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Beginning Guitar

for the
New Millinium
By Ed Rodriguez
2
3
This book is dedicated to those students that have
the courage to create and the compassion to under-
stand the spiritual meaning of music and it’s value to
hamanity.
Copyright 2002 by Paidia Academic Press
Library of Congress Number 68-264
All Rights Reserved
This volume may not be reproduced in whole or part in any form without written permission from the publisher.
Printed in the United States of America
2
3
Contents
Tuning the Guitar ...................................................5
Holding the Guitar .................................................7
The Left Hand........................................................8
The Right Hand HAND.........................................8
How to Practice the Guitar.....................................9
Diagram Systems ...................................................9
IMPORTANT KEYS ...........................................10
Important Chords in the key of G........................10
Strum System Explained...................................... 11
Important Chords in the key of D........................12
Important Chords in the key of A.........................14
REVIEW I............................................................16
Theory..................................................................17
Review of Chords Learned ..................................17
Important Chords in the key of E ........................18
Important Chords in the key of C ........................20
Important Chords in the key of F.........................22
REVIEW II ..........................................................24
BAR CHORDS....................................................25
The Set 1 Bar Chords...........................................26
The Set II Bar Chords ..........................................28
Notes on the Guitar Fretboard..............................30
Suspension Chords...............................................31
More chords frequently found in songs ...............31
NOTE READING................................................33
Notes On The First String....................................34
Counting...............................................................35
Notes On The Second String................................36
Notes On The Third String...................................38
Notes On The Fourth String.................................40
Notes On The Fifth String....................................42
Notes On The Sixth String...................................44
4
5
4
5
1. Press down the second string at the ffth fret, and when played it
should sound the sme as the frst string open. As long as the frst
string is fairly tightm, you can tune all the strings to it. If the sound
of the second string is not the same as the frst string, try to deter-
mine whether the string is higher or lower by listening. If the second
string is higher, loosen: if the string is lower, tighten it to the frst
string. try humming the sound of each to determine which is higher
or lower. Always adjust the string you are holding down.
2. Next, press dwon the third string at the fourth fret and compare that
sound with the second string, open. They should sound the same.
If not, adjust the thrird string until both the third and second strings
sound alike.
3. Press the fourth string dwon at the ffth fret. It should sound the
same as the third string, open.
4. Press the ffth sting down at the ffth fret. It should sound the same as
the fourth string open. If not, adjust the ffth string.
5. Press the sixth string down at the ffth fret. It should sounc the same
as the ffth string, open.
1
2
3
4
5
6
6 5 4 3 2 1 STRINGS
FRETS
Tuning the Guitar
6
7
E A D G B E
E A D G B E
E
329.6 cs
Dial tone
= A
440 cs
Electronic Tunner
M
i
d
d
l
e

C
Tuning Devices
6
7
Holding the Guitar
The guitar should sit comfortably on the right leg and be
held close to the body. Keep the neck of the guitar up, as
in the illustration. The right elbow should rest on top of the
guitar. Stay relaxed at all times. There are points of relax-
ation to watch for: they are the shoulders, back, forearm,
and wrist. The right leg may be crossed over the left if it is
more comfortable.
8
9
As the illustration shows, the pick
should be held frmly in the right
hand. This method will give you
better pick control and prevent you
from dropping it halfway through a
song. Use medium or heavy picks
only.
As in the illustration, the thumb should be
placed about in the middle of the guitar
neck. Line it up with the second fnger.
do not choke the neck. Round the fn-
gers as the picture shows, as if holding a
small ball in you left hand. When playing
chords, press frmly with both the thumb
and the fngers together.
The Left Hand
The Right Hand
8
9
How to Practice the Guitar
When frst learning to play, limit your practice time to a half hour, then take a break.
A half hour in the morning and a half hour in the evening is even better: this way you
are in constant touch with the instrument. Learn to be patient with yourself. Stick to the
lesson when you practice. Don’t keep playing chords you have already mastered. Prac-
tice the ones you have trouble with. Learn one set of chords a week. As you progress
through the book you can increase your practice time to forty-fve minutes before taking
a break.
Diagram Systems
The number next to the circle on
the string represents which fnger
of the left hand to use. The strings
are marked on the side of the dia-
gram. ‘X’ means not to play that
string. ‘O’ means play that string
even though you are not holding
it down.
