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2 0 1 3 - 1 4
Powder surfing, snowshoeing are just two ways to get outside

POWDER TIME

SOCHI 2014

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AERIAL VIEW

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The resort that’s rich in history, light on lift lines and home to Tahoe’s most annual snowfall has combined with North America’s largest XC resort, giving you easy access to more than 7,500 acres of pristine terrain on the crest of Donner Summit. To learn more about Sugar Bowl-Royal Gorge, visit sugarbowl.com Check out the new Crow’s Peak chairlift! Ski and ride the previously hike-to terrain of Strawberry Fields and some of the best tree skiing in the region.

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I N S I D E

T A H O E

D E PA R T M E N T S

R E C R E AT I O N
22 24 26 28 30 32 36 ice climbing snowshoeing snowcat tours backcountry hit list snowskating sledding gear guide

PEOPLE & PLACES
84 88 90 92 94 98 arcade belts sochi 2014 Q&A: sho kashima Q&A: julia mancuso history book review

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12

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I N S I D E

T A H O E

F E AT U R E S 103
VIEW FROM ABOVE
All-important Sierra Nevada snow surveys take to the skies
14 WINTER 2013 / 2014

106
FEEL THE RIDE
A powder surfing story

112
FOLLOWING THE SCENT
From greeters to elite rescuers, avalanche dogs are hard at work at Lake Tahoe’s ski resorts

118
IN A NEW LIGHT
Time-lapse photography gives unique view of Lake Tahoe

122
When Mother Nature doesn’t cooperate, resorts take to making snow to ensure a good winter season

TA H O E ’ S ‘INSURANCE POLICY’

A D ROOF A D PP ROOF
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1st PRINT J 2nd PRINT J GUIDE J COUPON BOOK J MAP J 1st J PRINT J 2nd PRINT J GUIDE J COUPON BOOK J MAP Ad J Editorial J Advertorial J Other ______________ J Ad J J Editorial J Advertorial J Other ______________
©Amie Engerbretson, Resort at Squaw Creek Ski Ambassador

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PUBLISHER Michael Gelbman ED I TO RS Kevin MacMillan

Trisha Leonard

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CO N T RI B U TO RS Amy Edgett Dylan Silver Margaret Moran Simone Grandmain A RT D I REC TO R Afton Groepper

Axie Navas Gloria Sinibaldi Mark McLaughlin Sylas Wright

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Tahoe Magazine is a product of the Tahoe Daily Tribune, North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, Sierra Sun and Lake Tahoe Action. All content is copyrighted, November 2013. Tahoe Magazine strives for accuracy and is not responsible if event details change after publication.

O N TH E C O V E R
PHOTO BY TOM ZIKAS PHOTOGRAPHY

M A G A Z I N E

W I N T E R

2 0 1 3 - 1 4
Powder surfing, snowshoeing are just two ways to get outside

POWDER TIME

SOCHI 2014
U.S. Ski Team looks to continue dominance

AERIAL VIEW
Sierra snow surveys reveal climate answers

530.581.TTMG WWW.TTMG.NET
16 WINTER 2013 / 2014

Jon and Kate Cooper glide down a perfectly groomed run at Diamond Peak Ski Resort. Located in Incline Village, the resort boasts one of the best views of Lake Tahoe. Tom Zikas is a commercial, editorial and fine art photographer based out of Lake Tahoe, Calif. His work can be viewed at www.tomzikas.com.
FR

On the
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I N T H E S I E R R A N E VA D A

Escape to our tranquil forest sanctuary with modern, results-oriented treatments. Relax in our heated co-ed lap pool overlooking the slopes. Unwind by a cozy fireplace in your private restoration lounge. Step into the dry-heat-lodge to detoxify. Re-energize in the eucalyptus steam room. Whatever your pleasure, your high-altitude journey of restoration and relaxation awaits. For reservations, please call 530-562-3030.

Manzanita features mountain-inspired California cuisine reflecting the region’s rich offerings. Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. For reservations, please call 530-562-3050.

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Photo Credit: Josh Hejl

20

WINTER 2013 / 2014

A California Mountain Shop

R E C R E AT I O N
Lake Tahoe resorts and outdoor areas offer a variety of activities to suit your needs. Whether you’re looking to tackle some steep terrain, snowshoe in the backcountry of the Sierra Nevada or spend a day in the snow with your family, we’ve got you covered.

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS

A group of skiers and riders gets out of a snowcat as part of Expedition: Kirkwood cat tours.

TAHOE MAGAZINE

21

R E C R E A T I O N

I C E

C L I M B I N G

There might be limited ice climbing around Lake Tahoe, but the sport has drawn a dedicated group of athletes throughout the basin. And more climbers are swelling those ranks as more people head into the backcountry.

Ask a veteran ice climber about ice climbing around Tahoe, and the words “small,” “scattered” and even “awful” might come up. But while the Lake Tahoe Basin may not be an ice-climbing mecca, the South Shore winter climbing scene is growing as more snow sports enthusiasts head to the backcountry. People just don’t move to Tahoe for the ice, South Shore climber Bryce Stath said. Stath started ice climbing in Alaska almost a decade ago before moving to South Lake Tahoe last year. “The Sierra doesn’t produce ice like the other mountain ranges, but something is better than nothing. We go ice climbing when the skiing is marginal,” Stath said. Epic powder days can make for terrible ice climbing. Feet of snow will cover routes and block access to the climbs, and the length and quality of the ice season varies drastically each winter as temperatures fluctuate. Novices be warned - ice climbing in Tahoe often involves thin ice and lots of mixed terrain, according to Stath. Yet Stath said the number of strong rock climbers who want to test their skills on the ice is growing. Each year more people ask him to take them up in the winter, but with more climbers comes more risk. “Being above people on ice is really dangerous. You have to be really mindful of where people are. And the equipment is very spiky and pointy. You just don’t want to fall. It’s such a different medium than rock. Ice can be really brittle,” Stath said.

LEARNING TO CLIMB

Epic ice climbing spots at Lake Tahoe might be few and far between, but the number of people who want to test their skills here is growing

On thin ice
BY AXIE NAVAS

The most important lesson a beginning ice climber should learn is how to read the quality of the ice, a level of experience that can take years to master, longtime climber Karl Wallischeck said. Wallischeck began ice climbing 35 years ago on the East Coast, where the winter climbing seasons are long and the ice plentiful. He kept ice climbing after he moved to Tahoe in 1987, but the limited terrain, “ephemeral” conditions and two full-time jobs shortened his season. Wallischeck, who works as both a lieutenant for the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District on the West Shore and as a ski patroller at Alpine Meadows Ski Resort, has seen the number of winter sports

PHOTO FROM THINKSTOCK

22

WINTER 2013 / 2014

enthusiasts venturing into the backcountry, and onto the ice, rise. And the consequences of getting in over your head are severe, he said. A 23-year-old El Cerrito man fell 125 feet to his death more than a year ago when he was ice climbing at Cascade Falls. Wallischeck said it’s the only fatality he knows of associated with the winter sport in Tahoe, but it’s indicative of the level of experience needed to tackle even beginner routes.

start in 2005. The goal? Bring the disparate ice climbers of the basin together for an annual celebration of the terrain, event founder Dave Riggs said. The AAC wanted to host an ice climbing reunion similar to the gatherings held for rock climbers and mountaineers at other times of year. The event hasn’t changed much over the past eight years. Attendees still ski or snowshoe into the Lost Trail Lodge on Friday night,

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“IN THOSE TIMES THAT WE’RE
OUT THERE, REALITY JUST KIND OF DISAPPEARS. IT’S JUST YOU AND NATURE.” – JENNA STEVENS
Cascade and Eagle falls as well as other routes around Emerald Bay typically draw many novice climbers. The climbs are easy to access and find, South Shore climber Jenna Stevens said. Like Stath and Wallischeck, Stevens didn’t get her ice-climbing start in Tahoe. She honed her skills in Ouray, Colo., home of the biggest ice festival in North America. “In those times that we’re out there, reality just kind of disappears. It’s just you and nature. It’s become a way of life for us,” Stevens said. where everyone pitches in to make communal meals. Saturday and Sunday are devoted to ice climbing on terrain that’s better than it gets credit for, Riggs said. “The old saying is that a California ice climber’s most important tool is a fast car because when the ice climbs form, they don’t last long,” he said. “There’s some truth to that, especially for Tahoe. But if you’re attentive to conditions and open minded, you’ll find fun and interesting ice climbing.”

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HIT OR MISS AT TAHOE

FORMING A COMMUNITY
The AAC’s ice climbing weekend typically sells out within a few days of open registration and Riggs said he expects about 35 people to attend this year. It’s the only organized event of its kind around the lake. South Shore climber Stevens hopes that the ice-climbing community will come together as more people augment its ranks, and gatherings like the ice climbing weekend might help. The key is to release more information about routes into the mainstream even if there isn’t a lot of ice to publicize, Stevens said. “People aren’t really vocal about where routes are and it’s really important for a climbing community to get data out there. It’s definitely a challenging activity. Your muscles are going to be really sore, but it’s a blast,” she said.
Axie Navas is a former reporter for the Tahoe Daily Tribune newspaper in South Lake Tahoe.

Stevens moved to the South Shore in May. Searching for ice climbing crags in the area is a hitor-miss endeavor, and she’ll often go out to survey routes without climbing them. Stevens hasn’t found much data about good climbs around Tahoe, and there isn’t a cohesive ice-climbing community to fill in those information gaps. “Ice climbers seem to be a little more scarce. A lot of people are still kind of hesitant to get out there are try it,” she said. The best way for beginners to leap into the sport is to find an experienced partner who’s willing to act as a mentor, Stevens said. The American Alpine Club annual ice climbing weekend set to take place winter 2014 at Coldstream Canyon in Truckee, Calif., is another good introduction to the sport. That event, which organizers describe as more of an informal gathering than a true festival, got its

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23

R E C R E A T I O N

S N O W S H O E I N G

Five must-do snowshoe hikes to truly experience Lake Tahoe’s winter wonderland
BY AXIE NAVAS

Take it all in

Sometimes Sometimes you’re just you’re not just in not the mood in the to hit the slopes. mood The to hit snow the slopes. gods have Thebeen snow fickle, gods you can’t handle another day have inbeen ski boots, fickle, or you the can’t crowds handle are too stifling. On days like another that, it’s day time in ski to boots, check or out the the crowds miles and miles of snowshoeare trails tooaround stifling. the On Lake daysTahoe like that, Basin. it’s From hikes with sweeping time to views check toout routes the with miles brutally and miles steep of climbs, snowshoe this areatrails has aaround little bit the ofLake everything. Tahoe Basin. From hikes with sweeping views to routes with brutally steep climbs, this area has a little bit of everything.

MODERATE / DIFFICULT The approximately 2-mile hike up to Winnemucca Lake offers some of the best views in the region, especially for such a short, easy route. Start at the Sno-Park on top of Carson Pass, about 27 miles south of South Lake Tahoe. You’ll be starting at above 8,000 feet, which means you’ll most likely be hiking in a lot of snow. Unless you’re ready for a world of hurt, snowshoes aren’t optional. Leashed dogs are welcome. You’ll need to buy a parking pass if you plan to leave your car in the lot at the top of the pass - it is, by far, the easiest option. The Chevron Station on Highway 50 in Meyers sells both day and annual passes, as does Kirkwood Mountain Resort. The trail climbs steadily through groves of conifers before you abruptly leave the trees behind and start traversing a fairly open, west-facing slope. You’ll be rewarded with spectacular views of Caples Lake to your right as the Pacific Crest Trail runs parallel on your left. Another mile, and you arrive at Winnemucca, a frozen gem below the jagged Three Sisters. Feeling intrepid? It’s another mile up to Round Top Lake, which offers more great views of the surrounding valley and peaks.

WINNEMUCCA LAKE

CAMP RICHARDSON HISTORIC RESORT

EASY The Camp Richardson Historic Resort in South Lake Tahoe offers groomed, level snowshoe trails for the whole family. The popular destination is located about 2.5 miles north of South Lake Tahoe on Highway 89 and sits just yards from the lakeshore. Rent equipment at the Mountain Sports Center, which is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day in the winter. Adults can buy a full day snowshoe pass at the resort for $19 while child tickets cost $12. Half-day options are also available, but don’t bring your dog. There’s a strict nopet policy at the resort. For more information, call 530-542-6584.

MEEKS BAY

EASY Across the road from the bay, there’s a wide-open meadow that offers several miles of snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. From South Lake Tahoe, head north on Highway 89 for about 18 miles until you reach Meeks Bay. Once you pass the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District on your right, you’ll see a turn-off almost immediately to your left. Park here. You’ll head up Forest Route 14N42, an access road that runs just to the

PHOTO BY JIM GRANT

24

WINTER 2013 / 2014

“UNLESS YOU’RE READY FOR
A WORLD OF HURT, SNOWSHOES AREN’T OPTIONAL”

north of the (now snow-covered) Meeks Creek. After about half a mile, the trees will thin and you’ll have access to a small, sunny meadow nestled in the green valley. Unless you’re feeling very aerobically sound, we’d recommend sticking to the open meadow and access road instead of heading up the U.S. Forest Service trail that leads to Lake Genevieve and Lake Craig. Leashed dogs are welcome.

SPOONER LAKE STATE PARK

EASY If you drove over Spooner Summit heading west on Highway 50, you likely saw this small lake on your right-hand side. Spooner Lake State Park, which sits more than 1,000 above Lake Tahoe, offers spectacular views of the basin. There’s a mellow trail that loops the lake and winds through an aspen grove in the frozen high country. Parking is available at the Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park lot, on your left once you turn north onto Highway 28 from Spooner Summit.

ANGORA LAKES

MODERATE Winter is a wonderful time to take advantage of the wide access road that leads up to Upper and

Lower Angora lakes. The major plus? You don’t have to worry about cars and snowmobiles are scarce (though it’s not unusual to see their tracks, which effectively groom the route for you). Dogs welcome. Drive west on Lake Tahoe Boulevard until you reach Tahoe Mountain Road about 2 miles past the intersection with Highway 89. Turn right and follow the road to the T-intersection where you’ll make a right and then an immediate left onto Dundee Circle. In about 200 yards, you’ll make another left. Depending on snow conditions, park alongside the road and walk down to the snow-covered Angora Ridge Road. It’s about two miles up to the Angora Fire Overlook, a narrow saddle with views of Tahoe on one side and the charred hillside that was burnt during a fire on the other. If you’re feeling up to it, you can continue along the road for another 2 miles to make it to Lower and Upper Angora Lakes. The climbing never gets too steep, but you’ll steadily gain elevation. If you make it to the lakes, you’ll find yourself in secluded wonderland surrounded by high granite peaks and towering conifers.
Axie Navas is a former reporter for the Tahoe Daily Tribune newspaper in South Lake Tahoe.
TAHOE MAGAZINE 25

PHOTO BY DAN THRIFT

R E C R E A T I O N

T O U R I N G

A group of skiers and riders on a cat skiing tour at Kirkwood Mountain. RIGHT: The E:K CAT climbs up Martin Point Road in search of fresh powder at Kirkwood Mountain.

At Kirkwood Mountain Resort, this scene can be experienced by the general public through snowcat tours, included under the resort’s Expedition: Kirkwood program. Cats takes guests to Martin Point, past the northwest boundary of

Snowcat tours:
REACHING THE OUTER LIMITS OF TAHOE
BY MARGARET MORAN

Imagine riding in an enclosed cab, watching through a window as snow-covered terrain passes by as the operator of the tracked vehicle navigates it steadily ever higher up a mountain.

the resort, which also offers guided backcountry tours at Kirkwood’s Thunder and Avy bowls. The tours include educational and backcountry safety skills and are designed for advanced riders “Expedition: Kirkwood is all about getting you more terrain,” said Jon Copeland, Kirkwood’s Ski & Ride School director. “Whether that’s inbounds or out, we’re going to work on off-piste skiing and riding techniques, terrain selection and management, and rescue procedures and protocols.” Tours cost $200 and up; times can vary, and tours also can be customized. They include backcountry awareness and equipment (avalanche beacons, probes and backpacks), but guests are encouraged to bring their own gear, if they have it. To book a trip, call the resort at 209-258-7360 or email expeditionkirkwood@vailresorts.com. Reservations are highly recommended. On the North Shore, Northstar California also includes a private snowcat tour as part of a special guest service offering. Cost is free, and guests are chosen at random for a 1-hour ride-along in the early evening, while the machine’s operator grooms mountain trails. “How many people get a ride in a snowcat?” asked Jim Larmore, director of mountain operations for Northstar California. “A fraction ... so that’s a very special deal.”
To learn more, visit the resort’s website at www.northstarcalifornia.com.

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

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R E C R E A T I O N

S K I I N G

Are you an experienced skier or rider looking for a challenge beyond Lake Tahoe’s resorts? Then be sure to hit up these five sick spots nestled just off the beaten path.
BY DYLAN SILVER

A backcountry hit list

Lake Tahoe’s backcountry has hundreds of options for

Caution
Dangers include avalanches, injuries and varying snow conditions. If at all possible, visit these areas with an experienced guide. Also, check out resources like the Sierra Avalanche Center or the many classes on backcountry skiing throughout the area. Learn more at www.sierraavalanchecenter.org.

those on the hunt for fresh powder or new runs. Here are a few hikes that highlight the Sierra’s world-class offerings. MOUNT TALLAC
Arguably Lake Tahoe’s most prominent peak, Mount Tallac has a bunch of great backcountry runs. Ranging from 2,000 to 3,000 vertical feet, the terrain varies in difficulty and length. A good beginner’s point is the north side of the mountain in an area known as “Corkscrew Trees.” Experts often take on the mountain’s telltale feature, “The Cross.” But if you’ve never climbed and skied Mount Tallac, don’t start here. Directions vary depending on the desired route. For the North Bowl area, backcountry skiers and riders often park and begin their ascent off Highway 89 near Spring Creek Road.

BACKCOUNTRY SKIING CAN B E E X T R E M E LY HAZARDOUS.

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

Two backcountry skiers ascend a peak near South Lake Tahoe. The Lake Tahoe Basin is full of options for those looking to get away from the resorts.
PHOTO BY DYLAN SILVER

MOUNT ROSE
North Lake Tahoe’s Mount Rose has a lot of technical aspects and a few that match the needs of beginning backcountry skiers and riders. The Backcountry in Truckee often offers helpful tips on snow conditions to those looking to make it up Tahoe’s third tallest peak. From the top, expect a 360-degree views and a good 2,500 foot descent. Directions: Drive up the Mount Rose Highway. Park in the parking area near the summit. The trailhead should be easily visible from the north side of the highway.

POWDER HOUSE
The South Shore’s Powder House has gotten a lot of attention from the backcountry community. For newcomers to the sport, this is a fantastic place to start. Because of the north-facing nature of the peak snow conditions are often great long after big dumps. The ascent is fairly easy and can merit multiple runs in a single day. The runs are long and steep in places. The heavy trees help cut down on the avalanche danger. Directions: From South Lake Tahoe, drive west on Highway 50. Turn onto Highway 89 south. The parking area is on the west side of the highway just before Luther Pass and is often marked by a line of cars.

FREEL PEAK
This is the Lake Tahoe Basin’s highest peak and not an everyday backcountry run. At 10,881 feet, it’s one of those for the bucket list. The hike is more than 6 miles and must be done when there’s a good amount of snow. The top of Freel Peak is wind-blasted and very often barren even after a good snow, but it offers a vast and very unfettered view of Lake Tahoe. Directions: From South Lake Tahoe, head west on Highway 50. Turn south onto Highway 89. The parking area is past Luther Summit, about 2 miles before the Highway 88 junction.

RED LAKE PEAK
Red Lake Peak and the greater Carson Pass area have a million options for backcountry skiers. Red Lake Peak is one of the more accessible summits. The hike from the Carson Pass parking lot is mellow. With a car parked in Hope Valley, it’s easy to make the descent a lot longer than the ascent. This area is also known for its heavy snowfall. If coverage is a concern, check out some of the north-facing aspects of Red Lake Peak. Directions: From South Lake Tahoe, head west on Highway 50. Turn onto Highway 89. Turn west onto Highway 88. Park at the parking area near Carson Pass on the north side of the highway.
TAHOE MAGAZINE 29

R E C R E A T I O N

S N O W

S K A T I N G

As winter extreme sports continue to evolve, interest and participation in snowskating is growing at Tahoe
BY BECKY REGAN

On the rise

Wearing what looks like blue dishwashing gloves, Mark “Spicolli” Montgomery sends it off a 30-foot kicker. It’s a decent-size jump for any rider, but Montgomery is doing it on a snowskate. Those “dishwashing gloves” he’s wearing are actually insulated crab fishing gloves that happen to have awesome grip for that oh-so-important landing.

