11-20-13 Edition | Jp Morgan Chase | Washington Mutual

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 81
PLUNGING AHEAD
NATION PAGE 7
BEARS WIN
IN OVERTIME
SPORTS PAGE 11
AN EASY COOKIE
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
FOOD PAGE 21
OBAMA IN SEARCH OF A NUCLEAR AGREEMENT WITH IRAN
DESPITE OPPOSITION
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
FlightCar, a new airport business that
allows people to rent out their personal
cars, is suing Millbrae after the city asked it
to shut down the company’s Millbrae loca-
tion last week over various code violations.
The suit, filed Monday in San Mateo
County Superior Court, states the non-com-
pliance identified at the Millbrae Planning
Commission hearing and in the commis-
sion’s report either relate to matters which
FlightCar had previously corrected, or mat-
ters which are unrelated to the terms of
FlightCar’s conditional use permit. It also
states the effect of the city’s actions has
been to “thoroughly and capriciously preju-
dice the rights of the plaintiff by denying it
the ability to operate its business.”
The business had been working with the
city attorney’s office prior to the lawsuit,
said Mayor Gina Papan. The city was
expecting the suit, said Vice Mayor Wayne
Lee.
“We knew they were going to,” he said.
“They had no choice; they were stuck in
limbo. We hope they will realize the safety
issues and impact on the neighborhood.”
FlightCar’s primary service is renting out
people’s cars through its website while
traveling, giving them a share of the pro-
ceeds, free airport parking and a car wash in
exchange. Customers are taken by limou-
FlightCar sues over shutdown
Personal car rental company targets city of Millbrae over pulling of use permit
Longtime S.S.F.
school district
trustee resigns
Hoch has had struggle
with health since strokes
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Shirlee Hoch, a long-
time South San
Francisco Unified School
District board trustee,
submitted her letter of
resignation Monday
after a struggle with her
health over the last cou-
ple of years, according to the San Mateo
County Office of Education.
Hoch, who became a trustee in 1990, first
had a stroke in January 2011 and her resig-
nation takes effect Jan. 1. In May 2011, she
suffered three strokes in the same day result-
ing in brain surgery. As a result, Hoch had to
Food bank more than
5,000 turkeys short
SanDisk covers $17K loss
due to recent gas theft
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Flash card maker SanDisk donated
$17,000 to the Second Harvest Food Bank
to cover its losses in a recent fuel theft but
it is still more than 5,600 turkeys short of
its Thanksgiving goal.
With need high and inventory low, the
food bank serving San Mateo and Santa
Clara counties is seeking monetary dona-
tions to fill its shelves and turkeys which
will be delivered to local pantries, soup
kitchens and shelters.
Downtown
parking to
see change
San Mateo considers
ways to meet demand
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s becoming increasingly harder to find
parking in downtown San Mateo, and the
city has enlisted the help of consulting firm
CDM Smith to develop a long-term down-
town parking management plan that could
include a new structure, squeezing more
spaces out of underutilized lots, freshening
up current structures, extending parking
enforcement hours, rais-
ing rates or integrating
new parking technology
so drivers can see avail-
ability in real-time.
An extensive study
including community and
stakeholder input was
presented to the council
at a special meeting
Monday.
“Parking is the first and last thing you
experience when you come downtown as a
visitor,” said Jessica Evans, director of the
Downtown San Mateo Association.
Complaints about it being hard to find
parking is actually a good sign, it means
downtown is prospering, Evans said.
The city will look at enhancing its current
parking structures, work to provide a better
parking experience for its patrons and iden-
tify future parking needs, said Assistant
City Manager Matt Bronson. Possible solu-
tions could include extending parking
enforcement hours from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
raising permit and parking rates from 25
cents to $2 per hour, lowering the time limit
for on-street spaces from four hours to three
hours while eliminating time limits for
See TURKEY, Page 18
Shirlee Hoch
See HOCH Page 18
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Possible solutions for downtown San Mateo parking may include extending enforcement
hours from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., raising permit and parking rates from 25 cents to $2 per hour,
lowering the time limit for on-street spaces from four hours to three hours while eliminating
time limits for off-street parking completely and integrating parking technologies that include
real-time parking availability.
See FLIGHTCAR, Page 23
See PARKING, Page 23
Jessica Evans
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Rapper Mike D is
48.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1947
Britain’s future queen, Princess
Elizabeth, married Philip
Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh, at
Westminster Abbey.
“Make haste slowly.”
— Caesar Augustus, Roman emperor (63 B.C.-A.D. 14)
Vice President Joe
Biden is 71.
Actor Joel McHale
is 42.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A member of the ‘Ranetka’private family club takes a medical-cosmetic massage using the Achatina fulica snail, also known
as the Giant African land snail, at the club in Russia’s Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk.This massage method, which is believed to
speed up the regeneration of the skin and to eliminate wrinkles and scars, has become more popular among beauty salons
and female health clubs of the city.
Wednesday: Showers likely and a slight
chance of thunderstorms. Highs in the
upper 50s. Southwest winds 10 to 20
mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. A
chance of showers. Lows in the upper
40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming partly cloudy. Aslight chance of show-
ers in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s. North winds 5
to 10 mph. Chance of showers 20 percent.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming clear. Lows in the mid 40s. North winds 10 to 20
mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs around 60.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1620, Peregrine White was born aboard the Mayflower
in Massachusetts Bay; he was the first child born of English
parents in present-day New England.
I n 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill
of Rights.
I n 1910, revolution broke out in Mexico, led by Francisco
I. Madero.
I n 1925, Robert F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Mass.
I n 1929, the radio program “The Rise of the Goldbergs”
debuted on the NBC Blue Network.
I n 1945, 22 out of 24 indicted Nazi officials went on trial
(one in absentia) before an international war crimes tribunal
in Nuremberg, Germany.
I n 1959, the United Nations issued its Declaration of the
Rights of the Child.
I n 1962, President John F. Kennedy held a news conference
in which he announced the end of the naval quarantine of
Cuba imposed during the missile crisis, and the signing of
an executive order prohibiting discrimination in federal
housing facilities.
I n 1967, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Clock at the
Commerce Department ticked past 200 million.
I n 1969, the Nixon administration announced a halt to
residential use of the pesticide DDT as part of a total phase-
out. Agroup of American Indian activists began a 19-month
occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay.
I n 1975, after nearly four decades of absolute rule, Spain’s
General Francisco Franco died, two weeks before his 83rd
birthday.
I n 1982, in one of college football’s oddest finales, the
University of California used five laterals to score a disput-
ed winning touchdown on the last play of a game against
Stanford, 25-20.
I n 1992, fire seriously damaged Windsor Castle, the
favorite weekend home of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II.
O
ne hundred years ago, the world
population was 1.6 billion
people. Today, it is around 6.5
billion people.
***
The world’s fastest passenger elevator
is in the world’s tallest building. The
elevator in Taipei 101, a 101-story
building in Taiwan, goes from the fifth
floor to the 89th floor in 39 seconds.
***
The word cauliflower comes from the
Latin words caulis, meaning cabbage,
and floris, meaning flower.
***
In the television sitcom “3rd Rock
from the Sun” (1996-2001), a group of
aliens come to Earth to learn about its
inhabitants and culture. They take on
human form and pose as a family. The
main male characters’ names are Tom,
Dick and Harry.
***
Comedian Henny Youngman (1906-
1998) was called “The King of One-
Liners.” His best known one-liner is
“Take my wife — please.”
***
In the movie “The Absent-Minded
Professor” (1961), a bumbling profes-
sor accidentally invents flying rubber,
called Flubber.
***
Can you name the five kids that tour
Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory in
the book “Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory” (1964) by Roald Dahl (1916-
1990)? Do you remember how they
meet their fates in the factory? See
answer at end.
***
Hypnotism has been performed for
hundreds of years, but it was recog-
nized by the American Medical
Association in 1958 as a valid thera-
peutic tool in the treatment of emo-
tional, psychological and habitual
problems.
***
The big furry orange creature that
wears sneakers and tries to capture
Bugs Bunny is named Gossamer.
***
The most poisonous mushroom in the
world is the Death Cap. The mushroom
is rare in North America but it does
grow in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Ingestion of the mushroom causes
liver failure and is usually fatal.
***
The original name of Bausch & Lomb
was Vulcanite Optical Instrument
Company. The company was started in
1866 when German partners J.J.
Bausch (1830-1926) and Henry Lomb
(1828-1908) discovered that vulcanite
rubber could be used to make eyeglass
frames.
***
The knee jerk reflex takes about 30
milliseconds.
***
If you have perfect vision, 20/20, you
can read an eye chart from 20 feet
away. In Britain, where they use the
metric system, perfect vision is called
6/6. It means you can read an eye chart
from 6 meters away.
***
The wooden cross braces that support
the rails on a train track are railway
ties in the United States and railway
sleepers in Europe.
***
Answer: Veruca Salt was thrown in to
the garbage by trained squirrels. Violet
Beauregarde chews gum that turns her
into a giant blueberry. Mike Teavee
gets shrunk. Augustus Gloop falls into
the chocolate river from which he’s
trying to drink and gets sucked into a
pipe. Charlie Bucket becomes Wi l l y
Wonka’s successor and inherits the
factory. The book has been made into
two movies. Gene Wilder (born 1933)
played Willy Wonka in “Willy Wonka
& the Chocolate Factory” (1971).
Johnny Depp (born 1963) played
Wonka in the “Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory” (2005).
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
THEFT SLANT PARLAY MIDDLE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He wanted to go bowling, but he didn’t have —
SPARE TIME
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KINTH
POTIV
ROPRAL
POXSEE
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Nobel Prize-winning author Nadine Gordimer is 90. Actress-
comedian Kaye Ballard is 88. Actress Estelle Parsons is 86.
Comedian Dick Smothers is 75. Singer Norman Greenbaum is
71. Actress Veronica Hamel is 70. Broadcast journalist Judy
Woodruff is 67. Actor Samuel E. Wright is 67. Singer Joe
Walsh is 66. Actor Richard Masur is 65. Opera singer Barbara
Hendricks is 65. Actress Bo Derek is 57. Former NFL player
Mark Gastineau is 57. Reggae musician Jim Brown (UB40) is
56. Actress Sean Young is 54. Pianist Jim Brickman is 52.
Rock musician Todd Nance (Widespread Panic) is 51. Actress
Ming-Na is 50. Actor Ned Vaughn is 49.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:43.64.
3 9 5
14 15 29 49 63 2
Mega number
Nov. 19 Mega Millions
10 29 37 44 59 10
Powerball
Nov. 16 Powerball
2 7 14 26 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 9 5 9
Daily Four
9 0 4
Daily three evening
18 19 27 29 45 15
Mega number
Nov. 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
·
FOSTER CITY
Assaul t. Reporting person says his dad
hit him in the head repeatedly after a verbal
argument over a TV show on Constitution
Drive before 5:51 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10.
Traffi c hazard. Ashopping cart was caus-
ing a traffic hazard at the intersection of
Vintage Park Drive and Metro Center
Boulevard before 9:54 a.m. Sunday, Nov.
10.
Arre s t . A person was arrested for threat-
ening his roommate with a gun on
Edgewater Boulevard before 8:34 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 9.
Di sturbance. Aperson said his dogs were
attacked by a pit bull that was off leash at
Leo J. Ryan Park on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 11:28 a.m. Saturday,
Nov. 9.
Ani mal cal l . A man was bit by a neigh-
bor’s dog on Bounty Drive before 10:50
a.m. Friday, Nov. 8.
BELMONT
Di sturbance. Juveniles were silly-string-
ing vehicles on Paloma Avenue before
5:22 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12.
Vandal i sm. Graffiti was reported on Lake
Road before 2:31 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12.
Theft. Items were reportedly missing from
a vehicle on Notre Dame Avenue before
9:50 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 7.
Overgrown veget at i on. A person was
cited and warned about overgrown vegeta-
tion on Wemberly Drive before 10:20 a.m.
on Thursday, Nov. 7.
Reckl ess dri ver. Two cars were racing
on Hiller Street and Marine View Avenue
before 11:41 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Police reports
Not so safe harbor
Aperson reported $113 was stolen from
a wallet at Safe Harbor on North Access
Road in South San Francisco before
11:18 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Redwood City Council gave its
approval of a redrawn downtown condo
project by denying neighboring business
owners’ appeal and implementing changes
the developer made to appease design con-
cerns over the three 10-story towers.
The unique resolution was necessary
because the legal firm that appealed the
Indigo project resolved its issues with the
developer after filing the paperwork.
Although both parties were satisfied with
the compromise, the City Council still
needed to give its approval. On Monday
night, the council did just that after first
commending the two parties for reaching a
resolution short of legal action.
“It certainly is nice that people talked and
they were able to work it out and they were
able to present us with something we can
get our arms around,” Councilwoman
Rosanne Foust said.
Councilman John Seybert echoed the sen-
timent, asking “Can we get all appeals to
happen this way from now on?”
The project is a 471-unit development at
525 Middlefield Road encompassing the
entire block bounded by Middlefield Road,
Bradford Street, Jefferson Avenue and
Veterans Boulevard. There is also approxi-
mately 10,500 square feet of commercial
space for the San Mateo Credit Union and
leasing office along with three levels of
unbundled parking which mean they will be
rented separate from the housing units.
The revised design shifts the Bradford and
Jefferson towers north 8.5 feet on floors
four through 10 to create an approximately
1,700-square-foot open space deck. The
change is “intended to give a little bit of
relief to that elevation,” said Planning
Manager Blake Lyon.
Other tweaks to downplay the buildings’
mass include separating them by at least
40 feet and pushing one building back
from the property line.
The changes were made to appease the
owners of 605 Middlefield, LLC, who
appealed the Planning Commission’s
September approval. The appellants wor-
ried that the tall development, particularly
the tower on Bradford Street facing them,
did not mesh with the existing architec-
ture’s charm and size.
The building owners invited the developers
to see firsthand the impact on the view from
their library and, said co-owner and public
defender Geoff Car, the “surprising” result
was a complete renovation of the facade.
“For that they deserve a round of
applause,” said Carr as several in the coun-
cil chambers complied.
Developer Paul Powers also expressed
gratitude for the resolution, saying it shows
that “reasonable people can get along.” He
said Carr and his fellow appellants turned
out to be “delightful to deal with despite not
liking them at first.”
Construction is scheduled to begin in
January 2014 with occupancy starting in
late 2015 to early 2016.
Former Sprint manager
takes embezzlement deal
The former manager of the Sprint store in
Redwood City faces up to six months in
jail for reportedly stealing more than
$11,000 in cash and taking roughly
$16,000 worth of merchandise.
Rodrigo Cevallos, 38, pleaded no con-
test to one count of embezzlement in return
for the six-month maxi-
mum when sentenced
March 10. He changed
his plea the morning his
jury trial was scheduled
to start.
Cevallos reportedly
committed the thefts on
seven occasions between
Oct. 24, 2011, and
March 27, 2012. Prosecutors say he stole
the $11,240 cash total meant for deposit at
the end of the work day on top of taking
the goods. He denied committing any
crimes.
Cevallos remains in custody in lieu of
$50,000 bail.
Council agrees to redesigned condo project
Rendering of the redrawn Redwood City downtown condo project.
Rodrigo Cevallos
Local brief
4
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Dorthey Kavaliunas
Dorthey Kavaliunas died peacefully at
her home in San Carlos
Nov. 16, 2013, at the
age of 98.
She was born Jan. 12,
1915, and was a 58-year
resident of San Carlos.
Dorthey was preceded in
death by her husband
William and her daugh-
ter Norma Jean. Dorthey
is survived by many family members and
friends.
A visitation will be held 6 p.m.-8 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 22 with a 7 p.m. vigil service
at Crippen and Flynn Carlmont Chapel,
1111 Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont. A
funeral mass will be held 11 a.m. Monday,
Dec. 2 at St. Charles Church, 880
Tamarack Ave. in San Carlos. Donations
may be made to St. Charles Church. Sign
the guestbook at http://www.crippenfly-
nn.com.
Obituary
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
San Mateo has been hit by a string of
vehicle burglaries and thefts over the past
few months and this crime trend could wors-
en as the holidays approach, police said.
Criminals are using a common technique
of smashing windows to enter vehicles and
steal valuables. Three vehicles were broken
into on Monday alone and a cluster of vehi-
cle burglaries occurred at a shopping center
last week, according to the San Mateo
Police Department.
Last week, police arrested Erwin Bautista
Favila, a 32-year-old transient, for being
connected with a cluster of burglaries and
two stolen vehicles that occurred between
August and September, according to police.
On Aug. 28, police responded to five
vehicles that were burglarized at the
Franklin Templeton Investments’ parking
lot on Saratoga Avenue and David Street.
One of the vehicles was broken into and
moved and another was stolen. Police
recovered video surveillance of a suspect
who is described as having short hair with a
rat tail in the back and has tattoos on both
arms, according to police.
On Aug. 30, police assisted in the recov-
ery of an unoccupied stolen silver Honda
and, with the assistance of witnesses, was
able to link the abandoned vehicle with a
dark SUV. In collaboration with the San
Francisco Police Department, the San
Mateo Crime Reduction police unit recov-
ered an unoccupied dark SUVthat was stolen
out of San Mateo Sept. 7. During this
investigation, police gathered evidence
that linked the vehicle to other burglary
cases. In mid-November, while Favila was
in county jail for an unrelated case, he was
identified as the perpetrator and charged
with the Aug. 28 burglaries and two counts
of vehicle theft, according to police.
As people begin to do their holiday shop-
ping, it’s important to be aware of one’s
surroundings and keep valuables hidden.
Police use decoy and undercover operations
at hot spots but encourage people to be
proactive and protect themselves against
vehicle burglaries. Criminals target dense
parking lots or residential streets where
vehicles are parked through the night.
Criminals stalk parking lots and watch
people as they park so drivers are urged to
hide valuables before parking, according to
police.
While this is a trend in San Mateo, it is
not isolated to one city.
“I think this can definitely be attributed,
at least in part, to the fact that people more
readily leave high-value items in plain
view in their vehicles during this time of
year,” said San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Deputy Rebecca Rosenblatt.
San Mateo faces cluster of auto burglaries
Increase in number of vehicle thefts could be related to holidays
5
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• Redwood City is
holding a public
workshop on its
upcoming housing
element update. The
workshop will
involve the Pl anni ng Commi ssi on,
Housing and Human Concerns
Commi ttee and the public talking about
the element requirements and community
housing needs. The state-mandated hous-
ing element serves as a blueprint for future
housing development in a city.
The workshop is 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3
in Counci l Chambers, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Those
who cannot attend can submit written
comments to Seni or Planner Diana
O’Del l at dodell@redwoodcity.org.
By Pete Yost and Marcy Gordon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — JPMorgan
Chase & Co. has agreed to pay
$13 billion in a landmark settle-
ment and acknowledged that it
misled investors about the quality
of risky mortgage-backed securi-
ties ahead of the 2008 financial
crisis.