1
2
3
4
6 5 4 3 2 1
FRETS
X 0 0
2
3
1



IV
V7
VI I

10
11
_
_
When playing chords, try for the best sound possible. Do not cut the
sound—let it ring. Try to memorize all the chords you are learning.
Life is but a stage, and someday you may be playing on it!
G Em
C
D7
1
2 3
1 2
3
2
1 1
3 2
0 0 0 0 0 0
X 0 0 X X 0
0
STUDY 1
Squeeze with thumb and fngers at the same time. Do not let the
fngers lean against other strings. Learn to change quickly from one
chord to another. It may be diffcult at frst, but be patient.
The key of G con-
tains one sharp.
Important Chords in the key of G
IMPORTANT KEYS



IV
V7
VI I

10
11
_
_
.
.
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
Em
, , , ,
C
, , , ,
D7
_
_
.
.
5
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
C
, , , ,
D7
, , , ,
C
_
_
.
.
9
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
D7
, , , ,
C
, , , ,
D7
Study 1
_
_
, , , , , , , ,
G
, , , , , , , ,
G
, , , , , , , ,
G
, , , , , , , ,
G
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
.
.
9
× × × ×
Blues Progression
, , , ,
, , , , , , , ,
, ,
, , ,
×
Strum System Explained
D D D D = One strum for each symbol or mark.
D U D U D U D U
= Use a down and up stroke for the symbole shown.
= Tie. Strum the frst mark connected to the tie but do
not strum the second mark. This is called syncopation.
= Triplet – means three strums will equal one beat.
= Rpeat the previous measure.
When strumming try to use more
writst action than arm movement.
On the up stum play the frst three
strings only. Keep the right wrist
loose.
IV
V7
VI I
12
13
Don’t choke the neck of the guitar when playing chords. Relax and
keep the elbows away from the body. Keep the neck of the guitar
pointed up, not down. In the beginning your playing may not sound
good, but remember that practice makes perfect.
_
_
_
X X 0
1 2
3
1
2
3
3 2
1 2 1
0 0 0 0 0
D Bm
G
A7
When holding chords, always start by placng the frst fnger. Fingers
must not cave in on the fretboard, so use your thumb to give you bet-
ter support.
The key of D con-
tains two sharps.
Important Chords in the key of D
STUDY II
0 X
X X 0
IV
V7
VI I
12
13
_
_
_
¿ , , , , , ,
D
× × ×
_
_
_
¿
5
, , , , , ,
D
× × ×
_
_
_
¿
9
, , , , , ,
D
× × ×
Bm
G
A7
G
A7 G
A7 G A7
Study II
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
_
_
¿
Ex. 4
, , , , , , ,
C Em
D
G C D
G
G C
D G
G C
D G
G
× × ×
_
_
.
.
5
× × × ×
_
_
9
× × × ×
_
_
13
× × × ×
Chords in the Key of G and D Combined
Very often songs will contain chords from two or more keys.
_
_
_
¿
Ex. 5
, , , , ,
D D
G A7
G
Bm A7
D
× × ×
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
_
¿
Ex. 6
, , , , ,
D D
G C
D
G C
D
× × ×
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
IV
V7
VI I
14
15
_
_
_
_
STUDY III
Important Chords in the key of A
The key of A con-
tains three sharps.
A
D
E7
You have now reached the half-way mark for knowing all the chords
of importance in the frst position. Your playing should start sound-
ing pretty good.
Rember not to rush through this book. I recommend that you learn
one study a week. If you have any question don’t be afraid to ask
your teacher.
F#m — Use your
frst fnger to hold
the three strings at
the second fret.
1 2 3 1 1 1
3
1 2
2
1
X 0 0 X X X
X X X 0 0 0 0
F#m
IV
V7
VI I
14
15
_
_
_
_
¿ , , , ,
E7 D
E7 A
D
E7 D
A
E7 D
F
_
m A
× × ×
_
_
_
_
¿
5
, , , ,
× × ×
_
_
_
_
¿
9
, , , ,
× × ×
Study III
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
_
_
_
_
¿ , , , , , ,
E7
A
D7 E7
A7 A
D7
D7
A7
A
A
A
× × ×
_
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
9
× × × ×
Blues or Rock Progression
Ex. 4
_
_
_
¿ , , , , , ,
D D A7 Em
G F
_
m Em D
A7
E7 Bm D
G F
_
m Em
D
× × ×
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
_
9
× × × ×
_
_
_
13
, , , ,
D Bm
, , , , , , , ,
×
Combining Chords Learned to this Point
Ex. 5
, , ,
-- TIE Strum the frst mark connected to the tie, but do not strum
mark. This is called syncopation.