PHOTOS BY BECKY REGAN

ABOVE: John Zapata jumps up on a down rail at Northstar California in January 2013. Snowskaters are becoming a common sight at most ski resorts. LEFT: Snowskater Mark “Spicolli” Montgomery launches off a big hip as he jams through a terrain park at Northstar California in January 2013.

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

after he broke his leg on a skateboard and could no longer put on a snowboard boot. He brought his friend Quinn along for the ride, and the timing was perfect. “I’ve been a ski bum my whole life, and basically, I was just ready for a change from snowboarding,” Quinn said. “It was getting to the point where, if I wasn’t going out and hitting an 80-foot jump, it was just boring, and then you’re risking your neck.”

SNOWSKATING 101

Mark “Spicolli” Montgomery hops up onto a box at Northstar California in January 2013. Montgomery started snowskating about 10 years ago when there was only a handful of snowskaters at resorts.

“I THOUGHT IT WAS A
COMPLETE JOKE AT FIRST WENT OUT AND RODE ONE”
It looks insane, but Montgomery swears it’s not. “It’s just a mental thing. It’s the whole aspect of not being attached to the board that people think is so much harder, but really it’s not,” Montgomery said. “Once you get past it, you totally forget that you’re not attached to the thing.” Montgomery and his friends didn’t single-handedly bring snowskating to Lake Tahoe, but they are among the pioneers. They’re among guys like Danny Sheehan, who created Ralston Snowskates, and Pat Quinn, who is a South Shore snowskating legend. These guys have been on the scene for nearly a decade, and have some good advice and entertaining stories to share with up-and-comers. “Once you figure out what’s going on and what to avoid, it really is pretty safe,” Quinn said. “A couple times on the hill and that was it. I was hooked.”

UNTIL I ACTUALLY

SNOWSKATING COMES TO TAHOE

Montgomery was making snowboards for Lib Tech in 2002 when a snowskate prototype was dropped in his lap. Lib Tech was looking to get into the snowskate business, and guys like Montgomery could help. “I thought it was a complete joke at first until I actually went out and rode one,” Montgomery said. “We just needed to make some subtle improvements to make it more comfortable.” Skateboards are meant for flat, smooth concrete while snowskates are like bombing a hill with lots of bumps. So Montgomery and his fellow Lib Tech crew set about making bigger and better skis for the bottom of their snowskates, and tweaking the sidecuts to see what worked best. Meanwhile, down in South Lake, Sheehan and Quinn were also getting into snowskating. Sheehan turned to snowskating

Learning to snowskate looks intimidating, but both Montgomery and Quinn said the learning curve is similar to snowboarding. It just takes getting past not being strapped in. “When you ride a bike once you take the training wheels of that bike’s a lot more fun to ride,” Montgomery said. “It’s just a comfort thing.” Going strapless can even be a benefit for beginners. When they catch an edge, beginners can jump off or sit down instead of being slammed into the ground by their equipment. Same principle holds true in the park and the powder. “If you come off the lip wrong on skis or a snowboard you’re kind of at the mercy of gravity,” Quinn said. “On a snowskate if you come off the lip and it’s wrong you just kind of fly through the air and get your feet under you and slide.” There’s also a freedom to not being attached and gliding through the powder, Montgomery said. No sore ankles or feet, and digging out of powder is much more manageable. “Riding powder unstrapped just blows your mind,” Montgomery said. “You don’t catch your edge and scorpion or face plant. If you catch your edge you just kind of slide out on your knees. It gives you freedom.”

And as the sport continues to progress, so does the equipment. Trucks, decks and skis - everything on a snowskate is now interchangeable. The ski attached to the bottom can be swapped out for a short park ski, a medium cruising ski or a long powder ski. The big-nosed powder ski and elevated riding platform lets snowskaters mob in the trees. Quinn takes his in the backcountry and said he floats fine on a 136. “Yeah, pretty much once you figure it out you can ride powder and not be strapped in it’s a game changer,” Quinn said. “It’s just taken a little while to catch on.” Don’t get these guys wrong. They’re not saying beginners won’t take their lumps. They’re just saying the new challenge and freedom of going strapless makes those lumps worth it.

FAST FORWARD

‘A GAME CHANGER’

Getting on the lift isn’t bad either. Snowskaters simply walk up and sit down, but they do have to ride off. There’s no strapping in. Just jump on the board and go, which saves beginners a ton of energy in the getting up and down department.

Hanging out with Montgomery and his friends in the lift line is like hanging out with celebrities. Everyone is gaping at the snowskates, and questions are flying at the guys. “Can you kickflip?” a kid asks Montgomery. Montgomery obliges. He’s used to fielding these questions. It’s pretty obvious the sport has potential to grow, but Quinn and Montgomery don’t think it will happen overnight. “Right now everyone just wants to push it and improve the sport,” Montgomery said. “Everyone is talking about going bigger. Everything that snowboarders do, we pretty much figure we can do and are doing.” But Montgomery thinks it will take something like an X Games appearance to really launch snowskating. In the meantime, the Tahoe snowskaters are doing their part to educate and continue to push boundaries. “Hopefully every mountain will open up to it, and maybe someday we’ll have a mountain that’s snowskate-only,” Montgomery said.
Becky Regan is a former sports editor of the Tahoe Daily Tribune newspaper in South Lake Tahoe and a former San Francisco Giants beat writer for MLB.com.
TAHOE MAGAZINE 31

R E C R E A T I O N

S L E D D I N G

DON’T: Sled in a wooded area.

Trees are not a sledder’s friend. Because of most sleds’ lack of reliable steering, they are rarely safe to ride around obstacles.

DO: Visit one of Lake Tahoe’s designated sledding hills. Around Lake Tahoe, numerous businesses have sprung up to provide sledding areas. The slopes are clear and safe, not to mention there’s often hot chocolate just a short walk away. DON’T: Drink and sled. As with
any winter sport, drinking is not a good companion activity to sledding. Wait till you’ve completed that double black diamond bobsled route to imbibe.

Zachary Holmes takes to the air during a well-lit night sledding session.

DO: Look out for shadowed areas. Snow surfaces can vary incredibly. A shadowy area can often mean ice or a change in snow conditions. It’s also hard to see what obstacles are in these areas.

The dos and don’ts of sledding at Lake Tahoe

Safety first
Sledding is one of the most fun and accessible winter activities out there. But don’t think that it doesn’t

DON’T: Sled above a roadway. You

may think you’ve found that perfect sledding hill right off the highway. But if your route has any potential at all to direct you onto the road, don’t risk it. Sledders have been killed in the Tahoe region after accidentally sliding onto a busy street.

BY DYLAN SILVER device. Saucers and straight sleds

DO: Buy a sled with a steering

are known for being uncontrollable. Also, if you are shopping for a sled with steering, be critical of any product’s claims and always test in an open obstacle-free environment. no-brainer.

come with its fair share of risk. As with all snowsports, there’s DON’T: Sled head first. That’s a a right way and a wrong way to hit the hill. DO: Build a jump. A little bump Here are a few tips to get you started. in the run can add that funny little
perk to your sledding adventure.

DON’T: Build a big jump.
always soft. Though sledding may seem like a playful activity, they can actually go quite fast. A helmet can greatly reduce the risk of head injury.

DO: Wear a helmet. Snow isn’t

Catching a lot of air on a sled is not something you want to be known for. Too many of those potentially glorious launches end in disaster. It’s not worth it.
PHOTO BY DYLAN SILVER

Dylan Silver lives in South Lake Tahoe and is a freelance recreation and entertainment writer for the Tahoe Daily Tribune and Lake Tahoe Action newspapers. He can be reached at dylanmsilver@gmail.com.

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

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GEAR GUIDE
Does winter have you in the mood to purchase some new gear to take on your outdoor adventures? From backpacks to boots, Lake Tahoe businesses offer a variety of equipment to get you through your next expedition. Check out our picks for this season.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN SELKOWITZ / ALPINE MEADOWS

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

R E C R E A T I O N

G E A R

G U I D E

NO

RT

H

SH

O
RE

THE GOODS

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1 MountainSmith Borealist AT The newly redesigned Borealis AT is a beast of a backcountry pack. Load up with everything from camera gear to hydration and set off on the ultimate mountain adventure. Manufactured with recycled materials, it’s a product you can feel good about wearing too. Available at Tahoe Mountain Sports, 8331 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, Calif. 530-546-7001. 2 Loki Mountain Hoody Colorado’s Loki Outerwear has been pushing the design of snow gear to new realms. The company’s additions to their jackets, like

Looking for new gear this season ? Check out our picks for must-haves around the lake.
deployable mittens built into the sleeves and a ninja-like facemask worked into the hood, are the kind of features that make a difference when the white sky is falling. Available at Tahoe Mountain Sports, 8331 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, Calif. 866-891-9177 3 Neff Daily Riding Pant For those who ski or ride every day, a solid, no-nonsense snow pant just makes sense. Of course, if it’s painted like a golden zebra that’s okay too. Neff’s Daily Ride Pant makes sense in a lot of ways. Available at Great Outdoor Clothing Co. 341 Ski Way, Incline Village, Nev. 775-832-9100. 4 Adidas Samba snowboard boots The iconic footwear brand is taking a step in a new direction. Adidas’ Samba snowboard boots encompass the famous soccer shoe’s look and design. But they’re built to the specs of a heavyhitting snowboard team. Available at The Ledge, Olympic Valley, Calif. 530-452-4477

3

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38 WINTER 2013 / 2014

5 EpicMix App Looking to track your vertical? Or maybe you want to pinpoint that secret stash of powder? Vail Resorts’ EpicMix works at Heavenly Mountain Resort, Kirkwood Mountain Resort and Northstar California. Available for free download through the App Store or Google Play.

IMAGES PROVIDED BY GEAR MANUFACTURERS

1
1 DaKine Tahoe Glove Don’t fool around with Grandma’s mittens. When it’s snowing, you’ll need a glove you can rely on to keep your hands the right temperature. DaKine’s Tahoe glove is affordable and comes with a built-in heat pack pocket. What’s not to like? Available at Tahoe Mountain Sports, 8331 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, Calif. 866-891-9177. 2 Airblaster Merino Ninja Suit The Airblaster Ninja Suit is top of the line when it comes to layering. This one-piece is warm, breathable and mostly smell proof. More than likely it’ll have you doing 360 roundhouse Chuck Norris kicks when you’re in the backountry. Who wouldn’t want that? Available at Butterbox, 3001 North Village Drive, Truckee, Calif. 530-562-3650. 3 Billabong Jamie Anderson Varsity jacket Jamie Anderson’s status in snowboarding says a lot about this product. If the South Lake Tahoe-based

s r he
2 3

X Games multimedalist and 2014 Olympic slopestyle hopeful puts her name on it, you can bet it’s a solid piece of equipment. Available at Dave’s Ski and Board, 600 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, Calif. 530-583-8833. 4 The North Face ThermoBall Vest When it’s really, really cold, an extra torso layer can hold a lot of core heat in your body. North Face’s ThermoBall technology has the insulating power of down - and is almost as light - but it’s less sensitive to moisture. Available at The North Face, 6001 North Village Drive, Truckee, Calif. 530-562-3663.

5 Giro Combyn helmet Giro’s new soft shell category of helmets allows skiers and riders to protect themselves crash after crash. The flexible, customforming helmet is comfortable, low profile and durable. vailable at Available lpenglow, Alpenglow, 415 North ake Blvd., Lake ahoe City, Tahoe alif. Calif. 530-583-6917.

4

5

R E C R E A T I O N

s i h

G E A R

G U I D E

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4 The North Face ThermoBall jacket Layering is key to staying warm in the snow. If your layers get wet and they fail to insulate, you’re going to have a shivering problem. The North Face’s new ThermoBall synthetic insulation technology will keep you warm even under the threat of wetness. Available at The North Face, 4118 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 530-544-9062. 5 Burton Double Barreled Beeracuda Burton has come up with a solution to the age-old quandary of how do you best carry beer in the backcountry. The Beeracuda’s sleek form perfectly fits the classic contours of Pabst Blue Ribbon or any other can out there. Available at Shoreline Ski and Sports, 259 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, Nev. 775-588-8777

2

4 3

1 Giro Onset Goggle The ultra-wide design of Giro’s Onset Goggle offers one of the widest ranges of view on the market. Not only that, the variety of Carl Zeiss Vision lenses ensures the right match for any conditions. A Available at 1001 Heavenly Village W Way, South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 775-586-2390 2 Gnu Billy Goat snowboard Stamped with Transworld Snowboarding’s Good W Wood award, the Gnu Billy Goat is a high-performance all-terrain ride. The magazine tested the boards at Lake Tahoe’s own T

Sierra-atTahoe Resort, so you know it’s good to go in Tahoe. Available at Shoreline Ski and Sports, 259 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, Nev. 775-588-8777 3 ‘In Search of Powder: A Story of America’s Disappearing Ski Bum,’ Want to be a real ski bum? Lake Tahoe local Jeremy Evans can tune you into the nuances of the lifestyle. Evans chronicles the culture driven by the mantra, “Ski as much as possible.” Available on Amazon.com. By
Jeremy Evans

IMAGES PROVIDED BY GEAR MANUFACTURERS

5

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UT

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SHO

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1 K2 Missdemeanor Ski Haled as the K2’s top all-around twin tip, the Missdemeanor is built for the pipe, park and side country. Whether it’s rails or powder stashes you’re looking for, features like the Missdemeanor’s allterrain rocker and bi-directional sidecut will not let you down. Available at Powder House, 4045 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 530-542-6222 2 Patagonia Wintertide boot Off the mountain, Patagonia’s Wintertide boots are the right footwear for stomping around winter. Waterproof and nearly kneehigh, the Wintertide won’t fail when 16 inches of fresh buries your Subaru in the parking lot. Available at Patagonia at Heavenly, 1001 Heavenly Village Way, South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 530-542-3385.

1
3 Tahoe Mountain Soap Handcrafted in South Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Mountain Soap offers a variety of natural soaps, including apricot vanilla, eucalyptus and oatmeal rose. You’ll need something to wash off a hard day on the hill. Available at Gaialicious, 987 Tallac Ave., South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 530-542-4244 or at tahoemountainsoap. com 4 Thermos The Rock How serious are you about your hot beverages? The Rock is the Hulk Hogan of insulated containers. It will keep your hot toddy hot for 24 hours and it’s virtually unbreakable. Available at thermos.com

T H E GOO D S
5 Thirty Two 86 Fast Track snowboard boot Thirty Two has a longstanding reputation in snowboarding for making light, durable and high-performance boots. The Fast Track is no exception. With an ultra-quick lace system, forget about lag time between the parking lot and the lifts. Available at The Village, 3552 Lake Tahoe Blvd,, South Lake Tahoe, Calif. 530-542-2390

2

3

4

5

s r he
TAHOE MAGAZINE 41

From your last lakeview run to the only lakefront base camp...
Conveniently located at the halfway mark between Heavenly and Northstar, with easy access to explore many more top-rated ski areas, our four-diamond resort, spa and casino also supplies inviting offers. Let’s start with your stay.

AN EXTRA NIGHT ON US *
Your fourth night is FREE after three paid nights when you book our Snow on Sale rate, offer code SNOW14. For more details and reservations, please visit laketahoe.hyatt.com or call 888 510 0529.

Spa Ski Season Pass
Including 4 massages and 8 day passes with up to 40% savings. Find out more at hyattstillwaterspa.com or 775 886 6745

111 Country Club Drive, Incline Village, Nevada 89451
*Stay must be booked in advance, with offer code SNOW14, and occur by 4/20/14. Must include 3 paid nights to receive 1 additional free night for same stay only. No refunds/credits for unused portion. Limit 1 free night per stay of any length. Offer subject to availability and blackout dates. Not valid with groups, award stays, travel agent rates or third-party bookings. Not combinable with other offers. Hyatt reserves the right to alter or withdraw offer. ©2013-14 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.

Après-ski & Game Time Deals
Lone Eagle Grille Tahoe Tuesdays with $5 appetizers, 50% off wines by the glass... Cutthroat’s Saloon for weeknight football.

$

51 4 5 W e s t L a k e B l v d . , H o m e w o o d , C A

59

Lift Tickets
with 3-Pack*
*Valid any day of the season, all winter long. Days do not need to be consecutive. Non-transferable and non-refundable.

|

5 3 0 - 52 5 -2 9 9 2

|

SkiHomewood.com

Winter Comfort and Adventure Available .......

photo by Steve Soulam

Sporting Goods

Snow Shovels

Clothing & Footwear

Snow Toys

Snowshoe Rentals

Home Decor
Blairsden 282 Bonta St (530)836-2589

Truckee 11320 Donner Pass Rd (530)587-4844

www.mountainhardwareandsports.com

RESORTS
From Heavenly to Diamond Peak, resorts at the lake offer breathtaking views of the Jewel of the Sierra. Whether you’re a beginner or a skilled snowboarder or skier, there are trails for every skill level. Take a look at our downhill resorts guide to figure out where to have your next adventure.

PHOTO BY JEFF ENGERBRETSON TAHOE MAGAZINE 45

L A K E TA H O E
MAX DEPTH:

FA S T S FA C T
MILES WIDE

1,645 ft. || 22

MILES LONG

x 12

DOWNHILL SKI RESORTS
ALPINE MEADOWS

2600 Alpine Meadows Rd. (off Hwy 89) CA 530-581-8244, skialpine.com
BOREAL

DONNER SKI RANCH

19320 Donner Pass Rd., Norden, CA 530-581-8244, skialpine.com
GRANLIBAKKEN

N

S

219659 Boreal Ridge Rd., Truckee, CA 530-426-3666, borealski.com
DIAMOND PEAK

725 Granlibakken Rd. Tahoe City, CA 877-552-6301, granlibakken.com
HOMEWOOD

1210 Ski Way, Incline Village, NV 775-832-1177, diamondpeak.com

5145 West Lake Blvd., Homewood, CA 530-525-2992, homewood.com

46

WINTER 2013 / 2014

HEAVENLY

SQUAW VALLEY

TAHOE DONNER

CAMP RICHARDSON CROSS COUNTRY SKI CENTER

HOPE VALLEY OUTDOORS

ROYAL GORGE

4130 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, CA 800-432-8365, skiheavenly.com
KIRKWOOD

1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Village, CA 530-583-6955, squaw.com
SUGAR BOWL

11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, CA 530-587-9444, skitahoedonner.com

1501 Kirkwood Meadows Dr. (off Hwy 88), Kirkwood, CA 530-581-8244, kirkwood.com
MT . ROSE 22222 Mount Rose Hwy, Reno, NV, 775-849-0704, mtrose.com NORTHSTAR

629 Sugar Bowl Road., Norden, CA 530-426-900, sugarbowl.com
SODA SPRINGS

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS
AUBURN SKI CLUB TRAINING CENTER

1900 Jameson Beach Road (off SR 89), CA 530-541-1801, camprichardson.com
DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Pickett’s Junction at Hwy 88 & 89, Hope Valley, CA 530-694-2266,
hopevalleyoutdoors.com
KIRKWOOD NORDIC CENTER

9411 Hillside Dr., Soda Springs, CA, 800-500-3871, royalgorge.com
SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

10244 Soda Springs Road, Soda Springs, CA 530-426-3901, sodasprings.com
SIERRA - AT - TAHOE

19749 Boreal Ridge Road Soda Springs, CA 530-426-3313
BIJOU CROSS COUNTRY

Hwy 80 - 3 miles west of Truckee, CA
HEAVENLY ’ S MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE PARK

1501 Kirkwood Meadows Drive (off Hwy 88), Kirkwood, CA, 209-258-7248, kirkwood.com
LAKE TAHOE WINTER SPORTS CENTER

Tahoma, CA 530-525-9528, parks.ca.gov
SORENSEN ’ S RESORT

14255 Hwy 88, Hope Valley, CA, 530-694-2203, sorensenresort.com
TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREA

5001 Northstar Drive (off Hwy 267) Truckee, CA 530-562-2267, northstarcalifornia.com

1111 Sierra-atTahoe Road, Twin Bridges, CA 530-659-7453

Hwy 50 and Al Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, CA, 530-542-6056

Top of Heavenly Gondola, South Lake Tahoe, CA, 775-586-7000, skiheavenly.com

Hwy 50, Meyers, CA 530-577-2970
NORTHSTAR

Tahoe City, CA. 530-583-5475
TAHOE MEADOWS

5001 Northstar Drive (off Hwy 267) Truckee, CA 530-562-2218, northstarcalifornia.com

Near the Diamond Peak Resort off Mt. Rose Hwy, Incline Village, NV
TAHOE MAGAZINE 47

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

25%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

40% 35%

ADVANCE D T RAILS

ALPINE MEADOWS
AT
With seven powder bowls, countless ridgeline adventures, summit-to-base A GLANCE groomed trails, and mountaintop views of Lake Tahoe, Alpine Meadows hosts some of Tahoe’s – and the country’s – finest terrain. Alpine’s reputation for a relaxed, welcoming atmosphere can be experienced both on and off the slopes. Beginner skiers and riders enjoy gentle groomed slopes just steps from the mountain’s day lodge, while experienced adventurers take advantage of the wide variety of Alpine’s famous natural terrain either through guided tours or specialty clinics or simply by exploring on their own. Full-and half-day ski and snowboard programs invite kids as young as age three (and as young as age five for snowboarders) to have fun on the slopes; and as the official home of Disabled Sports USA, Far West division, Alpine Meadows provides unmatched daily instruction to students with physical and developmental disabilities. With nine mountain dining options, Alpine Meadows offers delicious options which satisfy any appetite. Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows joined forces in fall 2011, bringing skiers and riders access to 6,000 skiable acres, 43 lifts and more than 270 trails all on one lift ticket or season pass. Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows are proud to announce nearly $8 million in capital improvements for the 2013-14 winter season. Improvements at Alpine Meadows include re-designed terrain parks that offer features for the entire family, and continued investments in snowmaking and grooming technology to bring skiers and riders the best possible snow surface conditions. Alpine’s mid-mountain Chalet is also undergoing renovations, transforming into a Sierra Beer Garden that serves delicious brews as well as tasty pressed sandwiches and sausage plates. Guests to Alpine can also indulge in an eclectic array of regionally and sustainably sourced cuisine from the two new Mtn Roots Food Trucks - one will be serving delicious eats at Alpine Meadows, the other at Squaw Valley. Continuing this year, Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows will provide a free shuttle that runs between the two resorts. The free, 15-minute shuttle ride allows skiers and riders to experience both resorts in one day on one lift ticket or season pass.