The settlement announced
Tuesday with the Department of
Justice is the largest ever between
the U.S. government and a corpo-
ration. It also included settlements
with New York, California and
other states.
JPMorgan was among the major
banks that sold securities that
plunged in value when the housing
market collapsed in 2006 and
2007. Those losses triggered a
financial crisis that pushed the
economy into the worst recession
since the 1930s.
The deal was reached after
months of negotiations and could
serve as a template for similar set-
tlements with other big banks. As
part of the deal, JPMorgan agreed
to provide $4 billion in relief to
homeowners affected by the bad
loans. The bank also acknowl-
edged that it misrepresented the
quality of its securities to
investors.
“Without a doubt, the conduct
uncovered in this investigation
helped sow the seeds of the mort-
gage meltdown,” Attorney General
Eric Holder said. “JPMorgan was
not the only financial institution
during this period to knowingly
bundle toxic loans and sell them to
unsuspecting investors, but that is
no excuse for the firm’s behavior. ”
JPMorgan will pay $2 billion in
civil penalties to the federal gov-
ernment and about $1 billion to
New York state. Another $6 billion
will go toward compensating
investors.
In a statement, JPMorgan CEO
Jamie Dimon said that the settle-
ment covers a “very significant
portion” of the bank’s troubled
mortgage-backed securities, as
well as those it inherited when it
purchased Bear Stearns and
Washington Mutual in 2008.
JPMorgan, gov’t reach $13B deal on mortgage bonds
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
APescadero ranch hand prosecu-
tors say was under the influence of
crystal methamphetamine when he
tried separately drowning a 9-
week-old puppy and its 67-year-
old owner at Castagnetto Family
Ranch will stand trial on five
felonies.
Jorge Ruiz-Martinez, 33, has
pleaded not guilty but, after a pre-
liminary hearing, was held to
answer on charges of residential
burglary, physical elder abuse,
false imprisonment, methamphet-
amine possession, animal cruelty
and a misdemeanor count of being
under the influ-
ence. He returns
to court Dec. 3
to enter a
Superior Court
plea and poten-
tially set a trial
date.
The bizarre
chain of events
began Nov. 3
when the fami-
ly matriarch reportedly saw Ruiz-
Martinez entering her home
although ranch hands are not
allowed in the main house. She
reported hearing her 9-week-old
puppy Heidi yelping and found
Ruiz-Martinez forcing water down
her throat with a water bottle. She
freed the choking dog and pushed
Ruiz-Martinez outside but he
broke a sliding glass door with
two rocks to reenter and place her
in a chokehold, according to pros-
ecutors. He reportedly dragged her
to the kitchen sink, held her jaw
open and poured water in her
mouth six times before she was
freed.
Responding deputies found
Ruiz-Martinez in a field about 30
feet away possessing and under the
influence of crystal methampheta-
mine.
Ranch hand to trial for attempting to drown puppy, owner
Jorge
Ruiz-Martinez
REUTERS
People walk by the JP Morgan &
Chase Co. building in New York .
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — JPMorgan
Chase & Co. will pay $299 mil-
lion to California’s public
employee and teacher pension
funds as part of a settlement relat-
ed to mortgage-related invest-
ments, state Attorney General
Kamala Harris announced
Tuesday.
The money will settle claims
that the company misrepresented
the value of residential mort-
gage-backed securities sold to
the California Public Employees
Retirement System and
California State Teachers’
Retirement System between
2004 and 2008.
“JP Morgan Chase profited by
giving California’s pension
funds incomplete information
about mortgage investments,”
Harris said in a statement. “This
settlement returns the money to
California’s pension funds that
JP Morgan wrongfully took from
them.”
The settlement is part of a
broader, $13 billion settlement
between the investment compa-
ny and the U.S. Department of
Justice. Under the larger settle-
ment, which also was announced
Tuesday, JPMorgan will provide
$4 billion in mortgage relief to
the states, including California.
Harris said her office’s investi-
gation found that documents pro-
vided by the company did not
accurately disclose the nature of
the underlying mortgages and
that the company did not proper-
ly eliminate risky loans from the
securities it was offering the pen-
sion funds.
The settlement will reimburse
the funds for the losses they took
for investing in mortgage-
backed securities offered by
JPMorgan, Washington Mutual
Bank and Bear Stearns.
JPMorgan acquired the other two
companies in 2008 and has said
most of its mortgage-backed
securities came from them.
The $4 billion in consumer
mortgage relief that is included in
the larger national settlement
goes to those who were harmed
by the same three firms. That
money will go toward loan modi-
fications, forgiving the principal
on mortgages and efforts to
improve blighted neighbor-
hoods.
Harris’ office could not predict
how much of the $4 billion will
come to California but said the
distribution will be overseen by
an independent monitor to make
sure the company meets its obli-
gations under the settlement. It
was not clear how the $300 mil-
lion is being carved from the $13
billion settlement.
JPMorgan deal brings $300M
to California pension funds
6
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Memorial services scheduled
for former supervisor
A memorial service for William
J. “Bill” Schumacher will be held
at Daly City Hall this Friday to
honor the former county supervi-
sor and mayor.
Schumacher died Nov. 3, 2013,
in Palm Desert. He is survived by
his wife Elizabeth Terra, his four
children, two stepchildren and
numerous grandchildren.
He was the first supervisor elect-
ed from Daly City in 1980, began
his work as a police officer and also
served as a Boy Scout volunteer
and attorney. The memorial is 3
p.m. Friday, Nov. 22 at City Hall,
333 90th St., Daly City. More info
is available at www.dalycity.org.
Liquor store
robbed at gunpoint
Columbo’s, a small South San
Francisco liquor store, was robbed
at gunpoint early Sunday morn-
ing, said Sgt. Bruce McPhillips.
At approximately 1:34 a.m., a
man wearing white gloves and a
ski mask brandished an old rusty
black revolver then fled the scene
on foot with an undisclosed
amount of cash, McPhillips said.
The robber was described as man
standing between 5 feet 11 and 6
feet 2 inches tall and weighing 200
to 220 pounds, according to police.
He was wearing a black hoodie,
light gray jeans and white tennis
shoes and white gloves.
Commercial and residential rob-
beries tend to become more preva-
lent as the holidays approach,
McPhillips said. The police have no
suspect and ask anyone with infor-
mation to call (650) 877-8900.
County holds free homeowner
workshop on energy rebates
San Mateo County homeowners
can learn about new rebates and
incentives for making their resi-
dents more energy efficient at a
free workshop Thursday.
The workshop will include infor-
mation on the Energy Upgrade
California Home Upgrade which
gives homeowners up to $4,500
back for energy-savings improve-
ments plus $300 for a home energy
assessment. The Nov. 21 workshop
will also include feedback from a
homeowner who participated in the
past and a talk with contractors
trained to do this type of work.
“These professionals can help
homeowners understand what they
cannot see, like air leaks in their
homes, through the use of robust
tests,” District Four Supervisor
Warren Slocum said in an announce-
ment of the workshop. Slocum said
the workshop’s advisors and con-
tractors will help homeowners best
choose the upgrades that match
their home’s needs and budget.
The workshop is 6:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Nov. 21 at the Redwood City
Library Community Room, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
President coming to
San Francisco next week
President Barack Obama is
returning to the Bay Area next
week for a Democratic fundraiser in
San Francisco.
Obama will attend a Democratic
National Committee fundraiser on
Monday at the new SFJAZZ Center
in the city’s Hayes Valley neigh-
borhood, according to an invita-
tion posted on the DNC’s website.
The president last came to the
Bay Area in June, when he attended
Democratic Senatorial Campaign
Committee fundraisers in Palo
Alto and Portola Valley.
Tickets for next week’s event
start at $500. The SFJAZZ Center,
which opened in January, is locat-
ed at 201 Franklin St.
As with Obama’s other visits,
Monday’s will be accompanied by
demonstrations. Code Pink and
other groups plan to gather out-
side the event to protest the
administration’s use of drone
strikes against overseas targets.
Man looking for
cheap gift cards robbed
ASan Carlos man was robbed and
beaten in the Home Depot parking
lot just after noon yesterday after
he tried to by a number of gift cards
at a discounted rate he had seen on
Craigslist, according to the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
At approximately, 12:25 p.m.,
the 40-year-old man went to the
parking lot at 1125 Old County Road
and was met by two Hispanic men in
their 30s who drove up in a four-door
silver Lexus sedan, later determined
to be stolen out of San Francisco,
according to the Sheriff’s Office.
The two men demanded money and
struck the man numerous times and
forcibly took his cash after he
refused, according to the Sheriff’s
Office. The two were last seen driv-
ing east on Brittan Avenue toward
Highway 101, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aparalegal already convicted of a
dozen felonies in Southern
California for falsely representing
himself as an attorney was sen-
tenced to more than five years
prison for impersonating a real-life
lawyer while helping a man with-
draw a criminal plea in San Mateo
County Superior Court.
John Hedderman, 53, pleaded no
contest in February to five charges
in return for up to five years and
eight months rather than stand trial
on 13 felonies including several
counts of practicing law without a
license, grand theft, false imper-
sonation and threats. Those
charges carried up to eight years in
prison.
On Tuesday, Hedderman received
the maximum although the sen-
tence will be split with two years
and eight months spent in the
county jail of which he has 164
days credit followed by three years
of mandatory
supervision. He
must also pay
victim Ruben
B i s c e g l i a
$3,600.
The sentence
is a good out-
come, said
D i s t r i c t
Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
“He is a fraud
who preyed on innocent victims
and his sentence accomplishes
both goals of the criminal justice
system — punish and then super-
vise to prevent repetition of the
crime,” Wagstaffe said.
Hedderman was once a licensed
attorney in California but resigned
in 2001 with charges pending after
several incidents of ineligibility to
practice law. Last February, he
allegedly represented himself as
Donald Welch, a real-life Southern
California attorney for whom he
worked as a paralegal, and took up
the case of Bisceglia who wanted
help withdrawing a plea of no con-
test to possessing stolen property
in San Mateo County. Bisceglia
reportedly paid Hedderman more
than $1,000 in fees for three
appearances in San Mateo County
Superior Court between March and
August 2012.
When a San Mateo County prose-
cutor attempted to contact the real
Welch, authorities learned of the
alleged local misrepresentation and
that he was convicted of 12
felonies in Orange County for
falsely representing himself as an
attorney. Hedderman also stipulat-
ed to the State Bar of California he
committed misconduct in four cases
including failure to perform compe-
tently; he must also refund
unearned fees and communicate
with clients and pay court-ordered
sanctions or cooperate with the
bar’s investigation, according to
the State Bar of California.
Hedderman had been free from
custody on $50,000 bail.
Fake lawyer sentenced
John
Hedderman
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of two men accused of rob-
bing $220 from a San Mateo gas
station two years ago was sen-
tenced Tuesday to three years super-
vised probation and a drug treat-
ment program for second-degree
robbery.
In pleading no contest, Alvaro
Antonio Hernandez, 34, also
admitted having a prior criminal
strike in return for no more than
four years in prison. He has a 2005
conviction for discharging a
firearm. Judge Jonathan Karesh
yesterday granted a defense request
to not count the previous strike for
sentencing purposes and imposed
one year jail with credit of 57 days.
The balance is modifiable to the
Latino Commission residential
treatment pro-
gram.
As part of the
negotiated plea,
prosecutors also
dismissed a sep-
arate felony case
for allegedly
being a convict-
ed felon in pos-
session of pep-
per spray.
Accomplice Daniel Victor Nerio,
40, of San Mateo, previously
received three years supervised pro-
bation and drug treatment after
pleading no contest to the same
charge.
Both men were arrested the morn-
ing of Aug. 22, 2011, after report-
edly robbing the Circle K gas sta-
tion at 28th Avenue and El Camino
Real in San Mateo. While Nerio
waited in front of the station,
Hernandez allegedly entered the
back office with his face covered by
a bandanna and clutching a realis-
tic-looking pellet gun. He pushed
the manager to the ground and
demanded money before taking
$220 in petty cash from the vault
and fleeing with Nerio, according
to the District Attorney’s Office.
With the help of a sharp-eyed
firefighter, responding officers
caught both men nearby with the
money and gun. Hernandez also
allegedly had in his possession .15
grams of methamphetamine and a
pipe.
Hernandez has been free from
custody on a $50,000 bail bond.
Carriers reject kill switch
for stolen smartphones
SAN FRANCISCO — Samsung
Electronics, the world’s largest
mobile phone manufacturer, has
proposed installing a built-in
anti-theft measure known as a
“kill switch” that would render
stolen or lost phones inoperable,
but the nation’s biggest carriers
have rejected the idea, according
to San Francisco’s top prosecutor.
District Attorney George Gascon
said Monday that AT&T Inc. ,
Verizon Wireless, United States
Cellular Corp., Sprint Corp. and T-
Mobile US Inc. rebuffed
Samsung’s proposal to preload its
phones with Absolute LoJack
anti-theft software as a standard
feature.
Armed gas station robber sentenced
Alvaro
Hernandez
Around the Bay
NATION 7
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Supreme Court refuses to
block Texas abortion law
WASHINGTON — A sharply
divided Supreme Court on Tuesday
allowed Texas to continue enforc-
ing abortion restrictions that
opponents say have led more than
a third of the state’s clinics to stop
providing abortions.
The justices voted 5-4 to leave in
effect a provision requiring doc-
tors who perform abortions in
clinics to have admitting privi-
leges at a nearby hospital.
The court’s conservative majori-
ty refused the plea of Planned
Parenthood and several Texas abor-
tion clinics to overturn a prelimi-
nary federal appeals court ruling
that allowed the provision to take
effect.
The four liberal justices dissent-
ed.
The case remains on appeal to
the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in New Orleans. That
court is expected to hear arguments
in January, and the law will remain
in effect at least until then.
Justice Stephen Breyer, writing
for the liberal justices, said he
expects the issue to return to the
Supreme Court once the appeals
court issues its final ruling.
J&J to pay $2.5B to
settle hip replacement suits
WASHINGTON — Johnson &
Johnson said late Tuesday that it
will pay $2.5 billion to settle
thousands of lawsuits brought by
hip replacement patients who
accuse the company of selling
faulty implants that led to injuries
and additional surgeries.
The agreement presented in U.S.
District Court in Toledo, Ohio, is
one of the largest for the medical
device industry. It resolves an esti-
mated 8,000 cases of patients who
had to have the company’s metal
ball-and-socket hip implant
removed or replaced. J&J pulled
the implant from the market in
2010 after data showed it failed
sooner than older implants.
The deal provides roughly
$250,000 per patient and covers
those who had their implants
removed or replaced before Aug. 31
this year. The company expects to
make most of the payments to
patients in 2014.
By Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — On the eve of
new talks, President Barack
Obama is plunging ahead in search
of a nuclear agreement with Iran
despite outright opposition from
American allies in the Middle East
and deep skepticism, if not open
hostility, from Congress.
Iran is pressing ahead in its own
way, trying to make a deal more
likely to ease painful economic
sanctions without losing its own
hardliners at home.
There was a fresh sign of efforts
to make headway as negotiators
from Iran, the five permanent
members of the U.N. Security
Council and Germany prepared for
Wednesday’s new round of talks in
Geneva. British Prime Minister
David Cameron contacted Iranian
President Hassan Rouhani in the
first such conversation between
the leaders of the two countries in
more than a decade.
Cameron’s office said the leaders
agreed during their telephone con-
versation that significant
progress had been made in recent
talks and that it was important to
“seize the opportunity” in this
week’s new negotiations.
Obama’s willingness to embrace
a pact that falls short of Security
Council demands for Iran to halt
uranium enrichment has pushed
his administration’s already con-
tentious relationship with Israel
to the brink, strained ties with
Gulf Arab states and exacerbated
tensions with Democratic and
Republican lawmakers.
Although everyone claims to
have to same goal — preventing
Iran from developing atomic
weapons — the rancorous, public
disagreement over how to achieve
it has driven a wedge between the
administration and those who the
administration insists will benefit
most from a deal.
Opponents say Iran is getting
too much in the way of sanctions
relief for too little in the way of
concessions. And, they argue, Iran
just can’t be trusted. Obama and
his national security team counter
that the risk is worth taking. The
alternative, they say, is a path to
war that no one wants.
In the run-up to the new talks,
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani
conceded a longstanding demand
that Iran’s right to enrich uranium
must be recognized in any deal,
and that incited opposition from
hardliners in the his country.
Also, speaking to reporters in
Rome while en route to the negoti-
ations, Iranian Foreign Minister
Mohammed Javad Zarif accused
Israel of trying to “torpedo” a pos-
sible agreement.
Yet most signs seemed to be
pointing to a deal coming togeth-
er before or over the weekend.
President plunges ahead
toward Iran nuclear deal
By Eileen Sullivan
and Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The intelli-
gence community’s top lawyer on
Tuesday defended the surveillance
violations by staff of the National
Security Agency by comparing pro-
grams that collect mass amounts of
information on Americans to prob-
lems with the troubled health care
website.
“Complicated technology sys-
tems frequently don’t work as they
expect them to,” Robert Litt, gen-
eral counsel for the Director of
National Intelligence, told a con-
ference at the Georgetown
University Law Center. “Using the
word ‘abuse’ in the context of the
operation of the surveillance pro-
gram is a little bit like saying the
Department of Health and Human
Services is abusing people because
of the fact that the Obamacare web-
sites don’t work properly. They are
complicated.”
In 2011, after the government
disclosed what it said were techni-
cal problems with its computer sys-
tems, a court found the NSA had
violated the Constitution for three
years. Litt’s statement on Tuesday
could be read as significantly down-
playing the constitutional viola-
tions cited by the court or as high-
lighting the politically sensitive
problems with the health care web-
site.
The Obama administration on
Monday declassified another round
of secret documents, showing that
the NSAhas made serious mistakes
in collecting American communica-
tions records. The documents also
show that agency reported those
errors and took action to prevent
future missteps.
According to court records
released by Director of National
Intelligence James Clapper
Monday, the NSAadmitted to gath-
ering material improperly — in one
case because of a typographical
error, and in another case because of
“poor management, lack of
involvement by compliance offi-
cials and lack of internal verifica-
tion procedures, not by bad faith.”
NSA violations compared to Obamacare website ills
Around the nation
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Wall Street Journal CEO council annual meeting in Washington,D.C.
STATE/NATION 8
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The future of state
laws that regulate everything from the
size of a hen’s cage to the safe con-
sumption of Gulf oysters may be at
stake as farm bill negotiators work to
resolve a long-simmering fight
between agriculture and animal welfare
interests.
The House Agriculture Committee
added language to its version of the
farm bill earlier this year that says a
state cannot impose certain produc-
tion standards on agricultural products
sold in interstate commerce. The pro-
vision, authored by Rep. Steve King,
R-Iowa, is aimed at a California law
that will require all eggs sold in the
state to come from hens that inhabit
cages in which they can spread their
wings — a major burden for egg pro-
ducers in Iowa and other states who
don’t use large cages and still want to
sell eggs to the lucrative California
market. The law goes into effect in
2015.
