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Journal
VOL LVIII, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013
WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaioix Ciun oi Viicixia
Te Garden Club of Virginia exists to
celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve
the gifts of nature and to challenge future
generations to build on this heritage.
Fiox Tui Eiiroi
Te women of the Garden Club of Virginia never cease to amaze me, as
evidenced at the recent Board of Governors meeting held in Danville. From our
talented leadership, to our loyal staff, to our dedicated members, we are a force
with which to be reckoned. We are intelligent, passionate, and believe firmly in our
mission “to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve the gifts of nature and to
challenge future generations to build on this heritage.” And did I mention that we
know how to have a good time? During this festive season, celebrate the honor of
being a part of such an incredible group of powerful and influential women.
We look forward to receiving your articles. Write to us at journal@gcvirginia.org.
Submission guidelines may be found on the GCV website.
Journal Editorial Board
2013-2014
Editor and Chairman: Karla MacKimmie, Te Warrenton Garden Club
ExOfficio Members
GCV President, Ann Gordon Evans, Te Huntington Garden Club
GCV Corresponding Secretary, Betsy Worthington, Te Lynchburg Garden Club
GCV Photographer, Jane Cowles, Te Boxwood Garden Club
Journal Advertising Chairman, Katya Spicuzza, Albemarle Garden Club, Te Garden
Club of the Northern Neck
Members
Betty Anne Garrett, Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
Julie Grover, Te Blue Ridge Garden Club, Te James River Garden Club
Ann Heller, GCV Communications Coordinator
Aileen Laing, Te Warrenton Garden Club
Susan Morten, Te Martinsville Garden Club
Grace Rhinesmith, Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
Helen Pinckney, Te Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton
Art Editor, Jeanette McKittrick, Tree Chopt Garden Club
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 1
Te Garden Club of Virginia
Journal
Te Garden Club of Virginia Journal
(USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is
published four times a year for members
by the GCV, 12 East Franklin St.,
Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage
paid in Richmond, VA. Single issue price,
$5.00.
Copy and ad deadlines are:
January 15 for the March issue
April 15 for the June issue
July 15 for the September issue
October 15 for the December issue
Email copy to the Editor and advertising
to the Ad Chairman
President of the Garden Club of Virginia:
Ann Gordon Evans
Journal Editor:
Karla MacKimmie
8505 Lees Ridge Road
Warrenton, VA 20186
Phone: (540) 341-3432
Email: journal@gcvirginia.org
Journal Advertising Chairman:
Katya Spicuzza
P.O. Box 411
Irvington, VA 22480
Phone: (804) 435-1782
Email: ksspicuzza@yahoo.com
Vol. LVIII, No. 4
Printed on recycled paper by
Carter Printing Company
Richmond, VA
ON THE COVER...
Helleborus niger, or Christmas rose,
acquired its name from the legend
of Madeline, a poor shepherd girl in
Bethlehem, who after hearing of the
birth of the Christ child, wanted to
worship him, but had nothing to offer.
She searched the frozen hills for a flower,
and, defeated, stood outside the stable and
wept. As her tears fell, a flower sprouted
from the snowy ground beneath her feet.
Tis beautiful rendering was created by
Mary Page Hickey of the Garden Club of
Alexandria.
IN THIS ISSUE ...
Tink ..................................................... 2
Common Wealth Award ...................... 3
A Garden for All Seasons ..................... 5
Cabin Walk .......................................... 6
Legislative Day Announcement ........... 8
Mystery at the K-V House ................. 10
Dugdale Award .................................. 10
Lily Lovers .......................................... 11
75th Annual Rose Show ............... 12, 13
Getting Ready for a Show Part II ....... 15
Club Notes .......................................... 16
Club Notes .......................................... 17
Restoration Committee ................ 18, 19
Wildflower Meadow Gardening ........ 20
New Member Orientation .................. 21
Contributions ................................ 23, 24
Statement of Ownership .................... 25
OTHER REFERENCES...
Kent-Valentine House
Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778
Email: director@gcvirginia.org
Historic Garden Week Office
Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778
Email: historicgardenweek@gmail.com
www.VAGardenWeek.org
Postmaster, please send address changes to:
Garden Club of Virginia
12 East Franklin Street
Richmond, VA 23219
2 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Tink
By Beth DeBergh
Te Garden Club of Warren County
W
atching hummingbirds can be addictive. Tey
are the most magical creatures on the planet.
We anticipate their arrival in early April and
lament their departure in the fall. Most hummingbirds
are predictable in their migration pattern. Te majority of
hummers leave our gardens for the tropics by the first of
September. Some stay through the first week of October.
Teir migration is triggered by shorter days, when they
still have a sufficient food supply and are fat enough for
their long journey. Younger birds may take a little longer
to build up their strength for flight.
“Tink” is the little ruby-throated hummingbird that
spent the winter with me. I don’t know why Tink stayed
behind—maybe she was extremely young, injured, not
strong enough for her excursion, or just liked her claimed territory. Typically, after the
stragglers have headed south, the feeders are bought inside, cleaned, and stored for the
following spring. I neglected to bring in the feeder that I had attached to the window of
my kitchen door and noticed one day in late October that there was a little female at my
kitchen door. For most of the summer, that feeder had been primarily dominated by one
feisty little female. I believe that little girl was Tink.
Te days became colder and the nectar-producing flowers and insects were becoming
scarce. Tink became a regular at my kitchen door. October turned into November; then
came Christmas. Tink remained. I brought her feeder inside on freezing nights. Te tiny,
but staunch, little bird was always there hovering and waiting for nectar in the morning.
On bitter cold days her nectar had to be brought inside at intervals to thaw. She survived
ice, snow, sleet, chilling rain, and fierce winds. January and February brought more bitter
cold nights. Te final days of winter began to flirt with sunny warmth, only to shrink back
into a chilling wind and snow. Every tease of spring brought relief and hope that Tink
would survive the winter.
I met my goal of keeping her alive until March. April finally came, and Tink was still
alive. I see less of her now that fresh flowers and insects are available as a food source, but
she still visits her feeder occasionally and perches on a top limb of a boxwood bush adjacent
to my kitchen. Tat dense old boxwood may be her home. Her friends should be arriving
soon. Tink will be here to welcome them when they return and will have much to share.
Note: I discovered later in the spring that
“Tink” was actually a juvenile male. Juvenile
male hummers look almost identical to adult
females. Te throat usually has some dark
streaking that appears later in the summer.
Te throats of some young males show red
throat feathers in late summer through fall.
Tese feathers appear as “dots” on their necks.
Troughout the winter Tink kept these red
throat feathers, changing to a metallic ruby
red in the spring. ❁
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 3
Common Wealth Award
By Katherine Knopf, Common Wealth Award Chairman,
Roanoke Valley Garden Club
T
he Common Wealth Award, established in 1979, provides a grant or grants
to support and promote the projects of GCV member clubs in the area of
conservation, beautification, horticulture, preservation, or education.
Te 2013 Common Wealth Awards were presented at the Board of Governors
Meeting in October. It was our pleasure to grant two awards this year. Te first-place
award was given to the Rappahannock Valley Garden Club for its project at the
Chatham Manor Garden, a historic home and garden in Stafford County. Te award
check in the amount of $6,500 will be used to restore and maintain the formal gardens
designed by Ellen Biddle Shipman in the early 1920s and to repair statuary. Te
second-place award was given to the Princess Anne Garden Club for its project at First
Landing State Park, which is located in Virginia Beach. Te award check in the amount
of $5,500 will be used to maintain the native plant landscape and to update exhibits in
the park’s Trail Center.
Te deadline for applications for the 2014 Common Wealth Award is March 1,
2014. Te application form and information on how to submit a proposal can be found
on the GCV website under “Awards.” Te Common Wealth Award Committee looks
forward to receiving many applications from the GCV member clubs. If your club has
questions about a project proposal, please do not hesitate to contact me at bradorkath@
cox.net or 540-798-6420. I look forward to talking with you. ❁
Tricia McDaniel, the Rappahannock Valley Garden Club,
Katherine Knopf, Common Wealth Award Chairman,
and Elizabeth Reed, the Princess Anne Garden Club
4 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia



DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 5
A Garden for All Seasons
Creating a Winter Landscape
By Barbara L. Cummings, GCV Horticulture Committee
Te Williamsburg Garden Club

M
y real interest in gardening began about 15 years ago when I moved to a
house on an acre of land. Te neglected woodland property backed up to
a ravine with a tidal creek winding its way to the James River. Numerous
American hollies and mature beech and oak trees were scattered throughout, creating a
heavily shaded environment with little variety in plant material. Changing that would
have required removing many of those trees, so we chose a different approach. We
opened up the landscape and began to create a garden instead of a yard.
I studied gardening techniques, including the use and value of hardscaping,
creating patterns with paths and walls, the use of creatively placed wooden fences,
and the placement of containers and garden art as special features in the overall plan.
Evergreen hedges provide color and structure, and, by using contrasting shapes of
barberries, nandina, boxwood, daphne, and bayberry, we were able to create dramatic
effects throughout all the seasons.
When I first started our gardens, I planted thinking of spring, my favorite season.
However, I have matured and so has my garden. I began to realize a garden’s structure is
most evident in winter.
To create winter interest, I began to choose the plants that would bring light
during the dull, gray, winter months. I also considered the texture, shape, and color of
the bark and stems of birch, Natchez crepe myrtle, barberry, pieris and many others.
Hellebores, my favorite winter perennial, and camellias provide vibrant color from fall
through spring. Winter pansies placed in containers throughout the beds add additional
interest, as do berries, which bring color and attract birds during the winter.
By now, the fall chores have been done. Beds have been tidied, and leaves raked
and composted. Overgrown perennials have been divided and relocated. Other
perennials, such as coneflowers, false indigo, and ornamental grasses, were left uncut
for texture, interest, and contrast against the cool palette of grays, browns, and winter
white. All have been made ready for the harsh winter months ahead.
I find myself enjoying the winter landscapes, frequently illuminated by spectacular
sunsets viewed from our west-facing picture window. I look out from the comfort of
our home and watch the sun reflect off the stark silhouettes of trees denuded of their
summer foliage. I thrill at the sight of a lone heron circling the edges of our woodland
property. Tese are times of quiet reflection, and I am calmed by the fact that our lives,
like our gardens, can be better appreciated in the winter. ❁
Te Editorial Board welcomes submissions and reserves the right to edit them.
6 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Country Elegance in a Stratford Hall Cabin
Garden Day and Cabin Walk at Stratford Hall
By Carol Price
Tree Chopt Garden Club
T
his year’s Garden Day tour at Stratford Hall, home of the Lee family, offers two
rare opportunities. Te first is the chance to see private cabins, many of which
were originally decorated by Sister Parish and have been recently renovated. Te
second is to meet and hear William D. Rieley, GCV’s landscape architect, and P. Allen
Smith, noted author and garden show host. Tey will discuss the challenges of restoring
historic gardens, as well as what to plant with poor soil, no rain and too many deer.
Te board of directors of the Robert E. Lee Memorial Association, which owns
and operates Stratford Hall, is eager to celebrate Historic Garden Week and Stratford’s
historic connection with the Garden Club of Virginia, while showcasing its newest
discovery. Te results of a four-year-long cultural landscape research project, which
Stratford completed in partnership with the University of Georgia, yielded evidence
of an additional garden between the East Garden and the Great House. GCV’s 2013
Rudy Favretti Fellow, Megan Turner, worked extensively on this project while she was a
graduate student at the University of Georgia.
Te Garden Club of Virginia began its long-standing relationship with Stratford
Hall in 1930 when it undertook the restoration of Stratford’s East Gardens, converting
a weed-infested area into an 18
th
-century style English garden with parterres framed in
boxwood. Trough the years, GCV has continued to advise and assist Stratford as other
garden needs have become evident.
Te cabins at Stratford were built in the 1930s and 1940s as accommodations for
the directors who traveled from all over the country for meetings to discuss the best
ways to preserve and share this early Virginia and American icon. Sister Parish decorated
many of the early cabins and they were first opened for a special Historic Garden Week
tour in 1974. Since 2014 is the 40
th
anniversary of this tour, and since many of the
cabins have recently undergone major renovations, it seemed fitting that Stratford host
a special Cabin Walk and Garden Day on April 27 during Historic Garden Week.
Members of the Stratford board of directors from around the country will serve as
hostesses for the Cabin Walk.
Space will be limited, so make reservations for the luncheon and special
presentations. For advance reservations, contact stratfordhall.org or call 804-493-1370,
and look for the ad in the Historic Garden Week Guidebook. ❁
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 7
Forget the partridge
in a pear tree idea.
A tin of Hubs under
the tree would make
anyone happy.
Your true love will be glad you ordered Hubs.
Call 1-800-889-7688 or visit www.hubspeanuts.com
Hubs.GCVjournal13.pdf 1 10/9/13 9:47 AM
Elizabeth Locke
Mazza
Temple S
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Clair
Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
www.victoriacharles.com
“on the avenues”
5707 Grove Avenue, Suite 200
Richmond, VA 23226
804.285.4666
fne designer
and
estate jewelry
call for
TRUNK SHOW dates!
8 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Decoratng for the Holidays
Historic Inns of Orange 2013 tour