Nine dining options, outdoor sundeck and fire pit, rental center, high performance demo equipment, ski and snowboard school, disabled sports center, retail shop, high-speed internet access.

AMENITIES

AVE R A G E SN O WFA L L
450 inches

T ERR A I N PA R K S
100-plus trails

4

T E R R AI N

T OP E L E VAT I O N
8,637 feet 1,802 feet

V E RT I C AL D R O P AC R E S
2,400
PHOTO BY JEFF ENGERBRETSON / ALPINE MEADOWS SKI RESORT

BA SE E L E VAT I O N
6,835 feet

W H AT ’ S N E W

L I FT S 13 including one high-speed detachable six-passenger chair; two high-speed express quads; three triple and five double chairs; two surface lifts.
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW.SKIALPINE.COM

L I FT HO UR S

48

WINTER 2013 / 2014

Love the mountains? Bring a piece of them home with you.

Our shop changes with the seasons, and always includes gifts and accessories that will remind you of your visit to Truckee-Tahoe. Show this ad… get locations, shipping available.

20% OFF any regular priced accessory or gift at one of our two

Downtown Truckee in the historic Loading Dock building 10115 Donner Pass Rd • 530.550.8800 • Open Mon.-Sat. 10-6; Sun. 10-5; Main Showroom for fireplaces, spas and outdoor furniture 11403 Brockway Road in Truckee • 530.587.6681 Open Mon.-Sat. 9-6; Sun. 10-6 Visit us online @ www.MountainHomeCenter.com

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

30%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

55% 15%
400 inches

ADVANCE D T RAILS

AVER A G E SN O WFA L L SN O WM A K I N G

75% to 80% terrain coverage

T OP E L E VAT I O N

BOREAL
AT A G L A N C E
Always the first resort open in the area and open from 9 a.m. to 9p.m, 7 days/ week, Boreal routinely provides skiers and riders more access to the mountain than any other resort in the country. Located directly off Interstate-80, Boreal has become a Mecca for terrain park enthusiasts, and the 1-2-3 Ride Free program gives beginners a reason to keep coming back for more. Woodward Tahoe, the newest addition to the renowned Camp Woodward family, opened for business in June, 2012 and has helped transform Boreal into a year-round destination for action sports enthusiasts. Woodward Tahoe offers week-long camps throughout the summer for snowboard, ski, skate, BMX, cheer/tumble and digital media, as well as public day sessions each year from August thru April. The 33,000 square foot Woodward Tahoe ‘Bunker’ includes launch ramps, foam pits, trampolines, full-sized spring floor, concrete skate park, digital media lab and much, much more. Woodward Tahoe’s outdoor campus, which will remain open each year until the snow falls, includes several dirt tracks and jumps for bikers as well as an additional skate park and mini-ramp. Learn more at www.woodwardtahoe.com. Along with the opening of Woodward Tahoe, Boreal’s lodge recently received a facelift including a new paint job, new carpeting and a renovated patio area for you to enjoy the Tahoe sunshine over lunch.

7,700 feet 500 feet 380

V E RT I C AL R I SE RI D E A B L E A C R E S L ON G E R ST R UN
1 mile

T E R R AI N
41 trails

T UB B I N G
11 3 quads, 3 triples, 1 double, 2 moving carpets, 1 moving carpet at tube park chairs, 6 surface lifts, 4 Magic Carpets

W H AT ’ S N E W

L I FT S

BA SE E L E VAT I O N
7,200 feet
PHOTO BY TOM ZIKAS

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW.BOREALISKI.COM
50 WINTER 2013 / 2014

L I FT HO UR S

Warm It Up Tahoe Style!

Furniture Lighting Accessories Flooring

Ask us about FREE measuring & installation for any product in the Alustra® Collection.
Save Time. Save Money. Stop in at our Hunter Douglas Gallery®, and take advantage of our current promotions, money-saving rebates, and special offers. Visit us today, and let our highly trained professionals find the right look for your home at a great price!

Full Service Interior Design
Sierra Verde Group
797 Southwood Blvd Ste 4 Incline Village NV Mon-Fri 10 - 5 Sat 10 - 2 775-831-2204 www.sierraverdegroup.com

Visit our Showroom in Village Center
797 Southwood Blvd. Incline Village, NV Monday - Friday 10 - 5 . Saturday 10 - 2

(775) 831-2204 . (775) 815-2338 www.sierraverdegroup.com
38548

Now Serving All of North Lake Tahoe and Truckee!
Goldfish Properties at Lake Tahoe is a full-service property management company in Incline Village, NV since 2003 specializing in vacation rentals and long term leases. We offer specialized rentals for every occasion. Choose from 150 different properties: • l akeviews • l akefronts • c ondos • t ownhomes • f ully furnished turnkey vacation rentals.

GoldfishProperties.com | 1-800-948-7311 | info@goldfishproperties.com
920 Incline Way, Suite A, Incline Village, NV | 10056 Spring Street, Truckee, CA

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T FA S T

S

DIAMOND PEAK

BEGINNING TRAILS

18%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

46% 36%
SE A SO N

ADVANCE D T RAILS

December to April Shuttle service, rental/ demo and repair center, ski and snowboard school, child ski center, retail shop Located on Spillway; family-friendly terrain features on Penguin 75% of developed terrain

AMENITIES

TE R R A I N PA R K

SN O WM A K I N G

T OP E L E VAT I O N
8,540 feet 1,840 feet

V E RT I C AL D R O P AT A G L A N C E
Less is more at Diamond Peak Ski Resort with incredible lake views, perfectly groomed runs, family-friendly atmosphere, and an excellent ski and snowboard school at affordable prices. Diamond Peak offers more ways for the whole family to have a great day on the slopes, without breaking the bank. Lift tickets are only $59 for adults and kids 6 and under ski free! Save big with a multi-day Mini-Pass or brush up on your skills with affordable lesson packages. New this year is a reciprocal season pass relationship with Homewood Mountain Resort that will allow passholders to ski four days at the other resort. Diamond Peak will also introduce Terrain Based Teaching into all beginner lessons, a method that has proven successful throughout the industry. Those 21 and older can enjoy more dates on the calendar for the resort’s signature Last Tracks wine/beer tasting event, including select Fridays and themed events. Look for new off-piste skiable terrain in the trees between Battleborn and Sunnyside, as a result of a defensible space project. Five new fan guns were added to the snowmaking fleet, increasing snowmaking efficiency and capacity when conditions warrant. A brand new DiamondPeak. com will launch in November with an upgraded online store and more interactive features. College students and those who like to start their weekends early should check out Face/Off Fridays, a new event series on Fridays starting at the end of February.

RIDE A B L E A C R E S
2.5 miles

655

LO N G E ST R UN T E R R AI N

W H AT ’ S N E W

30 runs, open glades, tree skiing
PHOTO BY TOM ZIKAS / DIAMOND PEAK

BA SE E L E VAT I O N
6,700 feet

L I FT S

6

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW. DIAMONDPEAK.COM

L I FT HO UR S

52

WINTER 2013 / 2014

20% OFF CAKES & PIES

OFF

B

• Sizes: 5x5 thru 10x50 • • 24-hour Access - Security Gate • • Household & Commercial Storage • • Boxes, Moving Supplies • • Freight Elevator to Upper Levels • • RV, Boat & Snowmobile Storage •

TREAT BOX
BAKED GOODS FOR EVERY OCCASION

THE

baker y

ESTABLISHED 1975

EXCEPTIONALLY DELICIOUS TREATS

Open every day from 5:30 am – 7 pm

Local & Long Distance Truck Rental

“CALL THE SELF STORAGE PROFESSIONALS”
(775) 831-3322
1060 Tahoe Blvd. Incline Village, NV 89451
530.587.6554 • 11400 Donner Pass Rd • Truckee, CA 96161

inclined to
Incline Village Recreation Center
• Group and Aqua Fitness Classes • Cardiovascular and Strength workout room • Massage by appointment • Indoor aquatic center • Gymnasium • Holiday youth, family, and senior programs • Pro shop and snack bar • Warm fireplace and 50” TV • Free Wi-Fi
Bring in a 2013-2014 lift ticket & receive

PLAY?

1/2 OFF ONE-DAY PASS
to the Incline Village Recreation Center

980 Incline Way, Incline Village NV 89451 (775) 832-1300 | www.inclinerecreation.com Open Daily

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

ACT F T S FA

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

15%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

50% 35%

ADVANCE D T RAILS

GRANLIBAKKEN
AT A G L A N C E
Granlibakken features an intimate ski hill, perfect for beginning through intermediate skiers and snowboarders. It’s a place to avoid the crowds, while enjoying a day of skiing right out your back door. Ski School, ski hill and snack bar are open Friday through Monday and Dec.h 20 through Jan. 5 and Feb. 14-24. The rental shop, snow play area and warming hut are open daily all season. Granlibakken offers plenty of Sierra terrain to explore on cross-country skis or snowshoes. Guests have easy access to popular cross-country trailheads which provide miles of un-groomed Lake Tahoe skiing and snowshoes terrain. For the kids or young at heart. Granlibakken has a machine groomed snow play area. Cost is $14 per person for saucer rental and use of the snow play area all day (no tubes or toboggans are allowed). Ski Package - Lodging, full hot breakfast and choice of 8 ski resorts starts at $150/person. Lodging guests at Granlibakken ski and sled all day for  $15 each. Granlibakken is located in a 74 acre picturesque mountain valley only minutes from Lake Tahoe and Tahoe City. The Treetop Adventure Park is new this year. Open Friday/Saturday and Holidays. Open mid-week by reservation for groups of ten or more. Park available for 5-year-olds and up. Each park session is 2.5 hours.

Ski school, rental shop, snowplay area, snack bar, warming hut

AMENITIES

SAU C E R /SL E D HI L L
50 feet

T OP E L E VAT I O N
6,570 feet 240 feet

V E RT I C AL D R O P T ER R A I N PA R K S ACRES
10 0

BA SE E L E VAT I O N
6,330 feet

2 surface lifts 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fri. - Sun. WWW. GRANLIBAKKEN.COM

L I FT S

L I FT HO UR S

PHOTO: GRANLIBAKKEN

W H AT ’ S N E W

54

WINTER 2013 / 2014

SKI | BACK COUNTRY | CLIMB | PADDLEBOARD | BIKE | KAYAK | RENTALS

SKI•BACK LS • C A T

TRY•CLIMB•BI N OU

Skis Boots Snowboards Clothing Rentals Demos Repairs

DDLE BOARD •PA • KE

www.TruckeeSportsExchange.com
T R U C K E E

10095 West River Street | Historic Downtown Truckee

• E vents for kings beach:
Tuesday Trivia at 7 Thursday Bingo at 7 Friday Brewlette all day

• E vents for Truckee:
Monday Trivia at 7 Tuesday Late Night Happy Hour 10-12 Wednesday Open Mic at 830 Friday Brewlette all day
LOCATIONS

Like us on Facebook Mellow Fellow Kings Beach and Mellow Fellow of Truckee

9980 North Lake Blvd, Kings Beach, CA
Next to the Crystal Bay Club on the CA/NV border

•CAMP•R YAK EN KA

530.582.4510

SAVE TIME and BOOK ONLINE! www.rentals.villageskiloft.com
800 Tahoe Blvd. • Incline Village, NV • 775-831-3537 • Open Daily • villageskiloft.com

• 4 0 American Craft Beers
on draft, always rotating

• G rilled fresh sausages
including elk, venison, buffalo, pheasant and bratwurst

• S nacks and Sandwiches
until last call
See daily events and new beers

10192 Donner Pass Rd, Truckee, CA

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

HEAVENLY
AT A G L A N C E
Unbuckle at Tamarack, rated as the No. 1 après ski party in North America by Forbes and confirmed by CNN Travel, is Lake Tahoe’s highest elevation après ski party from 3:30-5:30 p.m. featuring daily half-priced drinks, giveaways, food specials, lots of dancing and, exclusively on ThursdaysSaturdays, a live DJ and the Heavenly Angels. This season, Heavenly is elevating Unbuckle once again, by taking the party out onto the patio at Tamarack Lodge. Look for additional outdoor lighting, the Heavenly Angels dancing with the backdrop of the mountain and, best of all, another bar to serve those halfpriced drinks. When you come to Heavenly, you better plan to go “allin”…because Heavenly is for those who are up for first chair and are still going strong after last call. At Heavenly, you play hard and sleep when you get home.

BEGINNING TRAILS

20%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

45% 35%

ADVANCE D T RAILS

Ski and ride schools, five rental and two repair shops, nine on-mountain restaurants, four lodges.

AMENITIES

T ERR A I N PA R K S
100-plus trails

3

T E R R AI N

T OP E L E VAT I O N
10,067 feet 3,500 feet

V E RT I C AL D R O P ACRES
4,800

BASE E L E VAT I O N
6,540 feet

L I FT S 29 1 eight-passenger gondola, 1 aerial tramway, 2 high-speed six-passenger chairs, 7 high-speed quads, 5 triple chairs, 3 double chairs, 6 surface lifts, 4 Magic Carpets
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends and holidays WWW. SKIHEAVENLY.COM

PHOTO BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS / HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT

W H AT ’ S N E W

Cultivating a passion and appreciation for the outdoors is a year-round task, and Heavenly Mountain Resort is stepping up to the challenge by expanding its summer operations to include two ropes courses, a canopy tour and two zip lines, including a four-line zip line center. When stepping off the Heavenly Gondola this winter, guests will notice the infrastructure in place for these new activities, which will open in summer 2014. This spring, Heavenly will play its ace by hosting High Roller Hold ’Em, the industry’s most high-energy, innovative big air competition. Infusing an X Games-worthy big air competition with a little South Lake Tahoe casino gambling twist, High Roller Hold ’Em will take place on the World Cup run at Heavenly on Saturday, April 5, 2014, with a monster big-air jump, celebrity host and a $50,000 jackpot at stake. Some of the world’s top professional snowboarders, including Olympic athletes, will compete again in this high-production, night-time event, which will also feature a live DJ, an exhibition with local athletes, fireworks, laser lights and the Heavenly Angels. This will be an epic party befitting Lake Tahoe’s south shore!

L I FT HO UR S

56

WINTER 2013 / 2014

Place YOURSELF
IN THE PAINTING

REALTORS SERVING NEVADA AND CALIFORNIA AT LAKE TAHOE

“KT Addict” Oil on Canvas 36” x 24” Wayne Mckenzie is available for commissions, let him paint you, your friends and family into the painting!

Scott is a 33 year Tahoe resident and has spent 22 years as a full time Realtor specializing in Incline Village Nevada and California’s North Shore. An owner in one of Tahoe’s last, truly boutique offices, we are committed to personalized service with the current technologies. We focus on an intimate set of clients to keep that service level high: try it!
Licensed Broker Associate in Nevada and California Direct 775.742.1945 Fax 775.831.0685 www.tahoescott.com email: scott@tahoescott.com

Scott Tieche Broker Associate

“Violet” Oil on Canvas 20” x 16”

JAMES• HAROLD
GA L L E R I E S
The Boatworks Mall • Tahoe City 530.581.5111 • www.jhg4art.com

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

15%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

50% 35%

HOMEWOOD
AT A G L A N C E
Known as Tahoe’s most beautiful resort, Homewood Mountain Resort offers incomparable views of Lake Tahoe from each of its gladed runs, groomed slopes and powder bowls. Renowned as a family-focused mountain on the west shore of Lake Tahoe, Homewood’s daily children’s programs, renowned ski and snowboard school and Burton Learn-toRide Center offer a friendly environment for learning to ski and snowboard. Just steps from the slopes, Homewood’s West Shore Café & Inn offers visitors one of the region’s best lakefront locations for lunch, après-ski fun, dinner and lodging. Homewood is proud to start the 2013-14 ski season having just been awarded the Golden Eagle Award for environmental stewardship by the National Ski Areas Association.  Also new for the 2013-14 season, Homewood will offer skiers and riders an unrestricted 3-pack of lift tickets for $177, or just $59 per day, valid every day of the 2013-14 ski season. For the best value on the mountain, families need look no further than Homewood’s signature Family Season Pass, which offers two adults plus two teens/children unrestricted season passes for just $999. Homewood continues its tradition of providing incredible value to first-time skiers and snowboarders with online-exclusive $49 Learn to Ski/Learn to Ride packages available online at SkiHomewood.com. And Homewood’s terrain park skiers and riders will have an innovative new urban terrain park available to them this season as Homewood unveils the Foundation Park – an urban-style terrain park located within an unused building foundation adjacent to Homewood’s midmountain Big Blue View Bar.

ADVANCE D T RAILS

Children’s center, Burton Learn-to-Ride Center, West Shore Café & Inn, famous barbecue, rental/demo and repair centers, adult lift tickets from $44.

AMENITIES

T ER R A I N PA R K S T O P E L E VAT I O N
7,880 feet

6

VE RT I C AL D R O P
1,650 feet
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT

W H AT ’ S N E W

ACRES

1,260

BASE E L E VAT I O N
6,230 feet

1 high-speed quad, 3 triple chairs, 4 surface lifts 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW. SKIHOMEWOOD.COM

L I FT S

L I FT HO UR S

58

WINTER 2013 / 2014

FA C T FA S T

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

12% 30% 38% 20%

KIRKWOOD

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

ADVANCED TRAILS

EXPERT TRAILS

Two terrain parks, learnto-ski and ride center, cat skiing, back country classes, two rental shops, on-mountain restaurants, child care ages 2-6

AMENITIES

AVE RA G E SN O WFALL
600 inches

SN O W M AK I N G
Top-to-bottom on four runs 9,800 feet

T O P E L E VATI O N AT A G L A N C E TR A I L S
PHOTO BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS / KIRKWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT

80+

RI D E A BL E AC R E S
2,300

Kirkwood Mountain Resort is entering its 41st year of operation and second as a member of the Vail Resorts family. Since 1972, the 2,300 acres of Kirkwood have provided some of North America’s fiercest inbounds terrain that will challenge skiers and riders from first chair to last. The solitary horseshoe canyon in which Kirkwood resides is one of the purest, most authentic, big-mountain ski experiences in America, and with an average annual snowfall of more than 600 inches, there are sure to be plenty of deep powder days. As a newer member of the Vail Resorts family, Kirkwood is still easing into the portfolio in order to preserve the unique feel that makes Kirkwood a mecca for thrill-seeking skiers and riders. This winter the mountain is expanding on EpicMix technology that it introduced last year with the EpicMix Academy, an interactive platform for ski and ride school. EpicMix Academy is the future of learning to ski and ride. Students can track their progress through the sport, earn pins and share their accomplishments with friends on an online, interactive platform. The K-Bar, an outdoor umbrella bar that will seat 75, will be added to the main village area this winter and will feature seating for 75, beers on tap and a variety of snacks. The SWATCH Freeride World Tour is returning to Kirkwood Mountain where the best big mountain skiers and riders in the world will challenge themselves on the permanently closed section of the mountain called the ‘The Cirque.” Redbull athlete, Bobby Brown, will also be back at Kirkwood this winter with the NBC Signature Series event, MegaSlope. Twelve of the best slope style skiers in the world will session the massive features built specifically for the event on Kirkwood’s backside. For more event info and dates visit www.kirkwood.com/events.