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17
REVIEW I
1. How many chords have you memorized?
2. Are you trying to get the best sound possible from each chord? If not, play each
string one by one to fnd out where the problem is, then corrct it.
3. Try to stop your strum when changing fromchord to chord, even if a your fngers
are not in place yet.
4. Once you learn a new chord put it to use right away. Try to learn a song with that
chord in it.
5. Make sure you are holding the guitar pick correctly.
6. Remember to strum from the wrist; do not use the whole arm.
7. If you are having problems with certain chords, yo may not be squeezing with the
thumb and fngers at the same time. Check that out.
8. Buy as much sheet music or as many song books as you can afford. Once you
learn a new song, play if for your friends. Don’t be bashful—and this is no joke:
you will never be a complete musician if don’t learn how to perform.
16
17
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
Em
, , , ,
C
, , , ,
D7
5
, , , ,
D
, , , ,
Bm
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
A7
9
, , , ,
A
, , , ,
F
_
m
, , , ,
D
, , , ,
E7
Review of Chords Learned
_
_
_
_
Theory
This # on the frst line will represent the key G, one sharp. Be sure of which
key you are playing songs in, so you know what to expect in the way of
chords. Roman numberals are also used in music when you want to play the
same song in another key.
G Em C D7
I VI IV V
D Bm G A7
I VI IV V
Exercise old key:
New key:
This is called transposing music. The song will sound the same except a little higher or a
little lower.
Review of Chords Learned



IV
V7
VI I

18
19
E C#m
A
B7
0 0 0 X X 0
X 0 0 X 0
To check for clean sounding chords, play each string one by one
when holding the chords. Remember to squeeze with fngers and
thumb together. Strumming harder will not produce a better sound.
Ask you teacher to recommend some easy rock or folk song books
for you to use.
, , ,
— Triplet;
three strums must be
played in the same time
it takes you to play one
strum.
2 3
1
2 3
1
1 3 2 2 3 4
1
STUDY IV
Important Chords in the key of E
The key of E con-
tains four sharps.



IV
V7
VI I

18
19
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
, ,
3
, , ,
3
, , ,
E
, ,
3
, , ,
3
, , ,
B7 A C
_
m
× ×
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
5
, , , , , ,
A
B7 A
E
× × ×
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
9
, , , , , ,
B7 A B7 E
× × ×
Study IV
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
_
_
_
_
_
¿
3
, , , , ,
3
, , , , ,
B7
E A7 B7
E7
E A7 A7
E7
E
E E
× × ×
_
_
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
_
9
× × × ×
The Blues or Rock Progression
Ex. 4
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
, ¡ ¡ ¡
D
G
E
, ¡ ¡ ¡
B7
, ¡ ¡ ¡
D
, ¡ ¡ ¡
A
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
5
, , , ,
A D
E A
E
, , , ,
D
× ×
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
.
.
9
, , , ¡
A
, , , ¡
D G
, , , ¡
D G
, , , ¡
D A
_
_
_
_
_
.
.
.
.
13
, , , , , , , ,
E7
, , , , , , , ,
E7
, , , ,
A
, , , , , ,
D
Other Chords Combined
Ex. 5
Ex. 6
Ex. 7
(rest)
(rest)
IV
V7
VI I
20
21
STUDY V
Important Chords in the key of C
C Am
F
G7
The key of C con-
tains no sharps.
X 0 0 X 0 0
X X 0 0 0
1
If the chords are not sounding correctly you may have a weak hand.
Buy a small rubber ball and squeeze it a few times a day with your
left hand. This exercise should help to give you more power in the
left hand.
2
3
1
1 1
3 3
2 2
1 1 1
I have found the F chord to be one of the most diffcult chords for
students to learn. If you frst fnger is kept straight this should help to
learn it quicker. Strum the frst four strings only when playing the F
chord.
