnight. Step 2 Place butter, salt, remaining 3/4 cup sugar, and flour in the bowl of a food processor. Process until mixture is crumbly and starts to hold together. Step 3 Heat oven to 400 degrees. Line a 12-by-17-inch baking pan with parchment paper. Press dough evenly into the bottom and up the sides of the pan, making sure there are no holes. There should be at least 1/2-inch crust of dough going up the sides of the pan. Bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely, about 15 minutes Step 4 Place lemon-sugar mixture and eggs in the bowl of a food processor. Process until lemon rinds are in 1/4- to 1/2-inch pieces, 30 to 40 seconds. Pour mixture over cookie crust. Bake until set, 15 to 20 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Trim 1/2 inch around edges of pan. Cut into about sixty 1 1/4-by-2-inch pieces. Sift confectioners' sugar over cookies.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Chocolate Crinkles

Ingredients: 2 cups All-purpose flour 2 tsp. baking powder 1 cup cocoa powder cup cooking oil cup refined sugar 2 tsp. vanilla 3 pcs. Medium eggs Sifted powder confectioner sugar Procedure: 1. mix together cocoa, sugar and vegetable oil. 2. Beat in eggs one at a time then in vanilla. 3. Combine flour baking powder and salt. 4. Stir in cocoa mixture. Chill. 5. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper. 6. Roll dough into one inch balls. 7. Coat each ball in confectioner sugar. 8. Bake for 10-12 mins.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Pineapple \ Carrot Cake

Ingredients: 3 cups sifted All-purpose flour 2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 11/2 cup oil 2 cups sugar 4 pcs. Eggs 2 tsp. vanilla 2 cups finely grated carrots 1 cup undrained pineapple (crushed)

Procedure: 1. Sift together the first four ingredients. 2. Combine the oil and sugar. 3. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition, alternate the eggs and flour. 4. Add the dry ingredients, carrots and pineapple. 5. Mix until well blended. 6. Pour in the prepared pan. 7. Bake for 35mins.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Empanaditas
Ingredients: Filling: can condensed milk 2 egg yolks, beaten 1 butter Procedure: 1. In a double broiler, combine milk and yolks. 2. Cook in double broiler or thick sauce pan over low heat, with continuous stirring until thick. 3. Add butter, vanilla and nuts. Mix well. Set aside. Crust: 2 1/3 cups sifted all-purpose flour 2/3 cup butter 4-5 tbsp. cold water Melted butter and refined sugar for finishing Procedure: 1. Cut butter into flour until crumbs are pea-sized. 2. Sprinkle water while tossing mixture with a dull-knife, until moist enough to handle. 3. Chill dough for 1 hour. 4. Roll out on floured board to about in. thick. 5. Cut dough with a 2 1/2 inch round cutter. 6. Fill each round with cooked and cooled filling. Fold in half. 7. Seal edges by pressing with tines of a fork. 8. Place on a slightly greased cookie sheet and bake in a pre-heated 375F oven for 20mins. 9. Cool. Brush with melted butter and roll in sugar. 10. Wrap in colored cellophane 5x6. tsp. vanilla 1 tbsp. finely chopped cashew nuts

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Ube Macapuno Royal Pie

Ingredients: Crust: 4 cup all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. sugar 1 tbsp. salt 1 cup butter 1 tbsp. water 1 egg yolk Ube Filling: 1 cup condensed milk 1/3 cup water 5 egg yolks 1 tbsp. cornstarch 1/3 cup evaporated milk 1 cup sweetened mashed ube cup butter 3 tbsp. unflavored gelatin dissolves in cup cold water cup sweetened macapuno, drained 3 egg whites 1 tbsp. sugar Ube food color

Procedure: 1. Preheat oven to 350F. Prepare one 9-inch plate. 2. In a bowl, combine flour and butter. Cut-in the butter until mixtures resembles coarse crumbs. Add the water-egg yolk mixture and mix dough until forms a ball. Roll out dough to fit the pie plate. Flute edges decoratively. Prick the bottom and the sides of the crust. Bake for 15 to 20 mins. Or until golden brown. Cool. 3. Prepare Ube Filling: Combine the first 10 ingredients in a saucepan or double broiler. Cook until thick and bubbly. Add in the sweetened macapuno. Cool. In a bowl, beat eggwhites until soft peaks form. Add sugar gradually and continue beating until stiff. Fold into ube mixture. Pour into on crust. Chill untl set. Decorate the top with more macapuno , if desired.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Mongo Loaf