L O N G E ST R UN
2.5 miles

W H AT ’ S N E W

B ASE E L E VATI O N
7,800 feet

L I F TS 15 2 high-speed quad, 1 fixed quad, 6 triple chairs, 1 double chair, 3 surface lifts, 2 magic carpets
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW.KIRKWOOD.COM

LIFT HOURS

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R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

MT. ROSE
AT A G L A N C E
Mt. Rose is located just 25 minutes away from Reno and 15 minutes from Lake Tahoe and boasts over 1200 acres of terrain and 1800 vertical feet, including the 200-plus acre Chutes. Two six-passenger high speed chairlifts get you to the peak of the mountain in 3.5 minutes with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and Nevada awaiting you at the top. With Mt. Rose being just 25 minutes away from the Reno/Tahoe International Airport and Reno’s 17,000 rooms, it’s the perfect choice for the first and last day of your Lake Tahoe vacation. Reno and Lake Tahoe lodging properties partnered with Mt. Rose have amazing ski and stay deals starting at $79 and a Reno shuttle service that runs on holidays and weekends.

BEGINNING TRAILS

20%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

30% 40% 10%
350 inches

ADVANCE D T RAILS

EXPERT TRAILS

AVE R A G E SN O WFA L L SN O WM A K I N G

28% coverage top to bottom

T OP E L E VAT I O N
9,700 feet 1,800 feet

VE RT I C AL D R O P AC R E S
1,200

LO N G E ST R UN
2.5 miles

TRAILS

60+

BASE E L E VAT I O N
8,260 feet

W H AT ’ S N E W

Deals & Steals for the 2013-14 season: Daily Specials* are available non-holiday and can be purchased online or at the resort. Here’s what’s available this season: BONUS MONDAYS: $49 lift tickets online ($54 at the resort). Valid Mondays only. TWO ‘FER TUESDAYS: 2 Adult all day lift tickets for the price of 1.Valid Tuesdays only.     OVER THE HILL WEDNESDAYS: $35 lift tickets online for ages 50+ ($40 at resort). Valid Wednesdays only. LADIES DAY THURSDAYS: $29 lift tickets for ladies online ($34 at resort). Valid Thursdays only COLLEGE FRIDAYS: $39 lift tickets for college students online ($44 at resort). Valid Fridays only, must present college ID at resort to get deal. Daily Specials void Dec. 21-Jan. 4, Jan. 18-20, Feb. 15-17. Other lift ticket deals valid any day include: FAMILY PACKS: $217 non-holiday/$237 holiday. Includes 2 Adult lift tickets & 2 tickets for ages 17 & under. All tickets must be used on the same day. MULTI-DAY TICKETS: Save time and money when you buy 2 or 3-day consecutive lift tickets. Prices yet to be released. Save $5 off lift tickets by purchasing online through skirose.com.

L I FT S 8 2 six-pack, high speed detachable chairs, 2 quad chairs (fixed grip), 2 triple chairs (fixed grip), 2 surface lifts
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Blazing Zephyr: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.) WWW.MTROSE.COM

PHOTO BY SCOTT SADY / MT. ROSE SKI TAHOE

L I FT HO UR S

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

If you are injured at one of our local ski areas, you may be told that your only options are to be treated at the Ski Hill Clinic or an expensive hospital visit...at Gateway Urgent Care we specialize in ski and snowboard injuries with OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE.

kie Gate ars y& Snowboarders Sw
You Do Have a Choice!

URGENT CARE

Do you suffer from a tendon or ligament injury?
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) injections are less invasive and less expensive than surgery. The treatment helps regenerate tendon and ligament fibers, and accelerates the body’s natural healing process.

SKIERS AND SNOWBOARDERS

If you are To schedule an appointment or find out more about told that your only option is an expensive hospital visit . . .PRP Therapy, call Gateway Urgent Care.
Most Insurance Plans Accepted • Never a Wait Appointment Necessary • X-Ray UrgentNo Care we specialize in ski andFacility On Site

PRP Therapy can also be helpful for the spine, middle and lower back, neck, shoulders, elbows, hip/pelvis, lower you leg, ankle/foot injured wrist/hand, at one of our local knee, ski areas, may be and arthritic joints.

BUT. . . at Gateway General Family • Truckee’s Alternative to Costly Emergency Rooms snowboard injuries with OVER 30Care YEARS EXPERIENCE.

Gateway
URGENT CARE
www.gatewayurgentcare.com gatewayurgentcare@yahoo.com

Dr. Dennis Chez, MD Now offering Aesthetic Medicine, Botox Cosmetic & Dermal Fillers.

Most Insurance Plans Accepted • Never a Wait No Appointment Necessary X-Ray Facility On Site • General Family Care 11105 Donner Pass Road Across from Bank of the West

11105 Donner Pass Rd. Truckee

530-582-2070

Truckee’s Alternative to Costly Emergency Rooms

(530) 582-2070

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T FA S T

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

20%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

45% 35%
SE A SO N

ADVANCE D T RAILS

Mid-November to Mid-April

T ER R A I N PA R K S

7

NORTHSTAR
AT A G L A N C E
The only destination mountain resort at Lake Tahoe that offers a true five-star experience from start to finish, Northstar’s laid-back, welcoming California vibe, thoughtful, friendly service, incredible on-mountain experience and sophisticated alpine village offer guests the ultimate luxury ski experience without pretense. Located halfway between one of North America’s coolest mountain towns and one of the world’s most iconic alpine lakes, Northstar is a destination on the rise. Since 2004, more than one billion dollars have been invested on-site, making it the premier snow sports resort in Lake Tahoe. Visitors will find upscale shops, a plethora of dining options and the region’s only AAA Five Diamond slope-side lodging, paired with some of the best grooming in the country, unmatched tree skiing and enough variety to challenge every level of skier – including world-class terrain parks and tailored glades for tree-skiing. Those who come to Northstar know what they’re looking for. Sometimes it’s adventure. Sometimes it’s to learn. Sometimes it’s to relax in a welcoming place with family and friends. When you’re here, you’ll find your winter vacation experience to be the way it should be. As athletes prepare for the Winter Games in Russia, Northstar serves as a training ground.  Shaun White’s signature 22-foot halfpipe will take center stage January 9-12 for the Sprint U.S. Grand Prix and the Visa U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix presented by The North Face.  The Olympic qualifying event will determine which freeskiers and snowboarders will get a ticket to Sochi. Northstar’s Pro Team includes four athletes competing for top spots on the U.S. teams including Shaun White, Elena Hight, Chas Guldemond and David Wise. Local skier David Wise will help pave history as freeskiing makes its debut in the Olympic Games. An example of smart recycling, Northstar’s fresh new gondola cabins are unrecognizable thanks to a complete overhaul.  The updated look and feel reflects Northstar’s luxury brand. A new resident in the Village at Northstar, Icebreaker will sell its signature outdoor, merino wool technical sports apparel to Northstar shoppers.

S N O WM AK I N G
50% coverage 8,610 feet

T O P E L E VAT I O N VE RT I C AL D R O P
2,280 feet 6,800 feet 2,904

MID-MTN ELEV RI D E A B L E A C R E S BA SE E L E VAT I O N
6,540 feet

SUP E R P I P E H AL FP I P E L I FT S 18 1 gondola, 1 Six-Pack Express, 6 quad express chairs, 2 triple chairs, 1 double chair, 2 tow/ surface lifts, 5 Magic Carpets chairs, 6 surface lifts, 4 Magic Carpets
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m WWW. NORTHSTARCALIFORNIA. COM
PHOTO BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS / NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA

W H AT ’ S N E W

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Home to over 3,100 skiable acres, and the only 5 star slopeside lodging in California. Purchase your li tickets 3 days in advance for the lowest price guarantee and explore the best of Lake Tahoe.

NorthstarCalifornia.com

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

BEGINNING TRAILS

25%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

50% 25%

ADVANCE D T RAILS

AT A G L A N C E
Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort boasts 2,000 acres and 2,212 vertical feet of dynamic terrain with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe from the summit and one of the deepest snowpacks in the region. Access to expert backcountry terrain in Huckleberry Canyon, incredible tree runs, a commitment to consistent, quality grooming and excellent beginner programs like the world’s only Burton Star Wars Experience and a $45 beginner package, make Sierra Resort a favorite Northern California resort. Easy to get to and always welcoming, Sierra-atTahoe Resort is known as the “locals spot,” Sierra Resort is a bastion of the authentic California ski experience.

Ski and snowboard school, on-mountain dining, mountain sports shop and equipment rentals, child care: 8 months to 5 years

AMENITIES

T OP E L E VAT I O N
8,852 feet 2,212 feet

V E RT I C AL R I SE AC R E S
2,000 .5 miles

L ONGE ST R UN

46 slopes and trails 5 ski and snowboard Nationally Ranked superpipe

T E R R AI N

T ER R A I N PA R K S SUP E R P I P E

BASE E L E VAT I O N
6,640 feet

W H A T ’ S N E W Focused on enriching the guests’ overall experience, Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort is excited to offer new additions for the 2013-14 season that will offer guests an enhanced on-mountain and overall experience.  A new 9,000 square foot structure and plaza will improve the base area experience, enhance the overall après atmosphere, and give guests a place to gather and celebrate winter in the mountains. The Burton Star Wars Experience continues to grow with the Burton Star Wars Echo Base, a learning experience for kids ages 7-12. The Powder Alliance offers Unlimited Season Passholders free skiing at eleven other resorts. Along with a new base area, learning experience, and passholder benefits, Sierra Resort will host a spring concert series. Your powder playground awaits. See you on the mountain.

L I FT S 14 3 express family-friendly quad chairlifts,1 triple lift, 5 double lifts, 4 Magic Carpet children’s surface lifts, 1 tubing surface tow
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends and peak periods WWW.SIERRAATTAHOE. COM

PHOTO BY NATE VETTER / SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

L I FT HO UR S

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

You’re not the only one who loves playing in the snow.
Bring your pets with you and let them stay and have fun at our resort for pets

FREE DAY
of Doggie Day Care (for new customers) Expires 05/20/2014.

Stunning lake and sunset views. Splendid food and cocktails.
The Boathouse on the Pier is located at the Timber Cove Marina, right behind the Beach Retreat & Lodge, atop the 1,000 foot Pier. Serving lunch, cocktails and dinner, the Boathouse has the best views in town. Check out Two on Tuesdays and $8 Lunch Specials, Sunset Sippers, live music with Wine Not Wednesdays, and Sunday Songs with Bloodies and Bubbles. Outdoor patio and pier dining available in season. Catered events and receptions available.

Truckee-Tahoe Pet Lodge
A mountain retreat for your pet! Day Care • Overnight Lodging • Grooming
530-582-7268 • t ruckeetahoepetlodge.com

BOATHOUSE
ON THE PIER TA H O E

/BoathouseTahoe

3411 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150 Hours: 11 am – 10 pm I 530.600.1846 I tahoebeachretreat.com

$ 14.99 Steak&Lobster
Complete dinner includes soup or fresh garden salad and Lakeside’s famous warm bread basket. Daily 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
(while supplies last)

BOATHOUSE
ON THE PIER TA H O E

775.588.7777 | 800.624.7980 HIGHWAY 50 AT KINGSBURY GRADE, STATELINE, NV | LAKESIDEINN.COM

Management reserves all rights to modify or cancel the $14.99 Steak & Lobster dinner without notice.

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

FA C T T S A F

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

30%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

50% 20%

SODA SPRINGS
AT A G L A N C E
Soda Springs is located just off Interstate-80 at the Soda Springs exit atop Donner Summit. The welcoming small resort spirit and relaxed atmosphere is perfect for families. In fact, Soda Springs offers Planet Kids, a dedicated snow-play area designed with children ages 8 and under in mind. Access to Planet Kids includes tubing, beginner skiing/riding, tube carousels, snow volcanoes and more. Catch the free sleigh ride over to Planet Kids from the base lodge. Be on the lookout for new expanded terrain to the right of Crystal Bowl during the 2012/13 season. Soda Springs also recently expanded its Tube Town tubing area to nearly double its size. Tubing is included with every lift ticket purchased, so you can enjoy a day on the slopes plus slide down one of Soda’s many groomed tubing lanes.

ADVANCE D T RAILS

New for skiing and snowboarding. Great for kids that like bumps and little jumps. Take the Little Dipper and keep the little children smiling from ear to ear. But for the thrillseekers, the Tube Express will knock your snowboots off. It’s a kick for any age.

K I D S X PA R K

TU B I N G F L UM E S

PHOTO BY COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS / SODA SPRINGS

W H AT ’ S N E W

LI FT S 4 2 Ski, 2 Tubing tows
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW. SODASPRINGS.COM

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

FA C T FA S T

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

25% 45
%

SQUAW VALLEY

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

ADVANCED TRAILS

30%

Scenic Aerial Tram rides, 1960 Olympic Museum, Indoor climbing wall, Snowshoeing, Night skiing, Wanderlust Yoga Studio, Bungee Skyjump

A M E N I TI E S

PI PE S

2 12+ 30+

TA BL E TO PS

R A I L S/ BO XE S
9,050 feet 2,850 feet

TO P E L E VAT I O N VE RT I C AL D R O P ACRES T R AI L S
3,600 170+ 8

AT A G L A N C E
Known for legendary skiing and gorgeous views of Lake Tahoe, Squaw Valley is one of the jewels of the region. For locals and visitors alike, it’s the place to race to on a powder day, and the place to relax with family and friends at lively bars and restaurants or cozy firepits in the base village and enjoy all the Sierra has to offer.

TE R R AI N PA RK S
450 inches

AVE R AG E SN O W FALL LON G E ST R U N
3.2 miles

L I F T S 30 Arial Tram: 1 Funitel: 1 Express 6-pacs: 5 Express Quads: 3 Fixed-Grip Quad: 1 Triple Chairs: 9 Double Chairs: 4 Conveyor Lifts: 5 Magic Carpets: 2 Telecord: 1
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. WWW.SQUAW.COM

W H AT ’ S N E W

LIFT HOURS

Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows are investing nearly $8 million in capital improvements for the 2013-14 winter season. Upgrades to Squaw Valley include the new Wanderlust Yoga Studio and two, new Mtn Roots Food Trucks, located in The Village at Squaw Valley. The yoga studio offers one-of-a-kind yoga classes that incorporate Squaw’s breathtaking landscape and legendary skiing and riding. The Mtn Root food trucks will serve an eclectic array of regionally and sustainably sourced cuisine at the East end of the Village. Also new in The Village, Squaw’s slopeside condominium suites have received $1.2 million in renovations, including new mattresses with triple-sheet bedding and new furniture, carpet, and additional flatscreen TVs. On the slopes, Squaw Valley welcomes the addition of the new Teaching Tykes program, a class designed to provide parents with tips on how to teach their little one to ski or snowboard. Continuing this year, Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows will provide a free shuttle that runs between the two resorts. The free, 15-minute shuttle ride allows skiers and riders to experience both resorts in one day on one lift ticket or season pass.
TAHOE MAGAZINE 67

PHOTO BY HANK DEVRE / SQUAW VALLEY

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

SUGAR BOWL

FA C T T S A F

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

17%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

45% 38%
8,383 feet 1,500 feet

ADVANCE D T RAILS

T OP E L E VAT I O N V E RT I C AL D R O P PEAKS AC R E S TRAILS
4

1,650 103

AVER A G E SN O WFA L L
500 inches

L ONGE ST R UN G ROO M I N G
The ski resort that’s rich in history, deep in snow and light on lift lines has combined with North America’s largest XC resort to bring you over 7,500 acres of winter adventure on the crest of Donner Summit. Sugar Bowl’s 500” annual snowfall – the most in Tahoe – virtually guarantees quality conditions on terrain that spans across 4 majestic peaks, and into the most accessible backcountry terrain in the region. As the closest major resort to Sacramento and the Bay area, Sugar Bowl has long provided skiers & riders with the most convenient ski excursion, and shorter lift lines with uncrowded slopes nicely complements that distinction. At Royal Gorge, 200km of groomed XC trails across 6,000 acres of terrain offer endless adventure, including California’s first and only snowkiting school, and a network of trails dedicated to fat tire snowbiking. California owned & operated since 1939, Sugar Bowl-Royal Gorge is carrying the torch, preserving that classic California ski experience across both resorts. Sugar Bowl-Royal Gorge unveils $20 million in resort upgrades & improvements this season, including the new Crow’s Peak chairlift providing advanced-intermediate and expert skiers & riders with lift-serviced access to the previously hike-to terrain of Strawberry Fields. Spanning nearly 1,000 vertical on the far west side of the resort, this new terrain boasts some of the finest tree skiing in the region. Royal Gorge continues a triumphant return to its once & former glory, with improved grooming, signage, facilities and more. The Sugar Bowl Ski Academy moves in to its brand new classrooms and dorms this season, the only ski-in/ski-out academy campus in the country. Villagers, Lodge at Sugar Bowl guests and Academy student-athletes will also enjoy the new Sporthaus fitness & aquatics center, set to open this spring. Clearly, the resort that will next season look back and celebrate 75 years, has its eyes set on a very bright future. 

3+ miles

500 acres 375 acres

SNOW M A K I N G AT A G L A N C E

BASE E L E VAT I O N
6,883 feet

S T E E P E ST R UN
The Palisades

Three Progressive Parks at Judah

T E R R AI N PA R K

W H AT ’ S N E W

L I FT S 13 5 High-Speed Express Quads, 3 Fixed Grip Quads, 1 Fixed Grip Triple, 2 Fixed Grip Doubles, 1 Gondola,1 Surface Lift
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Weekdays WWW.SUGARBOWL.COM

PHOTO BY GRANT BARTA / SUGAR BOWL

L I FT HO UR S

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“We are Northern Nevada natives
whose only mission is to help you achieve your goals. Whether you are a first-time buyer, relocating, investor or just thinking about making a move we are here to help you. We can help you in the Reno/Sparks area and also North Lake Tahoe. Contact us and realize what true service is.

Browning
Cindy Browning
775-232-4510
cbrowning@dicksonrealty.com

Cindy & Troy

Please check our website for a complete schedule.

www.thestudiolaketahoe.com

800-495-1351
www.wesellreno.com

Troy Browning
775-232-4509
tbrowning@dicksonrealty.com

Heal Like a Champion.
Daron Rahlves: World Champion/Patient Daron Rahlves is one of the most decorated skiers in Downhill and Super G in American history. Known for taking more aggressive lines than his competitors, Daron has never been afraid to take a chance, especially if it puts him ahead of the competition. One thing he doesn’t take risks on is his orthopedic care. His choice—Tahoe Center for Orthopedics, home to the specialists who care for Daron Rahlves and champions like you.

877.543.5554 TahoeOrthopedics.com

R E S O R T S

D O W N H I L L

TAHOE DONNER

AT A G L A N C E
The place for family fun and learning, Tahoe Donner Ski Area is committed to being “The best place to begin.” Tahoe Donner offers a variety of services for families including ski instruction for children as young as 3 years old, interchangeable lift tickets for parents with non-skiing children, retail outlets, and a kid-friendly menu in the cafeteria. Wide-open bowls, uncrowded slopes, great beginner terrain, excellent grooming, and a friendly, courteous staff await you. Our size allows us to deliver that personal touch that the larger ski areas can’t always provide.