Presented by

Dolley Madison Garden Club

Sunday, December 8, 2013

11 a.m.—4:00 p.m.

In
n
a
t W
e
s
tw
o
o
d
F
a
r
m


The Inn at Willow Grove

The Mayhurst Inn

Added
atractons
2013

Tickets: $12.50 in advance, $15.00 on the day

For more informaton visit:
www.dolleymadisongardenclub.org

or email: info@dolleymadisongardenclub.org

Visit the Arts Center





Holladay

House

Partcipatng Inns ofer a
25% discount for the night
of December 8.

Free entry to James
Madison Museum on
Sunday, December 8
Special Ofer: $10 of the ticket price for
the Candlelight Tour at James Madison’s
Monpelier (by appointment)with your
Historic Inns tour ticket.
December 6/7 or 13/14 2013
Monday, January 27, 2014
Richmond Center Stage, Rhythm Hall
600 East Grace Street, Richmond
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.
Program begins at 9:00 a.m.
C
ome and discuss important conservation issues to be considered in the
upcoming Virginia General Assembly. Learn about GCV’s supported
legislative positions. Ten visit your legislators to promote those positions
in support of GCV’s mission “to celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve the
gifts of nature and to challenge future generations to build on this heritage.”
Go to www.gcvirginia.org for more information and to register.
Join the GCV Conservation Committee
and Virginia Conservation Network
for Legislative Day
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 9
lamp repair
rewiring
custom lamps
extensive
lampshade
collection
fine furniture
and gifts
THE
SHOP
LAURIE HOLLADAY
123 South Main Street • Gordonsville, Va
Phone: 540.832.0552
Monday thru Friday, 10-5:30
Saturday, 10-5 • Sunday, 11-3
LaurieHolladayInteriors.com
Are you a member of
the Garden Club of Virginia’s
Green Arrow Society?
N
amed for one of the Garden Club of Virginia’s most enduring
and familiar symbols, the Green Arrow Society is a group of loyal
members and friends who are supporting GCV’s future with
planned gifts. Just as GCV’s green arrow signage has directed
hundreds of thousands of visitors along Historic Garden Week tour
routes for 80 years, members of the Green Arrow Society are
helping point the way to a bright and sustainable future for GCV.
If you are a Green Arrow Society member,
will you share with us that you are?
If you are not, please consider joining
those who have made an enduring gift to
the Garden Club of Virginia by contacting:
Karmen Payne Gustin
Director of Development
804.643.4128
development@gcvirginia.org
GA.GCVjournal13.pdf 1 10/24/13 9:11 AM
10 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Former GCV Employee Stages Mystery
at the K-V House
By Suzanne Munson
Former Executive Director of Historic Garden Week
W
hile she worked in the Kent-Valentine House as the GCV’s administrator
(2002-04 and interim 2005), Maggie King had a mysterious hobby at
home. In her spare time, she was crafting a clever who-done-it novel.
After many rewrites, Maggie submitted her manuscript to publishers last year, and
her work was rewarded with a contract from Simon and Schuster. Murder at the Book
Group, set in Richmond, will debut in late 2014.
What’s more, Maggie’s short story, “A Not So Genteel Murder,” will be published
in the Virginia is for Mysteries anthology in January 2014. Each mystery in the collection
takes place in a Virginia location; Maggie chose the beautiful Kent-Valentine House as
her venue. A murder is committed on the third floor. For more information about the
anthology visit www.virginiaisformysteries.com. Maggie’s website is www.maggie.king.com.
Te anthology will debut on January 9 at a reception at the Library of Virginia.
Both novel and anthology will be available at stores like Barnes & Noble and via
Amazon. Congratulations, Maggie. We look forward to reading your next story set in
the mysterious Old Dominion. ❁
111 Lee Highway, Verona, VA 24482
540-248-4292
Open Daily 9:30am- 5:30pm
Sun 1-5pm
fashiongalleryva.com
The largest selection available in Virginia for your
special occasion is right here in the Shenandoah Valley…
cocktail • gala • mother of the bride or groom
Glamour in all sizes.
An invitation...
Corbin Harwood,
2013 Elizabeth Cabell Dugdale
Award Winner, with Anne Beals
(Te Rappahannock Valley Garden
Club), Chairman of the GCV
Beautification and Conservation
Committee.
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 11