“Bottom line of it is no state should
be allowed to regulate production in
other states,” King said at a meeting of
House-Senate negotiators last month.
But opponents say that depending
on how the language is interpreted, the
provision could lead to challenges of
dozens of other state laws — including
some aimed at food safety, fire safety
and basic consumer protections.
Concern over King’s language has
the potential to threaten the entire
farm bill, which congressional leaders
are hoping to finish by the end of the
year.
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich.,
chairwoman of the Senate Agriculture
Committee, said she has “great con-
cern” about King’s language, which is
not in the Senate version of the farm
bill.
Farm bill takes aim at state animal welfare laws
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A judge on
Tuesday granted an injunction that will
keep some University of California
hospital employees from participat-
ing in a planned strike at UC’s five
medical centers.
Sacramento County Superior Court
Judge David Brown issued the injunc-
tion in response to a request made by
the state labor board on the universi-
ty’s behalf. The injunction bars 49
workers whose jobs are considered
critical to patient health and safety
from taking part in the job action.
That’s about half the number UC want-
ed covered by an injunction, system
spokeswoman Shelly Meron said.
Local 3299 of the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employees has called for a
one-day strike Wednesday at the uni-
versity’s hospitals in San Francisco,
Los Angeles, Davis, Irvine and San
Diego. The union represents 21,000
UC patient care and service employ-
ees, including radiation therapists who
help treat cancer patients, MRI techni-
cians, technicians who sterilize equip-
ment used in surgeries, and pharmacy
technicians who deliver medications
to patients.
The union called the strike in
response to what it said was intimida-
tion by UC management of employees
who participated in a two-day walkout
in May. The May strike came after the
union’s contract expired and negotia-
tions over a new pact failed. The two
sides are at odds over staffing, wages
and benefits, including pensions and
health care.
Todd Stenhouse, a spokesman for
AFSCME Local 3299, said union offi-
cials had agreed before the injunction
was issued to keep 50 critical care
workers off the picket lines.
Judge grants UC hospital strike injunction
• Fire safety groups say the language
potentially could apply to fire-safe cigarettes
that have a reduced propensity to burn
when left unattended. Because tobacco is
an agricultural product, they worry that state
laws requiring sale of these fire-safe
cigarettes could be affected if challenged in
court.
• Food safety groups say they are concerned
that King’s amendment could threaten laws
like California’s statute requiring that oysters
from the Gulf of Mexico be pasteurized, a
measure that has helped reduce foodborne
illnesses in that state.
• Law enforcement groups say they worry
that the language could allow for fewer
standards on puppy mills. “Animals will be
at greater risk of mistreatment,”the National
Fraternal Order of Police wrote in a letter to
King.
• The attorneys general of Arkansas and
Mississippi have written letters to Capitol
Hill opposing the amendment. “Due to the
provision’s vagueness and overly broad
language, it is unclear exactly what impact
the King amendment could have on our
state’s ability to enforce its own laws and to
protect Arkansas businesses and
consumers,” wrote Arkansas Attorney
General Dustin McDaniel, a Democrat.
• The National Conference of State
Legislatures says the language would “pre-
empt” state agricultural laws designed to
protect the safety and well-being of
farmland, waterways, forests and people.
Some groups say language is too broad
Los Angeles-area voters to fill Assembly vacancy
SACRAMENTO — Democrats expect to retain a state
Assembly seat after Tuesday’s special election to fill a
vacancy created when Democratic Assemblyman Bob
Blumenfield resigned after being elected to the Los Angeles
City Council.
Avictory would restore Democrats’ two-thirds majority in
the 80-member Assembly. Democrats already have a super-
majority in the 40-member Senate.
The runoff election in the 45th Assembly District pits
Democrat Matt Dababneh, of Encino, against Republican
Susan Shelley, of Woodland Hills. Preliminary results show
Dababneh leading with 54 percent of the votes.
Democrats make up 49 percent of registered voters in the
district, while 25 percent are Republican. Nearly as many,
22 percent, have no party preference, according to the
California Target Book, which analyzes legislative and con-
gressional campaigns.
The district includes the southwest San Fernando Valley
communities of Encino, Northridge and West Hills, as well
as the cities of Calabasas and Hidden Hills, all in Los
Angeles County. It also includes a sliver of Ventura County.
Dababneh is the chief deputy to Congressman Brad
Sherman. He defeated six other Democrats during a special
primary in September, with 25 percent of the overall vote.
Shelley, an author and former congressional candidate,
was one of three Republican candidates. She advanced to the
runoff election with 21 percent of the overall vote under
California’s top-two primary system.
Silicon Valley patent office to open in San Jose
SAN JOSE — The U.S. Commerce Department has
announced plans to open a long-awaited patent office in
Silicon Valley, the world’s top region for patent filers.
Commerce officials said Tuesday the city of San Jose is
donating two years of rent-free office space in San Jose City
Hall, where more than 80 new patent judges and reviewers
will help inventors and entrepreneurs cut through red tape.
The California Assembly speaker’s office is also donating
$500,000 for the office.
“It’s a great relief,” said U.S. Rep. Mike Honda, D-Calif.,
who has pressed for years to bring the office to his con-
stituents.
“This is going to really help our entrepreneurs protect
intellectual property, help them attract capital, and bottom
line, it’s going to create jobs,” Honda said.
Around the state
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The coveted political
endorsement; which
one means the most?
Editor,
The Daily Journal endorsed Russ
Cohen for Burlingame City Council.
Jackie Speier endorsed Ricardo Ortiz.
The winner, Ricardo Ortiz. The Daily
Journal endorsed Ann Schneider for
Millbrae City Council. Jackie Speier
endorsed Anne Oliva. The winner,
Anne Oliva. The Daily Journal
endorsed Marty Medina for San Bruno
City Council. Jackie Speier endorsed
Ken Ibarra. The winner, Ken Ibarra.
The Daily Journal endorsed Josh
Hugg for San Mateo City Council.
Jackie Speier endorsed Joe Goethals.
The winner, Joe Goethals. All
endorsements are important, but in
San Mateo County getting Jackie’s
endorsement is the most important.
Joe Galligan
Burlingame
Student safety at
Sequoia High School
Editor,
My daughter is a freshman at
Sequoia this year, and we love the
school — except for the dangerous
crossings at Brewster Avenue and
Broadway. We have heard of at least
three students being hit so far this
year and some serious injuries have
resulted. The crossings of Brewster
Avenue at Birch and Clinton streets
are uncontrolled. The only safety
measures are painted crosswalks, and
drivers fly past without a thought
(except maybe of making the light
ahead, or writing a text). Students
crossing from the north peek around
parked cars and try to see if it’s safe
to venture into the street.
Try to figure out the streetlights at
the intersection of Broadway,
Brewster Avenue, Birch Street and the
exit from the campus; I dare you.
Drivers, especially when leaving the
campus, can’t tell which light, if any,
pertains to them. They are also
unable to tell where the lanes are as
they cross. It’s a disaster waiting to
happen.
Sequoia is a beautiful school with
great students. Redwood City has to
do something now to control those
crossings for the kids, such as stop-
lights that pedestrians can activate.
Common sense measures need to be
taken immediately to protect student
safety at the Brewster crossings and
the triple intersection at the campus
entrance.
Tim Murphy
San Carlos
The liberal perspective
Editor,
Letters submitted to the Daily
Journal provide for some interesting
reading. The Republicans were round-
ly criticized for opposing the
Affordable Care Act, and the president
took every opportunity to admonish
them, in public, for trying to derail
his agenda. Now, the Affordable Care
Act is in a free fall and some feel the
Republicans should do their part in
helping the program become success.
Next, insurance companies are
accused of lining their pockets with
money made on the backs of those
they insure. Unless I am mistaken,
insurance companies are regulated by
the state, with regard to how much
they can profit from their pool of cus-
tomers. Based on the guidelines of
Affordable Care Act, the insurance
actuaries have spent several years
establishing rate plans based on the
assumption of presumed individuals
who will be mandated to carry insur-
ance under the Affordable Care Act.
Now, it is decided that you should be
able to keep your plan if you liked it.
Thus, those who liked their plan
will renew, but those who are young
and healthy will not be obligated to
do so. What happens to the rate plan
now? Arecent solution proposed by
our friends in Washington, D.C.,
would bail out insurance companies
for any loss incurred under the “keep
your plan” extension. Don’t forget
that Washington gets their money
from you, the tax payer.
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Kerry’s bad Iran agreement
Editor,
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
has proposed a bad agreement with
Iran, which would limit sanctions and
does not reduce their capability to
quickly make atomic weapons. They
don’t need enriched uranium for atom-
ic energy, and they don’t need atomic
energy because they have large oil
reserves. This agreement is opposed
by France, Israel and Saudi Arabia.
When these three countries have
agreed on something like that, it is
consequential, and the U.S. adminis-
tration should take notice.
Norman G. Licht
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
W
ith an unanimous vote
Monday night, the Foster
City Council took a big
step toward the future and closed the
books on a significant dream of the
past.
The Foster Square development,
with hundreds of planned housing
units for seniors, fits a growing need
for the city as it ages. In making the
vote, which still needs a second read-
ing, the council finally moved on
from the long-held but diminishing
dream of locating a high school for
the 15-acre site by City Hall.
When the city was envisioned and
incorporated in 1971, it was done so
with progressive ideas of locating
homes a certain distance from parks,
schools and shopping areas so recre-
ation, education and retail needs could
be met right away. Part of that vision
was to have neighborhood elementary
schools, a middle school and a high
school on a 56-acre site at the city’s
center with 16 acres to be used for
parking. It was later decided that there
was enough space for Foster City stu-
dents in the other schools in the San
Mateo Union High School District. In
the 1980s, the district sold a large
chunk for development and took the
proceeds to spend on educational
needs. The remaining acreage was
given to the city. Several proposals
for private high schools were intro-
duced and the closest the city came
was an Episcopalian high school in
the early 2000s. Amore recent effort
for a new school was brought forward
by the Foster City High School
Foundation that would only need 4
acres of the 15-acre site. In 2008, the
council decided not to hold the parcel
for a high school and instead moved
forward with the public planning
process that arrived at the council dais
Monday night.
While it is regrettable that a city of
Foster City’s size and population does
not have a high school, it is time to
move on from that original vision
and focus on the needs of the city —
and senior housing is a definitive
need. The city is also embarking on a
retail effort to attract innovative busi-
nesses to the city that will serve its
emerging young communities and
that will be a balance in this site with
its emphasis on its older residents.
However, this is a solid step toward
finally building a high-quality devel-
opment on a long-vacant site. It only
took 42 years to determine a use, but
perhaps the wait will be worth it.
A new vision for Foster City’s 15-acre site
Childhood’s legacy
“A
mericans like to think we have greater regard
and show a greater responsibility for the
needs of our children than most other soci-
eties. In fact, however, the very nature of current American
daily life — fast-paced and frequently changing — causes
our failure both to recognize and to meet the most impor-
tant needs of our children.” — Joseph Rosner, “Myths of
Child Raising.”
How have we, as a society, lost patience with childhood?
How have our children been bought-out, neglected, abused,
forced to grow up too soon and so often treated like neces-
sary nuisances? What are the dark clouds looming in the
future that will prevent our grandchildren from seeing the
rainbows?
Not only do we hurry childhood, we exploit it. The pre-
vailing attitude in this culture seems to be that parenthood
is some kind of affliction that is hindering progress
(whether for parents or as a society) toward more wealth and
better things and the affliction must be recovered from
(especially the early stages) as quickly and with as little
inconvenience as possible. Insightful people who lament
what is being wrought are
not often heard.
Many years ago, when the
women’s movement was in
full swing, an article in
“Parenting” magazine titled,
“Are We Shortchanging Our
Children?” by Penelope
Leach, caught my attention
because of its unusual prem-
ise. It was surprising to see
a national magazine risk the
wrath of gainfully employed
mothers everywhere and
present the realistic, down-
to-earth, compassionate
truth about at least one
aspect of this disturbing situation.
“Children are not hobbies to be kept out of the way
except when they are wanted. They are not luxuries to be
indulged in when the parents have time. And they are not
strange beings, best dealt with by trained professionals.
Babies are people with unlimited potential, and they are the
citizens of the future. Parents are the ones best equipped to
help children become fulfilled people and good citizens.
Society, with its dazzle of material prizes, is blinding us to
the right to parent our own children. Can we slow down
enough to see where we are going?” wrote that wise child
advocate.
Our culture should have long ago taken the lead in encour-
aging interest in quality parenting. Experts in childrearing
should not have reneged — should have risen up in outrage
that our children should be so demeaned, instead of allow-
ing themselves to be swept along with the tide of self-
interest and materialism. As Leach wrote, “by expecting
parents to separate from infants and toddlers, society tells
them that their presence is not very important to their chil-
dren — and this is not true. Children travel down a back
alley and are parked at day care, while parents join other
adults on an onramp to a highway that takes them away
from those children.”
We are deluding ourselves if we think that children
shipped off to day care or left with indifferent sitters at very
young ages are not deprived (in one way or another) of a
closely bonded, intimate and loving quantity (and quality)
interaction with a devoted, unharried adult. As Debora L.
Spar wrote in her new book, “Wonder Women,” “We want to
be fully involved in the care of our children without com-
promising our time spent at work, with our spouses and on
ourselves.”
Not only have many parents reneged in many cases —
either by neglecting their children outright or pursuing
their own interests at the expense of their children, but
government policies, a lack of legislation aimed at
improving the lives of our children by relieving family
stress, religious dogma that continues to disallow even
contraceptives — all are adding to the plight of our
nation’s children. Now, with the economy in a slump, with
so many families very insecure about their financial status
even with two parents employed, the possibility of
improving the situation becomes even more remote.
But we must remember that when we deprive children
physically, intellectually and/or emotionally, we are pro-
moting dysfunction that will come back to haunt us. Agov-
ernment that is focused so strongly on increasing the
advantage of the wealthy is widening the gap between the
have and have-nots to the point of serious unrest. Our
inability and unwillingness to see how our actions today
will affect tomorrow, plus our societal worship of power,
wealth and egocentrism is the outcome of the collapse of
intelligence and the antithesis of wisdom.
“Saving our kids is not just the compassionate thing to
do. It also happens to be the fiscally responsible thing to
do. Doing what is right by our kids builds up our competi-
tive strength and knits together the raveled sleeve of this
society, but it also produces a kinder, gentler nation.” —
Sylvia Ann Hewlett, “When the Bough Breaks.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
of
Di seases & Di sorders
of t he Eye
EYEGLASSES
and
CONTACT LENSES
DR. ANDREW C. SOSS
OD, FAAO
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BURLINGAME
650- 579- 7774
Provi der for VSP and most maj or medi cal
i nsurances i ncl udi ng Medi care and HPSM
www. Dr- AndrewSoss. net
by
Dow 15,967.03 -8.99 10-Yr Bond 2.712 +0.034
Nasdaq 3,931.55 -17.51 Oil (per barrel) 93.96
S&P 500 1,787.87 -3.66 Gold 1,274.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Campbell Soup Co., down $2.61 to $39.20
The company’s quarterly profit fell 30 percent as U.S. sales of soups and
V8 beverage declined.
Best Buy Co. Inc., down $4.78 to $38.78
The electronics retailer said it is committed to “winning” the holiday
season with price matching, doorbusters and deals, even if that means
pressure on profits.
Salesforce.com Inc., down $2.77 to $52.74
The customer management software maker reported a smaller third-
quarter loss but issued fourth-quarter guidance that missed Wall Street
expectations.
Vail Resorts Inc., up $2.38 to $74.71
An analyst lifted his rating and price target for the ski resorts operator due
in part to an easy year-ago weather comparison and improving economic
conditions in Denver.
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., down $3.72 to $60.03
The engineering company’s fiscal fourth-quarter earnings and guidance
missed Wall Street expectations.
Nasdaq
Tesla Motors, Inc., down $4.51 to $126.09
The government’s auto safety watchdog is investigating whether Tesla’s
Model S electric car is vulnerable to fires.
Aerie Pharmaceuticals Inc., up 84 cents to $11.45
Three analysts started covering the biotechnology company with “Buy”
or “Outperform”ratings.
Hallador Energy Co., up 17 cents to $6.75
Cowen and Co. analysts upgraded the company saying it is
underappreciated despite its attractive margins, prospects for future
sales growth and sound finances.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Disappointing earn-
ings news helped push the stock mar-
ket lower on Tuesday.
Electronics retailer Best Buy
plunged after saying extended store
hours and price-cutting could squeeze
its fourth-quarter profit. Campbell
Soup fell sharply after reporting that
its profit slumped as sales of soups and
V8 drinks fell. The two stocks were the
biggest decliners in the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index.
Even with the slight decline the S&P
500 is still up 25 percent so far in
2013 and has risen for six weeks
straight, the longest winning streak
since February. The extended run-up
has prompted a number of market
watchers to call for caution.
“We’ve had a phenomenal run, par-
ticularly in the last few weeks. I would-
n’t be surprised if we would pull back
from here,” said Alec Young, global
equity strategist with S&P Capital IQ.
The Dow Jones industrial average
edged down 8.99 points, or 0.1 per-
cent, to 15,967.03, the first decline
for the index in five days. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index lost 3.66 points,
or 0.2 percent, to 1,787.87 and the
Nasdaq composite fell 17.51 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 3,931.55.
The Dow Jones industrial average
and the S&P 500 crossed round-number
milestones in early trading Monday
but failed to build on those advances.
The Dow crossed 16,000 and the S&P
500 hit 1,800 for the first time before
falling back to close below those lev-
els both Monday and Tuesday.
Retailers were a key focus on
Tuesday, especially with the holiday
shopping season coming up. Black
Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, is
one of the biggest shopping days of
the year. Consumer spending is a criti-
cal component of the U.S. economy,
so how consumers behave during the
closely watched holiday season will
give investors a sign about the out-
look for growth.
Best Buy sank $4.78, or 11 percent,
to $38.78 after its warning of a tough
holiday trading period ahead. The com-
pany’s stock is still up 227 percent
this year, making it the second-best
performer in the S&P 500 after Netflix.
Home Depot rose 71 cents, or 0.9
percent, to $80.38 after reporting
income that surpassed analysts’ expec-
tations. The company also raised its
earnings forecast for the year.
TJX Cos., which operates discount
stores including T.J. Maxx and
Marshalls, climbed 63 cents, or 1 per-
cent, to $63.12. Its income rose 35
percent as sales improved at both U.S.
and international stores.
Investors will turn their thoughts
back to the Federal Reserve on
Wednesday.
Minutes from the Fed’s October
meeting will be released at 2 p.m. and
investors will scour them to get a read
on the central bank’s stimulus policy.
The central bank is currently buying
$85 billion of bonds a month to keep
interest rates low and boost the econo-
my. That has underpinned a rally in
stocks.
Investors were also watching
JPMorgan Chase. The bank reached a
record $13 billion settlement with
federal and New York State authorities,
resolving claims over the bank’s sales
of mortgage-backed securities that
collapsed during the U.S. housing cri-
si s.