FA C T FA S T

S

BEGINNING TRAILS

40%

INTERMEDIATE TRAILS

60%

open daily 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ski school, lodge, rental shop and retail shop

AMENITIES

ACRES W H AT ’ S N E W
New for the 2013-14 winter season, the installation of a 700-square-foot yurt will provide a warming area during lessons and also offer a convenient slopeside gathering space that is separated from the general public. The sundeck at the lodge has also been newly resurfaced. This year is an Olympic year and Tahoe Donner will be offering special events to celebrate and for guests to experience a taste of the Olympics at Tahoe Donner. We also have great family events including a torchlight parade, 200-foot banana split extravaganza, downhill dummy and rail jam. We are also participating in Learn to Ski and Snowboard Week. Special offers include parent’s day every Tuesday (excluding holiday periods). Bring your kids (under 13 years old) to Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area for a day of skiing and get an all-day adult lift ticket free for yourself ! Tahoe Donner is one of the only local ski areas that offers lesson or 3-year-olds; half-day sessions available for $79 including lift ticket, lesson and rentals. Tahoe Donner continually offers some of the best groomed terrain in the region and in keeping up with this standard, Tahoe Donner added a new snow groomer to the fleet last season.

120 14
PHOTO BY KENNY BLUM / TAHOE DONNER

TRAILS

AVER A G E SN O WFA L L
350+ inches

L I FT S 5 1 quad chair, 1 double chair, 3 conveyor lifts
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. WWW. TAHOEDONNER.COM

L I FT HO UR S

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

Lake it. Love it.
For your next Tahoe vacation, don’t just lake it, love it. Choose the ideal vacation property from Incline Vacation Rentals. With a wide selection of rental properties from 1-5 bedroom condos and homes, all in Incline Village, Nevada on the north shore of picturesque Lake Tahoe.

Incline Vacation Rentals
www.InclineVacations.com
Helping people enjoy Lake Tahoe since 1968.

(800) 831-3304 • ( 775) 831-3349 917 Tahoe Blvd. Suite #201 C

All our vacation properties are equipped with full kitchens, TV, VCR, telephone, linens and towels. Most have washers, dryers and multiple TVs. Many have high speed internet access.

VACATION RESORTS INTERNATIONAL
THREE BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN LOCATIONS

TMAG

Tahoe Seasons Resort: A few steps from Heavenly® Mountain Ski Resort. All-suite resort; in –room spas; yearround heated outdoor pool and hot tub. Tahoe Beach & Ski Resort: 500 feet of private beach on Lake Tahoe’s South Shore; minutes from Heavenly, casinos, dining; suites; kitchenettes; whirlpool tubs (most units); outdoor heated pool and more! The Lodge at Lake Tahoe: Center of South Lake Tahoe; condominium units; partial and full kitchens; pool and spa. RATES & PACKAGES Rates from $108 Call today for specials! *Based on availability. Restrictions apply.

RESERVATIONS AND INFORMATION 866.4MY.VACATION (866.469.8222) 8664myvacation.com

R E S O R T S

C R O S S - C O U N T R Y

HOPE VALLEY OUTDOORS
AT A G L A N C E
Hope Valley Outdoors is a sustainable, off-the-grid, solar powered winter resort offering our customers the best in outdoor recreational opportunities. If you’re looking for cross-country skiing, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, rentals, lessons, and even guided tours, Hope Valley Outdoors can provide experienced information for just about all your outdoor needs. In our quiet and secluded location, only 20 minutes from Lake Tahoe, we do not have any phone service. Therefore we only accept cash or checks. We operate out of a yurt at Pickett’s Junction at the intersection of Hwy 88/89. We are located in Hope Valley, a beautiful high alpine valley surrounded by seven ten thousand foot peaks. Our location is between South Lake Tahoe and Kirkwood Ski Resort.†Lodging and camping are all nearby, and we are open Thanksgiving through Easter. Our opening and closing dates depend on the snow conditions.

R N MO R A E L
. WWW U ALLEYO HOPEV

E
S.COM

TDOOR

W H A T ’ S N E W Our major focus is on fitting winter enthusiasts with cross country skis, snowshoes and accessories. Hope Valley Outdoors has over 60 miles of marked trails for cross country skiing and snowshoeing, Wonderland Tours and Moonlight Expeditions. On 20 miles, the resort grooms and sets track. The resort’s trail system and parking are on a donation program, considering grooming and plowing the parking is quite expensive – a $10 donation is recommended for trail use. Please email the resort for reservations at hopevalleyoutdoors@gmail.com.

PHOTO: DYLAN SILVER

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

530.583.8587 Monday–Friday 8 am–5 pm

Old Mill Rd

Fabian Way

28
N. Lake Blvd

Medical Surgical Dental Daytime Emergency Services

Cym

e

ay sW
lvd

28

La

ke F

La N.

B ke

ore

st

Rd

Meadow Brook Dr

2933 Lake Forest Rd. Tahoe City

811 Tahoe Boulevard Incline Village, NV 89451

LAKEFRONT/LAKEVIEW SALES & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Long term 1 bedroom to 6 bedroom $100 to $900 per night Year round

VACATION RENTALS

Lakewood Dr.

For your real estate inquiries please contact

Blane

JOHNSON
775-750-7789
Broker/Salesman

Sales, Rentals, Management

www.inclineattahoe.com 888-686-5253

Check our website for specials

Rhonda J. HUTTON
rhondahutton@att.net

775-336-7005 or 775-831-9000

R E S O R T S

C R O S S - C O U N T R Y

KIRKWOOD
CROSS COUNTRY & SNOWSHOE CENTER

AT A G L A N C E

The Kirkwood Cross Country Center is one of the premier destinations for classic and skate skiing in California. This winter the center will offer a number of tours that introduce guests to the beautiful area surrounding Kirkwood. Explore the high sierra by moonlight on a full moon snowshoe hike (dates 12/13, 1/11, 2/4, 2/18). Later in the season the Cross Country Center offers the chance to head out at sunset to catch Hope Valley at its most beautiful on a sunset snowshoe tour (dates 3/1, 3/8, 3/13). Guided tours are weekends only and fill up fast, more information and reservations can be made by calling (209) 258-7248.

PHOTO: COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS / KIRKWOOD RESORT

W H A T ’ S N E W Eighty kilometers of groomed trails at 7,800 feet offer the most spectacular scenery and exciting terrain in the west. Located 1/4 mile east of Kirkwood on Hwy 88 (next to the Kirkwood Inn), the Kirkwood Cross Country Center is nestled in a beautiful Alpine Valley. The diverse terrain offers excellent skiing for all abilities. Bring four-legged friends along too – dogs are allowed on two trails, the High Trail located behind the Kirkwood Inn and the Outer Loop on the meadow. Sip on hot chocolate beside the wood burning stove in the day lodge or warm up in one of three trailside warming huts, then finish the perfect day with a scrumptious meal at the historic Kirkwood Inn.
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The The Incline Incline Village Village Real Estate Team
SM SM

The Incline Village Real Estate Team
SM

Edee Edee Campbell Campbell REALTOR REALTOR 775.232.5262 775.232.5262 Edee@ Edee Edee@ Campbell SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com
REALTOR 775.232.5262 Edee@ SNPHomes.com

Mimi Ed Sally Ginger Bob Darrell Mimi Ed Sally Ginger Bob Darrell Komito Madigan Small Stoner Wheeler Plummer Komito Madigan Small Stoner Wheeler Plummer REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR Managing REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR REALTOR ManagingBroker Broker Broker/Owner Broker/Owner 775.762.7906 775.233.4068 775.742.0424 775.813.8420 775.843.9888 775.823.3307 775.762.7906 775.233.4068 775.742.0424 775.813.8420 775.843.9888 775.823.3307 Mimi@ EdMadigan@ SSmall@ Ginger@ Mimi Ed Ginger Bob BWheeler@ Mimi@ EdMadigan@ Sally SSmall@ Ginger@ BWheeler@ Darrell Darrell@ Darrell@ Komito Wheeler Plummer SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com Madigan SNPHomes.com Small SNPHomes.comStoner SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com
REALTOR 775.762.7906 Mimi@ SNPHomes.com REALTOR 775.233.4068 EdMadigan@ SNPHomes.com REALTOR 775.742.0424 SSmall@ SNPHomes.com REALTOR 775.813.8420 Ginger@ SNPHomes.com Managing Broker 775.843.9888 BWheeler@ SNPHomes.com Broker/Owner 775.823.3307 Darrell@ SNPHomes.com

Photo Photoprovided providedby byTT& &M MGarrels GarrelsGallery Galleryand andMary MaryGarrels, Garrels,Photographer Photographer
Photo provided by T & M Garrels Gallery and Mary Garrels, Photographer

Photo provided by T & M Garrels Gallery and Mary Garrels, Photographer

110 Club 110 Country Country Club Dr., Dr., Incline Incline Village, Village, NV NV 89451 89451 SNPHomes.com
the Hyatt Regency Lake Resort Accrossfrom from the Hyatt Regency LakeTahoe Tahoe Resort 110 Accross Country Club Dr., Incline Village, NV 89451
Offices Reno and Accross from the also Hyattin Regency LakeFernley Tahoe Resort Offices also in Reno and Fernley

775.831.7767 775.831.7767 775.831.7767 SNPHomes.com SNPHomes.com

Offices also in Reno and Fernley

R E S O R T S

C R O S S - C O U N T R Y

ROYAL GORGE
CROSS COUNTRY RESORT
AT A G L A N C E
North America’s largest cross country resort, Royal Gorge offers 200 kilometers of groomed trails across 6,000 acres of pristine land atop majestic Donner Summit. Six distinct track systems offer endless options for winter adventure, be it classic striding, XC skating or scenic snowshoeing. The Summit Station lodge offers all skier amenities, from rentals and retail to lessons and dining. Under new owner/operator Sugar Bowl Resort’s management, Royal Gorge is enjoying extensive upgrades & improvements, returning this iconic cross country resort to its once & former glory. And with a trail system now seamlessly connecting these two iconic resorts, skiers can enjoy the best of both worlds with world-class skiing & snowboarding at Sugar Bowl Resort plus endless XC skiing at Royal Gorge Cross Country. After a successful fundraising effort by the Truckee Donner Land Trust to acquire the Royal Gorge lands, new owner/operator Sugar Bowl Resort has invested over $750,000 into resort improvements and upgrades, including renovated Summit Station lodge, new wayfinding signage, and a fleet of grooming machines new to the trails. Skiers, skaters and snowshoers are sure to notice and appreciate the improvements, able to explore certain stretches of trail that haven’t been open in many seasons. A new fleet of fat tire snowbikes are available at Summit Station, with 10km of groomed singletrack trail available to explore for a wintertime bike ride. California’s first and only snowkiting school will return for its second year, teaching skiers & snowboarders how to harness the wind and cruise across the wide-open expanse of the Van Norden Meadow. XC trails are now seamlessly connected with the Village at Sugar Bowl, allowing skiers to enjoy lunch at the foot of the mountain, or stay slopeside in the Lodge at Sugar Bowl’s comfortable accommodations.

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PHOTO: DAPHNE HOUGARD

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open the door to a world of fantastic gifts, home decor & so much more!

hats - candles cards - wreaths birds ~ bears birdhouses windchimes kitchen items & other treasures!


8623 N. L ake Blvd., Kings Beach.

NOT YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S OPERA.
NEVADA OPERA
Guaranteed. Whether you’re into skiing, hiking, biking, rafting, fishing, stargazing, picnicking, or relaxing, it’s all waiting for you here, just 20 minutes from South Lake Tahoe, just down the hill a spell in beautiful Hope Valley. Scenery, it can’t get any grander; air, it can’t get any purer; hospitality, it can’t get any warmer.
nevadaopera.org

www.sugarpinegifts.com

530.546.3834

Love AT FIRST
SIGHT

www.sorensensresort.com

Our country cafe is open every day serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. For cabin rates and events calendar, call us or visit

Sorensen’s

14255 Highway 88 • Hope Valley, CA 96120 • 1-800-423-9949 or 530-694-2203

R E S O R T S

C R O S S - C O U N T R Y

TAHOE

CROSS COUNTRY SKI CENTER

AT A G L A N C E

Tahoe XC offers twenty three groomed cross country ski trails just above Tahoe City, a few minutes from downtown. Catch panoramic views of Lake Tahoe from several vantage points. Three different trailside warming huts offer free hot chocolate and shelter from the storm. Glide through open meadows and up challenging climbs with a fun downhill reward. The day lodge houses the Free Heel Cafe, Ski Rental, Ski School, and free Wifi. Tahoe XC hosts the start of the Great Ski Race, and is home of the 14th annual Gourmet Ski Tour. Tahoe XC now operates a second location in downtown Tahoe City. The Tahoe City Winter Sports Park at Tahoe City Golf Course. The Sports Park offers 3 kilometers of dog-friendly ski and snowshoe trails, two sledding hills, and night skiing and sledding every Saturday night. Food and beverage is available in the clubhouse, as well as ski, snowshoe, and sled rentals.

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TAHOE DONNER
AT A G L A N C E

CROSS COUNTRY SKI CENTER

Tahoe Donner is a world-class cross country ski center with some of the finest terrain to be found not only in the region but also nationwide. With a diversity of terrain skiers can enjoy gliding through pines and aspen groves, climbing challenging peaks or cruising along gentle rolling hills through aspens or the flats of Euer Valley. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center is a premier cross country ski and snowshoe facility with over 100 kilometers of trails groomed daily for diagonal striding, skating and snowshoeing. With a wide variety of terrain, there is something to meet every skier’s need, from beginner to expert. Dog lovers can buy a pass to ski with their dogs on 3 kilometers of designated trails including Cup of Tea, Piece of Cake and Dogonit. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center hosts a variety of events, programs and clinics throughout the season for skiers of every level. With great value, home-cooked food and impressive terrain Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center has a lot to offer. Daily hours 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. and season pass early ski is 7 a.m. Call 530-587-9484 for more information or visit www. tahoedonner.com/cross-country.

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A new trail has been created this year to link Hastings and Firewalker – making it a fun intermediate loop. Also new this year, new multi-day programs and lessons for kids have been added to the ski school offerings. Skating 101 is also a new program offered this year to teach the most basic and essential skills of skating. Participants will learn skills to help master cruising the flats, climbing hills and control going downhill on skate skis. Skating 101 is offered Mondays from Jan. 6-Feb. 24 from 10-11:30 a.m. for $160. In this Winter Olympic year, Tahoe Donner will be offering many special events to celebrate and allow guests to experience the Olympic sports of skiing cross country skiing and biathlon. Last season, the introduction of dog-friendly was a big success. This year, we have those same trails available as well as dog season passes. Thanks to a new Pisten Bully Nordic 400 groomer, the same machine used at the 2012 FIS Nordic World Championships, that was purchased last year, Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center can groom more trails in less time on a daily basis keeping the trails well-maintained and in great condition.

TAHOE MAGAZINE

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going somewhere?

GIFTS FOR GOOD
GIVE GENEROUSLY. GIVE THOUGHTFULLY.
Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation encourages you to give alongside other community members. Our collective dollars make a big impact. Give today for the good of our region. www.ttcf.net

Free! Night Rider

Daily Aiport Shuttle

TART Public Bus

N O R T H L A K E TA H O E

Backstreet F ramers & Gallery

Free! Express Ski Shuttle

Truckee Transit also offering new services.

• Custom framing • Unique selection of frames • Art gallery

LakeTahoeTransit.com

Historical downtown T ruckee 10099 Jibbom St. 530-587-1409 Open T ues. - Sat. 10-5

www.backstreetframers.com

PEOPLE&PLACES
Lake Tahoe is a recreation mecca that draws outdoor enthusiasts of all types. During the winter months, the Sierra Nevada is a haven for anyone who wants to play in the snow, including professional athletes such as Julia Mancuso and Sho Kashima. The area is also steeped in rich history and bright futures by those who live here year-round.

JONATHAN HAYWARD / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS TAHOE MAGAZINE 81

P E O P L E & P L A C E S

C O M M U N I T Y

Tahoe offers everything
From upscale accommodations to smaller areas with a relaxed vibe
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If you live here long enough, you stop seeing the lake as a
scheduled for the downtown corridor, the future of Kings Beach will see easy access for visitors between the shopping areas and recreation areas, all of which serve as the perfect Kings Beach venue for the upcoming 32nd annual SnowFest!

region. It’s because all those little communities surrounding the lake — from the 25,000 people in South Lake Tahoe to the 250 in Carnelian Bay — have unique local identities they do not want to lose. This guide will help you understand where you are, as you tour beautiful Lake Tahoe.
gunslingers and other wild west fantasies, it works hard to keep its local charm while playing host to the thousands of guests who stay in our area each year. With nearby Donner State Memorial Park and a downtown shopping area, Truckee can entertain just about anyone with some time on his or her hands. With a rich downtown shopping corridor and easy access to, among others, Sugar Bowl Ski Resort, Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort and the marvel that is the Donner Summit backcountry, Truckee’s winter playground is at your fingertips.

THE T OUR
INCLINE VILLAGE

to some of the world’s best winter athletes, including gold medalist and America’s sweetheart, Julia Mancuso.

ALPINE MEADOWS

Beach, Tahoe City has everything you need. And this is where SnowFest! started, way back in 1981. Celebrate 32 years of this true community event this March in TC, as the locals call it.

RE

This luxury village is home to some of the wealthiest people in the world. When you drive through, take Lakeshore Boulevard to view the large estates that border the lake on its northeast side. Only one mile from the casinos, and 30 miles from Reno and Carson City, Incline Village offers its own mountain in Diamond Peak and a number of winter athletic training hot spots — not to mention exclusive beaches that, even in the winter, afford beautiful views of the lake.

NORTHSTAR

Kings Beach

Just west of Incline Village, Kings Beach sits atop Lake Tahoe. With easy access to Northstar, the casinos and the lake, Kings Beach truly lives up to its name. And it’s only going to get better. With $48 million in improvements
WINTER 2013 / 2014

Just north of Kings Beach on Highway 267, halfway between Truckee and the lake, Northstar is a growing resort area that is filled with summertime activities. Best known for its shopping — jewelry, kids clothing, outdoor gear, you name it — its winter terrain park and its family friendly ski trails, Northstar is perfect for an afternoon with the kids. Also home to the $300 million Ritz Carlton, Lake Tahoe and a multi-million redeveloped base area, Northstar will play host to a number of fun festivals and events year-round.

SQUAW VALLEY

TRUCKEE

The town of Truckee is the gateway to the lake. With a rich history of saloons,

Halfway between Truckee and the lake on Highway 89, Squaw Valley is a world-recognized ski resort and home of the 1960 Winter Olympics. It’s also home to a great party to kick off SnowFest! The Tram Car takes visitors up to the top of the mountain to enjoy spectacular views and ice skating. The base area provides shopping and family activities, and plenty of parking. Speaking of Olympics, the mountain is home

Just a couple miles south of Squaw, accessible to and from Squaw via the Squaw/Alpine Express shuttle, Alpine Meadows is a locals’ favorite offering a diverse selection of terrain and a laid back atmosphere. Renowned for optimal spring skiing conditions, guest will be sure to learn a bit about “Cornology” at Alpine — what they call the science of skiing spring snow and one of the reasons Alpine has some of the best spring skiing in the region.

HOMEWOOD

TAHOE CITY

On the West Shore just south of Tahoe City lies Homewood, a small winter ski resort that boasts one of the best lake views in the entire basin. Homewood is one of the most beautiful places to stay, as it is surrounded by old-growth elm and pine trees, and sits just yards from the lake. And if you get a chance, talk to some of the locals — they are the definition of “tight-knit community,” and you might learn a thing or two from them, especially about our curious bear population.

On the northwest side of the lake, Tahoe City is a perfect little hamlet for visitors to enjoy the quiet of the lake while having plenty of entertainment options close by. With good restaurants and easy access to businesses and the picturesque walk along Commons

MEEKS BAY

This small little neighborhood on the West Shore offers luxurious views of the lake, and great access to nearby state parks. Meeks Bay has its own fire station, one of the few developments other than homes in this classic Tahoe vacation spot.

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THE TOUR
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE/ STATELINE

Just south of South Lake Tahoe, Meyers is a funky town that is home to many locals. If you’re looking for a trip off the beaten path, try lunch or dinner in Meyers, and come back telling stories about the “real” Tahoe.

The largest of the communities around Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe — its only city — has a large variety of entertainment options. The area’s biggest casinos bring in the area’s biggest act numbers— from Maroon 5 to Brad Paisley to Los Lobos and the Beach Boys — so if nightlife is what you’re looking for, make a trip to South Lake. Did we mention Heavenly Mountain Resort is there too? South Lake Tahoe has it all.