Casual Cafe
Flowers & Plants
Gardening
Gifts & Gear
Group Outings
Plants
Produce
Private events
Tours & Walks
Workshops &
Much, Much More!
Tuesday - Saturday 9 - 5
Sunday 11 - 4
540-672-7268
Somerset, Virginia
A Farm Market &
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Please visit our website
For the latest information
TheMarketAtGrelen.com
Lily Lovers Can Learn
Lots at Workshop
By Barbara Holland,
GCV Lily Committee Chairman
Te Garden Study Club
In September 1936, Mrs. (Joseph G.)
Walker, former GCV President, urged the
study of liliums [sic]. Te next month,
Rivanna (Garden Club) had 25 ‘second size’
lily bulbs in the ground, and by 1938 was
raising lilies from seed.
Excerpted from Follow the Green Arrow:
Te History of the Garden Club of Virginia,
by Mrs. James Bland Martin
T
he study of lilies by Garden
Club of Virginia members
continues. For those who
would like to know more, the GCV
Lily Committee will host a workshop
on March 5, 10:30 a.m. at the Kent-
Valentine House.
Some basics about lilies include the
fact that more than 100 different plants
have the word “lily” in their common
names. Tink of daylily, calla lily, spider
lily and lily of the valley, to name a few.
Te Liliaceae, the botanical family to
which the genus Lilium belongs, has more
than 200 genera of plants. It had more;
the family was once a catch-all category,
which included asparagus, allium and
other plants until a reclassification moved
them to other families.
Te GCV Lily Show schedule
specifies that only true scale lilies of the
genus Lilium can predominate in all
arrangements. Tey are the only lilies that
can be shown in horticulture. ❁
Grateful appreciation extended to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel and Hilldrup Moving & Storage for support of the GCV Flower Shows.
Te complete list of winners and additional photographs can be viewed at www.gcvirginia.org.
“Te Quintessential Rose” October 2-3, 2013
12 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaioix Ciun oi Viicixia
Sponsored by The Boxwood Garden Club
Inter Club Class 40A
Assemblage Arrangement
(Blue)
Chatham Garden Club
Class 44, Miniature Arrangement, (Blue),
Te Elizabeth Bradley Kincheloe
Stull Award, Best Novice,
Missy Rakes
Roanoke Valley Garden Club
Inter Club Class 40D
Art Nouveau Arrangement
(Quad Blue), Te Elizabeth
Gwathmey Jeffress Bowl,
Te Martinsburg Garden Club
The 75th Annual Rose Show 2013
Inter Club Class 40B
Western Line Arrangement
(Blue), Rivanna Garden
Club
Inter Club Class 40C
Early Colonial Arrangement
(Blue)
Te Garden Club of Gloucester
Class 41
Panel Arrangement
Te Georgia S. Vance
Award for Most Creative
Arrangement in a
GCV Rose Show
Peyton Wells
Te Tuckahoe Garden
Club of Westhampton
Artistic Awards Artistic Awards
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITORS: 36
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURAL STEMS: 229
NUMBER OF ARTISTIC ENTRIES: 69
Grateful appreciation extended to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel and Hilldrup Moving & Storage for support of the GCV Flower Shows.
Te complete list of winners and additional photographs can be viewed at www.gcvirginia.org.
“Te Quintessential Rose” October 2-3, 2013
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 13
Sponsored by The Boxwood Garden Club
Best Floribunda Spray
‘Dancing Pink’
Kathy Watson
Te Tuckahoe Garden
Club of Westhampton
The 75th Annual Rose Show 2013
Miniflora Queen
‘Baldo Villegas’
Pat Wade Taylor Miniflora Cup
Pamela Powers
Best Miniature Spray
‘Glamour Girl’
Pamela Powers
Best Modern Shrub
‘Carding Mill’
Gail Babnew
Dolley Madison
Garden Club
Best Polyantha Spray
‘Te Fairy’
Joyce Moorman,
Te Lynchburg Garden Club
Class 42
French Empire
Arrangement (Blue)
Te Virginia Brown
Guild Perpetual Award
& Te Flower Shows
Chairman’s Cup,
Best Arrangement by Individual
June Hambrick
Fauquier & Loudoun
and Leesburg Garden Clubs
Queen ‘Crystalline’
Jane Marshall Broyhill
Memorial Trophy
Cheryl and John Smith
Horticulture Awards Horticulture Awards
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURAL EXHIBITORS: 36
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURAL STEMS: 229
NUMBER OF ARTISTIC ENTRIES: 69
14 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 15
Editor’s note: Showtime!
Te following is the second in a series of three articles about preparing to compete in a flower
show. Te articles pertain to a daffodil show, yet some of the ideas and tips have universal
usefulness while others could be modified or adapted for shows that showcase other species.
Te tips could be particularly helpful to the novice exhibitor.
For more on showtime preparation, please see the September 2013 issue of the Journal,
and stay tuned for the final article, coming in the March 2014 issue.
An Ounce of Flower Show Preparation
Worth a Pound of Panicked Procurement
By Lucy Rhame, GCV Daffodil Committee Chairman
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club
Te Hunting Creek Garden Club
S
ome of us have been known to go out into the garden the night before a show to
look for that prize-winning flower. Tere is an easier way. Te winter months offer
a chance to stop and think ahead. Tought can be put into action by making a
preparation checklist for a flower show, in this case, the GCV’s 80th annual Daffodil Show.
Top of the list: Mark your calendar to start walking through the garden every
day, beginning two weeks before the show, to see what is in bloom or about to bloom.
You can begin amassing entries long before the night before by picking flowers and
refrigerating them. Clean and groom the blooms before refrigeration. Flowers will
harden off, particularly in a frost-free fridge, making later grooming difficult. Mist
refrigerated flowers daily with distilled water to prevent desiccation. Freshly picked
blooms will keep in refrigeration for up to two weeks. (See the Journal’s March issue for
more what-to-do tips.)
Next on the list: Review the flower show schedule to familiarize yourself with
classes. When showtime nears, you can refer back to the schedule to determine the
appropriate classes for your blooms. (Te GCV Daffodil Show schedule should become
available in January. It will be posted on the GCV website, www.gcvirginia.org.; a
printed copy can be obtained by sending a request to suzyoliver2@aol.com.)
It’s worth knowing that all daffodils can be entered in more than one class. Say, for
example, you have a dozen show-worthy ‘Dreamlights.’ You can enter in the standard
single stem class, the standard vase-of-three class, the intermediate single stem class, the
intermediate vase-of-three class, the historic single stem class and the historic vase-of-
three class. Another option is classes for small growers, open to those who grow fewer
than 50 varieties. Another possibility: if you have never won a blue ribbon, you can
enter the class for Te Patricia Mann Crenshaw Award, which goes to a novice.
Tis year’s schedule will include a Classics Section, an area for more possibilities.
Classics are daffodils registered between 1940 and 1969, inclusive. Classics were
chosen for the GCV’s 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 Daffodil Collections. Information
about GCV Daffodil Collections can help. Te year a cultivar was registered appears
in parentheses next to its listing. Symbols show whether the bloom is American-bred,
historic or classic. Any American-bred daffodil is eligible for entry in the red-white-blue
collection, section B, class 18. Also, collections over the years have included a number
of white daffodils. Check out section A, class 2. Wouldn’t you like to bring home a
beautiful piece of GCV silver?
Final item on the checklist: Mark showtime on the calendar. GCV’s 80th annual
Daffodil Show will take place April 1 and 2, hosted by Te Little Garden Club of
Winchester. Entries will be accepted after 2 p.m. on March 31. ❁
16 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Fann Greer, Kirk Clarkson,
Anne Whittemore
Club Notes
By Gillian Cady and Pam Combs
Te Garden Club of Norfolk
O
n August 19, Te Garden Club
of Norfolk met for luncheon and
a stroll down memory lane. All
were encouraged to “…wear your favorite
hat and gloves … bring your photographs
and clippings…and share a tale or two of
your special club times.” Te event was held
in the home of long time club member,
Kirkland Clarkson, whose mother and
grandmother served as club leaders in the
past. Guests were greeted by a lovely wire
form “club lady” in a floral organza day
dress that once belonged to Mrs. Clarkson’s
grandmother. A delicious luncheon was
served with the menu taken from a 1915
Norfolk gathering. Te traditional Virginia
fare included Smithfield ham biscuits,
pimento cheese finger sandwiches, and a strawberry blanc mange for dessert. Te
centerpiece of fresh garden flowers, including hydrangea and old roses, was arranged in
a silver and crystal epergne and crowned a table set with bone china and heavy linen…
all with a nod to the past. Fun times were recalled and images and voices of seasoned
members sharing remembrances of valued club relationships and important community
contributions were captured for safe-keeping ❁
Te Ashland Garden Club
takes advantage of all
Kent-Valentine House
has to offer.
Book your club’s meeting,
luncheon or private
event now!
Call (804) 643-4137
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 17
Club Notes
By Mary Margaret Wise
Te Little Garden Club of Winchester
S
eptember in Winchester is always a glorious month as the colors of fall arrive
in the Shenandoah Valley. Tis year a special partnership between the Headley
family, Te Little Garden Club of Winchester, and Blue Ridge Hospice brought a
memorable event to Winchester.
After nearly twelve months of planning and preparation which included our event
co-chairs, Mary Ann Kaplan and Colleen Zoller, Winchester Showhouse and Gardens
2013 took place September 7-29 at Long Green, home of Joe and Regina Headley.
Long Green is situated just north of Winchester. Visitors enjoyed the vision and work of
regional interior designers inside the stone home at this special event.
Other events included an en plein air day for artists, a talk on the home’s history
with Maral Kalbian, architectural historian, a cooking demonstration, as well as other
local non-profit group events. A gift shop was outfitted with selections provided by
members of Te Little Garden Club of Winchester and a cafe provided delicious treats
for visitors to enjoy. Designer furnishings and artwork were
available for purchase.
Te hospitality of the Headley family at Long Green will
long be remembered as central to the partnership between our
club and Blue Ridge Hospice. Proceeds from the event benefit
both organizations. ❁
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Iv××v Sixxic×sox Guv
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18 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
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For information, please contact:
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Mark Your Calendars!
The 22
nd