JPMorgan closed 41 cents, or 0.7
percent, higher at $56.15.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note
edged up to 2.71 percent from 2.67
percent. Crude oil rose 31 cents, or 0.3
percent, to $93.34 a barrel and gold
edged up $1.20, or 0.1 percent, to
$1,273.50 an ounce.
Stocks edge lower after disappointing earnings
“We’ve had a phenomenal run,
particularly in the last few weeks. I wouldn’t
be surprised if we would pull back from here.”
— Alec Young, global equity strategist with S&P Capital IQ
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — The U.S. government’s
auto safety watchdog is investigating
whether Tesla’s Model S electric car is
vulnerable to fires because roadway
debris can pierce the car’s underbody
and battery.
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, which
announced the probe early Tuesday, is
looking into two incidents in which
Model S drivers struck metal objects
on highways. The objects penetrated
the bottom of the car, punctured the
battery and caused fires.
Both drivers were warned of a prob-
lem by the car and escaped safely.
Tesla CEO Elon Musk said in a blog
post that he requested the NHTSA
investigation. He says accident data
show that the Model S is far safer than
gasoline-powered cars, but the probe
is needed to dispel questions the pub-
lic may have about the safety of elec-
tric vehicles as a result of the fires.
But NHTSA Administrator David
Strickland told reporters in
Washington Tuesday that he isn’t
aware of any request from Tesla.
However, the agency said Tesla is
cooperating in the investigation.
News of the probe didn’t hurt Tesla’s
stock price. It gained $4.51, or 3.7
percent, to close at $126.09, and at
one point rose to $129.
The probe affects more than 13,000
cars from the 2013 model year that
were sold in the U.S. Tesla has sold
about 19,000 of the cars worldwide.
They start at $70,000 but often run
more than $100,000.
Tesla’s batteries are mounted
beneath the passenger compartment
and protected by a quarter-inch-thick
metal shield. Experts say that if the
batteries are damaged, that can cause
arcing and sparks and touch off a fire.
NHTSA, in documents posted on its
website, said it opened the prelimi-
nary evaluation “to examine the
potential risks associated with under-
carriage strikes” on the Tesla cars.
The investigation could lead to a
recall, but a decision likely is months
away.
U.S. safety agency opens probe into Tesla fires
Yahoo offers $1B of debt,
adds $5B to buyback fund
SUNNYVALE — Yahoo Inc. says it plans to sell $1 billion
in convertible senior notes in a private placement and will
use the money to buy back shares and for other purposes.
The Sunnyvale company said Tuesday that it added $5 bil-
lion to its stock buyback program. Yahoo had spent $3.1
billion buying back 123 million shares in the first nine
months of this year.
Companies sell stock in an effort to boost the value of
their remaining shares.
Business brief
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Going Up As A Result Of ObamaCare?
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If you have questions, please contact
Jeff Miller ~ Head Coach
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www.norcalblitz.com
Page 13, Giants finalize
|deal with Tim Hudson
Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013
SEEKING A TURNAROUND: SONNY DYKES BELIEVES CAL’S RISE CAN MIRROR STANFORD >> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep’s Maddy Johnston,right,gets off a pass over a charging Catalpa Hoover of Soquel during the Gators’13-3 win over the Knights
to advance to their eighth straight CCS Division II championship matchSaturday at the Santa Clara International Swim Center.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Jon Burke, Sacred Heart Prep girls’ water
polo coach, admits there is a certain amount of
expectation — and with that, pressure — that
comes with the Gators’ girls water polo pro-
gram.
Having advanced to seven straight Central
Coast Section Division and winning six times
in a row will do that.
Those expectations and pressures will
remain as Sacred Heart Prep, the No. 1 seed,
advanced to its eight-straight final following
a dominating 13-3 win over No. 5 Soquel
Tuesday night at Menlo-Atherton.
“I think it does get harder every year (to
reach those expectations). But we stress this
is this year’s team,” Burke said.
The Gators will play either No. 3 Castilleja
or No. 7 Presentation in the championship
match Saturday at the Santa Clara
International Swim Center. The time has yet
to be determined.
This year’s team is strong as any of the pre-
vious seven teams that advanced to the CCS
championship game in the past. Sacred Heart
Prep (21-7) had seven different players score,
Another CCS final for SHP
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Five teams from two different leagues.
What do they all have in common? All five
are in the semifinals of the Central Coast
Section volleyball playoffs.
Menlo-Atherton and Burlingame repre-
sent the Peninsula Athletic League, while
Menlo School, Crystal Springs Uplands
School and Priory come out of the West Bay
Athletic League.
Below is a look at their semifinal
matchups.
Division I
No. 1 Menlo-Atherton (21-9) vs.
No. 5 Palo Alto (23-9), 5:30 p.m.
at Santa Clara High School
M-A cruised past No. 8 Cupertino 25-14,
25-17, 25-15 in its quarterfinal match
Saturday. Palo Alto needed four sets to get
past No. 4 San Benito, 25-21, 25-13, 26-
28, 25-18.
This is the first playoff meeting between
these two schools since Palo Alto won
back-to-back Division I titles in 2010 and
2011, at the expense of the Bears each time.
Those Palo Alto teams, however, went on to
the state finals each year.
Times have changed, however, and now the
Bears are the defending champs. M-A has
four players with 200 or more kills on the
season, led by Pauli King who, despite
missing some matches with a shoulder
injury, still managed to lead the team with
311 kills. Devin Joos, who only became
eligible for the Peninsula Athletic League
portion of the schedule, still managed to
finish second on the team with 270 kills.
Leanna Collins has 238 on the season and
Alyssa Ostrow has chipped in with 206.
The Bears are just as strong defensively,
with five players recording 200 or more
digs.
Five play for spots in championship games
The Gators advance to their eighth straight championship match
See GATORS, Page 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For the boys on the Menlo-Atherton water
polo team, there will be a chance at champi-
onship redemption.
Ayear after losing to Bellarmine College
Prep in the finals of the Central Coast
Section Division I championship in heart-
breaking fashion, the Bears will return to
the scene of the crime by virtue of their 9-7
overtime victory over No. 2-seed St.
Francis-Mountain View.
Menlo-Atherton, the No. 3 seed, over-
came a 6-4, fourth-quarter deficit, tying the
game on a Mostyn Fero goal with 28 second
left in the game. And in two, three-minute
overtime periods, another Fero goal and one
by Jorge Pont were the difference in the
game.
“We never gave up,” said first-year Menlo-
Atherton head coach Giovanni Napolitano.
“I told the kids that even though we were
feeling down at 6-4, to never give up. We are
in amazing shape, we can swim with any-
body. And that’s what happened. They (St.
Francis) got tired and we kept swimming. I
thought that was key. ”
It was an impressive victory for Menlo-
Atherton, considering the means by which
the Bears accomplished it. Up until the
about the two-minute mark in the fourth
quarter, the interior part of the pool was a
black hole for the Bears offense. When M-A
needed a goal, one of the best shooter in the
Peninsula Athletic League, Evan
McClelland, was there to answer from five
meters and beyond.
And with 2:03 left in the game and M-A
down two goals, it was McClelland from the
outside that drew the Bears closer at 6-5.
But the key to the game turned out to be
the young Fero. Only a sophomore (on a
team full of sophomores) Napolitano said he
knew what the youngster was capable of,
having coached him last season on the
frosh/soph team. Fero was thrown into that
M-A rallies to
beat St. Francis
See BEARS, Page 16
See CCS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The following
information is to
address common
concerns about the
Reverse Mortgage
product.
We do NOT take
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The reverse mortgage is a non-recourse
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Any balance owed above and beyond
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You do NOT have to make monthly
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We are in the business of helping you
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However, at any time you decide to sell
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Frequently Asked Questions
Below is a list of Frequently Asked
Questions by category.
Do I have to own my home free and clear
to qualify?
You can payoff your existing mortgage
with the proceeds from the reverse
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If something happens to me, can my
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Yes they can. As long as you were joint
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Yes you can leave your home to your
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Why Security 1 Lending is the Right
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Security 1 Lending provides the
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Myths & Misconceptions of Reverse Mortgages
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY— The TEDx Talk that Stanford
coach David Shaw gave earlier this year about
turning a prestigious academic university into
a football powerhouse resonated with many of
his colleagues around the country. Perhaps sur-
prisingly, even Sonny Dykes watched the
presentation to see how he could use the same
concepts at rival California.
“I think it’s remarkably similar,” Dykes
said.
Shaw’s message is espe-
cially relevant this week.
Seven years ago, just
before Shaw joined Jim
Harbaugh’s staff at
Stanford, the Cardinal
were 1-10 entering the Big
Game against a ranked Cal
team that was 8-3. While
the Golden Bears were
competing for a conference championship
almost every season, Shaw recalled how some
believed that Stanford should drop out of
major college football or lower the academic
standards for its athletes if the program wanted
to be competitive.
The academic-rich Bay Area programs have
reversed roles now.
Cal (1-10, 0-8 Pac-12) has struggled might-
ily in Dykes’ first season, and the football
team’s graduation rates are the worst among
teams in major conferences. Entering the
116th Big Game on Saturday, Dykes is chas-
ing the model that has made No. 10 Stanford
(8-2, 6-2) a success on the field and in the
classroom.
“Cal was up at one point. Stanford was
down. Stanford’s up right now. We’re down a
little bit. I think we know the formula,” Dykes
said. “It doesn’t happen overnight. It didn’t
happen overnight for Stanford. It’s a process.
It’s a painful one to go through sometimes,
but you don’t build programs overnight. It’s
just not the way it works. We’re going to do it
the right way. And when you do it the right
way, sometimes it goes slow. It’s a burden-
some process, but we’ll get there.”
Shaw knows all about that process.
The former Cardinal wide receiver recalled a
conversation he had with Harbaugh, who left
for the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers after the
2010 season, when the two started at Stanford.
Harbaugh asked Shaw how former Cardinal
coaches Dennis Green and Bill Walsh built
winning teams, and Shaw outlined three
things: a competitive coach with a lot of ener-
gy, a tough running game and a physical
defense.
To sustain that success, Harbaugh and Shaw
turned what had once been a burden — those
high academic standards — into a benefit to
separate Stanford on the recruiting trail from
other schools. Other strong academic pro-
grams such as Duke, Vanderbilt and Baylor all
have followed a similar philosophy: that a
competitive student is also a competitive ath-
letic — so long as they have the physical abil-
ities.
“I think the mode was different around us at
the time. People were saying it’s not possible.
I don’t think people around (Dykes) are saying
it’s not possible. It’s just, ‘How do you get it
done?”’ Shaw said. “When Jim took over here,
there was a faction saying, ‘Hey, let’s go. Let’s
drop down. Let’s get out of (Division) I. We
can’t do it. It’s impossible.’ Which I think
only strengthened our resolve. But the ques-
tions are different. But I do understand the
struggle as far as putting it together to produce
the right product on the field combined with
what guys are going to do in the classroom.”
Cal, which fired Jeff Tedford after going 3-9
in his 11th season last year, has been under
heavy criticism for what has seemed like a
non-stop stretch of bad news this fall.
The Bears have lost nine straight games and
13 consecutive conference games going back
to last year. They are the only winless team in
Pac-12 play and are 31 1/2-point underdogs
entering their season finale at Stanford, which
endured seasons of 4-8, 5-7 and 8-5 before
making BCS bowls the past three years.
Making matters worse in Berkeley, data
released by the NCAAlast month also showed
Cal — the No. 1 public university in the coun-
try — had the worst graduation rate among the
72 teams in major football conferences at 44
percent. The graduation success rates repre-
sented the four-year average of freshmen who
enrolled from 2003-04 through 2006-07 and
were given six years to graduate.
Dykes said that while wins are still eluding
his team, which has been ravaged by injuries
this season, he has seen the attitude begin to
change around the program off the field. He
said players are being better students and bet-
ter teammates and that “culture of working
together is really critical. That’s what makes
good teams.”
Dykes hopes to mirror Stanford’s turnaround at Cal
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Sonny Dykes
SPORTS 13
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Hudson hardly
envisioned his career crossing the country
once more to bring him back to the Bay Area.
Hudson finalized a $23 million, two-year
contract with the San Francisco Giants on
Tuesday, returning the pitcher to his profes-
sional baseball roots. He began his big league
career with Oakland.
“I’d like to start out by saying we’re really
excited to come back to the bay. This is where
I started my career,” Hudson said. “Making a
trip back across the country quite honestly
isn’t something I anticipated a couple years
ago. When the Giants were interested in me, I
quickly realized it was going to be a definite
possibility.”
While Hudson had a hard time deciding to
leave the Braves — the team he grew up cheer-
ing — he understood this would be a great
opportunity with a franchise that won the
World Series in 2010 and ‘12. His two daugh-
ters were born in the Bay Area.
Hudson had a physical Monday, and the team
announced the agreement Tuesday.
“Once we got the physical squared away,
there was no question he was going to become
a Giant,” said general man-
ager Brian Sabean, who
credited the pitcher for his
swift decision.
Hudson made his major
league debut with the
Athletics in 1999 and went
92-39 in six seasons with
Oakland, where the right-
hander teamed with Mark
Mulder and Barry Zito to
form a successful “Big Three.”
The 38-year-old went 8-7 with a 3.97 ERAi n
21 starts this season for Atlanta. His season
was cut short by a broken right ankle that
required surgery. The Braves earlier this month
declined to make a qualifying offer to Hudson,
who won 49 games during the previous three
seasons.
Hudson was hurt July 24 in New York when
the Mets’ Eric Young Jr. inadvertently stepped
on the back of the pitcher’s lower right leg
while Hudson covered first base.
While he hasn’t begun running on the ankle
yet, he had a screw removed last week and
expects to be full strength for spring training.
“The ankle’s coming along just fine, not
quite 100 percent right now but it’s well on its
way,” he said. “I anticipate in the next month
or so start throwing bullpens.”
San Francisco, which missed the playoffs
this year, is seeking another starter to join
Matt Cain, Madison Bumgarner and Tim
Lincecum in a rotation losing Zito and proba-
bly also free-agent righty Ryan Vogelsong.
Cain and Bumgarner are signed long term,
while Lincecum received a $35 million, two-
year deal last month.
“They have a ton of talent here, I was excit-
ed to join this rotation,” Hudson said. “They’re
really good. They probably don’t need my
help.”
Hudson was drafted by the A’s in the sixth
round of the 1997 amateur draft out of Auburn.
Oakland traded Hudson to the Braves in
December 2004 and he pitched nine seasons in
Atlanta. The three-time All-Star earned NL
Comeback Player of the Year honors in 2010
after he returned from elbow ligament replace-
ment surgery to go 17-9 with a 2.83 ERA. He
had surgery for a herniated disk in November
2011.
The Giants had been eager to find an experi-
enced starter to fill in the rotation. Zito just fin-
ished a $126 million, seven-year contract and
had his $18 million option declined.
Vogelsong’s $6.5 million option also was
turned down by the club.
“Great news with the need that we have for
pitching here and to get Tim, who was one of
the highly sought pitchers out there. I couldn’t
be more thrilled,” manager Bruce Bochy said.
“It certainly helps fill a very important need
for us as we try to get back on track here. ... For
him to choose us, we’re honored and I look
very forward to working with him.”
Hudson traded text messages with good
friend Zito on Monday — and now is filling a
rotation spot vacated by Zito’s departure.
“It’s a bit odd,” Hudson said. “We go back a
long way. We were texting a little bit yester-
day. He’s happy for me and my family but it’s a
little bittersweet. I texted him I wish he’d been
here with me. The game is what it is. Chapters
open and close. I wish him the best.”
Hudson is 205-111 in a 15-year career and
was coming off a $36 million, four-year con-
tract.
After snapping a career-worst 10-game win-
less streak with a 13-4 victory July 6 at
Philadelphia, Hudson went 4-0 with a 3.10
ERAin his last four starts.
Hudson will pitch to 2012 NLMVP and bat-
ting champion Buster Posey, who is signed
through 2021. Right fielder Hunter Pence was
given a $90 million, five-year contract before
the season ended.
Giants finalize deal with Tim Hudson
Tim Hudson
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The Palo Alto offense revolves around
Becca Raffel, who is averaging 13.6 kills
per match.
The Vikings headed into the playoffs
hardly with a head of steam as they split
their final six games.
Division III
No. 3 Burlingame (20-11) vs.
No. 2 Sacred Heart Cathedral (27-7),
5:30 p.m. at Valley Christian High School
Burlingame defeated No. 6 Saratoga 25-
17, 25-18, 25-14 Saturday to advance to
tonight’s semifinal match, while Sacred
Heart Cathedral punched its ticket with a 25-
16, 25-14, 25-16 win over No. 7 Hillsdale.
The Panthers have as much talent as any-
one in left in the draw. If they can get con-
tributions from everybody, they’re hard to
beat. Morgan McKeever and Bianca Alvarez
leads the Panthers attack with 9.4 and 8.9
kills per match, respectively. Isabell
Walker has been an assist machine for
Burlingame this season, pumping out an
average of 15 assists per match.
The Irish are the 21st-ranked team in the
state, according to MaxPreps.com and fin-
ished third in the West Catholic Athletic
League. The Irish already recorded a 3-1 win
over Burlingame in their season opener.
Division IV
No. 1 Menlo School (27-5) vs.
No. 4 Harker (14-11), 7:30 p.m.
at Notre Dame-Belmont High School
Menlo defeated No. 8 Notre Dame-
Belmont 25-17, 25-17, 25-12, while
Harker beat No. 5 Castilleja 21-25, 25-13,
25-11, 25-19 to advance to the semifinals.
This is an-all West Bay Athletic League
matchup. Both schools play in the WBAL’s
Foothill Division and Menlo swept Harker
in both league matches this season, win-
ning the first round, 25-18, 25-21, 25-20.
Harker made it a little tougher the second
time around, but Menlo managed to pull it
out in four sets, 21-25, 27-25, 25-13, 25-
15.
The Eagles are led offensively by Divya
Kalidindi, who is averaging just over 13
kills per match. The defense is led by
Doreene Kang, who leads the team in blocks
with 54, and Mercedes Chien, who is aver-
aging nearly 20 digs per match.
Menlo counters with one of the most bal-
anced attacks in CCS. The Knights are led
by Maddie Huber and Maddy Frappier offen-
sively. They are riding an eight-match win-
ning streak, including a 2-0 tournament win
over Northern California power Bishop
O’Dowd. They were 4-0 against teams from
the Peninsula Athletic League this season,
including 3-0 against Menlo-Atherton and
Woodside. They also went 3-3 against teams
from the West Catholic Athletic League,
with wins over Valley Christian (No. 1 seed
in the Division III tournament) and Sacred
Heart Cathedral (No. 2 seed in the Division
III tournament).
Division V
No. 4 Crystal Springs (14-15) vs.
No. 1 Mt. Madonna (7-17), 5:30 p.m.
at Thomas More High School
No. 2 Priory (14-12) vs.