Ingredients: 2 tablespoon yeast cup warm water 2 cups milk 1 cup sugar 2 teaspoon salt 2 eggs 7 cups all-purpose flour 3 cups mongo filling Melted butter for brushing Procedure: 1. Dissolve yeast in warm water. In a mixing bowl, combine milk, sugar, salt, eggs and part of the flour to make a batter. Beat in yeast mixture and continue adding flour until dough leaves the sides of the bowl. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and satiny. Placed on greased bowl, turning once to greased surface. Cover and let rise in warm place until doubled. 2. Punch down dough then divide into 3 portions. For every potion of dough, roll out to a 6x10inch rectangle. Cut 1/3 of the rolled dough and use it to cover the bottom of a greased 9x5-inch loaf pan. Spread some mongo filling over it. To the remaining 2/3 , brush some butter and spread some of the mongo filling. Roll as in a jelly roll. Cut into 6 equal pieces then put cut side up on the loaf pan pan over the piece of rolled dough. Do the same for the remaining dough. Let rise until doubled. Before baking, brush with melted butter. Bake in a preheated 375F oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until done.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Ensaymada

Ingredients: 1 tablespoon yeast 1 tablespoon sugar 1 cup warm water 8 egg yolks 1 cup sugar cup milk Procedure: 1. Dissolve yeast and sugar in half of the water. In a bowl, combine remaining water, egg yolks, sugar milk, salt, 2/3 cup of the melted butter and half of the flour. 2. Stir in yeast mixture. Mix until dough leaves sides of the bowl. Transfer dough to a floured surface. Add more flour as knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. Put dough in a greased bowl, cover and let rise until doubled. Brush 3 muffin pans with butter. Set aside. 3. Divide dough into balls weighing about 30 grams each. Roll each portion very thinly into a rectangle. Brush with butter then roll as in a jelly rolls. Hold one end of the rolled dough between your thumb and 2 fingers. Using the other hand, coil the fingers. Tuck in the end under. Put the coiled ensaymada on muffin pan. Do the same for the rest of the dough. 4. Cover and let rise until light. Brush tops with melted butter. Bake at 375F until golden brown. Remove from pan. Brush top with butter. Dust with sugar and sprinkle with grated cheese. 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup melted butter 6-7 cups all-purpose flour Melted butter for brushing Sugar for dusting Grated cheese

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Siopao

Ingredients 4 tsp yeast 5 c All-Purpose Flour 1 cup sugar cup lard 1 Tbsp baking powder 1 Nestle Cream (small)

Procedure In a bowl, dissolve yeast in 1/3 part of water. In a mixer combine sifted all-purpose flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Mix for 1 minute at low speed. Add the dissolved yeast and the remaining water. Mix for 2 minutes at low speed then mix at medium speed for approximately 4 minutes. Add shortening and mix until gluten is slightly developed. Transfer the dough in a greased bowl and cover with plastic. Let the dough rest for about 30 minutes at room temperature. Punch down the dough and divide into pieces weighing 60 grams each. Round the dough and let it rest for about 15 minutes. Cover with plastic to prevent dough from drying up. Flatten the dough and place desired filling in the middle. Gather the edges to seal. Place siopao liner at the bottom of the dough. For bola-bola, place a red dot on top of the dough. Let the dough rise until it doubles in size. (Approximately 60 to 70 minutes). Half fill bottom layer of aluminum steamer with water and set over high fire. Keep covered. Arrange siopao dough in the steamer. Once water is boiling, steam for 18-20 minutes. Remove siopao from steamer and let it cool.

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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PICTURE PERFECT

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Healthy and delicious!!! Butterscotch cookie flavored with squash

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Fill your mouth with fondant carrot cake specially made by us

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Fondant Icing made of marsmallowwhala!!!!our masterpiece for the Exhibit!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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PiePiePie.so tempting Ube pie filled of UBE

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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So little..so cuteso colorful.oh empanaditas how beautiful you are

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Presentinga Loaf Bread filled with Ube..wanna have some?

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Giganticround..oh my Siopaowhere have you been?

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Happy 50th year wedding anniversary!!!! Congratulations!!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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FINAL OUTPUT PER GROUP

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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GROUP 1

HAPPY VALENTINES TO ALL LOVERS!!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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GROUP 2

HAPPY GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY!!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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GROUP 3

HAPPY 18TH BIRTHDAY!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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GROUP 4

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEWLY WED!!!!

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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FANTASTIC GROUP 2 MEMBERS

LELIBETH

MADEL

MARGE

LEI

REGINA

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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PROFESSOR

MRS. CELIA P. DAYAO

Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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Master of Arts in Teaching - Advance Baking 1st Sem 2013 | Professor Celia P. Dayao

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