Spring
Market
presents...
Restoration Committee
Holds Maintenance
Workshop
By Candy Crosby,
GCV Restoration Committee
Albemarle Garden Club
E
very two years the Restoration
Committee hosts a maintenance
workshop for the workers who
maintain the forty gardens that the
Garden Club of Virginia has restored
throughout the state. On February
5, 2013, gardeners and maintenance
workers from the GCV Restoration
properties met at GCV headquarters in
Richmond for a day of lectures, lunch and
networking. For some in attendance, this
was their first visit to the Kent-Valentine
House, and many remarked how much
they enjoyed meeting there. Members
of the Restoration Committee were in
attendance, as well as GCV President Ann
Gordon Evans.
Sally Guy Brown, chairman of the
Restoration Committee, welcomed our
guests and thanked them for all they do
to help maintain our restored gardens
as outstanding examples of historic
landscape preservation. Will Rieley of
Rieley and Associates, GCV landscape
architect, started the day’s lectures with
a brief PowerPoint presentation on the
history of the Kent-Valentine House
and then continued with “An Illustrated
Guide to the Garden Club’s Policies and
Procedures.” Peggy Singlemann, director
of horticulture at Maymont, followed
with “Gardening in Her Footsteps and
Wishing I Had Her Budget.” Peggy had
some great tips on how to utilize the
volunteers and Master Gardeners who can
help in the gardens.
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 19
 Cut-Flower Seeds & Accessories
 Gardening Supplies
 Program Information
 Lisa's Blog
 Newsletter Sign Up
757-877-7159 Local
1-888-977-7159 Toll Free
info@shoptgw.com
Newport News, VA