No. 3 Pinewood (13-11),
7:30 p.m. at Thomas More High School
Crystal Springs defeated No. 5 Thomas
More 25-13, 25-16, 25-18 to advance to the
semifinals, while Mt. Madonna cruised to a
25-11, 25-17, 25-17 win over No. 8 Jewish
Community.
Mt. Madonna won three straight CCS title
from 2007 to 2009. Who snapped its title
run? Crystal Springs, which captured the
title in 2010 with now-Menlo coach Steve
Cavella at the helm.
Defending CCS champion Priory had lit-
tle trouble with No. 7 Alma Heights in the
quarterfinals, beating the Pacifica school
25-7, 25-13, 25-16. Pinewood also swept
its match, beating No. 6 Trinity Christian
25-15, 28-26, 25-14.
This is another all-WBAL matchup.
Priory, playing in the tougher Foothill
Division, struggled this season, going win-
less in WBAL play. Pinewood played in the
less competitive Skyline Division, where
the Panthers finished in fourth place with a
6-6 record.
Continued from page 11
VOLLEYBALL
Warriors’ Curry out vs. Grizzlies with concussion
OAKLAND — Stephen Curry will not play for the Golden
State Warriors against the Memphis Grizzlies on Wednesday
night because of what the team is calling a “mild concussion.”
Curry was injured in the fourth quarter of Golden State’s 98-87
victory at Utah on Monday night. The star point guard left the
game after hitting his head on the court in a scramble for a loose
ball.
The Warriors said Tuesday that Curry’s only symptom was a
headache, which had since dissipated. His status is day to day.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Findus on
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NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260
Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274 258
N.Y. Giants 4 6 0 .400 192 256
Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 311
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 8 2 0 .800 288 183
Carolina 7 3 0 .700 238 137
Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237
Atlanta 2 8 0 .200 214 292
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253
Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267
Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239
Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179
San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 178
Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 212
St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 3 0 .700 256 199
N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268
Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276
Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245
Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212
Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255
Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232 138
Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246
San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222
Thursday’sGame
Indianapolis 30,Tennessee 27
Sunday’sGames
Chicago 23, Baltimore 20, OT
Oakland 28, Houston 23
Buffalo 37, N.Y. Jets 14
Tampa Bay 41, Atlanta 28
Pittsburgh 37, Detroit 27
Philadelphia 24,Washington 16
Cincinnati 41, Cleveland 20
Arizona 27, Jacksonville 14
Miami 20, San Diego 16
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 5 7 .417 —
Toronto 4 7 .364 1/2
Boston 4 8 .333 1
New York 3 7 .300 1
Brooklyn 3 7 .300 1
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 8 3 .727 —
Atlanta 6 5 .545 2
Charlotte 5 6 .455 3
Orlando 4 6 .400 3 1/2
Washington 3 7 .300 4 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 9 1 .900 —
Chicago 6 3 .667 2 1/2
Detroit 4 6 .400 5
Cleveland 4 7 .364 5 1/2
Milwaukee 2 7 .222 6 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 9 1 .900 —
Houston 8 4 .667 2
Dallas 7 4 .636 2 1/2
Memphis 6 5 .545 3 1/2
New Orleans 4 6 .400 5
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 9 2 .818 —
Oklahoma City 7 3 .700 1 1/2
Minnesota 7 5 .583 2 1/2
Denver 4 6 .400 4 1/2
Utah 1 11 .083 8 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 8 3 .727 —
L.A. Clippers 7 4 .636 1
Phoenix 5 4 .556 2
L.A. Lakers 5 7 .417 3 1/2
Sacramento 2 7 .222 5
Tuesday’sGames
Washington 104, Minnesota 100
Miami 104, Atlanta 88
Detroit 92, New York 86
Houston 109, Boston 85
Phoenix at Sacramento, late
Wednesday’sGames
Miami at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Indiana at New York, 4 p.m.
Brooklyn at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Portland at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Boston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
vs. Tampa
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/21
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/14
@Oilers
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/15
@Chicago
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/17
vs.L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/27
vs.Devils
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/23
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs. Grizzlies
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/20
vs.Thunder
7:30p.m.
TNT
11/14
vs.Utah
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
@Utah
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/18
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/23
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN/ESPN
11/22
vs. St.Louis
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/29
@Pelicans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/26
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
WEDNESDAY
Girls’ tennis
CCSteamfinals
No.1 Menlo School (23-1) vs.No.3 Monta Vista (19-
5), 1:30 p.m. at Courtside Tennis Club, Los Gatos
Volleyball
CCSsemifinals
DivisionI
No.5 Palo Alto (23-9) vs.No.1 Menlo-Atherton (21-
9), 5:30 p.m. at Santa Clara High
DivisionIII
No. 3 Burlingame (20-11) vs. No. 2 Sacred Heart
Cathedral (27-7), 5:30 p.m. at Valley Christian
DivisionIV
No. 4 Harker (14-11) vs. No. 1 Menlo School (27-5),
7:30 p.m. at Notre Dame-Belmont
DivisionV
No. 4Crystal Springs (14-15) v. No. 1 Mt. Madonna
(8-17), 5:30 p.m. at Thomas More High
No. 3 Pinewood (14-11) V. No. 2 Priory (14-12), 7:30
p.m. at Thomas More High
Girls’ water polo
CCSsemifinals
DivisionI
No.1 St.Francis (24-2) at No.4 Menlo-Atherton (17-
8), 7:30 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
CCSsemifinals
DivisionII
No. 3 St. Ignatius (19-7) vs. No. 2 Menlo School (22-
3), 5:30 p.m. at Serra
No. 5 Soquel (2-7) vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (24-
3), 7 p.m. at Serra
FRIDAY
Football
CCSfirst round
OpenDivision
No. 8 Valley Christian (7-3) at No. 1 Terra Nova (10-
0), 7 p.m.
DivisionII
No. 6 Oak Grove (5-5) at No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (7-
3), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 7 Aragon (7-3) at No. 2 Aptos (8-2), 7 p.m.
No.8 Hillsdale (7-3) at No.Burlingame (10-0),7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No.5 Monterey (7-3) vs.No.4 Menlo School (6-4) at
Sequoia, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
CCSfirst round
OpenDivision
No. 7 Pioneer (7-3) at No. 2 Serra (8-2), 1 p.m.
DivisionIV
No. 8 Seaside (5-5) at No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (9-1),
1 p.m.
Volleyball
CCSchampionshipsatIndependenceHigh,TBD
Girls’ water polo
Championshipmatchat
SantaClaraInternational SwimCenter
Division II
No.1SacredHeart Prep(21-7) vs.No.3Castilleja(14-
7),TBA
Boys’ water polo
Championshipmatchat
SantaClaraInternational SwimCenter
DivisionI
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (16-10) vs. No. 1 Bellarmine
(18-10),TBA
WHAT’S ON TAP
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 21 14 6 1 29 59 38
Tampa Bay 20 14 6 0 28 64 50
Toronto 21 13 7 1 27 62 49
Detroit 22 9 6 7 25 54 62
Montreal 22 11 9 2 24 58 47
Ottawa 21 8 9 4 20 60 67
Florida 21 5 12 4 14 46 70
Buffalo 23 5 17 1 11 42 72
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 21 13 8 0 26 59 48
Washington 21 12 8 1 25 69 59
N.Y. Rangers 21 10 11 0 20 43 52
Carolina 21 8 9 4 20 40 59
New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49
N.Y. Islanders 22 8 11 3 19 63 73
Philadelphia 20 8 10 2 18 40 50
Columbus 21 7 11 3 17 52 64
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 22 14 4 4 32 79 66
St. Louis 20 14 3 3 31 70 47
Colorado 20 15 5 0 30 64 42
Minnesota 22 13 5 4 30 57 50
Dallas 20 11 7 2 24 58 56
Winnipeg 23 10 10 3 23 61 66
Nashville 21 10 9 2 22 48 63
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 23 15 6 2 32 72 59
San Jose 21 13 3 5 31 72 50
Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66
Los Angeles 21 14 6 1 29 58 46
Vancouver 22 11 8 3 25 56 58
Calgary 21 7 11 3 17 59 79
Edmonton 23 6 15 2 14 60 83
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
St. Louis 4, Buffalo 1
Toronto 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
Philadelphia 5, Ottawa 2
Montreal 6, Minnesota 2
Nashville 2, Detroit 0
Boston 2, N.Y. Rangers 1
Colorado 5, Chicago 1
Edmonton 7, Columbus 0
Florida at Vancouver, late
Tampa Bay at Los Angeles, late
Wednesday’sGames
Minnesota at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Calgary, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PLATTE CITY, Mo. — AMissouri
high school football player was
charged Tuesday with assault for
allegedly ripping off another play-
er’s helmet during a game and hit-
ting him in the head with it, giving
him a concussion.
Colin W. Byrd, a 17-year-old cen-
ter for Platte County R-3 High
School, is charged with misde-
meanor assault for the incident that
occurred Oct. 18 during a game
against Winnetonka High School,
Platte County Prosecutor Eric
Zahnd said.
Byrd’s lawyer, Anthony
Bologna, said he was still investi-
gating the incident, which he called
“very unfortunate.”
“Tempers were involved, and
unfortunately it sounds like some-
body got hurt,” Bologna said.
While the teenager told investi-
gators he didn’t intentionally hurt
the other player, whom authorities
have identified only as “J.R.,”
Bologna said he didn’t want to com-
ment on whether his client denies
the allegations.
“We haven’t fully investigated,
and he’s not in a position to make a
statement at this point,” Bologna
said.
According to the probable cause
statement, an official at the game
said Byrd and J.R. were headed out
of bounds on a kickoff return, and
that once out of bounds, Byrd twist-
ed J.R.’s helmet off and intentional-
ly struck him in the head with it.
Byrd was ejected from the game.
“Football players consent to
physical contact and the possibili-
ty of injury every time they walk
onto the field,” Zahnd said. “And
even conduct that draws a penalty is
almost never criminal. In this case,
however, we allege what happened
that night was not football.”
According to the probable cause
statement, Byrd told investigators
that J.R.’s “helmet ended up in my
hand and I just went back to throw it
behind me and ended up hitting
him.”
The probable cause statement
says J.R. suffered a “significant
concussion for which he is still
under doctor’s care.” Zahnd said
J.R. has not yet been able to return
to school and continues to deal con-
cussion symptoms.
“The official told investigators he
had been officiating football games
for more than 20 years and had
never seen anything like it,” Zahnd
said.
Byrd, who is not in custody, faces
up to a year in jail, Zahnd said.
Jason West, spokesman for the
Missouri State High School
Activities Association, said if Byrd
is convicted he would be ineligible
to play high school football until
he has completed any sentencing
requirements, including probation
or community service.
MSHSAA was also informed this
week that Boone County has been
investigating possible charges
against a soccer player after a fight
broke out during a recent game in
St. Louis, West said. Other than
these two incidents, he said
MSHAA has not had to deal with
high school athletes being charged
with crimes for conduct during
games.
West said MSHAA also has a
bylaw that addresses citizenship.
“This bylaw has been put in place
for a few years now, and the schools
have done a pretty good job of edu-
cating their athletes, saying you
need to be responsible and your
actions do carry consequences, not
only on the field but off the field,”
West said.
Prep player charged for hitting opponent with helmet
16
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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led by Maddy Johnston’s three goals and two
assists. Johnston was one of four multi-goal
players for the Gators. Caitlin Stuewe,
Camille Zelinger and Layla Waters all added a
pair of goals, while Malaika Koshy, Kelly
Willard and Megan Anderson each scored once
in the win.
“It was solid play by us,” Burke said.
The game was all but over after the first peri-
od as the Gators blitzed the Knights for seven
unanswered goals. After missing their first
shot of the game, the Gators scored on their
next four shots on goal to take a 4-0 lead with
4:12 left to play in the opening period.
Sacred Heart Prep’s fourth goal was a clinic
as the Gators stole the ball at midpool and
went the other way on a 3-on-1 fast break.
They worked the ball around the perimeter and
then back to Stuewe, who started the play and
finished it with the goal.
“I loved our focus to come out and goals on
the board right away,” Burke said. “Too often
we’ve allowed the other team to dictate to us.”
The Sacred Heart Prep defense was equally
impressive. Pressing up on the Soquel play-
ers, the Gators limited the Knights opportuni-
ties to even get the ball near the their goal.
Soquel managed just one shot in the opening
seven minutes and that one hit off the cross-
bar.
Burke went to his bench early and often after
that opening period tirade and the match
evened out. Over the final three periods, the
Gators outscored Soquel 6-3.
“We knew they wouldn’t stop playing,”
Burke said of Soquel.
The Knights’ tenacity forced Burke to
continue to use his starters sparingly
throughout the match.
Sacred Heart Prep extended its lead to 8-0 at
halftime on Waters’ goal. The Soquel offense
picked up, getting four shots off in the second
period, all of which were off the crossbar.
The Knights played the Gators even in the
third period, with each team scoring two
goals. Soquel finally cracked the seal on the
scoreboard when Liliana King-Adas fired
home a goal on a 5-meter penalty shot, but the
Gators responded by scoring the next two
goals — one from Willard and one Stuewe’s
second goal of the game. The Knights finally
got a goal during the run of play when Taylor
Thorson scored a power-play goal off an assist
from Catalpa Hoover.
Leading 10-2, heading into the final seven
minutes, the Gators added three more — all in
the final two minutes of the match.
“Overall, I’m pretty happy,” Burke said.
Continued from page 11
GATORS
black hole and made his coach look good
with a sweet backhand goal to the near post
that tied the game with 28 second left.
“No one could guard him,” Napolitano
said. “He is a beast.”
Andrew Goodenough played the role of
beast for St. Francis early on. He’d score on
a couple point blank chances during Lancer
advantages. St. Francis took an early
McClelland goal and roared back in the first
quarter. Goodenough scored followed by
Trevor Raisch just seconds after. Then
Benoit Viollier got in on the action with a
goal halfway through the second period to
put St. Francis up 3-1.
M-Adidn’t panic and stayed with its game
plan of trying to wear down the Lancers.
John Knox scored from the outside with
1:18 left in the half and on the ensuing pos-
session, M-A capitalized on an exclusion
with Matt Baszucki scoring to tie it at 3-3.
Just like they had in the first half, St.
Francis came out as the aggressors to start
the second half. Goodenough scored from
interior on an exclusion and another man-
advantage allowed Quinn Vitakis to find
twine and make it 5-3.
M-Apulled one back with 39 seconds left
in the third period on yet another laser beam
from about seven meters out but 11 seconds
later, a nice skip shot by Sean Elmurib set
up the dramatics of the fourth quarter and
overtime.
M-Agoalkeeper Hans Brouwer stepped up
huge for the Bears in the game’s last 13
minutes. He kept his team in the game with
a couple of big saves and again, to
Napolitano’s credit as a coach, M-A never
panicked.
After Fero tied it, he put the Bears up for
good midway through the first overtime
period. About a minute later, Pont scored,
going cross-post on the Lancers’ goalkeep-
er to pad the lead.
An exclusion goal by Adam Antony drew
St. Francis a bit closer, but a huge steal by
Knox a couple of possessions later ended
the game (but not before McClelland scored
from half-pool).
“That was our goal,” Napolitano said of
M-A’s return to the CCS championship
game. “We actually peaked during CCS
because during the season, we had a lot of
kids sick. Fortunately, they got sick before
CCS.”
Continued from page 11
BEARS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VIENNA — Geoff Cameron’s header off
Michael Bradley’s corner kick deflected off an
arm of Marko Arnautovic and appeared to cross
the goal line in the 17th minute before it was
swatted away by goalkeeper Robert Almer.
Hungarian referee Istan Vad and his linesman
failed to rule it a goal, and the United States
ended a record-setting year with a 1-0 exhibi-
tion loss to Austria on Tuesday night.
“It’s a friendly game, so I’m not wanting to
make a big deal out of it. But I’m still asking
why we are in 2013 and not have goal-line
technology,” U.S coach Jurgen Klinsmann
said. “It’s just a joke.”
Marc Janko scored Austria’s goal in the 33rd
minute after lax defensive marking.
“Disappointed in the result, but I think we
played pretty well,” goalkeeper Tim Howard
said before adding: “The year 2013 has been
one of our best years ever.”
The U.S., which tied 0-0 at Scotland on
Friday, qualified for its seventh straight World
Cup and finished 2013 with team records for
wins (16), winning percentage (.761), goal dif-
ference (plus 28) and scoring average (2.14).
The Americans started the year with a 0-0 exhi-
bition draw against Canada, then wasted a lead
in the opener in the final round of qualifying
and lost 2-1 at Honduras.
“It’s been a fun ride, and it’s been amazing to
be a part of watching this team grow from the
loss to Honduras to how we picked ourselves
up,” forward Jozy Altidore said. “It’s been
inspiring.”
U.S. falls to
Austria, 1-0
SPORTS 17
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Gary Fineout
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Atop Tallahassee
official said that an investigation into alle-
gations of sexual assault against Florida
State University quarterback Jameis
Winston was placed on hold for months
because the alleged victim decided she did
not want to press charges.
One of the lingering questions surround-
ing the case involving the Heisman Trophy
candidate for the No. 2 ranked Seminoles is
why it took 11 months for Tallahassee
police to hand over information about the
alleged December 2012 assault to local
prosecutors.
City Manager Anita Favors Thompson,
saying that she anticipated national news
media interest because of Winston’s celebri-
t y, emailed the information to the
Tallahassee mayor and city commissioners
on Nov. 12. The Tallahassee Democrat first
reported the existence of the email, which
The Associated Press later obtained.
Favors Thompson, who reports to the
city commission, oversees the police
department, which currently does not have a
permanent police chief.
Favors Thompson said the woman who
filed the complaint got “intoxicated at a
local bar” and was then allegedly assaulted.
The city manager said that city police
immediately began investigating the case
after it was first reported to authorities.
But as they started interviewing witness-
es, “they stopped getting responses from
the young woman and could no longer con-
tact her for additional follow up and infor-
mation after many attempts to do so,”
Favors Thompson wrote.
Favors Thompson said that an attorney
representing the victim’s family said she
“changed her mind and did not wish to pros-
ecute.”
News media outlets have been requesting
information about the case from the
Tallahassee Police Department. David
Northway, a spokesman for the department,
said that it is normal policy for the depart-
ment to review any case that is inactive
before information is handed over to the
media. He added that investigations are not
reactivated solely because of media requests.
In her email, Favors Thompson told city
commissioners that the city reached out to
the victim to let her know the information
had been requested by the news media.
Last week, Tallahassee police released a
heavily redacted two-page incident report
that does not mention Winston by name,
but says an assault took place between 1:30
a.m. and 2 a.m. last Dec. 7. It describes the
suspect as being between 5-foot-9 and 5-11.
Winston is listed by Florida State at 6-4.
Timothy Jansen, the attorney represent-
ing Winston, maintains his client has done
nothing wrong. Last week he gave affidavits
from two eyewitnesses that he said will
“completely exonerate my client.” Jansen
has said that he believed the investigation
was closed last February.
Four days after the first media request for
information, Tallahassee police turned over
information to local prosecutors.