_
IV
V7
VI I
20
21
_
¿ , , , ,
G7 F C
, , , ,
Am
× ×
_
¿
5
, , , , , ,
F
G7
C
, , , , , ,
F
× ×
_
¿
9
, , , , , ,
G7
F
G7 C
, , , , , ,
× ×
Study V
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
_
¿ , ,
3
, , ,
3
, , ,
B7
Am
G
C
Em B7
G C
B7 Am G C
A D Em
, ,
3
, , ,
3
, , ,
B7
× ×
_
.
.
5
× × × ×
_
9
× × × ×
_
13
× × × ×
Other Chords Combined
Ex. 4
_
¿
.
.
, , , , , ,
G F G
Am
× × ×
_ ¿
_
.
.
5
, , , ,
Am
, , , ,
G
, , , ,
F
, ,
E
Ex. 5
Ex. 6
IV
V7
VI I
22
23
STUDY VI
Important Chords in the key of F
The key of F con-
tains one fat.
_
,
F Dm
Bb
C7
Remember to practice all the chords you have learned. This is im-
portant so you don’t forget some of them. Chords are like words; the
more you know, the better you are able to express yourself.
Bb — You must skip
the second fret when
holding this chord.
Strum the frst four
strings only.
Now that you have complete learning the important chords in frst
position, it is time to think about buying an electric guitar. Consider
that Section II contains advanced chords that would be easier to play
on an electric guitar.
1 1
2
3 3
1
2
1
4 3 2 3 4
1
2
X X X X 0
X X X 0
IV
V7
VI I
22
23
_
,
¿
¿
,
3
, , , ,
3
, , ,
C7
B
,
A F
× × ×
_
,
¿
¿
5
, , , , , ,
B
,
C7
B
,
F
× × ×
_
,
¿
¿
9
, , , , , ,
C7 B
,
C7 F
× × ×
Study VI
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
_
,
¿
¿
, , , , , , , ,
G F
G F
G
B
,
A F
G
B
,
F
, , , , , , , ,
A
× ×
_
,
5
× × × ×
_
,
.
.
9
× × × ×
Combining Other Chords
Ex. 4
_ ¿
_
, , , , ,
E Am E
Am
F D C
Am
F E C
Am
E E Am
, , , , ,
C
× ×
_
5
× × × ×
_
9
× × × ×
_
.
.
13
× × × ×
Ex. 5
24
25
REVIEW II
Congradulations! Now that you reached this point
in the book, let’s see how you did.
1. You know almost all the important chords in frst posi-
tion.
2. You can play music in six different keys.
3. You should have a fne collection of songs to play.
4. Try to memorize those songs you like best.
5 Remember, it’s easy to play guitar, but hard to play
guitar well.
24
25
BAR CHORDS
These chords can be used in place of frst postion
chords for that heavy sound. Try practicing them at
the 5th fret frst, then slide them up and down the
neck to different postions on the guitar. Remember
to keep you frst fnger straight as this will give
you the best sound. Also, learn the names of each
chord up and down the neck.
Major Minor Seventh
That’s right! Your frst fnger must lay across
all six strings at the same time. Learn all these
chords up the neck of the guitar.
FRETS FRETS FRETS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
26
27
2
4 3 3 4 3
2
F
Gb
G
Ab
A
Bb
B
C
Db
D
Eb
E
Fm
Gbm
Gm
Abm
Am
Bbm
Bm
Cm
Dbm
Dm
Ebm
Em
F7
Gb7
G7
Ab7
A7
Bb7
B7
C7
Db7
D7
Eb7
E7
The Set 1 Bar Chords
Major Minor Seventh
That’s right! Your frst fnger must lay across
all six strings at the same time. Learn all these
chords up the neck of the guitar.