Lisa Mason
Ziegler,
Cut-Flower
Farmer
and Group
Speaker
The Gardener’s Workshop
Cut-Flower Farm
Online Garden Shop
Visit www.shoptgw.com
“Cool Flowers”
Coming Fall 2014
St. Lynn’s Press
Lisa shares in her new book
how to grow some of the
sweetest flowers; Sweet Peas,
Bells of Ireland, Snapdragons,
and others. Many of these
hardy annuals bloom in spring
just in time for Garden Week!
Scheduling Programs, Book
Signings and Pop-up Shops
now for 2014-2015
Our afternoon speakers were Peggy
Cornett, curator of plants at Monticello,
“Preserving Historic Plants at Monticello:
Gardening and Seed Saving Ten
and Now,” and Jack Gary, director of
archaeology and landscapes at Poplar
Forest, “Restoring Tomas Jefferson’s
Poplar Forest Landscape.” Our guest
speakers were from GCV Restoration sites,
and their talks reflected acknowledgment
of the unique character and challenge of
maintaining historic gardens.
Lunch allowed time for attendees
to network and converse about their
particular properties. An email address
list of participants was circulated after
the workshop to encourage further
conversation. In the evaluations returned,
many interesting questions were posed,
such as:
✿ how best to manage invasive plants
used in historic landscapes in modern
landscapes
✿ how to accurately restore historical
gardens when there are no records
✿ how to meld the great strides in
horticulture with old-fashioned plants.
Tese questions and others raised will
be answered in future issues of Restoration
News. Be sure to click on the link for the
newsletter on the GCV website to learn
more.
Te good work of the gardeners at
GCV-restored landscapes is vital to the
high standard of maintenance required for
GCV historic properties. Next time you
see the gardeners at a GCV garden, be sure
to thank them for the important work that
they do. ❁
20 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Photos Provided by: Laura Anne Brooks
Wildflower Meadow Gardening
By Laura Anne Brooks
Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
L
ate autumn through early spring is
perfect for seeding a wildflower meadow.
Begin by clipping the grass short, leaving
selected native plants. Till or disk lightly and
hand-broadcast seed, using sand for poppies.
Fertilizer is unnecessary, but do plant before
a gentle rain. Larkspur, bee balm, coneflower,
and poppies will need winter cold to germinate.
Early fall plantings of black-eyed Susan,
Queen Anne’s lace, golden rod, lobelia, and
butterfly weed can be seeded into an existing
meadow garden. Cosmos, asters, California poppies, cleome, Sweet William, foxglove,
and woodland phlox are best planted in spring. Many wildflowers may be seeded in
established borders of antique flowers like nepeta, salvia, hyssop, baptisia, campanula,
primrose, perennial verbena and hollyhock.
Te trick to beauty, color, texture and feeding capacity of a meadow is grouping
the seedlings and planting by the pound. Swaths and colonies of one variety will create
the most kinetic energy from visiting bees, butterflies, finches, hummingbirds, and
quail. Aggressive natives like horsemint will push back fescue or nettles. Te commercial
meadow-in-a-can yields one year of anemic bloom and two years of weeds. An entire
field of Virginia’s native black-eyed Susan, Queen Anne’s lace, goldenrod, blue mist
flower plus coreopsis will offer years of cost-free bloom.
It is important to plan for a path when a meadow is planted. Near this path spring
violets, wood sorrel, multiheaded narcissi, squill, and autumn crocus that will add contrast
to the taller meadow flowers. Species lilies, iris and daylilies are attractive when added near
the path. A sunny path will need mowing; a shaded trail can be coaxed into moss.
Originally, the meadow was a shaded area, a cool and inviting pasture for cattle
and away from the overgrazed highland. Frequently romanced by its gurgling brook,
the meadow became a cool thicket and solace for biodiversity and human solitude.
To develop a woodland meadow, colonize groupings of joe-pye weed, Solomon’s seal,
foxglove, columbine, fern, trout lilies, violets and trillium. Wild hydrangea, southern
arrowwood, blackhaw viburnum, native rhododendron, elderberry and buttonbush
will provide structure and food in moist woodlands. Groupings of viburnum, and
native fringe tree, blackberry, even a native black cherry
will provide cover and flight structure for birds and
pollinators in a sunny meadow.
Te true beauty of a native wildflower meadow is
its biodiversity, color, texture, and fragrance. Absent is
noise from gasoline machines, poisons from fungicides
and insect sprays, aggressive growth from non-fertile
hybrids, and even deer, which prefer the sweetness of
nonnatives.
Recommended seed source: Wildseed Farm www.
wildseedfarms.com in Fredericksburg, Texas. ❁
Inside cover, Journal Board members needs to be updated.
Þage 1 Check volume number. lsn'L the same as Lhe cover. Also, hlsLorlc Carden week's emall ls changed
to historicgardenweek@gmail.com