Prosecutors have begun their own investi-
gation and State Attorney Willie Meggs said
he wants to interview the alleged victim,
who now lives out of state.
City Commissioner Scott Maddox said
that “it is important that the process for this
case is handled the same way as any other
case.”
“I am going to demand that this case is
handled fairly and have full confidence that
it will be,” Maddox said.
Meggs told the AP on Saturday that he is
concerned that media attention has focused
primarily on 19-year-old Winston.
“We have a female victim here, too, and
my job is to make sure that this victim or
any victim of a crime has their rights pro-
tected,” Meggs said. “Everything is now
focused on Winston and what’s going to
happen to him.”
Winston has continued to play football.
Florida State hosts Idaho this week, then
takes on the Florida Gators on Nov. 30.
Prosecutors have said that they anticipate
concluding their investigation in the next
couple of weeks.
City: The Winston case was
investigated immediately
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — Reigning Olympic downhill
champion Lindsey Vonn crashed Tuesday while
training in Copper Mountain, Colo., ahead of
her planned return to racing following major
knee surgery.
U.S. Ski Team spokesman Tom Kelly said
Vonn was taken down the hill on a sled, which
he noted was “normal protocol” in such cases.
Kelly said he was not sure whether Vonn hurt her
surgically repaired right knee in the fall at the
team’s speed training center.
“We have no reason to believe it’s anything
significant right now,” Kelly told The
Associated Press in a telephone interview.
Aspokesman for Vonn, Lewis Kay, issued a
statement saying the ski racer was not admitted
to a hospital and instead went home to Vail to be
evaluated by the doctor who performed her knee
surgery. Kay didn’t specify the nature of her
injuries.
“We expect to have clarity on the situation in
the next 24 hours,” Kay said.
Vonn, a four-time overall World Cup champi-
on, tore ligaments in her right knee in a high-
speed accident at the world championships in
February. She has been aiming to return to
World Cup competition next week in Beaver
Creek, Colo.
The Sochi Games are in February.
Tuesday’s crash was first reported by
Skiracing.com.
With Vonn feeling her knee was months ahead
of schedule, she thought about pushing up her
comeback to the season-opening giant slalom
in Soelden, Austria, late last month. But she
changed her mind, opting instead to continue to
prepare.
Vonn recently said her super-G is “some of the
best super-G I’ve ever skied, but my downhill
still needs a little more time.”
She’s been taking practice runs in Copper
Mountain, and posted on her Twitter account
Monday: “Catching some air today in Downhill
training.”
Skier Vonn crashes while
prepping for return to racing
18
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
Suicide bombings at Iran Embassy in Beirut kill 23
BEIRUT — Suicide bombers struck the Iranian Embassy
on Tuesday, killing 23 people, including a diplomat, and
wounding more than 140 others in a “message of blood and
death” to Tehran and Hezbollah — both supporters of Syrian
President Bashar Assad.
The double bombing in a Shiite district of Beirut pulled
Lebanon further into a conflict that has torn apart the deeply
divided country, and came as Assad’s troops, aided by
Hezbollah militants, captured a key town near the Lebanese
border from rebels.
The bombing was one of the deadliest in a series of
attacks targeting Hezbollah and Shiite strongholds in
Lebanon in recent months.
An al-Qaida-linked group said it carried out the attack as
payback for Hezbollah’s backing of Assad forces against
the mainly Sunni rebels as the Syrian civil war increasing-
ly becomes a confrontation between regional powers.
The Syrian army’s border offensive is part of a larger gov-
ernment push that started last month and has seen forces
loyal to Assad firmly seizing the momentum in the war, tak-
ing one rebel stronghold after another.
‘Apocalyptic’ stormfloods Sardinia, 16 dead
ROME — The Mediterranean island of Sardinia, prized by
the jet-set for its white sand beaches and crystal-clear seas,
was a flood-ravaged mud bath Tuesday after a freak torrential
rainstorm killed at least 16 people, downed bridges and
swept away cars.
Italian Premier Enrico Letta declared a state of emergency
and set aside 20 million euros ($27 million) for emergency
relief, saying the priority was reaching remote areas, sav-
ing the lives of those still unaccounted for and providing for
those left homeless. Letta later traveled to the island, where
he met with people hit by the floods.
The island, which draws royals, entrepreneurs and ordi-
nary tourists alike during the dry, peak summer months,
received more than 44 centimeters (17.3 inches) of rain in
24 hours Monday — half the amount it normally receives in
a year, officials said.
Russia grants bail to nine foreign activists
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — ARussian court on Tuesday
granted bail to nine foreign Greenpeace protesters, the first
non-Russians jailed and awaiting trial over a demonstration
near a Russian oil rig to be made eligible for release.
The decision came a day after the Primorsky court in St.
Petersburg refused to release an Australian activist, and
another court granted bail to three Russians, including
prominent photographer Denis Sinyakov.
The Primorsky court set bail at 2 million rubles
($61,500) each for the activists from Argentina, Canada,
Brazil, Finland, France, Italy, New Zealand and Poland. The
court said they will be released if the bail is paid within the
next four days.
By Todd Pitman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TACLOBAN, Philippines — They
found the hoop in the ruins of their
obliterated neighborhood. They
propped up the backboard with broken
wood beams and rusty nails scavenged
from vast mounds of storm-blasted
homes.
Acrowd gathered around. And on one
of the few stretches of road here that
wasn’t overflowing with debris, they
played basketball.
I didn’t know what to think at first
when I stumbled upon six teenagers
shooting hoops over the weekend in a
wrecked neighborhood of Tacloban, a
city that Typhoon Haiyan reduced to
rubble, bodies and uprooted trees when
it slammed into the Philippines Nov.
8.
As a foreign correspondent working
in the middle of a horrendous disaster
zone, I didn’t expect to see people hav-
ing a good time — or asking me to
play ball. I was even more stunned
when I learned that the basketball goal
was one of the first things this neigh-
borhood rebuilt.
It took a moment for me to realize
that it made all the sense in the world.
The kids wanted to play so they can
take their minds off what happened,
said Elanie Saranillo, one of the spec-
tators.
Signs of life amid misery reveal Filipinos’ spirit
Around the world
The food bank’s goal this year is
12,000 turkeys and as of Tuesday was
still more than 5,600 short.
“Turkey is a transitional holiday
meal of many local families, so we are
depending on the community to help
us meet our turkey goal,” said CEO
Kathy Jackson in a prepared state-
ment.
The food bank is extending its dock
hours at both the San Carlos and San
Jose sites to make donating easier and
is reminding the community not to put
turkeys in food collection barrels in
other locations.
The call for turkeys comes amid
Second Harvest’s annual holiday food
and fund drive which kicked off last
month with a goal of $13.2 million
and 2 million pounds of food. The food
bank raises nearly half its annual rev-
enue during the holiday drive. But
donations are low at the moment as are
the goods at the bank.
“The shelves at Second Harvest are
getting a little bare and that is con-
cerning,” Jackson said.
Jackson said Second Harvest’s pur-
chasing power can turn a one dollar
donation into the equivalent of two
meals.
On top of the donation challenges,
the Food Bank also sustained a rough-
ly $17,000 loss earlier this month
when the gas lines of two trucks at the
San Carlos site were cut to steal about
$400 worth of gas. The towing and fix-
ing of the vehicles plus the hiring of a
security guard to prevent future vandal-
ism and theft at the Bing Center pushed
up the losses past that of the 90 gal-
lons of fuel.
The $17,000 was equivalent of more
than 34,000 meals which food bank
officials said was a setback, particular-
ly in the middle of the campaign sea-
son.
However, spokeswoman Caitlin
Kerk said yesterday that SanDisk
stepped in to make the food bank
whole.
SanDisk is a “wonderful supporter of
the food bank,” Kerk said.
Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa
Clara and San Mateo counties provide
food to more than 250,000 people
each month which is equal to one in 10
individuals. Last year, the food bank
distributed nearly 52 millions pounds
of food with more than half being fresh
produce.
Those wanting to donate should
visit www.SHFB.org or call (866) 234-
3663. The Bing Center dock in San
Carlos is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during
the week and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 23.
The Curtner Center dock in San Jose
is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. during
the week, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 23 and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 24.
Those needing food should call the
Food Connection Hotline at (800)
984-3663.
Continued from page 1
TURKEY
re-learn to talk and read. Her left side
was also impaired.
Since July 2012, the district board
opted to approve missing meetings
one at a time rather than excusing
her for another six months. She has
been attending meetings regularly
for the past six months, said
Superintendent Alejandro Hogan.
The board is now facing two vacan-
cies, the other is for Trustee Liza
Normandy’s seat. Normandy was elect-
ed to South San Francisco City
Council and will leave the board to fil l
that position at the end of November.
The board is currently in the process
of interviewing Normandy’s replace-
ment and may have to expand this
search to fill Hoch’s seat. Applications
for the board are due to the district Dec.
4.
County Superintendent Anne
Campbell has responded to both indi-
viduals accepting their resignations
which makes the resignations official,
according to Nancy Magee, adminis-
trator of board support and community
relations for the San Mateo County
Office of Education.
Hoch has worked as an administra-
tive supervisor and grant writer, along
with volunteer work for the PTA and
Rotary club. Hoch is the mother of six
children who attended district schools.
She was re-elected in November 2010
for a four-year term.
Continued from page 1
HOCH
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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1653-1655 Laurel Street, San Carlos
(near St. Francis Way)
Sun– Thur: 11 AM – 9:30 PM ;
Fri – Sat: 11 AM – 10 PM
www.sancarlosamazingwok.com
Grand Re-Opening
“Same great food,
same great prices!” – Yelp!
Chinese Cuisine
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — We are deep in the
bowels of Michael White’s sumptuous
Marea restaurant on Central Park
South, far from the sleek dining room
upstairs with its bar of carved onyx and
its rosewood walls rubbed, according
to the proud chef and owner, with
seven coats of lacquer. We’ve passed
through the bustling main kitchen
into a labyrinth-like basement area,
which White has dubbed the
Catacombs.
We arrive at a tiny closet, filled with
endless varieties of raw fish, flown in
daily from around the world.
The 6-foot-4, beefy White — he
looks exactly like the junior college
football player he once was — can’t
contain his enthusiasm. “Look at
those halibuts!” he crows.
“Iridescent!” He shows off tiny sar-
dines from Greece, then slaps a huge
slab of swordfish. “No smell!” he con-
firms proudly. He insists upon proffer-
ing a taste of orange sea urchin roe.
“Isn’t that just RIDICULOUS?”
To top it all off, he takes an entire
cornet fish — that long, eel-like crea-
ture — and drapes it gleefully around
his neck, like a garland.
White is so enthusiastic as he roams
Michael White plots expansion like a Roman emperor
Marea, which specializes in seafood, (marea means ‘tide’ in
Italian) is just one of six Manhattan restaurants owned by
White’s Altamarea Group.
See WHITE, Page 22
FOOD 20
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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M
y definition of the ideal summer
cocktail? Easy to make, refresh-
ing to drink. Come the winter
holidays, I make only one change: Easy to
make, comforting to drink.
Because while I’m looking for bright and
fruity in the heat of summer, at
Thanksgiving and Christmas and the
onslaught of holiday gatherings in
between, I want whatever is in my cup to
put me at ease, leave me feeling warm and
play nicely with whatever food is on the
table. But I’m not willing to work all that
hard for it. Hence the “easy to make” part
never changes, no matter what the season.
For cold weather holidays, I gravitate to
bourbon. It has all the qualities I’m look-
ing for — warming, festive, affordable and
compatible. And because of those qualities,
you don’t need to do much to it to create a
terrific cocktail you’ll
want to nurse your way
through during the
party.
So here’s a trio of
holiday-friendly bour-
bon cocktails to get
you started. The root
beer in the rooted and
brewed cocktail may
seem unusual, but it is
quite delicious and does
not impart an overly
sweet flavor.
BOURBON ORCHARD
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Turn to bourbon for easy,
warming holiday cocktail
J.M. HIRSCH
See BOURBON, Page 22
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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at Emerald Hills Lodge & Golf Course
938 Wi l mi ngt on Wa y, E me r a l d Hi l l s , CA 94062
( 650) 369- 4200 c a c a t er i ngc ompa ny. c om
Join us for Family Night Buffet
$7 Children 6-12 $15 Adults
2
nd
and 4
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Wednesdays
6:30-8:00 Buffet Bar Open at 5:30
Buffet Includes: 5 Hot Items, Soup, Salad,
Other Cold Items, Coffee & Dessert
11/27 Salmon Provencal
12/11 Calamari Steak
12/25 Merry Christmas - Closed
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
I was a happy little butterball when I was
a kid. Sweets were my thing, desserts in par-
ticular. And chocolate desserts most of all.
The one exception to the rule? My grand-
mother’s oatmeal cookies.
They were sweet, of course, but also lacy
and crispy. Back then I didn’t know or care
that oatmeal cookies were a healthier
choice than most other treats (thanks to the
oats, which are a concentrated source of
fiber and nutrients). But healthfulness alone
has never done it for me.
During my hippy days, I was well aware of
the nutritional benefits of granola cookies
— which are, in essence, soft oatmeal cook-
ies stuffed with dried fruit and nuts — but
they struck me as more like medicine than
dessert. Besides, I missed the crispiness of
my grandmother’s version.
This is an embellished rendition of
Grandma Ruth’s cookies. We start with a
pure base: oatmeal, butter, white sugar, a
whole egg and vanilla extract. No low-fat
ingredients. I firmly believe that a modest
serving of a full-fat, full-sugar dessert is
more enjoyable than a larger serving of
something with no fat or fake sugar.
In a festive nod to the holidays, I’ve
spruced up the basic recipe with chocolate
and orange, a combination that plays beau-
tifully together. Bittersweet chocolate
chips are my chocolate of choice, but you’re
welcome to substitute chopped bittersweet
chocolate or semi-sweet chocolate chips, if
you prefer.
If you’re not the most accomplished
baker, but like the idea of whipping up a
homemade treat for family and friends dur-
ing the holidays, these are the cookies for
you. They’re so easy that even my husband
could make them. And yet they come off
more like a specialty item from a fancy bak-
ery than a prosaic little oatmeal cookie.
Also, they’ll stay fresh for several weeks
in an airtight container at room tempera-
ture, which allows you to keep eating when
your guests and the holidays are gone, but
your cravings remain!
CHOCOLATE ORANGE LACE COOKIES
Start to finish: 50 minutes (30 minutes
active)
Makes 2 dozen cookies
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon freshly grated orange zest
(about 1 orange)
1 1/4 cups rolled oats
1 teaspoon double-acting baking powder
Crisp, sweet cookies that are just a bit healthy
If you’re not the most accomplished baker, but like the idea of whipping up a homemade
treat for family and friends during the holidays, these are the cookies for you. See COOKIE, Page 22
By Candice Choi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Butterball apparent-
ly has big fat mystery on its hands:
The company says it doesn’t know
why some of its turkeys wouldn’t
plump up in time for Thanksgiving
this year.
CEO Rod Brenneman says in an
interview with the AP that it’s the first
time it happened and that the company
is investigating what went wrong.
Butterball had announced last week
that it will have a limited supply of
large, fresh turkeys that are 16 pounds
or heavier for the holidays.
“It’s a really good question. We don’t
have an answer yet,” Brenneman said
when asked about the cause. But he
noted that turkeys are “biological crea-
tures” subject to a variety of factors.
“For whatever reason, they just did-
n’t gain quite as well this year,” he
said.
Like many other turkey producers,
Butterball feeds its birds antibiotics to
prevent and treat illnesses, which can
occur from living in cramped quarters.
The use of antibiotics, which also pro-
mote growth in livestock, has been
the subject of concern that it could lead
to antibiotic-resistant germs.
Butterball, a privately held company
based in Garner, N.C., declined to say
whether it made any changes to its feed
formula this year. But the problem
seems to have come up rather recently.
For much of the year, Butterball pro-
duces turkeys that are frozen and stored
until they’re ready to be sold for the
holidays. But then in October and
November, it shifts into production
for fresh turkeys. And that’s when the
company ran into problems with the
turkeys not gaining enough weight,
Brenneman said.
It hasn’t been an issue for some
other poultry producers.
“The weather was great, so the
turkeys were a little bigger,” said Theo
Weening, the global meat buyer for
Whole Foods Market, which is based
in Austin, Texas. The grocer works
with smaller suppliers from around the
country to sell turkeys that haven’t
been treated with antibiotics.
Over at meat producer Cargi l l ,
spokesman Michael Martin says in an
email that the company has never had
a problem where its birds didn’t put on
enough weight to produce an adequate
supply of large turkeys.
Mark Kastel, founder of The
Cornucopia Institute, a Wisconsin-
based group that advocates for organic
farming, noted that major poultry pro-
ducers tightly control production fac-
tors, making Butterball’s shortage
unusual.
“I thought that was very mysterious.
I could not think of a rational explana-
tion,” Kastel said, suggesting that a
change in the feed formula may have
been to blame.
Butterball mystery: Turkeys wouldn’t fatten up
FOOD
22
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
his kitchens, greeting workers and admir-
ing produce, that it’s easy to believe him
when he says he feels like he hasn’t actual-
ly been working for the last 20 years. But
it’s also clear that the man is hugely ambi-
tious. And the jacket to his new cookbook
indicates just what he’s aiming for: “Hailed
by food critics as the next great hero of
Italian gastronomy,” it says.
Marea, which specializes in seafood,
(marea means ‘tide’ in Italian) is just one of
six Manhattan restaurants owned by
White’s Altamarea Group. He also has two
in New Jersey, and is opening one this
month in Washington, D.C. And White has
gone global, too: he has restaurants in
Hong Kong and London, and just opened
one in Istanbul.
To cap off a busy year, earlier this month
his new cookbook came out, “Classico e
Moderno (Classic and Modern),” a glossy
400-page volume divided between classic
and what he calls his “interpretive cuisine,”
modern creations based on traditional fla-
vors.
Of course, there’s lots and lots of pasta.
Because it is pasta, in all its possibilities,
that defines White as a chef.
“Michael White makes pasta, and people
go crazy,” wrote New York Times food critic
Sam Sifton, when Osteria Morini, his more
casual SoHo restaurant, opened. It features
rich creations like a garganelli with cream,
radicchio, truffle butter and prosciutto.
So how DID a Wisconsin boy who grew up
on Fritos and Kraft Macaroni & Cheese get
to this point? Part of the answer lies in tim-
ing. “Boy, I started at the right time!” White
says. “You can no longer say that America is
not the country of great food. The progress
we’ve made in 10 years is incredible.”
Food writer Colman Andrews notes that
White is one of a number of rising chefs
here who aren’t Italian but have felt the free-
dom to refresh the concept of Italian food.
“Maybe the Italians are too close to a cer-
tain way of cooking, so focused on what
they grew up with, that it takes an outsider
to reimagine it,” Andrews says.
White’s speedy expansion has also come
with warnings; The Times review of Osteria
Morini noted that expansion “can stretch a
chef too thin,” and that on nights when
White wasn’t present, the restaurant “shows
that danger plain.”