KIRKWOOD

About 35 miles from South Lake Tahoe, on a two-lane road that weaves over two mountain passes, lies Kirkwood Mountain Resort. It may be remote, but in this solitary horseshoe canyon, climate and geography conspire to create one of the purest, most authentic, big-mountain ski experiences in North America.

for the whole family to enjoy. The worldfamous gondola will take you to gorgeous winter views of the lake and the snowshoe hike back to town, should you try it, is perfect for those who are in shape — or want to be.

offer a slew of fun activities, and Zephyr Cove Resort offers perhaps the best line of snowmobile tours in the region, for people who need a bit more horsepower in their winter fun.

undisturbed serenity and unique recreational opportunities.

SAND HARBOR

GLENBROOK

HEAVENLY

ZEPHYR COVE

Heavenly Village offers shopping selections, great food and even a cinema

Located on the southeast short of the lake, Zephyr Cove is a historic area. Businesses nearby

On the northeast shore of Lake Tahoe, historic Glenbrook epitomizes the idea of rural and lake. Only 150 acres of the town have been developed, leaving homeowners and visitors with

With a sandy beaches, boat launches, picnic spots and access to worldclass biking, hiking and fishing, Sand Harbor is one of the most popular summer spots on the lake. But that doesn’t mean it’s not full of plenty of winter adventures. Be sure to pack your snowshoes or crosscountry skis, as you can catch the Flume

Trail and the Tahoe Rim Trail nearby, hit the trails down the road from Spooner Lake and explore the backcountry between Lake Tahoe and Carson City.

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P E O P L E & P L A C E S

B U S I N E S S

Going Global
Lake Tahoe-based Arcade Belts hot on the international market
BY SYLAS WRIGHT

S

ABOVE: From left, David Bronkie, Tristan Queen and Cody Townsend founded Arcade Belts in 2010 as a solution to the poorly fitting belts they once used. RIGHT: Arcade Belts come in a variety of colors and styles.

now down the pants, buckles that bite into the gut – these are just a couple of annoyances that are no longer tolerated by North Tahoe skiers Cody Townsend, Tristan Queen and David Bronkie. “We kind of had this minor revelation while skiing that our belts sucked,” said Townsend, a professional big-mountain skier based out of Squaw Valley. “Our leather and nylon belts that we were typically wearing for skiing just weren’t working. They were either too tight or too loose, too constricting, the buckle would slam you in the gut if you ate it, you’d get snow down your pants - they were just bad.” A solution was in order. Queen explored his options and came up with a stretchy fishing wader belt, which spawned an even better idea. “Tristan tried on these fishing wader belts and was like, ‘Oh my God, these are amazing.’ But it wasn’t our style,” Townsend said. “So we essentially started making our own (belts). We started out by making 500 of them - just kind of took a gamble on it -†and went in to some local shops and we sold out within about six or seven weeks. So we decided, ‘Maybe we should start a company.’” Arcade Belts was born. Three years later, the Tahoe brand has gone global, with sales in more than 140 stores across the country, as well as Canada, Japan, New Zealand and Australia. And Arcade Belts continues to grow. “We’re really happy about it. It’s cool to see something turn from kind of a pet project into a success organically, without forcing it to happen,” said Queen, who moved to Tahoe from Breckenridge, Colo., in 2006. “We kind of followed the natural course of things, and things kept going. It’s been fun to have a creative outlet and bring something a little different to the market.” To get the company off the ground, the trio of friends first learned to sew. They sewed the first 2,000 belts themselves, embarking on three-day marathons piecing together their new product. They settled on a flexible but tough, nylon-blend stretch weave, Townsend said, with commercial-grade, low-profile plastic buckles. “There are a few different fabrics in there, mainly nylon, which is super durable as opposed to polyester, which really

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS: GRANT KAYE AND GP MARTIN

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UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE
MACKINAW, KOKANEE SALMON, BROWN TROUT AND RAINBOW TROUT • 7 Boats, 30-45 ft. • Fishing year-round • 4, 5 & 7 Hour trips • Morning & Afternoon • Group Charters Available

A Reel

SNOWMOBILE SALES & RENTALS
Check out our two Snowmobile Tracks and Tubing Hill!
The Track Rental/Tubing Hill is located at 55 US Hwy 50 Stateline, NV (Next to Montbleu) the second Track Rental is located at the Lake Tahoe Golf Course (Snowmobile rentals only at this location)

TAHOE SPORT FISHING CO.
ski run marina | zephyr cove marina

800-696-7797
Follow us on: facebook.com/tahoesportfishing @tahoefishing | TahoeSportFishing

Your local CAT & Polaris dealer Sales, parts & service
2 71 9 L a k e T a h o e B l v d 5 3 0 . 5 4 4 . 5 4 4 9 SIERRAMOUNTAINSPORTS.COM

TIMESHARE RELSALES: SAVE THOUSANDS!
LS RENTA TOO!

1001 Heavenly Village Way - Suite 37
Marriott Timber Lodge - Best Deals

1-800-996-2001 The Shops at Heavenly Village

OPEN week i 7 days a ncl EVENI uding NGS

The market leader for Lake tahoe & Hawaii timeshare resales since 1989.
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P E O P L E & P L A C E S

B U S I N E S S

Arcade Belts are ideal for pretty much any outdoor activity.

breaks down with heat and the weather,” he said. “So that was a big part of it as well. We really wanted something that was super durable and lasted forever, and we took a lot of time to make sure we found the right webbing.” Based on customer feedback and the infallible test of time, they nailed it. “We have guys with the first belts we ever made, and they

pigeonholed to skiing. We really are a year-round brand.” Arcade Belts, which come in numerous colors, styles and functional designs, are useful for just about any activity, including climbing, backpacking, skating, skiing, mountain biking and more. They’re fashionable, too, making for great street wear, Bronkie said. Most of the belts retail between

look just the same,” Townsend said. While the first belts were designed with skiing in mind, Townsend, Queen and Bronkie -†like most Tahoe locals -†enjoy many of the outdoor recreational options the area affords. They wanted their belts to reflect that all-around, active lifestyle. “We live in the mountains because we love it here. Yeah, we happen to ski, but we didn’t really start this brand because we ski,” said Bronkie, a mechanical engineer who moved West from Buffalo, N.Y. “We don’t want to be

$24 and $26, although the friends plan to unveil a new, more sophisticated hybrid model this fall that will sell for $32. “It’s become sort of an everyday thing for me,” said Queen. “My primary use is my jeans every single day. It’s part of my wardrobe for whatever I get into. So I don’t look at it as a sports-specific thing. It also works really well for sitting at your desk emailing for 10 hours.” Porters Sports was the first local shop to jump on board, Queen said. Others followed suit - Tahoe Dave’s Ski & Boards, the Start Haus,

Tahoe Mountain Sports, Elite Feet of Lake Tahoe, even Obexer’s General Store in Homewood. “They took the first risk on them, and they did well. So we have a very solid relationship with our local retailers, because they’ve really supported us, and we try to always support them,” Townsend said. Townsend, a former big-mountain competitor who now sticks to filming and “chasing powder,” used his connections in the outdoor industry to branch out beyond Lake Tahoe. Soon Arcade Belts began

appearing in shops across the country, then Canada and overseas. Townsend said once the word got out, stores began contacting them. “A lot of people we’ve noticed have this ‘Ah ha’ moment when they put it on,” he said. “Because at first it’s like, ‘It’s just a belt; whatever.’ But then they put it on and it’s like, ‘Oh, I get it now.’ So a lot of our sales and growth is by word of mouth from people falling in love with them.” The experience as business owners is new to all three friends. They overcame the initial financial hurdle by starting out small. They’ve since managed to double the brand’s growth each year since 2010. “The goal was to be successful, but I don’t think we really knew what success was. The numbers, or what territories we’d be in or whether we’d try to go international, that was very much not planned out,” Queen said. “It’s been a learn-as-we-go, by-the-seatof-our-pants kind of thing. We had to develop a plan as we went. We see where we’re trying to go now, but originally it was like, ‘We have 300 belts; we need to sell 300 belts.’
Sylas Wright is sports editor for the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza newspapers in Truckee, Tahoe City and Incline Village. He can be reached at swright@sierrasun.com.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS: GRANT KAYE AND GP MARTIN

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P E O P L E & P L A C E S

P R O F I L E

Sochi
2 0 1 4
THE

Tahoe
INFLUENCE
BY SYLAS WRIGHT

U.S. Alpine Ski Team – loaded with plenty of local talent – looking to build on racing success

E

uropean domination in Alpine ski racing is a thing of the past - a memory of what used to be. Credit the United States. The upstart U.S. Ski Team enters the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, on the heels of a historic season in which it produced 33 World Cup podiums by 10 different athletes, including 18 first-place finishes. Led by the red-hot Ted Ligety, who claimed three World Championship gold medals, the U.S. squad became the first non-European nation to win the medal standings at Worlds, with five. “I think there’s definitely a lot of confidence on the team,” said

11-year U.S. Ski Team veteran Stacey Cook of Truckee, who was part of the 2010 Alpine team that won eight medals. “It really drives everyone to push themselves, which is a good thing. When everyone on the team is coming off a good season, it really makes for a positive atmosphere to be around.” Cook is coming off a fine season herself. The Truckee native, who now trains out of Mammoth, began the 2012-2013 World Cup season by earning two downhill podiums in Lake Louise, Alberta. She wound up fourth in the downhill standings.

U.S. WOMEN LOADED
The 29-year-old Cook is surrounded by competitive company on the U.S. women’s speed team, which has secured the overall downhill title four consecutive seasons. Leading the way are Lindsey Vonn and the North Shore’s own Julia Mancuso of Squaw Valley, both of whom will look to add to their Olympic medal count in Sochi. Despite suffering a knee injury

that held her out of the final two downhill races last season, Vonn won three of the five downhills she entered, which was good enough for a record sixth straight title in the discipline. Vonn has won 17 World Cup titles and 59 World Cup races, which ranks second on the women’s all-time list. “She’ll be definitely ready to go,” Cook said of her teammate, who won gold in downhill in 2010. “She’s so strong and naturally talented, I don’t think it will be hard for her to get back to her winning ways.” Mancuso, the 2006 Olympic gold medalist in the super G, recorded podium finishes in four of six super G races on the World Cup tour last season, never finishing worse than sixth. She finished fourth in the overall standing for the second straight year. Mancuso then capped her season by winning an American record 16th national title at the U.S. Alpine Championships, taking the giant slalom at her home mountain. “I think that we’ve had really strong leadership, and obviously Julia and Lindsey have been part

of that,” Cook said. “They are constantly pushing us to get better and proving that it’s possible.” While Vonn and Mancuso lead the way with their experience and success, the U.S. women’s team is stacked with still-emerging talent, as Lauren Ross and Alice McKennis both earned their first podiums last season, while Leanne Smith had two downhill podiums and was 12th in the downhill standings. Teenage standout Mikaela Shiffrin, meanwhile, stormed onto the scene to win the World Cup slalom title. Shiffrin, now 18, finished fifth in the overall standings in only her second year on tour. Cook said the U.S. Ski Team’s increasing success on the world stage has boosted confidence across the board. “I think that’s one thing that the U.S. hasn’t really had before is that confidence of knowing that it (victory) is within our grasp,” Cook said. “A lot of the past Olympic medalists have been surprises. And now, it’s not that we expect it, but it’s something that we know we

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can shoot for. So it’s a different approach, a different attitude.” Mancuso confirmed as much. Four years after earning two Olympic silver medals, in downhill and super combined, she said she has one goal in Russia - to bring home her second career Olympic gold. “I want to win gold again. It was incredible to win two more medals in Vancouver, and I am super proud of those silvers, but nothing compares to standing on the top step,” Mancuso said.

U.S. MEN POISED FOR SUCCESS
The U.S. squad bolsters a deep and talented men’s roster as well, paced by Ligety after his smoking 2012-13 season. In addition to his hat trick at the World Championships -†he won gold in the super G, super combined and GS -†the technical specialist from Park City, Utah, won six GS races on the World Cup and finished on the podium in all eight races. He secured his fourth GS

title and placed a career-best third in the overall standings. He ended his year by winning his seventh career national title at Squaw Valley in the slalom. Joining Ligety are Squaw Valley skiers Marco Sullivan and Travis Ganong, both speed-event specialists, Truckee grad Tim Jitloff, Steven Nyman, and Bode Miller, who sat out all of last season to heal from injuries. David Chodounsky and Nolan Kasper also were named to the U.S. Ski Team’s A Team this past fall. The 36-year-old Miller will compete in his fifth Olympic Games. He won gold in the super combined in 2010 and took silver in the super G. In 2002, he skied to silver medals in the GS and combined. Sullivan, 33, who finished third in the opening downhill of last season, at Lake Louise, will look to secure his fourth Olympic berth, while Ganong, 25, is seeking his first-ever Olympic roster spot. Ganong is coming off his third national title, as he won the super G at the U.S. Alpine Championships at Squaw. Sullivan also owns three

U.S. titles -†two in downhill and one in super G. “My sights are definitely set on the Games,” Ganong said, adding that he won’t know for sure if he made the U.S. Olympic team until almost February. “Going to the Olympics and representing the United States has always been a dream of mine since I first started skiing. Now that dream is becoming a reality, and I’m just going with it. “I’m trying not to let the nerves surface, and just keep doing what I love to do, and reminding myself every day to just enjoy every moment, not take things too seriously and take care of the little things. If I do all of that, nerves won’t be an issue and come February I’ll be where I want to be.” Jitloff, who excels in the technical events, won his fourth national title at the end of last season, in GS. He began this season on the U.S. Ski Team’s B Team. Nyman won the Val Gardena downhill to highlight his 2012-13 season. With so many competitive skiers on the U.S. Alpine Ski Team, roster

spots are hardly a lock outside of the elite few. And the athletes are well aware of it. “We know it’s going to be really hard just to qualify, because all of us are capable of being medal contenders,” Cook said. “It’s been awhile since we’ve had a team with more capable medal contenders than spots.”
Sylas Wright is sports editor for the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza newspapers in Truckee, Tahoe City and Incline Village. He can be reached at swright@sierrasun.com.
Marco Sullivan of Squaw Valley is one of a handful of Olympic hopefuls from the Lake Tahoe area. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: FRANK GUNN Julia Mancuso, of the United States, speeds down the course during the first run of an alpine ski, women’s World Cup giant slalom, in Semmering, Austria, Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2010. PHOTO BY
MARCO TROVATI / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Stacey Cook of Truckee races in a World Cup downhill last season.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: U.S. SKI TEAM

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Q & A

Sho Kashima, a Heavenly Foundation skier and U.S. Ski Team member, podiumed twice at the Sprint U.S. Freestyle Championships at Heavenly Mountain Resort to end last season. This year he’s gunning for some Olympic hardware.

Making a Comeback
Four years and two knee surgeries later, Heavenly skier Sho Kashima is feeling strong entering Olympic year
BY BECKY REGAN

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his is the season that Sho Kashima was waiting for. The Heavenly and U.S. Ski Team moguls skier is entering the season injury-free for the first time since 2009. The repaired ligaments in both knees feel strong, and Kashima says training is going well - a surprising sentiment since the 26-year-old is always his own toughest critic. Kashima finished last season ranked No. 17 in the world, but that was after he sat the first half of the season out rehabbing his second knee injury. He charged back into national

ranking in the final two months and wrapped up the season by scorching his hometown resort with a secondand third-place performance at the U.S. Freestyle Championships. The likely 2014 Olympian looks like he’s set to have his best season yet, but his Olympics path was not easy and it was paved with potholes. Kashima was all set for a trip to the 2010 Winter Olympics when he tore his ACL, MCL and meniscus about three months before the Games. Olympic dreams were put on hold as Kashima underwent surgery and started the rehab process. The following year, 2011-12,

Kashima was back on the slopes. He looked stronger than ever, with three World Cup podium finishes, until he was dealt another season-ending blow. Halfway through the season, Kashima tore the ACL and meniscus in his other knee and fractured a femur. It was a devastating setback. Kashima had just spent the better part of a year rehabbing the same injury in his quest to climb back to the Olympic level. Now he was back to square one. Kashima fixed his attention on 2014 and started the slow rehab process all over again.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: KIRK PAULSEN

“ALL OF THESE SETBACKS HAVE CHANGED MY
ATTITUDE IN A GOOD WAY. I’VE LEARNED TO SWALLOW MY PRIDE AND NOT BE AFRAID TO LOOK STUPID WHILE WORKING ON MY WEAKNESSES.

Now, four years and two knee surgeries later, Kashima is skiing like an Olympian once again, and he doesn’t plan on slowing down until he comes home with some matching hardware. Tahoe Magazine caught up with Kashima at a U.S. Ski Team training camp in Chile in August for an email Q-and-A. He shared his thoughts and goals for the upcoming season.

Q: It’s all pretty good timing considering this is an Olympic year. How do you feel about your chance of making the team? What will it take? A: I’ve showed that I’m capable of being one of the guns on World Cup in the past. I was ranked third in the World before my latest knee injury. I’m looking to improve from that spot. Q: What are your goals for the upcoming season? A: To finish the season ranked No. 1 in the world and bring back an Olympic medal when I come home for US Nationals at Heavenly in March. Q: You’re entering this season with some serious experience and competition knowledge under you belt. How has all that experience changed your mind set before this season? A: All of these setbacks have changed my attitude in a good way. I’ve learned to swallow my pride and not be afraid to look stupid while working on my weaknesses. It’s all helped me become more balanced, resulting in more success. Q: What competition are you most looking forward to this year?
December and April. It’s been a few years since I’ve skied a full year of competition.
Becky Regan is a former sports editor of the Tahoe Daily Tribune newspaper in South Lake Tahoe and a former San Francisco Giants beat writer for MLB.com.

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LIGHT UP THE NIGHT
NOV. 30, 2013—With a host of classic holiday activities, including s’mores, storytelling, and holiday caroling, this is a terrific family event. Don’t miss the breathtaking tree-lighting ceremony!

Q: When we left off last season you had just picked up some sweet hardware, at the US Freestyle Championships on your home turf. What have you been up to since?
back to Park City so I can water ramp 3-4 times per week and get in the gym six times per week. I coached for five weeks this summer between Mt. Hood and Whistler to make some money, now the focus is on my on-snow training and competition. your summer “vacation?”

FULL MOON TOURS
DEC. 14, 2013; FEB. 14, 2014— Come on

A: Since April, I’ve moved

out on cross country skis or snowshoes and watch the moon rise from the trails. Includes dinner and wine-tasting!

CHILDREN’S GLOW STICK PARADE AND CARNIVAL
FEB. 22, 2014 —A kid’s version of a torch-

Q: What was the best part of

A: Being healthy. It’s been a while since I’ve been able to participate in all of the offseason ski training.
season in some time that you’re not coming off a knee surgery. How are you feeling heading into the season? How do you feel you were skiing during summer training? great and my skills have improved since I was last healthy. Can’t wait until winter.

light parade with glow sticks for children 10 and under. Come early to secure a spot in the parade and get glow sticks by playing free carnival games. Sign-ups and carnival start at 4:30 p.m.; parade starts at 6:30 p.m. This event is free!

Q: This will be the first

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MARCH 23, 2014— Our new on- snow gourmet food tasting event will feature delicious offerings from local restaurants.

A: All of them between

A: My body is finally feeling

530-587-9400 tahoedonner.com

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Q & A

On a Mission
Lake Tahoe’s hometown sweetheart, Julia Mancuso, has her sights set on gold once again
BY SYLAS WRIGHT

T

ahoe Magazine caught up with Julia Mancuso during her offseason to chat about the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia. Check out what the Squaw Valley alpine-racing star had to say.

Q: What were some of the highlights of your summer offseason? A: This summer was great. I spent a lot of time in the gym getting healthy, and skiing in New Zealand. This summer I decided to make it a long ski trip with a short recovery in Fiji in the middle, so four weeks in New Zealand, one week in Fiji and one week in Chile. It was really productive, and super fun to get to go to a tropical paradise between. Q: With it being an Olympic year, did you treat your offseason any different than normal as far as training? A: I spent a lot more time and attention to staying healthy, and did tons of Pilates and physical therapy. It’s not really different, just an extra focus on being the most prepared I can be. Q: Not only do you have a few Olympics under your belt now, you’ve also had a fair share of success there. What is about the Games that brings out the best in you?

ABOVE: Julia Mancuso of Squaw Valley celebrates after winning the silver medal in super G at the Alpine Skiing World Championships in GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany, in 2011.
PHOTO BY JEAN-CHRISTOPHE BOTT

LEFT: Julia Mancuso shows off her bronze medal an Alpine FIS Ski World Championships awards ceremony last season. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO:
MITCHELL GUNN

A: I just love the Olympics. I grew up in Squaw Valley so the Olympic flame really burns bright in everyday life. There really wasn’t a day that I didn’t think about them, or dream about being in them as a kid. I guess I just focused a lot of my energy there, and I have been so fortunate for those dreams to come true. Q: I imagine people ask if they can see your Olympic medals. Do you ever break them out to show off ?