FRETS FRETS FRETS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
26
27
_
,
¿
¿
, , , ,
C
C B
,
G
C
B
,
C7
F
, , , ,
B
,
× ×
_
_
¿
¿
5
, , , ,
C
B
,
G
, , , ,
× ×
_
_
9
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
13
, , , , , ,
B
G
_
A
E
E A
A
E
E
E
D
,
F
_
F
_
F
_
F
_
, , , , , ,
E
× ×
_
_
_
_
_
17
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
_
21
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
_
25
× × × ×
_
_
¿
¿
29
, , , ,
D7 G C7
D7
G7
G C7 C7
G7 G
G
, , , ,
C7
× ×
_
_
33
× × × ×
_
_
37
× × × ×
The E-Bar Chord Study
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
Ex. 4
The Bar Chord Study
Set 1
Major Minor Seventh
FRETS FRETS FRETS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
28
29
3 3 3 3 4 3 2
2
Bb
B
C
Db
D
Eb
E
F
Gb
G
Ab
A
Bbm
Bm
Cm
Dbm
Dm
Ebm
Em
Fm
Gbm
Gm
Abm
Am
Bb7
B7
C7
Db7
D7
Eb7
E7
F7
Gb7
G7
Ab7
A7
X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1 1 1 1
The Set II Bar Chords
Major Minor Seventh
FRETS FRETS FRETS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
28
29
_
_
_
_
¿
¿
, , , ,
A
A
G
F
_
G F
_
F
_
, , , ,
× ×
_
_
_
_
5
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
9
×
, , , ,
C D
× ×
_
_
¿
¿
13
, , , ,
D7 G
D7
A7
E7 G
, , , ,
B7
× ×
_
_
17
× × × ×
_
_
_
_
_
21
, , , , , ,
B
A
E
, , , , , ,
D
× ×
_
_
_
_
_
25
, , , ,
B
E F
_
, , , ,
G
_
m
A
× ×
The Bar Chord Study
Set 2
Ex. 1
Ex. 2
Ex. 3
Ex. 4
30
31
Notes on the Guitar Fretboard
E A D G B E
F C F
G C F D G
B E A
B
C E A G D A
F
B E A D B
C C F G
B E
D A F C G D
E A B G B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Frets
6 5 4 3 2 1
E
30
31
Chord Reference
More chords frequently found in songs
Suspension Chords
A suspension means adding a particular note to the chord
which is not part of the regular chord.
X
Dsus
X 0 X 0
Asus
0 X 0
Esus
0 X 0
Csus
3 4
1 2 1
4
2 3 14 2
1 1
3
X 0 0
Am7
0 X
Eb
X X X
Cm
X X X
B
X
2
1
1 2
3
2
1
3
1
2
3
X 0 0
Cma7
0 X 0
Fma7
X X
Dm7
X X 0 0 0
Em7
3 3
2
1 1 1
2 1 2
3
2
32
33
32
33
_ ¿
¿
¸
¸
¸
¸
_ ¿
_
5
¸
¸
¸
¸
_ ¿
¿
9
, , , ,
, , , ,
, , , ,
, , , ,
_ ¿
_
13
. ¸
. ¸
. ¸
. ¸
_ ¿
_
17
, , , ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
_ ¿
_
21
, , , ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
Note and Time Values
Whole Notes
A whole note = 4 beats or counts
Play note and then count: 1-2-3-4
A half note = 2 beats or counts
Quarter Notes
A quarter note = 1 beat or count
Dotted half notes
A dotted half-note = 3 beats or counts
Eigth Notes
An eigth note = 1/2-beat or count
Two eigth notes = 1 beat or counts
Half Notes
NOTE READING
34
35
_
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
7
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
¿
10
, , , , , ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
_
13
, ,
, ,
,
,
,
,
,
, ,
,
_
16
, ,
, ,
,
, ,
,
,
, ,
,
Notes On The First String
E - Open
F - Use 1st finger
G - Use 3rd finger
E, F, & G - Notes Combined
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Notes On The First String
0
3
1
G
F
E
34
35
_ ¿
¿
_
4
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
_
7
, ,
¸
¸ ¸
,
, ¸
_
10
¸
¸
¸
_
13
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
_
16
, ,
¸
¸ ¸
, ,
¸
_
19
. ¸
,
.
¸
, . ¸
,
_
22
, ,
,
,
, ,
¸ , , ¸
_
25
, ,
,
¸
, ,
, ¸ , ,
,
¸
_ ¿
_
28
,
,
, . ¸ .
¸
_ ¿
_
31
. ¸
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
_ ¿
_
34
,
,
, , ,
,
,
,
,
Counting Time
= 4 beats in a measure
Measure 1 Measure 2 Measure 3
= three beats in a measure
3
4
4
4
Counting
36
37
_ ¿
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
7
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_ ¿
¿
10
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
,
,
,
,
_
13
,
,
,
,
,
,
¸
¸ ¸
_
16
¸
¸
¸
_
19
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
¸
_
22
,
,
¸
, . ¸
, ,
¸
_
25
, .