White though, is not stopping. He even,
when asked, won’t dismiss the idea of an
outpost in his favorite country, Italy.
“I think we’d be embraced,” he says.
White is clearly proud of his Italian
“roots.” He writes about leaving his family
home of Beloit, Wis. — “a small town in
the vast green pastures of the American
heartland” — in 1991 to work at Spiagga,
in Chicago, and eventually realized he need-
ed to travel to the source of Italian cuisine.
He arrived in Italy with a duffel bag and
hardly a word of Italian, for an internship in
the kitchen of the famed San Domenico in
the town of Imola, in Emilia-Romagna. He
stayed in Italy for much of the next eight
years.
In New York, he started as the chef at
Fiamma before heading to L’Alto and
L’Impero, which later became Convivio. In
2009, he opened Marea and joined with
business partners to form the fast-growing
Altamarea Group, which now has close to
1,000 employees.
Some 50 of them were working a recent
lunch service at Marea. As White walked
through the kitchen, he stopped to wipe a
tiny errant squirt of tonnato sauce from a
dish about to be served. Nearby, a cook was
making homemade garganelli by wrapping
rectangles of dough around a dowel, then
creating ridges with a reed comb.
With all his confidence, you’d think
White would be perfect for TV, but he insists
that’s not what he’s looking for. “Listen,”
he says of the celebrity chef phenomenon,
“I didn’t do this to be famous. I didn’t do
this to have 25,000 followers on Twitter (in
fact, he has 23,644.) I hardly ever tweet!”
And then he remembers another thing he
has to do.
“Oh yes. Now I have to get on Instagram.”
Continued from page 19
WHITE
Ice
2 ounces bourbon
4 ounces apple cider
1 teaspoon agave nectar
In an ice-filled cocktail shaker, combine
all ingredients. Shake well for 30 seconds,
then strain into a tumbler.
ROOTED AND BREWED
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Ice
2 ounces bourbon
1 ounce coffee liqueur
Root beer
Fill an 8-ounce drinking glass with ice.
Add the bourbon and coffee liqueur. Stir,
then slowly pour in enough root beer to
top off the glass. Gently stir again.
JUICY DREAMS
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Ice
2 ounce bourbon
1 ounce Lillet
1/2 ounce lemon juice
2 ounces pomegranate juice
In an ice-filled cocktail shaker, combine
the bourbon, Lillet, lemon juice and pome-
granate juice. Shake, then strain into an
ice-filled tumbler.
Continued from page 20
BOURBON
1/8 teaspoon table salt
1/2 cup bittersweet chocolate chips
Heat the oven to 350 F. Line 2 baking
sheets with kitchen parchment.
In a medium bowl, use an electric mixer to
beat together the butter and sugar until the
mixture is light and fluffy, about 3 minutes.
Add the egg, vanilla and orange zest, then
beat until light and fluffy, about another 4
minutes. In another medium bowl, mix
together the oats, baking powder and salt.
Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredi-
ents and beat just until combined. Stir in the
chocolate chips by hand.
Scoop the dough a tablespoon at a time
onto the prepared baking sheets, arranging
them about 2 inches apart and about 12 per
baking sheet. Use the back of a spoon to
lightly press down on each mound to slight-
ly flatten it. Bake the cookies, one sheet at
a time, on the oven’s center rack until the
edges are browned, 8 to 10 minutes.
Transfer the cookies to a wire rack imme-
diately and let them cool completely.
Nutrition information per serving: 50
calories; 25 calories from fat (50 percent of
total calories); 3 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 10 mg cholesterol; 7 g carbohy-
drate; 1 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 1 g protein; 40
mg sodium.
Continued from page 21
COOKIES
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20
Introducing FindIt!, Our New On-
line Catalog and Much More. 10:30
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Don’t miss this
chance to learn about the greatest
social media reader’s service since
Good Reads! Free. For more informa-
tion email conrad@smcl.org.
Explorer Hike: GoWhere Few Have
Gone Before. 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Ravenswood Open Space Preserve.
Learn about the history of the area,
from marshland through salt pro-
duction to protection as open space.
Leisurely 2-mile hike. Free. For more
information go to www.open-
space.org/activities.
Employment Roundtable Spon-
sored byPhase2Careers. 11 a.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Free For more informa-
tion email ronvisconti@sbcglobal.net.
Small Works Exhibition at the
Peninsula Art Institute. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Peninsula Art Institute, 1777
California Drive, Burlingame. This
exhibit will run through Dec. 31. The
gallery is open Wednesday through
Sunday or by appointment. For
more information go to www.penin-
sulaartinstitute.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, but
lunch is $17. For more information
call 430-6500.
John Kelly Samaritan Book Debut
and Interview. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Foster City Community Center, 1000
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Books
will be available for signing at $20.
For more information call 286-0286.
NAMI General Meeting: NAMI
Thanksgiving Celebration. 6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Hendrickson Room, Mills
Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo Drive,
San Mateo. RSVP necessary. For more
information call 638-0800.
Learn How to Create a Garden. 7
p.m. De Anza Chapter of the Ameri-
can Rhododendron Society, 97
Hillview Ave., Los Altos, Room 12. A
presentation by Bob and Judy
Mathey on their Harmony Woods gar-
den, located in Mendocino. For more
information go to www.deanza-
ars.com.
Terry Hiatt and Aki Kumar Host the
Club FoxBlues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For
information go to rwcbluesjam.com.
Toastmakers Open House. 7:30 p.m.
SamTrans Building, Third Floor, 1250
San Carlos Ave., San Carlos. Free. For
more information call 364-4110.
New Century Chamber Orchestra
presents World Premiere — Lega-
cies and Concertos. 8 p.m. Mountain
View Center for Performing Arts,
Mountain View. Single tickets start at
$29. To purchase tickets go to
www.mvcpa.com or call 903-6000.
For more information on New Cen-
tury go to www.ncco.org.
THURSDAY, NOV. 21
San Mateo AARP Chapter 139
Meeting. 11 a.m. Beresford Recre-
ation Center, 270 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. 11 a.m. is social
hour and there will be a pie sale. The
business meeting will be held at
noon. There will be bingo afterwards.
Launch Your Successful Business —
Orientation. 1 p.m. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Free. For
more information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Thanksgiving Day — The Healthy
Way. 1 p.m. Defineit Studio, 981 In-
dustrial Road, Ste C., San Carlos. Come
join our Cardio Boosters for a pre-
Thanksgiving meet and greet after
our noon Cardio Boost class. We have
light and healthy snacks. RSVP by
emailing Kathy@hardforhealth.com
or calling 224-7021.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Pocahontas.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita Av-
enue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
FreeWorkshop for Homeowners on
Energy Efficiency Rebates and In-
centives. 6:30 p.m. Redwood City
Library’s Community Room, 1044
Middlefield Road Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 363-4125.
Aragon High School Performing
Arts Presents ‘Chicago.’ 7 p.m.
Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Set
in prohibition-era Chicago, and based
on actual crimes of passion,‘Chicago’
is a musical satire on corruption in
the criminal justice system and the
concept of the ‘celebrity criminal.’ $15
for adults, $10 for students and sen-
iors. For more information email
info@aragondrama.com.
Pauline Frommer of Frommer
Travel Media. 7 p.m. Schultz Cultural
Hall, Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian
Way, Palo Alto. Learn helpful travel
tips. For more information contact
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
Pay-what-you-can preview night:
‘November’ by David Marnet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. A hilariously biting
commentary on the state of the
union, a politically incorrect president
in the death throes of his failing re-
election campaign and some
Thanksgiving turkey pardons for sale.
Contains adult language. Through
Dec. 15, 8 p.m.Thursdays through Sat-
urdays, 2 p.m. Sundays.
FRIDAY, NOV. 22
International Business Seminar
and Resource Expo. 8:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. San Mateo Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Business
and government representatives will
present information about regula-
tions, requirements and
opportunities to conduct trade be-
tween California and other countries.
Learn how to start an import/export
business, how to use technology and
innovation to improve your business,
hear tips for success doing business
in California, and more. Free. To reg-
ister visit
www.boe.ca.gov/sutax/sbf.htm or call
(888) 847-9652. For more information
go to
http://pakuschamber.com/web/expo
2013/index.html.
Thanksgiving Party: Dancing to the
Ron Borelli Trio. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road. There will be a
turkey lunch with all the fixings. $5.
For more information call 516-7150.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1, hardbacks are two for $2
and up and children’s books are two
for 25 cents and up. All proceeds ben-
efit the Belmont Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
Senior Scam Stopper Seminar. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. City of San Mateo
Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las
Pulgas San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 340-8840.
Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony.
5:30 p.m. Hillsdale Shopping Center,
Macy’s Center Court, 60 31st Ave.,
San Mateo. For more information
call 345-8222.
Aragon High School Performing
Arts Presents ‘Chicago.’ 7 p.m.
Aragon High School Theater, 900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
Set in prohibition-era Chicago, and
based on actual crimes of passion,
‘Chicago’ is a musical satire on cor-
ruption in the criminal justice sys-
tem and the concept of the ‘celebri-
ty criminal.’ $15 for adults, $10 for
students and seniors. For more
information email info@aragondra-
ma.com.
Reel Life Goes On Film Fest: ‘Stand
by Me.’ 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
‘Stand by Me’ is a 1986 American
coming of age drama/comedy
directed by Rob Reiner. Based on
the novella ‘The Body’ by Stephen
King, it focuses on a group of boys
who set about trying to solve a local
murder case with the intention of
becoming local heroes. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Roy Cloud School Presents
Disney's ‘Beauty and the Beast Jr.’
7 p.m. McKinley School Auditorium,
400 Duane St., Redwood City. For
more information email good-
nius@gmail.com.
Sequoia High School presents
‘Thoroughly Modern Millie.’ 7 p.m.
Sequoia High School, 1201 Brewster
Ave., Redwood City. This Tony
Award-winning musical tells the
story of a young, vivacious
Midwestern girl who comes to the
bustling metropolis of New York
City. Tickets are $15 for adults and
$10 for students and seniors.
Advanced tickets are available at
www.showtix4u.com or by phone at
(866) 976-8167.
Martin Cruz Smith book signing. 7
p.m. Bay Book Company,
Strawflower Village Shopping
Center, Half Moon Bay.
Refreshments will be available. For
more information contact bay-
book@baybookcompany.com.
The New Millennium Chamber
Orchestra and the Peninsula
Cantare Performance. 7:30 p.m.
Trinity Presbyterian Church, 1106
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Carlos.
Celebrate Benjamin Brittens’ 100th
Birthday and St. Cecilia’s day. The
music of Britten, Bizet, Adrienne
Albert, Purcell, Rossini and Mozart.
$15 Suggested donation, students
are free. For more information call
281-6669.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
off-street parking completely and inte-
grating parking technologies that
include real-time parking availability,
according to a staff report.
The council is also considering the
need to build new structures to keep up
with future demand. But the city should
look at its existing assets first by
using the library’s parking lot after-
hours or leasing private off-street lots
before they endeavor a long-term
development plan, Mayor David Lim
said.
Downtown currently has about
1,207 on-street and 1,711 off-street
parking spaces that the city will con-
sider improving or expanding upon,
said Terri O’Conner, principal planner
at CDM.
Parking has become increasingly
difficult to find and, with the potential
loss 246 public parking spaces from
the former Kinkos site at Fifth and
Railroad avenues, the city is projected
to need an additional 400 parking
spaces over the next 10 years to keep
up with demand, O’Conner said.
“I would really like to see the city
move toward a system that’s based on
demand,” CDM consultant Rick
Williams said.
CDM and the Planning Commission
held two public workshops, conducted
online surveys and met with key stake-
holder groups to identify problem
areas. In general, there is strong com-
munity support for new parking regu-
lations, O’Conner said.
Recommendations include varying
pricing based on the proximity to the
downtown core, figuring out ways to
inform the public of available parking
spaces and improving the existing
structures, O’Conner said.
Part of the reasons people don’t take
advantage of parking structures on
downtown’s outskirts is because they
may not seem safe, O’Conner said.
Improving the aesthetics of the lots,
adding gates and installing more thor-
ough lighting may be a way to encour-
age more people to park in the city’s
structures, O’Conner said.
Improving the existing lot and
adding real-time parking indicators
will encourage patrons to utilize the
city’s lots and keep people from ven-
turing into the neighborhoods to park,
Councilwoman Maureen Freschet said.
The city has many options from
which to choose and $4.5 million
from in-lieu parking fees and an oper-
ating surplus, Williams said.
“From a financial point, the really
good news is the system is in really
good health,” Williams said.
Developing a centralized city
Parking Services division and hiring a
full-time parking manager would keep
the city on track and provide the coun-
cil with guidance related to the man-
agement plan, Williams said.
But the city has had to cut staff posi-
tions in other areas and creating a new
position could exacerbate problems
the council is trying to correct, Lim
said.
The first thing the council needs to
do is outline which practices and poli-
cies will be appropriate for the future
of downtown. It’s also important to
remain transparent with the public and
explain the reasons for the changes
that will affect them, Williams said.
“There’s a need to develop clear
goals and principles,” Williams said.
“Changes and strategies tend to be
more relevant to people when we tie it
to a specific goal in the system.”
The council will hold another study
session to specify which recommenda-
tions on which to focus before moving
forward with any planning, Interim
City Manager Larry Patterson said.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
PARKING
sine from a nearby airport parking
lot to their flights at the San
Francisco International Airport,
while the company says renters get a
cheaper price.
Further, the suit states Nov. 13, the
day after City Council decided to
revoke the permit, a sheriff’s deputy
visited the facility and issued a notice
to appear for an alleged violation of
FlightCar employee Andrei Pareno
for operating without a business
license and zoning non-compliance.
When issuing the notice, the deputy
told the employee he was going to be
arrested and would go to jail if the
business didn’t immediately cease
operations, the suit states.
The city’s actions constitute the
improper citation of FlightCar’s
employees, and the de facto abate-
ment of a business without proper due
process protection. The city hasn’t
initiated a formal abatement process
or civil action, it states. As a conse-
quence of the city’s improper
actions, FlightCar is concerned it
will be forced to immediately cease
operations, lay off employees, aban-
don its site improvements and find
another location from which to con-
duct business in the next several
days, the suit goes on to say.
Based on the time and expense
required to obtain a conditional use
permit and business license from the
ci t y, FlightCar believes it will
require several months and several
tens of thousands of dollar to suc-
cessfully relocate its business. In the
meantime, FlightCar and its cus-
tomers will suffer irreparable injury,
it states.
Issues with the city include three
FlightCar rentals being stolen since
the company moved into the 14,159-
square-foot 480 El Camino Real site
on two parcels of the former Daland
Nissan, according to the police
department. The company’s claim
that one can’t report a stolen car for
five days is not true, police said. The
suspects in the cases have criminal
records and this invites crime into
the city, police said.
In addition to problems with
Millbrae, the company ran into trou-
ble this summer with the San
Francisco City Attorney Dennis
Herrera, who wanted to shut it down
until it complied with the regula-
tions, including conducting pickups
and dropoffs at a special area, paying
10 percent of gross profits to the air-
port and paying a $20 per rental
transaction.
On Aug. 15, Fire Marshal Jim Allan
observed two electrical generators on
the site and a neighbor on Hermosa
Avenue reported to staff that a gener-
ator had been operating 24 hours a
day. The use of the generators was
never approved, according to a staff
report. He also observed a makeshift
exhaust for the temporary generator
attached to a portable toilet enclo-
sure. The downspout/exhaust stack
was unprotected and was very warm to
the touch and could have potentially
reached a temperature capable of
burning skin, according to the
report.
Additionally, there was an empty
fire extinguisher and no smoke detec-
tor in the temporary office structure,
unauthorized curb painting and stored
vehicles that presented a potential
Class B fire hazard. Dead plants
observed on the property also violat-
ed the requirement that the landscape
must be maintained in neat, healthy
and growing condition, according to
the report.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
FLIGHTCAR
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
COMICS/GAMES
11-20-13
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Winter woe
4 Apple products
8 Adventurer, often
12 Poet’s contraction
13 Drama award
14 Fall birthstone
15 Wrap up
17 Took a bus
18 Affront
19 Maurice’s thanks
21 Corrode
23 Salmon variety
24 Pothole locales
27 Mr. Stravinsky
29 NATO turf
30 Hold on to
32 Body’s partner
36 In — veritas
38 Ore hauler
40 Incan singer — Sumac
41 Brownish-purple
43 Crocks
45 Assist
47 Floor model
49 Dads, in Dijon
51 Medieval clown
55 Tijuana Ms.
56 It may be secret
58 Actor Brad
59 Accord
60 RV haven
61 Nautical position
62 Concordes, e.g.
63 Motor lodge
DOWN
1 Central points
2 Spinks or Trotsky
3 Footed vases
4 Clam, e.g.
5 Touches
6 England’s FBI
7 Appear
8 Atrocities
9 Historical period
10 Music source
11 Fiesta shout
16 Coagulated milk
20 “Green” prefix
22 Like a wedding cake
24 Race the engine
25 Yes, on the Riviera
26 Prince Val’s son
28 College stat
31 Common abbr.
33 Toon Olive
34 Thurman of “Gattaca”
35 Refrain syllables
37 Run
39 Jiffies
42 Sporty truck
44 Misplaced
45 Showery month
46 Davis or Midler
48 Cockpit button
50 Uses a straw
52 “Kon- —”
53 Famed prep school
54 Pitcher Nolan —
55 Resort
57 “— Boot”
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Discuss sensitive
issues, and you will find workable solutions. A
personal relationship will benefit if you take a unique
approach to domestic duties. Follow your heart.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Altering where
or how you live may lead to an emotional situation,
but once you do, it will eventually prove to be a good
choice. Don’t let anyone manipulate you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Make your move.
Strategy coupled with insight and a little luck will
lead to victory. Put personal relationships first. Pay
attention to what your friends and family respond
to most favorably.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Don’t ignore the
facts. Listen and assure anyone who has concerns
that you are aware and willing to compromise, but you
won’t take the brunt of the responsibility alone.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You will have the upper
hand. Don’t stop when there is so much to gain. Wheel
and deal until you get what you want. An emotional
relationship will be best dealt with passionately.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Everything will be
dependent on how you get along with others. Reach
for equality, and you will find common ground that will
bring you closer to your goals.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Shop around and look
for bargains. Heading for a destination that offers
information and a chance to share with someone you
enjoy being with should highlight your day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Work toward getting
whatever is expected of you out of the way. You will
discover a talent you didn’t know you had if you offer
to help someone in need.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Expand your
interests and explore what life has to offer.
Subscribe to something that will help you broaden
your perspective and choices. Follow your heart
and make a positive change.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Make the changes you
desire, but do so discreetly. The less people know
about what you are up to, the less interference you will
face. Don’t take on responsibilities you cannot handle.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Getting in touch with
people you have worked with in the past will bring
about new opportunities. Mix business with pleasure,
and you will please everyone and secure your position.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Share your concerns, but
don’t try to lay down the law. Compromise and keeping
the peace will be your ticket to getting what you want.