“IT’S LIKE HAVING SUPERPOWERS.
I MIGHT LOOK LIKE A NORMAL GIRL, BUT WATCH OUT!

- Julia Mancuso, on having so many Olympic medals

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Julia Mancuso races down the course on her way to sixth place in the women’s World Cup downhill ski race in Lake Louise, Alberta on Saturday Dec. 4, 2010.
PHOTO BY FRANK GUNN / THE CANADIAN PRESS

A: I don’t keep them with me, so I wish I could, cause I think it’s kinda awesome and funny at the same time. It’s like having superpowers. I might look like a normal girl, but watch out!
Sochi Games with any specific goals in mind?

more prepared in the moment, unlike downhill where you get training runs, and you just get the one chance. final Olympics?

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Q: Will this be your

Q: Are you entering the

A: I want to win gold again. It was incredible to win two more medals in Vancouver, and I am super proud of those silvers, but nothing compares to standing on the top step.
your all-around ski racing ability. What is your favorite event, and in which event do you think you have the best shot at gold?

A: I have no idea. I am having fun in the sport, and I am in the best shape physically and mentally than I have ever been, so it’s hard to put a limit on things.
ski racing?

Q: What’s next for you after

Q: You’ve always been known for

A: I want to continue to spend my life in nature, so wherever that brings me. Hopefully on top of more mountain peaks.
Sylas Wright is sports editor for the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza newspapers in Truckee, Tahoe City and Incline Village. He can be reached at swright@sierrasun.com

it’s fast and you have to make tactical decisions without knowing what comes next or how the speed will feel. I think you have to be

A: I really like super G, because

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H I S T O R Y

McGlashan’s vision of winter sports got a big push when Truckee’s Hilltop ski jump was built in 1928, three years before his death.

Charles F. McGlashan: Truckee’s patriarch
The history-rich Sierra Nevada location known as Truckee celebrated 150 years in 2013. One man’s noted accomplishments helped make it possible.
BY MARK MCLAUGHLIN
oseph Gray and his family are credited as the first Anglo Americans to settle near the present site of Truckee when he built a toll station during the summer of 1863, near the river where the current Highway 267 Bridge is located. For at least 8,000 years before Gray arrived, native people had traveled through and summered in the region. Resident archeologist Susan Lindstrom has reported that, before downtown Truckee was built, the site was a Washoe Indian village named “K’ubuna detde’yi.” Gray may be considered the first pioneer to settle the Truckee Basin, but arguably the town patriarch is Charles Fayette McGlashan, whose noted accomplishments live on today, most importantly in winter sports. When McGlashan died Jan. 6, 1931, all major California newspapers mourned his passing with eulogies recognizing his life as “a pioneer historian, newspaperman, scientist, educator and barrister.” His interests were diverse: during his criminal justice career he was known as one of the best defense attorneys on the West Coast. He was an accomplished scientist; fascinated

J

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: TRUCKEE DONNER HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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with astronomy, but best known for his work in entomology (study of insects), specifically butterflies. As a lepidopterist, McGlashan and his daughter Ximena amassed a collection of more than 20,000 specimens of butterflies and moths, one of the largest and most extensive in the world. An amazing array of the insects were sealed and protected between glass panels for viewing; part of the collection is still on display at Donner Memorial State Park. McGlashan’s 1879 book, “History of the Donner Party: A Tragedy of the Sierra,” about the 1847 event and its survivors is still a classic. It was his measurements of cut tree stumps from that winter that dictated the height of the pedestal for the monument at the state park. In a strange coincidence, McGlashan was conceived in Wisconsin Territory during the harsh winter of 1847, when members of the ill-fated Donner Party were struggling to survive east of Donner Pass. Thirty years later McGlashan would meet many of the survivors

and write the first comprehensive history of that tragic frontier episode. His pioneering efforts to develop a winter sports industry in the Truckee-Lake Tahoe area have had the greatest historic and economic impact of all. Born into a poor family in the primitive settlement of Beaver Dam, Wis., on Aug. 12, 1847, to Peter and Elizabeth McGlashan, Charles was raised the only boy among six sisters. When he was about 2 years old, Elizabeth died in childbirth at Christmastime. In 1851, Peter McGlashan suddenly broke the news that the family was leaving for California, and after two years of preparation, they headed west for Placerville, where they arrived in September 1854. As a boy, “Fayette,” as he was called then, swept floors and did yard work to pay tuition at Sotoyome Institute in Healdsburg.

He graduated in 1864 and after a short stint teaching students in a Mother Lode mining camp was accepted to Williston Seminary, a progressive intermediary school in Massachusetts that specialized in science. “Mac,” as his fellow students called him, excelled scholastically and athletically. But in his final year of law studies, he was expelled along with eight other seniors for protesting the disciplinary treatment of a classmate. He returned to California in the spring of 1871 as a 23-year-old man to take the position of principal and teach at Placerville Academy. By December, McGlashan had fallen in love and married a pretty,

ABOVE: Charles Fayette McGlashan in his Fraternal Order of Knights of Pythias brigadier general uniform. CONTRIBUTED
PHOTO: TRUCKEE DONNER HISTORICAL SOCIETY

LEFT: The iconic McGlashan tower covered a 17-ton rocking stone and his collection of Donner Party artifacts. PHOTO BY MARK
MCLAUGHLIN

young local girl named Jennie Munson. In 1872, the newlyweds moved to Truckee, where he accepted the school superintendent job. In July, the couple stepped off the train at Truckee and strolled into the dust of Front Street. At the time Truckee was a raucous, violent town that harbored sketchy transients, a large Chinese population, and a red light district. The wild and wooly town also held McGlashan’s future. Energetic and curious, McGlashan immersed himself in his new job and colorful hometown. His role as superintendent necessitated him visiting the school at the little town of Boca five miles down the Truckee River. At Boca he discovered a library full of law books and he soon began studying at night for the California Bar Examination. He also began writing humorous articles regional newspapers and some editors encouraged McGlashan to go out and experience new angles for his stories. During a severe snowstorm in January 1880, McGlashan climbed aboard a Central Pacific snowplow to see how railroad men endured mountain blizzards. Engine crews called the snow-clearing shifts a “suicide run.” Powered by 8 to 12 locomotives at full throttle, the lead plow plunged into the first drift at speeds in excess of 40 miles-perhour. Hitting the dense snowpack was like racing into a pile of bricks. Derailments were common, as were shattered windshields smashed by flying chunks of icy snow. Truckee was a dangerous place in the 1870s, plagued by criminals and vagrants attracted to the seamy red light district on Jibboom Street and strip of saloons and dance halls on Front Street. In 1872, McGlashan joined a secret vigilance committee called the “601” formed to eradicate lawlessness elements and chase them out of town. These vigilantes were often respectable local businessmen who protected their identity by wearing masks over their faces. In the 1870s, the silver mines at Virginia City slowly began to play out and unemployment grew among Truckee’s workforce. The newly jobless white workers became less tolerant of Chinese im-

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H I S T O R Y

migrants as men scrambled for any job they could get, including some of the low-paying work performed by Orientals. CP had employed thousands of Chinese workers and when railroad construction ended, about 1,000 settled in Truckee. These hardworking laborers were very active in the regional logging and ice harvesting industries. In fact, Truckee’s Chinatown was the second largest on the West Coast. McGlashan became a vocal leader in the community for the removal of the Chinese. By 1886, vigilantes had used violent tactics such as murder and arson to force virtually all Chinese inhabitants to leave town. McGlashan later opened a law office which kept him busy, but for a few months during the winter of 1876 he tried his hand as editor at the Truckee Republican newspaper. McGlashan quickly realized that he couldn’t run his own business and a popular bi-weekly newspaper, but before he quit he published many articles about Truckee’s winter scenery and early winter sports such as tobogganing, sledding and ice skating. It was a harbinger of his later efforts in the early 1890s to help Truckee organize an annual winter carnival to promote sports and the local economy. McGlashan’s greatest accomplishment was arguably his conviction that the economic future for Truckee would be based on winter sports. In 1894, he constructed a 45-foot tall, cone-shaped wooden frame on the hill near his house above town. He wrapped the towering structure with chicken wire and at night when temperatures fell below freezing he sprayed water on it until it eventually resembled a

READ MORE
More information can be found in “Give Me a Mountain Meadow” by M. Nona McGlashan, 1981, and “From the Desk of Truckee’s C.F. McGlashan,” edited by M. Nona McGlashan and Betty H. McGlashan.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS: NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

ABOVE: McGlashan’s mansion and the Rocking Stone Tower on the hillside above Truckee, which burned down in 1935. LEFT: In January 1880, Charles McGlashan rode a bucker plow like this one for a newspaper story.

gigantic icicle. His neighbors had no idea what McGlashan was up to and rumors abounded. McGlashan really sparked everyone’s interest when he rigged up a powerful arc light on a nearby flagpole that bathed the sparkling icicle in bright light. At night, no one could take their eyes off the magnificent, glittering tower of ice aglow above them. It certainly caught the attention of curious train passengers traveling through Truckee. At local meetings, he proposed that the town build a “spacious ice palace, illuminated during the day by a transparent roof of thin ice, but supported by thick walls of ice

surrounding a large skating rink.” It wasn’t long before McGlashan’s dream snowballed into what became Truckee’s famous Winter Carnival, a major tourist attraction for snow lovers in California and Nevada. It was the first ice carnival in the West; complete with live music, concessions and more. On winter weekends, the town staged dog sled races, toboggan runs, horse-drawn sleigh rides, ski races, and moonlight skating parties on Donner Lake. Three months before his death on Jan. 6, 1931, Charles McGlashan wrote a letter to the Truckee Chamber of Commerce:

“Now, in my eighty-fourth year, I look back to quite a number of years when it is well known I was the acknowledged leader of Truckee Winter Sports. I have always believed that the vast snowfields of the Truckee Basin, situated on a transcontinental railroad in sunny California, would annually attract tens of thousands of visitors.” The dream of the Truckee-Tahoe region as a mecca for winter fun has succeeded beyond anyone’s imagination, a vision that led directly to the 1960 Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley, an event that showcased Truckee and Lake Tahoe as an international destination for all seasons.
Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at www.thestormking.com. Mark can be reached at mark@thestormking.com. Check out his blog at www.tahoenuggets.com.

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R E V I E W
“Tahoe Chase” is the latest installment in Todd Borg’s Owen McKenna mystery novel series. For more information visit www.toddborg.com. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

‘Tahoe Chase’
Author scores with latest mystery novel
BY GLORIA SINIBALDI

T

odd Borg’s mystery series featuring private detective Owen McKenna has become part of Lake Tahoe’s culture. Rumor has it you can order an Owen’s Omelette, named for his popular protagonist, off the menu at the Red Hut Cafe. That’s quite a tribute. With 10 published books under his belt, Borg’s 11th, “Tahoe Chase,” was released in August and does not disappoint. I found “Tahoe Chase” to be engaging with a well-developed plot. It was sprinkled with just the right amount of sophistication and coupled with a double dollop of suspense and drama that added the extra spice. Borg provides vivid descriptions and uses a great deal of detail to set his scenes. It doesn’t matter if you are a faithful follower or a first-time reader, you’ll enjoy this one. No, the books in Borg’s series do not have to be read in any particular sequence ... just in case you’re wondering. “Tahoe Chase” is set during the winter months. Locals, as well as other Tahoe aficionados, will be well acquainted with the evocative and familiar scenes of the area. McKenna is hired by Joe Rorvick, a former Olympic ski racer, to investigate how Rell, his beloved wife, could take an ugly fall from their backyard
WINTER 2013 / 2014

deck. Rell receives serious injuries from the fall and lingers near death. She was not clumsy nor was she careless. Was this an accident or was there a perpetrator that tossed her off the deck intentionally? The story unfolds while she lies in a hospital bed, and Joe, 92 years old, struggles with the decision to remove her from life support. A series of supposedly accidental

“IS A PROPOSED
TAHOE SKI RESORT DRIVING SOMEONE TO MURDER?

deaths and strange occurrences ensue, leaving both McKenna and Joe to wonder if there’s a sinister connection. Is a proposed Tahoe ski resort driving someone to murder? With Spot, McKenna’s beloved Great Dane, by his side, the detective unravels the truth, but it’s not a flawless effort. There’s a lot of second-guessing and a handful of gut instincts to explore before the facts are exposed. Readers will enjoy the Tahoe scenes both on and off the water. They’ll travel through parts of Desolation Wilderness, ride on a snowmobile by moonlight and enjoy

a Cave Rock adventure involving a fancy cruise craft. “Tahoe Chase” touches on the socially sensitive topic of domestic abuse. Simone, who suffers at the hand of her brutal boyfriend, emerges to take center stage in the book’s plot. “Tahoe Chase” may provide a sense of empowerment to anyone in a similar situation, and, if so, that’s a positive. At 351 pages it’s possible a twist or two could have been eliminated from the book, but then it wouldn’t have been nearly as clever. Each turn is well thought out and interesting. If you’re looking for a steamy novel, this is not the one for you. I enjoyed the sentiment and

the suspense, and I fell in love with Spot. “Tahoe Chase” will provide a lot of interesting developments that pop up when you’re least expecting them. It’s a great source of entertainment to dive into after a brisk walk in the woods. Sit back and enjoy, but be warned. It might be addicting. You could find yourself ordering that Owen’s Omelette and tapping your toe waiting for McKenna’s next adventure. Borg’s goal is to write one each year.
Gloria Sinibaldi resides part-time in South Lake Tahoe. She is a job coach, trainer and author. She can be reached at glorialinda16@gmail.com.

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TAHOE MAGAZINE 99

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TAHOE MAGAZINE 101

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VIEW FROM ABOVE
BY ADAM JENSEN

ALL-IMPORTANT SIERRA NEVADA SNOW SURVEYS TAKE TO THE SKIES
GETTING AN ESTIMATE OF THE AMOUNT OF WATER IN REGION’S SNOWPACK HAS LONG BEEN A LABORIOUS PROCESS.

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Surveyors accomplish much of the work by end, said Bruce McGurk, a researcher with the hand, taking measurements at specific locations snow survey program and former manager at the year after year and comparing data to past results. Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in Yosemite National A host of remote sensors contributes to the Park. With demand for water at an all-time high knowledge, but predicting how much water the and climate change impacting the timing of snow contains is still a guessing game for water snowmelt, this traditional hedging is coming with managers looking to serve millions of acres of greater degrees of uncertainty, according to the farmland, people and businesses. researchers. The Airborne Snow Observatory program - a “Everybody’s looking at you to do a better and partnership between NASA’s Jet Propulsion better job and your tools are getting worse and Laboratory and the California Department of worse, until ASO comes along,” McGurk said. Water Resources, among others - took to the sky The measurements may provide implications in 2013 to provide more accurate estimates of for a host of areas outside of water management, California’s water supply. including fighting wildfires, managing wildlife and By using a combination of sensing equipment planning a backcountry ski trip. mounted in the bottom of a twin-prop plane, Because of the precision of the technology and scientists will be able to fill in a major missing its nearly real-time availability, the data gathered puzzle piece in the snowmelt equation. Researchers from the aerial surveys can be displayed in detailed will use spectrometer readings to measure the maps showing how much snow remains in specific snowpack’s albedo - or reflectivity - and a remote areas, even terrain in the High Sierra, well above sensing technology known as Lidar to gauge the currently existing remote sensing technology. snowpack’s depth during the aerial program. “Oh, it’d be huge,” said Frank Gehrke, chief Direct solar radiation accounts for about 90 of the California Cooperative Snow Survey, percent of snowmelt, but can’t be measured using about the possibilities for backcountry skiers and traditional on-the-ground surveys and remote snowboarders. sensors, Tom Painter, the principal investigator Backcountry users would be able to see accurate, on the aerial surveys for NASA’s Jet Propulsion up to date basin-by-basin snowpack totals for Laboratory, said in May 2013. Measuring the remote areas, he said. reflectivity of the snowpack will give researchers a “There’s still a lot of snow up there that we don’t more accurate idea of what’s happening with the know anything about,” Gehrke said. snowmelt, Painter said. Existing snow-surveying methods will remain, “To be able to actually forecast the timing of but the aerial surveys are likely to become a bigger snowmelt you need to be able to determine the part of how California, and possibly the rest of the albedo and how that is progressing,” Painter said. world, watches its water, Painter said. Previous measurement techniques “I don’t see it replacing it,” he said. only provide part of the picture, “There’s great utility in actually Painter added. knowing what’s going on on Remote sensors can be the ground. unreliable and aren’t “Having this really able to measure the robust measurement snowpack as it of the timing and THERE’S STILL retreats into the magnitude of upper elevations snowmelt takes us A LOT OF of the mountain into the maturity range. Manual of water resource SNOW UP THERE snow surveys, management,” he often conducted said. THAT WE DON’T on cross-country The aerial snow skis, also aren’t able survey project is KNOW ANYTHING to reach late season funded into 2015 water reserves of the and focuses on the ABOUT High Sierra. Tuolumne River Basin. “It’s a stunningly Painter said he sees limited amount of the program expanding, information,” according but the timeline is funding to the researcher. The limited dependent. When large swaths information is especially stunning of the mountain range could be given the importance of water to the state’s surveyed from the air is unknown. nearly $2 trillion economy, Painter said. Initial results of the aerial surveys are not yet The uncertainty in the water supply estimates available online. Data from the flights is expected leave water managers hedging their bets about how to be posted at http://aso.jpl.nasa.gov as it much water will make it to reservoirs by season’s becomes available. •

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

A 2008 aerial photo shows the Sierra Nevada snowpack near Mono Lake.
PHOTO BY JEFF PANG

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Grassroots Powdersurf founder Jeremy Jensen lands a pop shuvit in the backcountry on his bindingless powdersurf board.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: JEREMY JENSEN

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WINTER 2013 / 2014

THE

A POWDER SURFING STORY
BY MICHELLE MORTON

A

re you obsessed with riding powder and the

feeling of floating over fresh snow? Do you dream of taking your surfing skills to the mountains? kickflip shuvit in the backcountry excite you? Does the possibility of pulling off the first ever

pioneers of this new industry are learning what shapes and sizes work best for surfing powder without bindings, and they are pushing the limits of what people think is possible.