Page 2, paragraph 1, llne 3, perlod afLer º[ourney", add Lhe posLscrlpL ( now on dropbox under ºedlLed
1lnk revlsed 10/28")
Page 3, paragraph 2, llne 3, small ºL" ln ºLhe 8appahannock..", llne 3, omlL ºLo" ln fronL of ºmalnLaln",
llne 7, small ºL" ln fronL of ºLhe Þrlncess....." line 9 does there need to be a space between early
and 1920s?
Þage 3, paragraph 4, llne 3, deleLe ºas well as" and replace wlLh ºand"
Þage 6, paragraph 1, llne 4, omlL ºLo" ln fronL of ºhear", omlL ºLhe" ln fronL of ºCCv", line 6, comma
afLer ºgardens" Þaragraph 2, llne 3, comma afLer ºvlrglnla", llne 6, omlL ºLhe" before CCv
Þaragraph 3, llne 3, omlL ºsLyle" beLween ºLngllsh" and ºgarden", llne 4, omlL ºLhe" before ºCCv"
Þaragraph 3, llne 1, comma afLer ºllmlLed", llne 2, comma after phone #
Þage 8, llne 2 ln LexL, omlL ºLhe" ln fronL of ºCCv" add 's Lo read ºCCv's", llne 4, omlL ºLhe" ln fronL of
ºCCv", remove perlod before ºLo" ln quoLe
Þage 9, llne 3, 4, and 7, omlL ºLhe" before CCv
Page 10, paragraph 1, line 3, comma after ºLlme" Þaragraph 2, llne 1, omlL ºwrlLe and" Lo read ºafLer
many rewrlLes", llne 3, comma afLer º8lchmond" Þaragraph 3, llne 1, comma afLer ºmore" Paragraph
3, line 5, remove http:// from both web addresses Þaragraph 4, llne 1, change ºan" Lo ºand"
Þage 11, paragraph 1, omlL space ln ºWalker", remove quoLes and lLallze lnsLead, reformaL ºLxcerpLed
from..." Lo reflecL spaclng as ln arLlcle on dropbox
Page 15, paragraph 2, line 3 change Your to You next to last line, remove mark between º!ournal's" and
ºMarch" Þaragraph 3, llne 4, remove º 's º afLer CCv LasL paragraph, llne 1, omlL ºLhe" before
ºCCv", llne 2, small ºL" ln ºLhe LlLLle Carden Club.."
Page 16, 3
rd
llne from boLLom, change lasL senLence Lo read, ºlun Llmes were recalled and images and
voices of seasoned members sharing remembrances of valued club relationships and important
community contributions were captured for safe-keeplng." Add some sorL of dlvlslon beLween Lhe
text and the bottom photo------these are 2 separate clubs. Add caption to bottom photo.
Þage 17, Þaragraph 3, llne 4, small ºL" ln ºLhe LlLLle Carden Club..."
Page 19 add hyphen between old and fashioned in third bullet point
Þage 20, paragraph 3, llne 2, comma afLer ºcrocus" , lnserL ºLhaL" beLween beLween comma and ºwlll"
Þaragraph 4, llne 6, comma afLer ºarrowwood", omlL ºand", comma afLer ºvlbernum", l 7, comma afLer
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 21
Getting Oriented
T
he Garden Club of Virginia Admissions Committee will host orientation
sessions for new members during February and March. Te sessions offer a
chance to learn about all that the Garden Club of Virginia has to offer.
New members, who joined their clubs during 2012, 2013 and 2014, are invited
to attend the orientation sessions, along with their respective club presidents and
Membership Committee chairmen. Invitations to the sessions, which will be offered by
district, will go out in January.
New Member Orientation Dates, Locations, Admissions Committee Contacts:

District 1 Richmond
Feb. 25, Kent-Valentine House, Melissa Williams

District 2 Charlottesville
Feb. 27, Westminster Canterbury, Janice Carter

District 3 Williamsburg
Feb. 26, Bruton Parish, Laura Geddy

District 4 Roanoke
Feb. 4, Council of Garden Clubs, Kelly Ellis

District 5 Middleburg
Feb. 18, Emmanuel Church, Harriett Condon

District 6 Virginia Beach
Jan. 29, Galilee Church, Molly Ill
Questions? Please contact your Admissions Committee district representative
or Martha Moore at moortej3@verizon.net.
22 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Hilldrup Moving and Storage and the McDaniel family are delighted
to support the commendable efforts of the Garden Club of Virginia.
For a free in-home consultation
call (866) 487-6780 or visit
www.hilldrup.com
Auto, Boat & RV Storage
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DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 23
Donor
C O N T R I B U T I O N S
Given in 7/1/13 Trough 9/30/13
Annual Fund
Te Garden Club of the
Northern Neck
Victoria Alexander
Marguerite O. Bacon
Anne Beals
Charlotte S. Benjamin
Laura Y. Brown
Betsy Bickford Burnette
Sharon Byrd
Jeanette Cadwallender
Candy Carden
Gwendolyn B. Carter
Jane D. Cheadle
Meg Clement
Jackie Compton
Jane H. Cooper
Kim Cory
Jane Cowles
Kelly H. Ellis
Ann Gordon Evans
Trish Falcon
Martha W. Fidler
Mrs. Merritt W. Foster, Jr.
Lynn F. Gas
Catherine Gillespie
Mrs. B. H. Grant
Greta I. Gustavson
Bettie Guthrie
Susan Henderson
Sandra K. Hodge
Elizabeth Holsinger
Gudrun Hooff
Sheila Jamison-Schwartz
Elizabeth B. Johnson
Tata Kellam
Mrs. Richard U. Lawhon
Julie MacKinlay
Elisabeth Miles
Nina Mustard
Margaret Neale
Merry Outlaw
Frances Padden
Mrs. J. Ridgely Porter III
Denise Revercomb
Linda D. Reynolds
Joyce Rice
Suzie Rockwell
Natalie Rude
Molly Rueger
Mrs. Charles B. Ryan
Rosalie L. Short
Lea Shuba
Lois Spencer
Ms. Page D. Styles
Suzanne S. Taylor
Christina Teague
Mrs. W. McIlwaine
Tompson, Jr.
Blanche Toms
Ellen Upton
Priscilla M. Wellford
Susan Wight
Kate Williams
Donor In Honor of
Nancy Collins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cabell and John West
Barbara Luton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ann Gordon Evans
Dianne Nea Spence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ann Gordon Evans
Catherine Whitham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GCV Staff
Donor In Memory of
Te Garden Club of Norfolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emma Ramsey
Lucyle H. Macon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peggy Faulconer Nelms
Patty Olivieri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Byrd Miller
Jane M. Purrington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. T. Parker Host, Jr.
Helen Scott Reed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy Payne Minor
Mary Ross Reed
Rachel Galbraith Watson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Common Wealth Award Fund
Donor In Memory of
Aileen Wilson Kelly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Peggy Sydnor
24 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
Garden Club of Virginia Endowment
Donor
Te Brunswick Garden Club
Donor In Honor of
Te Mill Mountain Garden Club. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Feinour
Donor In Memory of
Te Brunswick Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fraunces Hardy
Te Charlottesville Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard M. Brandt
Te Huntington Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peggy Faulconer Nelms
Mary Hart Darden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jane Beale
Margaret Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Achsah Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Jane Walker Kerewich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Pattye H. Leggett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Mr. and Mrs. Tomas J. Malmgren. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Sally C. Nelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Whitley and Charles Rotgin, Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mavis Bayles
Mr. and Mrs. Toy D. Savage III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunter Hankins Savage
Lois S. Spratley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anne Rixey Ruffin
GCV Conservation Fund
Donor In Memory of
Mrs. James C. Godwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jane Beale
Lois Mengel
Restoration
Donor In Honor of
Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kimbrough K. Nash
Linda L. Consolvo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fleet Hurlbatt
Donor In Memory of
Gabriella Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lois Mengel
Kirk Bidgood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lois Mengel
Fred and Cary Dabney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Kim Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Kerry and Eva Donley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Nan C. Freed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Joanne and Bill Hamnett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Mike and Karen Huennekens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Joan F. Vogel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
Dr. and Mrs. George A. Whipple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henley L. Guild
DECEMBER 2013 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 25
Statement of Ownership
Te ownership, management and circulation of Te Garden Club of Virginia’s Journal,
published four times a year in Richmond, Virginia, is hereby stated in the first issue
published after the first of October, 2013.
Te name and address of the publisher is: Te Garden Club of Virginia, Kent-Valentine
House, 12 East Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219. Te name and address of
the editor is: Karla MacKimmie, 8505 Lees Ridge Road, Warrenton, VA 20186. Te
owner is: Te Garden Club of Virginia, Kent-Valentine House, 12 East Franklin Street,
Richmond, Virginia 23219. Tere are no bond-holders, mortgages, or security holders.
Te purpose, function, and non-profit status of this organization and the exempt status
for Federal Income Tax purposes have not changed during the preceding 12 months.
Te total number of copies published nearest the filing date is 3,400. Te average
number of copies published in the preceding 12 months is 3,400. Tere are no sales
through dealers, etc. Paid subscriptions average 3,284; the number nearest the filing
date is 3,249. Other mailed copies average 0. Free distribution averages 45. Te average
number of copies not distributed for the preceding year is 66. Te average number of
copies not distributed nearest the filing date is 106.
Te Journal Editor requests permission to mail Te Garden Club of Virginia’s Journal at
the phased postal rates presently authorized on form 3526 for USPS #574-520 (ISSN
0431-0233). I certify that the statements made here are correct and complete as listed
in the Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation.
Karla MacKimmie, Journal Editor
8505 Lees Ridge Road
Warrenton, VA 20186
10/1/2013
(KWK 10/1/2013)
Te Garden Club of Virginia appreciates responsible advertising and reserves the right
to accept or reject submitted advertisements. Inclusion in the Journal is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Garden Club of the advertised goods or services.
WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG Tui Gaiiix Ciun oi Viicixia
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s

f
o
r

t
h
e

C
o
m
m
o
n

W
e
a
l
t
h

A
w
a
r
d
,

t
h
e

B
e
s
s
i
e

B
o
c
o
c
k

C
a
r
t
e
r

C
o
n
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n

A
w
a
r
d

a
n
d

t
h
e

H
o
r
t
i
c
u
l
t
u
r
e

A
w
a
r
d

o
f

M
e
r
i
t
M
a
r
c
h

5

L
i
l
y

W
o
r
k
s
h
o
p
,

K
e
n
t
-
V
a
l
e
n
t
i
n
e

H
o
u
s
e
M
a
r
c
h

1
9

J
u
d
g
e
s

W
o
r
k
s
h
o
p
,

K
e
n
t
-
V
a
l
e
n
t
i
n
e

H
o
u
s
e
A
p
r
i
l

1
-
2

A
n
n
u
a
l

G
C
V

D
a

o
d
i
l

S
h
o
w

T
e

L
i
t
t
l
e

G
a
r
d
e
n

C
l
u
b

o
f

W
i
n
c
h
e
s
t
e
r