Change will be inevitable. Go with the flow.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
COMPUTER SYSTEMS Admin: For resi-
dential elderly care facility; Bach Deg In-
fo Tech or related computer science field
plus 12 months on job or computer,
web, data admin. exp reqd. Mail Res:
Navin Walia, Marymount Greenhills
LLC, 1201 Broadway, Millbrae, CA
94030
ENGINEER -
Genesys Telecommunications Labs, Da-
ly City, CA, seeks Senior Technical Sup-
port Engineer, Tier 3. Responsible for
advanced troubleshooting and resolving
complex technical problems. Requires
Bachelor or foreign equivalent in Com-
puter Science or related field and 5 years
of progressive experience. Significant re-
imbursed travel is required for this posi-
tion. Mail resumes to: 2001 Junipero Ser-
ra Blvd #600, ATTN: Itan Jordan, Daly
City, CA 94014. Include job code 64562
in reply.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
THREE BELLS OF MONTARA
Immediate openings for:
F/T Activity Director
P/T Maintenance
F/T Caregiver
F/T Medication Assistant
Experienced helpful but will
train. Please apply in person.
1185 Acacia Street, Montara
Phone 650-728-5483
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
129 Cemetery Plots
TWO CEMETARY Plots, SKYLAWN,
$3700 Ea. Call (650)533-6164 for details.
200 Announcements
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258541
The following person is doing business
as:ANA Smog Test Station, 75 El Cami-
no Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Huong Tran, 1558 Orangewood Drive,
San Jose, CA 95121. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 11/13/2013.
/s/ Huong Tran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524299
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
SOLOMON TEAL & CELES TEAL
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Solomon Teal & Celes Teal
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Zellia Faith Teal
Proposed name: Zellia Faith Teal Quar-
ters-Styles
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/16/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/30/13, 11/06/2013,
11/13/2013, 11/20/2013)
26 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524464
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
JACKIE KARL
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jackie Karl filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Jackie Karl
Proposed name: Jackie Heights
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/30/13, 11/06/2013,
11/13/2013, 11/20/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258166
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: J&J Catering Co, 570 Railroad
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners:Jesus Castro, same address
and Jose I. Delgadillc, 10 Gregory Ln.,
American Canyon, CA 94503. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jesus Castro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258188
The following person is doing business
as: Phyziquest Vitality Sciences Institute,
407 N. San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow
ing owner: Phyziquest Vitality Enterpriz-
es, Inc., CA The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2005.
/s/ Aaron Parnell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258216
The following person is doing business
as: Natcha Thai Massage, 517 S. B St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Charnwisut
Khachondechakul, 512 19th Ave, Apt. D,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Charnwisut Khachondechakul /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Robert J. Murphy
Case Number: 123876
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Robert J. Murphy. A Pe-
tition for Probate has been filed by Moni-
ca Murphy in the Superior Court of Cali-
fornia, County of San Mateo. The Peti-
tion for Probate requests that Monica
Murphy be appointed as personal repre-
sentative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 4, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Meredith R. Bushnell
Arnold & Porter, LLP
3 Embaracadero Center, 10th Flr.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111
(415)471-3321
Dated: November 4, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 6, 13, 20, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258373
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: R & D Remodoling and Repair,
1776 Cottage Grove Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners:Ramiro Hernandez same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Ramiro Hernandez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258398
The following person is doing business
as: Silly Monkey Mobile Coffee Cart, 39
13th Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michelle Pizzo and Christopher Pizzo,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a married couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Michelle Pizzo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258549
The following person is doing business
as: SDG Architects, 603 Jefferson Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Steven
Simpson, 2805 San Ardo Way, Belmont,
CA 94002. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on1996.
/s/ Steven Simpson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258179
The following person is doing business
as: Talenti Consulting Services, 138 Ex-
eter Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lihn-Phuong Ho, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/16/2013.
/s/ Lihn-Phuong Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257670
The following person is doing business
as: Chinese Medicine Pro, 144 Albacore
Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Scott
Whitfield same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Scott Whitfield /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258361
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Vapor Land, 7381 Mission
Street DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owners: K I
Investments, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/01/2013.
/s/ George T. Salameh II /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258309
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Cultivated Walls, 278 Iris
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Amy Rogers, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Amy Rogers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258515
The following person is doing business
as: Conscious Kitty, 605 Fox Court East,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shari
Klein, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ ShariClair Klein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258511
The following person is doing business
as: New City Church, 2701 Crestmoor
Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: New
City Community, Incorporated. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Lee Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
ESTATE OF Robert Raymond Palmer
Case No. PRO123044
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL
PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, sub-
ject to confirmation by the Superior Court
of San Mateo County, on November 25,
2013, at 9:00 am, or thereafter within the
time allowed by law, the undersigned as
Co-Administrators of the estate of the
above-named decedent, will sell at pri-
vate sale to the highest and best net bid-
der on the terms and conditions herein-
after mentioned all right, title, and inter-
est of the decedent at the time of death
and all right, title, and interest that the
estate has acquired in addition to that of
the decedent at the time of death, in the
real property located in Lake County,
California.
The property is commonly referred to as
3000 Lakeview Drive, Nice, California,
assessor's parcel number 031-191-35,
and is more fully described as follows:
All that real property situate in the unin-
corporated County of Lake, State of Cali-
fornia, as described as follows:
Parcel B of Parcel Map filed July 19,
1973 in Book 6 of Parcel Maps at Page
38 of Lake County Recorder's office.
Assessor's Parcel Number 031-191-35
The property will be sold subject to cur-
rent taxes, covenants, conditions, restric-
tions, reservations, rights, rights of way,
and easements of record, with the pur-
chaser to assume any encumbrances of
record.
The property is to be sold on an "as is"
basis, except for title.
The personal representative has given
an exclusive listing agreement to Kalyn
Noble at 375 E. Hwy 20, P.O. Box 834
Upper Lake, CA 95485.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and will be re-
ceived at the office of Kalyn Noble, listing
agent for the Administrator at 375 E. Hwy
20, P.O. Box 834 Upper Lake, CA 95485
or delivered to Kalyn Noble personally, at
any time after first publication of this no-
tice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: cash only, ten percent (10%) of
the amount of the bid to accompany the
offer by certified check, and the balance
to be paid before close of escrow which
shall be within 10 days from buyer's re-
ceipt of a copy of the court order confirm-
ing sale. Taxes, rents, operating and
maintenance expenses, and premiums
on insurance acceptable to the purchas-
er shall be prorated as the date of re-
cording of conveyance. Examination of
title, recording of conveyance, transfer
taxes, and any title insurance policy shall
be at the expense of the purchaser or
purchasers.
The Property is sold "AS IS," in its pres-
ent condition as of the date of Accept-
ance. Escrow shall close within 10 Days
from Escrow Holder's or Buyers receipt
of a Copy of the court Order Confirming
Sale. Seller shall pay for a natural haz-
ard zone disclosure report. Seller shall
pay for smoke detector installation; car-
bon monoxide detector installation; and
water heater bracing, if the Property con-
tains a residential water heater of less
than 120 gallons. Seller shall pay the
cost of compliance with any other mini-
mum mandatory government retrofit
standards, inspections and reports if re-
quired as a condition of closing escrow
203 Public Notices
under any Law. Buyer shall pay escrow
fee. Buyer shall pay for owner's title in-
surance policy. Seller shall pay County
transfer tax or fee.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
fuse to accept any bids.
For further information and bid forms,
contact Thirkell Law Group, Attn: Mark
Gullotta, 181 - 2nd Avenue, Suite 625,
P.O. Box 190, San Mateo, California,
94401.
Attorneys for Administrator,
JERRY LEE DAVIS
DATED: November 4, 2013
BY: MARK GULLOTTA
THIRKELL LAW GROUP
Attorney for Petitioner
Jerry Lee Davis
181 Second Avenue, Suite 625
Post Office Box 190
San Mateo, California 94401
Telephone: (650) 348-1016
Facsimile: (650) 348-2968
ESTATE OF Robert Raymond Palmer
Case No. PRO123044
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL
PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, sub-
ject to confirmation by the Superior Court
of San Mateo County, on November 25,
2013, at 9:00 am, or thereafter within the
time allowed by law, the undersigned as
Co-Administrators of the estate of the
above-named decedent, will sell at pri-
vate sale to the highest and best net bid-
der on the terms and conditions herein-
after mentioned all right, title, and inter-
est of the decedent at the time of death
and all right, title, and interest that the
estate has acquired in addition to that of
the decedent at the time of death, in the
real property located in San Mateo Coun-
ty, California.
The property is commonly referred to as
2980 Lakeview Drive, Nice, CA 95464,
assessor's parcel number 031-191-34,
and is more fully described as follows:
The following described real property in
the unincorporated area of the County of
Lake, State of California:
Parcel A as shown on map filed in the of-
fice of the County Recorder of said Lake
County on July 19, 1973, in Book 6 of
Parcel Maps at Page 38.
Assessor's Parcel Number 031-191-34
The property will be sold subject to cur-
rent taxes, covenants, conditions, restric-
tions, reservations, rights, rights of way,
and easements of record, with the pur-
chaser to assume any encumbrances of
record.
The property is to be sold on an "as is"
basis, except for title.
The personal representative has given
an exclusive listing agreement to Kalyn
Noble at 375 E. Hwy 20, P.O. Box 834
Upper Lake, CA 95485.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and will be re-
ceived at the office of Kalyn Noble, listing
agent for the Administrator at 375 E. Hwy
20, P.O. Box 834 Upper Lake, CA 95485
or delivered to Kalyn Noble personally, at
any time after first publication of this no-
tice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: cash only, ten percent (10%) of
the amount of the bid to accompany the
offer by certified check, and the balance
to be paid before close of escrow which
shall be within 10 days from buyer's re-
ceipt of a copy of the court order confirm-
ing sale. Taxes, rents, operating and
maintenance expenses, and premiums
on insurance acceptable to the purchas-
er shall be prorated as the date of re-
cording of conveyance. Examination of
title, recording of conveyance, transfer
taxes, and any title insurance policy shall
be at the expense of the purchaser or
purchasers.
The Property is sold "AS IS," in its pres-
ent condition as of the date of Accept-
ance. Escrow shall close within 10 Days
from Escrow Holder's or Buyers receipt
of a Copy of the court Order Confirming
Sale. Seller shall pay for a natural haz-
ard zone disclosure report. Seller shall
pay for smoke detector installation; car-
bon monoxide detector installation; and
water heater bracing, if the Property con-
tains a residential water heater of less
than 120 gallons. Seller shall pay the
203 Public Notices
cost of compliance with any other mini-
mum mandatory government retrofit
standards, inspections and reports if re-
quired as a condition of closing escrow
under any Law. Buyer shall pay escrow
fee. Buyer shall pay for owner's title in-
surance policy. Seller shall pay County
transfer tax or fee.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
fuse to accept any bids.
For further information and bid forms,
contact Thirkell Law Group, Attn: Mark
Gullotta, 181 2nd Avenue, Suite 625,
P.O. Box 190, San Mateo, California,
94401.
Attorneys for Administrator,
JERRY LEE DAVIS
DATED: November 4, 2013
BY: MARK GULLOTTA
THIRKELL LAW GROUP
Attorney for Petitioner
Jerry Lee Davis
181 Second Avenue, Suite 625
Post Office Box 190
San Mateo, California 94401
Telephone: (650) 348-1016
Facsimile: (650) 348-2968
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME
FOUND
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 unframed prints, nude figures,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
27 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
296 Appliances
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
DOLLS: PILGRIM dolls 14” boy & girl
new from harvest festival. $25. 650-345-
3277
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 (650)578-9208
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 SOLD!
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31”x 61” x 18” , $45. (650)592-2648
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
SOLD
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50, (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
304 Furniture
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258081
The following person is doing business
as: Victory Honda of San Bruno Pre
Owned Center, 345 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cappo
Management XXVI Inc., 345 El CAmino
Real, San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/ Michael Cappo, CFO/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/13/13, 11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13).
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $350 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL Strips excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
28 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Food at a bar
6 54-Across
vaccine
developer
10 “My stars!”
14 Run off, in a way
15 Help in solving
16 Age-old stories
17 Series of “Got
milk?” spots, e.g.
19 Suffragist
Lucretia
20 Emmy-winning
Arthur
21 “__ Gang”
22 Tolstoy work
subtitled “The
Story of a Horse”
24 Queen’s subjects
26 Dismissive cry
28 Kitchen
attraction
29 Ran off with
31 Multi-institutional
financial crisis
34 Mexican cover-up
36 JFK Library
architect I.M.
37 Connecticut hrs.
38 It’s used to break
a habit
42 That girl
45 Garden pond fish
46 Weather map line
50 American bacon
source
54 See 6-Across
55 Whirlpool
subsidiary
56 Sweet tuber
58 MacDonald’s
home
59 Ristorante dish
62 Apprehend
64 Place for some
me-time
65 Make a muffler,
perhaps
66 Browser feature,
or what the ends
of 17-, 31-, 38- or
50-Across can
have
69 Clothing fluff
70 Actress
Elisabeth
71 French sweetie
72 Tense
73 Undiluted
74 Company with
“counting sheep”
ads
DOWN
1 Popular food fish
2 Ristorante request
3 The “L” in URL
4 Org. for shrinks
5 Showroom model
6 Sacred beetle
7 Sacha Baron
Cohen’s “Da __
G Show”
8 Galoots
9 Reporter known
for ducking into
phone booths
10 New York city
near the
Pennsylvania
border
11 “Well played!”
12 Sister of Apollo
13 Take away (from)
18 Watering hole
23 See 68-Down
25 Fries alternative
27 Antepenultimate
fairy tale word
30 Prefix with center
32 Not paleo-
33 New Zealander
35 Actress Sommer
39 Typed chuckle
40 Seer’s claim
41 Sleigh’s parking
spot
42 Vivacity
43 Neanderthal, for
one
44 Frequent
schoolroom
activity
47 Weapon for Han
Solo
48 Touchdown site
49 Bucharest’s
country
51 Difficult
52 Club on the
diamond
53 Mariano Rivera,
e.g.
57 Fairy queen of
English legend
60 1/16 of a cup:
Abbr.
61 Site of the Ko’olau
range
63 Tampa NFLers
67 Lowlife
68 With 23-Down,
what an accused
thug may beat
By Victor Barocas
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/20/13
11/20/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
318 Sports Equipment
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
318 Sports Equipment
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS - 4
Wheeled Rollators w hand brakes, seats
- back rest, folds for storage or transport.
$50 each (650)365-5530
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
513 Investment Property
REAL PROPERTY EXCHANGE - Owner
of an 8-unit apartment building with
swimming pool and on-site laundry in
quiet Gridley, California, will trade for
property in San Mateo County. All 8 of
these 2Bed/2Bath apartments are re-
cently remodeled, and provide steady in-
come. Contact (650)726-4140.
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Decks & Fences
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
30 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
WORLD 31
Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Taxi
By Sarah El Deeb and Tony G. Gabriel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s revolutionary
activists, overshadowed since leading the
2011 uprising against Hosni Mubarak,
showed a new vigor Tuesday, scuffling with
supporters of the military-backed govern-
ment in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and wrecking
a state memorial dedicated to slain protest-
ers only hours after it was inaugurated.
The vandalizing of the memorial reflect-
ed the youth activists’ anger against what
they see as an attempt by the current mili-
tary-backed rulers, boosted by popular
support since the July coup against
Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, to
paper over past bloodshed and rewrite his-
tory.
The interim prime minister inaugurated
the memorial’s empty base — a statue to top
it is planned later — with great fanfare on
Monday afternoon. By Tuesday morning,
the pedestal was reduced to a lump of con-
crete covered in revolutionary graffiti after
activists before dawn ripped off its stone
cladding and spray-painted it with slogans
denouncing both Morsi and his nemesis,
military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi.
“The revolution continues,” one slogan
across it proclaimed. “Down with all those
who betrayed- military, former regime, or
Muslim Brotherhood.” Activists set a mock
coffin draped with the Egyptian flag onto
the pedestal.
Secular, leftist youth activists were at the
forefront of Egypt’s revolutions, starting
with the 2011 uprising that ousted the auto-
crat Mubarak. But they have been over-
shadowed since. They have also been divid-
ed over how to deal with the new order after
the military removed Morsi, the country’s
first freely elected president, on July 3 fol-
lowing massive protests against him.
Since then, the streets have been domi-
nated by pro-military rallies or smaller,
near daily protests by Morsi’s backers,
amid a heavy crackdown on Islamists. Non-
Islamist critics of the new leadership have
been reluctant to speak out for fear of being
seen as supporting the Brotherhood and
Morsi, whom they also sharply oppose.
Egypt revolutionaries make return to Tahrir Square
By Kathy Gannon and Amir Shah
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan — In a phone call
Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
acknowledged “mistakes” and asked Afghan
President Hamid Karzai to allow American
forces to enter Afghan homes in “exception-
al circumstances” as the two sides rushed to
finalize the wording of a draft security agree-
ment ahead of a meeting of tribal elders who
must approve the deal.
Deep divisions in Afghanistan over legal
immunity for American soldiers and contrac-
tors as well as night raids have threatened to
derail diplomatic efforts to keep thousands
of American soldiers in the country beyond
next year’s withdrawal deadline. The issue
has taken on added urgency amid a spike in
violence that has raised fears the Afghan
forces aren’t ready to take over the battle
against the Taliban and al-Qaida linked mil-
itants without more training.
Night raids by American forces have been
one of the touchiest issues in the 12-year-
old war and an agreement to allow them to
continue, even on a conditional basis,
would clear a major obstacle that has held up
the pact. U.S. officials said Monday that
Karzai had conceded that the Americans
could maintain exclusive legal jurisdiction
over U.S. soldiers and contractors after
2014 as part of the deal.
The U.S. declined to release specific
details about the negotiations and stressed
nothing was final until the gathering known
as the Loya Jirga makes its decision.
State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki
said the two sides continue to make
progress, but “we’re not there yet.”
Approval by the traditional council of
3,000 prominent Afghans that begins meet-
ing on Thursday was by no means guaran-
teed. The group can revise or reject any
clause of the draft agreement, and a flat-out
rejection would most likely prevent the
Afghan government from signing it. Even if
it is approved, the final decision will be
made by Parliament.
The U.S. wants to keep as many as 10,000
troops in the country to train and mentor the
Afghan national security forces and go after
the remnants of al-Qaida. If no security
agreement is signed, all U.S. troops would
have to leave by the end of 2014.
Many American allies have also indicated
they will not keep troops in Afghanistan if
there is no U.S. presence. Billions of dollars
in funding for Afghan forces and develop-
ment will also likely be at stake. Afghan
security forces are generally considered to
be not yet fully prepared to fight the Taliban
without further foreign training and interna-
tional funding.
U.S., Afghans work toward agreement on night raids
REUTERS
Protesters scatter after security forces fired tear gas to disperse a crowd in Tahrir Square in
downtown Cairo, Egypt.
32 Wednesday • Nov. 20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Stimulus
The Response
The Norman Silverman
Bridal Collection

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