¸
,
, ¸
¸
Notes On The Second String
B - Open
C - Use 1st finger
D - Use 3rd finger
B, C, & D - Notes
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Notes On The Second String
0
1
3
D
C
B
36
37
_ ¿
¿
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
¸
C G7
_
5
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
, ,
,
C G7
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
¸
C
_
9
,
,
,
,
G7
,
,
,
,
C
,
,
,
,
G7
,
,
,
,
C
_
13
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
,
,
C G7
,
,
¸
G7 C
_ ¿
¿
17
,
,
,
,
C
, , ¸
C
, , ¸
G7
,
, ¸
C
_
21
,
,
,
,
C
, , , ,
C
, ,
,
,
G7
¸
C
_ ¿
¿
25
,
¸
, ,
C
¸
, ,
C
, ,
,
,
C
¸
, ,
C
_
30
, ,
, ,
G7
, ,
, ,
G
,
,
,
,
C
¸
,
,
C
_
34
¸
, ,
C
¸
, ,
C
, ,
,
,
C
¸
, ,
C
_
38
, ,
, ,
G7
, ,
, ,
G7
,
,
,
,
G7
¸
,
C
Lake Tahoe
E. Rod
Mary Had A Little Lamb
A Tisket A Tasket
38
39
_ ¿
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_ ¿
¿
7
, ,
, ,
,
,
,
, ,
,
,
,
_
10
¸
¸
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
_
13
,
, ¸
¸
, , , .
¸
_ ¿
_
16
, ,
¸ , , ¸
, , ,
_
19
¸
,
,
,
, ,
¸
Notes On The Third String
G - Open
G- and A- Notes Combined
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Ex. 3
Notes On The Third String
0
2 A
G
38
39
_ ¿
¿
, , ,
,
C
, ,
¸
F C
, ,
, ,
C G7
. ¸
,
C
_
5
, , ,
,
C
, ,
¸
F C
, ,
, ,
C G7
. ¸
, ,
C
_
9
, , ,
, ,
C
, , ¸
C
, , , , , ,
C
,
,
,
,
G
_
13
, , ,
,
C
, ,
¸
F C
, ,
, ,
C G7
¸
C
_ ¿
¿
17
,
, ,
, ,
,
G
,
,
,
,
G
, ,
,
,
G
. ¸
,
,
D7
_
22
,
, ,
,
G
,
,
,
,
G
, ,
, ,
G B7
¸
G
_
26
¸ ¸
C
, ¸ ,
C
, ,
,
,
G
. ¸
,
,
D7
_
30
,
, ,
,
G
,
,
,
,
G
, ,
, ,
G B7
.
¸
D7
_ ¿
_
34
,
,
,
G
,
,
,
D7
,
, ,
G
. ¸
C
_
38
,
,
,
C
,
,
,
D7
,
, ,
D7
.
¸
G
Old Mac Donald
E. Rod
The Three String Waltz
Oh! Susanna
40
41
_ ¿
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
7
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_ ¿
¿
10
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
,
, ,
,
_
13
,
, ,
,
, ,
,
,
, ,
, ,
_
16
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
_
19
¸
¸
¸
Notes On The Fourth String
D - Open
E - Use 2nd finger
F - Use 3rd finger
D, E, & F - Notes Combined
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Notes On The Fourth String
0
3
F
2 E
D
40
41
_ ¿
¿
,
, ,
¡
C
,
, ,
¡
F
, ,
,
,
G7
,
,
¸
C
_
5
,
, ,
¡
C
,
, ,
¡
F
, ,
,
,
G7
, , ¸
C
_
9
,
,
,
¡
C
,
, ,
¡
F
, ,
,
,
G7
,
,
¸
C
_
13
,
,
,
¡
C
,
, ,
¡
F
, ,
,
,
G7
,
, ¸
C
_ ¿
¿
17
,
,
,
,
C
,
,
¸
C
,
,
¸
G7
,
,
¸
C
_
21
,
,
,
,
C
,
,
¸
C
¸
¸
G7
,
. ¸
C
_ ¿
¿
25
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
29
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
33
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
37
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
¸
Little Brown Jug
London Bridges
E. Rod
rest = 1 count or beat
42
43
_
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
7
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
¿
10
, ,
, , . ¸
,
.
¸
,
_
13
.
¸
, . ¸
,
.
¸
,
_
16
,
,
,
,
, ,
, ,
¸
_
19
¸
¸
¸
Notes On The Fifth String
A - Open
B - Use 2nd finger
C - Use 3rd finger
A, B, & C - Notes Combined
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Notes On The Fifth String
0
2
3
C
B
A
42
43
_ ¿
¿
,
, ¸
C
,
,
¸
C
,
,
,
,
G7
¸
G7
_
5
,
, ¸
C
,
,
¸
C
,
,
,
,
G7
¸
C
_
9
,
, ¸
F
,
,
¸
Em F
,
,
,
,
F Em
¸
F
_
13
,
, ¸
F
,
,
¸
Em F
,
,
,
,
F Em
¸
F
_
17
,
, ¸
C
,
,
¸
C
,
,
,
,
G7
¸
G7
_
21
,
, ¸
C
,
,
¸
F E
,
,
,
,
Dm G7
¸
C
_ ¿
_
25
, ,
C
¸
, ,
C
¸
,
,
C
,
,
,
C
,
,
,
,
G7
_
30
,
, ,
,
G7
¸
,
,
G7
,
,
,
,
G7
¸
, ,
C
_
34
¸
,
,
F
,
¡
,
,
C
,
,
,
F
,
,
, ,
C
_
38
¸
,
,
C
,
¡
,
,
C
,
,
,
G7
.
¸
C
_
42
,
,
,
,
C
,
,
,
,
C
,
,
,
,
C
¸
,
,
C F
_
46
,
,
,
,
F
,
,
,
,
F C
,
,
,
,
C F G7
¸
C
New World Theme
Lullaby
J. Bhrams
Shasta Rock
44
45
_
¿
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
4
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
7
, , , , ¸ ¸ ¸
_
¿
10
, , , ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
_
13
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
¸ ¸
_
16
¸
¸
¸
_
19
, ,
¸
, ,
¸
¸
, ,
Notes On The Sixth String
E - Open
F - Use 2nd finger
G - Use 3rd finger
E, F, & G - Notes Combined
Ex. 2
Ex. 1
Notes On The Sixth String
0
1
3
G
F
E
44
45
_ ¿
¿
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
5
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
9
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
¸ ¸
_ ¿
¿
13
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
17
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
21
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
¸
_ ¿
¿
25
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
29
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
33
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
_
37
,
,
,
, ,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
¸
Let’s Rock
Let’s Roll
E. Rod
Let’s Rock & Roll
E. Rod
E. Rod
Edward Rodriguez taught a generation of guitar players in the Bay Area
from the mid-sixties until 1999. After returning from four-years of military
service overseas, Mr. Rodriguez embarked on a career in music. He spent
two years at the College of San Mateo, then two more years at Hayward
state, where upon he received his Bachelor of Arts in Music in 1963.
About then, guitar instruction was a very hot feld with the booming folk
music movement. Mr. Rodriguez interests soon led him to San Francisco’s
Haight-Asbury scene, where he witnessed the local rock renaissance and
began playing and teaching professionally. “Rod”—as his students liked to
call him—began teaching folk, rock, jazz and classical guitar styles out of
Wolmer’s music store in Burlingame. He was a popular instructor, right up
until suffering a debilitating stroke in 1999. Rod is now retired, living quietly
in Modesto, devoting himself to classical guitar and an occasional round of
golf.
Mr. Rodriguez was a great believer in having his students perform in public.
As result, many of these students saw local success in coffee houses, dance
halls, school auditoriums and fairs. Among the acts that Rod coached,
included folk-singer, Steven Rosenthal and the rock band, Juveniles.
Rod also inspired a new generation of guitar instructors, including the
collaborator of this manual, Antony Nispel.
Mr. Rodriguez has always been concerned with the importance of music
and the process of creativity in people’s lives. In addition, he has an
unusual capacity to understand the essence of what is musically vital and
communicate this to his students. This book—his only written work on the
guitar—is a testament to this minimalist excellence.
Antony Nispel