If so, powdersurfing could open up a world of possibilities. The

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“Landing a kickflip on snow was always a fantasy I had while snowboarding, and now it’s a reality,” South Lake Tahoe photographer Jason Hogan said. “Riding a powsurf board is a totally unique experience - it floats differently than a snowboard and you have to be more calculated in your lines. I just love the challenge and the sensation!” Chris Gallardo, Tahoe resident and owner/ founder of splitboard.com, has been riding bindingless for four seasons and powsurfing for two. He said the new sport has been challenging. “You have to rely so much more on technique, weighting, foot placement, speed, balance, etc,” Gallardo said. “There’s something genuinely fun about adding that challenge back to snowboarding ... It’s hard not to grin like a kid again and it quickly becomes addictive.” Snowboarding has its roots in bindingness riding. The original snowboards, developed in the 1960s by Sherman Poppen and Dimitrie Milovich, had no fixed bindings - the riders stood on the board like a surfboard. Hogan grew up skateboarding, and the very first time he tried to ride snow sideways was on an old skateboard deck turned backward. When Burton re-birthed Steve Fink’s idea of a bi-deck snowskate, he knew he had to get one. Hogan started snowskating in 2002 and progressed to powder snowskating and powdersurfing. Snowskates are currently allowed at all of Lake Tahoe’s resorts except Alpine Meadows, Granlibakken, Squaw Valley and Tahoe Donner. Powsurfs are newer on the scene, and many resorts have not deemed them acceptable snow-riding deceives. Russ Pecoraro, Director of Communications for Vail Resorts Mountain Division, said the resorts are often a step behind when it comes to finding out about and authorizing the use of new snow-riding devices. “We take these things on a case by case basis,” Pecoraro said. While things like snowbikes and snowskates have been tested and proven, powsurf boards have yet to be approved for use at Heavenly, Northstar California or Kirkwood, Pecoraro said. Without metal edges, powsurfs are nearly impossible to ride on groomed runs. So for the time being, powsurfers have to make their turns
108 WINTER 2013 / 2014

in the backcountry. “Powsurfing is a way for riders to take those skills (from skateboarding and snowskating) into the backcountry, still keep their feet free from bindings, and take advantage of the freshly fallen snow and the thousands of acres of beautiful terrain,” said Jeremy Jensen, owner of Grassroots Powsurf. For Jensen, powsurfers turn the mountain into a giant wave or a huge skate park. He said they make the small drops feel big and the steeps feel steeper. The boards allow riders to perform tricks that have never been done before in powder conditions. Jensen said he’s come close to riding out of 360 flips, backside 180 kickflips, pressure flips and kickflip shuvits. “All that stuff is possible, it’s just a matter of

“Tahoe is known for its stable backcountry snow pack, so along with the featured terrain it’s great for back country powsurfing and powskating,” Hogan said. “Last season, I took a powsurf tour from Talking Mountain to Flagpole Peak that was a lot of fun. I was amazed at how well the powsurf handled the steep technical section I rode out on Talking Mountain.” Gallardo said Mountain Approach skis are a good option because you can skin up the peak like on a splitboard. He often takes his powsurf board with him when he goes on overnight snow camping trips via snowmobile. “Thanks to special racks from Cheetah Factory Racing, they’re easy to attach to a sled,” Gallardo said. “There’s been some talk about making a powsurfer than coverts to a splitboard. I think there could be a future there with the right design.” Riding bindingless can be a good alternative for riders who have suffered knee or leg injuries in the past. After having multiple ACL and ankle surgeries, Jensen said he feels some discomfort when he straps into his snowboards. “My knees get sore being locked into the same positions all the time and my back takes a beating when the runs get bumped out,” he said. “Having your feet free takes a lot of pressure off your knees and ankles. Wearing shoes or waterproof boots can be a lot more comfortable than wearing Jason Hogan climbs the shoulder of Mt. Tallac snowboard or ski boots.” using foldable Mt. Approach skis while carrying Searching for the feeling his Grassroots Powdersurf board on his back. of surfing in the backcountry, a number of riders have finding the right feature and conditions to make started powdersurf board companies. Jensen, it happen,” Jensen said. “It’s not like skateboardwho lives in Utah, makes his own powsurfers ing or snowskating, where you can try a trick featuring various shapes and designs for different over and over until you get it. The takeoffs and terrain and riding styles. Jensen said he wanted the landings get ruined quickly, so you only really to make something unique, not necessarily a get a couple of good tries on a feature.” bindingless snowboard. Jensen said there is a freedom that comes from “I wanted a board that provided a different riding in the backcountry instead of at the resort, feeling in the way it turned, floated and popped... and it enables people to enjoy riding powder something that set itself apart from snowboarddays after the end of a storm. He said powsurfing,” Jensen said. ing will be a natural fit for backcountry riders Grassroots Powsurfs are shorter and wider who feel the rewards of floating through powder than traditional snowboards. Some have tradioutweigh the effort it takes to get to the top of tional sidecuts and tapered shape, while others the mountain. have reserve sidecuts or hybrids of the two. The Hogan accesses Tahoe’s backcountry terrain uscombination of shape and profile of the boards ing either snowshoes or folding approach skis made gives them incomparable float and responsiveness. by Mountain Approach. Depending on conditions, “I wanted an agile board that floated and he said he’ll either bring his powsurf (for perfect turned really well,” Jensen said. “Something that powder) or his powskate (for variable snow). you could ride both forward and backward on.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: JASON HOGAN

Jeremy Jensen attempts a kickflip while riding his Grassroots Powdersurf board in the backcountry. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: JEREMY JENSEN

“LANDING A KICKFLIP ON SNOW WAS ALWAYS A FANTASY I HAD WHILE SNOWBOARDING, AND NOW IT’S A REALITY”
TAHOE MAGAZINE 109

A board that could actually ‘ollie’ and open up freestyle progression in powder conditions ... No such board existed at the time. I started designing, building and shaping my own so that I could make the type of riding I wanted to do a reality.” Jensen said after making boards for himself and his friends, he knew that anyone who tried them would be instantly hooked. He thought that if he didn’t start a company, someone else would take their ideas and develop a similar product. The company has been doubling production and sales every year for the past four years. “All the positive feedback and seeing the looks on the faces of the first-time riders got me super stoked,” Jensen said. “I started the company out really small and tested the waters for interest. The response has been overwhelmingly positive from the people watching the films and seeing the photos.” Jensen said Grassroots Powsurfs are being carried by more retail shops and with more professional snowboarders trying the sport, younger riders are learning about the possibility of bindingless riding. “When kids see their favorite snowboarder ripping without bindings they are going to be a lot more likely to want to give it a shot,” Jensen said. “I really want to see the next generation of kids take this kind of thing and run with it. When I see the level that skateboarders, snowboarders, and surfers are at, it gets me stoked to think of where those talented people could take powsurfing.” On the West Coast, Tim Wesley makes hand-shaped bamboo snowsurf boards in Leavenworth, Wash. Every one of Snowshark Snowsurf ’s boards has individual graphics, water colored and wood burned by Wesley. This year’s boards will have P-Tex bases and metal edges. He has been experimenting with different shapes for four years now. “Coming from a skateboarding background, bindingless always seemed like the way to do it to me, the problem was, the shapes weren’t there,” Wesley said. “I looked into purchasing a snowsurf board, and I could not find one to buy. I’m a woodworker myself, so I figured I could make a decent board if I tried. It took a long time, but totally worth it now that the shape is refined.” Wesley said since snowsurfing is a new sport, it’s been tough selling boards no one has ever tried before, but he’s getting the word out and spreading the stoke through photos and videos on this website and Facebook. Wesley said he hasn’t ridden in Tahoe yet, but he has plans to take his boards on a demo tour and Lake Tahoe is on his list of stops. “Tahoe is fortunate enough to share the maritime snowpack that we in the Northwest enjoy,” Wesley said. “So I’m positive that there’s good surfing in that set of mountains. I can’t wait!”

Local photographer Jason Hogan surfs the powder bindingless in the Tahoe backcountry.

On a global scale, professional snowboarder Wolle Nyvelt has a company called Aesmo, which produces powsurfers. His website says his boards are handmade pieces of riding art intended for riders of a high skill level. Japanese rider Taro Tamai founded Gentemstick to enhance the connection between the rider, their board and the mountain. Jensen said snowboarding has had a huge impact on his life, and he wanted to pay tribute to the soul of the sport and its original intentions by creating a powsurf line. He said every day during the winter brings something new, and progression in the sport is constant. Snowsurf designers and pioneers keep moving into bigger and steeper lines, dropping bigger cliffs and pushing the limits in every way possible. “We have already far exceeded what we initially thought would be possible on our boards, so it’s pretty exciting to see what the next season will bring,” Jensen said. Lake Tahoe played a key role in the development and progression of snowboarding back in the 1980s, and it’s positioned to do so for snowsurfing as well. With a good snowpack and so many athletes living and riding in the surrounding mountains, Lake Tahoe is the perfect backdrop for pushing the limits of this growing sport. “Powsurfing is basically the blending together of all the fun summer activities that are popular in the Tahoe area,” Jensen said. “Skateboarding, longboarding, paddle boarding, windsurfing, surfing, and of course snowboarding. Powdersurfing is the next step in true skate-style and surf-style powder riding.” •

There’s a form of bindingless riding for all conditions. The Ralston snowskate (far left) can be ridden at local ski resorts on groomed runs and in the terrain parks. The powder snowskate (far right) can be ridden at the resort on powder days and in variable conditions in the backcounty. The Grassroots Powdersurf board (second from right) is designed to be ridden in the backcountry on fresh snow. Hogan uses the Mtn. Approach skis (second from the left) to skin up some of Tahoe’s highest peaks.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS: JASON HOGAN

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TAHOE MAGAZINE

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FOLLO W ING THE

From greeters to elite rescuers, avalanche dogs are hard at work at Lake Tahoe’s ski resorts
BY AXIE NAVAS

SC E N

112

WINTER 2013 / 2014

Sierra-at-Tahoe avalanche rescue dog Khuno practices finding a victim buried in the snow at the resort.

NT
PHOTO BY AXIE NAVAS TAHOE MAGAZINE 113

cave with no light and a depleting supply of oxygen. But then you hear scratching on the surface, get a whiff of cold air, and the tawny muzzle of a golden retriever thrusts through the crust toward you. If you’re an avalanche victim, the dog has just saved your life. Many of the resorts around the Lake Tahoe Basin have specialized avalanche rescue dog teams composed mostly of golden retrievers and labs ready for a situation like this - a solo skier or rider gets caught without a transceiver in a slide and needs to be recovered quickly, dead or alive. While most of the dogs won’t ever need their avi skills outside of weekly trainings - the last time Heavenly Mountain Resort deployed its dogs for a retrieval was in 2009 - the ski patrollers who handle the animals say it’s the fastest way to locate someone who doesn’t have specialized equipment. “Ninety-nine percent of the dogs will go their whole career without making a rescue, and hopefully they don’t have to,” said Dave Paradysz, Kirkwood Mountain Resort’s Assistant Director of Ski Patrol. “The goal is the same: To find people fast who have been caught in an avalanche.”

Y

OU ’RE B U RIE D I N A SNOW

Sierra-at-Tahoe handler Tim Owen praises his dog, Kopa, after he successfully completes an avalanche rescue training at the resort.

TAHOE MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY AXIE NAVAS 115

Sierra-at-Tahoe handler Tim Owen plays with his dog, Kopa, after a training session. PHOTO BY AXIE NAVAS

“ Everybody can play basketball, but
not everyone can make it to the NBA. And that’s what we’re looking for – a dog who can make it to the NBA.
D AV E PA R A D Y S Z
116 WINTER 2013 / 2014

MAKING A LIVE FIND
If the number of retrievals is small, the number of live rescues is even smaller. But in 1993, Paradysz and his dog, Doc, not only found an avalanche victim, they found him alive. Jeff Eckland, Kirkwood’s current assistant mountain manager, had hiked above what is now Chair Three to take advantage of some fresh powder. Paradysz remembered that it was a few days after a big storm and patrol hadn’t blasted the area yet. Eckland dropped into the run when the snow beneath him gave way and he was caught in a slide. One of his companions reported him missing while the other trekked to the nearest patrol hut where Paradysz and Doc were waiting. The duo immediately headed out to the location where Eckland was last seen. Doc caught the scent and in less than 20 minutes, they found Eckland buried in 4 feet of snow. “That was pretty notable. He was bent backwards like a pretzel against a tree. He said tunnel vision was starting to set in and then all of a sudden he could hear the dog scratching and he got a whiff of air and it started to get lighter. It’s pretty cool to hear him talk about it,” Paradysz said. Eckland suffered a few bruised vertebrae, but he was alive. A day like that validates the whole avalanche rescue dog program, Paradysz said.

“Most of them do fairly well. Some of them get pretty skittish, but since the dogs have the handlers there, they don’t freak out,” Pond said. According to Owen, any dog can be trained to find an avalanche victim. But many of the golden retrievers working at the South Shore ski resorts come from an avi dog lineage that dates back to the early 1980s. To give you some idea, Terry’s dog, Summit, is the great grandson of Paradysz’s Doc. And Summit, like Doc, is one of the few dogs ever used in a real retrieval situation. Quite simply, they’re bred for the work. “Everybody can play basketball, but not everyone can make it to the NBA. And that’s what we’re looking for - a dog who can make it to the NBA,” Paradysz said.

A D AY I N T H E L I F E
Most days aren’t so eventful. Typically, avi dogs will hang out at the patrol shack, train with their handlers and greet guests. They do a lot of public relations for the resort, said Colton Terry, Heavenly’s Avalanche Dog Program Coordinator. Terry’s dog, Summit, did a photo shoot for Maxim Magazine’s Heavenly Angels contest earlier this year where he posed with the new angel and was tasked with nothing more than “looking cute,” according to Terry. The dogs train about once a week for avalanche rescues. Sierra-at-Tahoe handler Tim Owen said puppies will start by searching for their owner in an open hole. About two years later, they’ll have the skills to smell out and help dig up a stranger completely buried in snow. The animals also train with California Shock Trauma Air Rescue Ambulance - or CALSTAR in case the dog team ever needs to be transported by helicopter. The idea is to get the dogs used to the machines before they’re needed in a real avalanche rescue situation, Chief Flight Nurse Bryan Pond said. And even though CALSTAR hasn’t deployed any of the dog teams since the program started in 2008, it’s important to have the dogs and handlers ready to go, he said.

THE BIG LEAGUES
Squaw Valley Ski Resort has its own line of avalanche dogs. The newest addition to the team, Boomer, is a fifth generation Squaw rescue dog that recently completed his intensive training. The famed North Shore resort follows a particularly rigorous set of guidelines when it comes to preparing their dogs for search and rescue work. Squaw adopted the Canadian Rescue Dog Association, or CARDA, training standard in 2001. That essentially means any wannabe rescue dogs have to pass an annual exam if they don’t want to be out of a job. “We do have a pretty rigid set of standards. So if you don’t pass a test, you’re still a great dog and I’m sure the patroller will still love and take care of you, but you can no longer come to work,” says Amelia Richmond, the resort’s Senior Public Relations Manager. “It’s definitely not a bring-you-dog to work program. These dogs are very smart and do a lot of training throughout their lives.” That level of training was the dog team’s ticket to the 2010 Vancover Olympic Games, according to Richmond. The Squaw Valley Ski Patrol Avalanche Rescue Dog Team was the only U.S. group to be invited to help with search and rescue at the games. “This is the highlight of all the handlers’ and dogs’ careers,” Matt Calcutt, who coordinated the team in Vancouver, said in a previous Tahoe Daily Tribune article. “It’s almost like the doggy Olympics.” •
Axie Navas is a former reporter for the Tahoe Daily Tribune newspaper in South Lake Tahoe.
TAHOE MAGAZINE 117

IN A

TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY GIVES U N I Q U E V I E W O F L A K E TA H O E
BY ADAM JENSEN

FIREWORKS BURST OVERHEAD AT A FRENETIC PACE, BOATS DRIFT IN UNISON WITH LAKE TAHOE’S WIND-DRIVEN CURRENTS, THE MILKY WAY ARCS ACROSS THE NIGHT SKY, CLOUDS RUSH PAST THE SIERRA CREST – ALL IN LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES.

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Photographer Justin Majeczky sets up a shot for “Tahoe Time” on Speedboat Beach.

PHOTO BY NATE METCALF

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AKE TAHOE HAS NEVER BEEN criticized for its lack of beauty, but the work of time-lapse photographers has shown the lake’s allure in a new light. Justin Majeczky released a stunning compilation of timelapse shots entitled “Tahoe Time” in early 2012. The fourand-a-half minute edit of Lake Tahoe was rooted in a single series he got from the Mount Rose Highway in 2010. “I really just wanted to capture it in a way that’s never been done,” the former Kings Beach resident said in May. “I figured time lapse was a way to do that.” Majeczky uses an automated dolly in many of the shots in the clip to introduce camera movement into a series of images that already have a dream-like quality. The dolly is purely optional, Majeczky said, but an intervalometer, a device that fires the shutter of a camera at specific intervals, is not. “Anyone with a DSLR, a tripod and an intervalometer can shoot time lapses,” the photographer said. “The most challenging thing is finding time to do it,” Majeczky added. Josh Michaels, a Portland, Ore.-resident who has spent the past several winters living near Heavenly Mountain Resort’s Nevada lodges, released a time-lapse project called “Tahoe Blue” with photographer Hal Bergman in the spring of 2012. He said the time commitment of time lapse is a big part of the challenge. Between setting up a shot, waiting around for the camera to get a succession of photos and post-production work, it can take dozens of hours to get seconds of good footage, Michaels said. “For me it’s been a technical endeavor and a beautiful photographic endeavor,” Michaels said. Despite several mishaps during the filming of “Tahoe Blue,” including a slide down Heavenly’s Gunbarrel run that resulted in the loss of an emergency radio, the 33-year-old said he expects to be back shooting the lake this winter. “It’s just one of those things you kind of get hooked,” Michaels said. Although he has produced time-lapse photography in locations around the world, the practice holds a special allure at Lake Tahoe, Michaels said. “I’ll just say, it’s like the lake is asking to be photographed,” Michaels said. Majeczky said he is also working on a follow-up to his time-lapse work at the lake. The project will focus on timelapse shots of the lake at night, he said. “The night stuff is definitely the most challenging,” Majeczky said. “The next one is going to blow the first one out of the water.” Sample footage of the follow-up effort is awe-inspiring. Lake Tahoe paddle-wheelers buzz through the lake as clouds build in the last light of the day, fish swim in shallow water around granite boulders and lightning snaps above the South Shore as a storm passes in a rush over Emerald Bay. In late September, Majeckzy said he was working on a list of shots he had yet to capture. He did not have an expected release date for the latest project.
More information on Majeczky’s time-lapse work is available at www.varient3.com. Adam Jensen is editor of Lake Tahoe Action, the region’s premier entertainment and recreation weekly publication. He can be reached at ajensen@tahoedailytribune.com.
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“ I R E A L L Y J U S T WA N T E D T O C A P T U R E I T I N A W A Y T H AT ’ S N E V E R B E E N D O N E . ”

A still from “Tahoe Time” shows Lake Tahoe from the Mount Rose Highway.

PHOTO BY JUSTIN MAJECZKY

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TA H O E ’ S ‘INSURANCE POLICY’
When Mother Nature doesn’t cooperate, resorts make snow to ensure a good winter season
BY MARGARET MORAN

Snowmaking on Squaw’s upper mountain. The practice has come in handy the past couple winters at Lake Tahoe, which saw little snow.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: WARREN ASHER / SQUAW VALLEY

Early season snowmaking at Squaw Valley.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: MATT PALMER / SQUAW VALLEY

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hen Mother Nature is stingy with the snow, Tahoe ski resorts can turn to their backup plan. Using water and compressed air, local resorts create their own snow-covered runs to ensure winter success. “Snowmaking is a form of an insurance policy,” explains Amelia Richmond, senior public relations manager for Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. It ensures that resorts can open in time for the holiday season – be it Thanksgiving or Christmas – fill in areas with subpar snow coverage and provide good skiing and riding until the end of the season. “It’s a guest service piece,” said Jim Larmore, director of mountain operations for Northstar California. “It’s a piece we provide our guests so they can make planned vacations and provide a better ski experience than if they just relied on Mother Nature’s natural snow.” Yet to make snow, resorts still rely on Mother Nature – to a degree.

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Snowmaking on Squaw’s upper mountain
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: WARREN ASHER / SQUAW VALLEY

THE ‘ART AND SCIENCE’ OF SNOWMAKING To make snow, resorts need freezing temperatures and low relative humidity. “The humidity is huge - probably the single biggest factor,” said Dave Hahl, snowmaking and grooming manager of Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe. He added that low humidity allows the atmosphere to be saturated with water to create “that much more snow.” If humidity is high, however, the atmosphere is too saturated to produce significant amounts of snow. Secondary snowmaking factors are winds and cloud-cover. “When you’re making snow in the Sierra, you’ve got to catch every window you can,” said Jack Coughlin, slope maintenance manager for Diamond Peak. “I used to make snow back East, and back East, you know you can make snow four, five days a week. “Here, when it’s cold, you grab it, and then you’re going to get the beautiful warm weather after that.” When conditions are right, resorts pump water stored in ponds, reservoirs or other sources - through pumphouses, up pipes running up the mountain to specific snow guns. Depending on the guns in a resort’s fleet, compressed air must also be pumped to the gun. Together - air and water - under the right conditions, form snow. “You don’t want to pick it up and squeeze it, and you’ve got slush coming out,” explained Coughlin, who’s looking for a hard snowball at the end of the process. “So you really have to pay attention to what you’re doing.” Once made, the snow is left to cure, perking out some of the excess water, before groomers move and flatten the

snow into a favorable skiing and riding surface. “(Making snow) it’s a science and an art,” Hahl said. “... The science part of it, it’s the technology - the technology improves like anything else. Yet it still takes the guy on the ground to get it right. You can’t overestimate the human link.” H O W S N O W M A K I N G S AV E D WINTER BUSINESS With two consecutive mild winters at Lake Tahoe, resorts have had to heavily rely on their snowmaking systems. According to Squaw Valley’s snowfall tracker, it snowed 183 inches at 6,200 feet and 326 inches at 8,200 feet in 2012-13. For 2011-12, it snowed 182.5 inches and 355 inches, respectively. The average snowfall for the Lake Tahoe region is 430 inches. “Two years ago when there was a complete lack of snow, we still did great business through the Christmas period with snowmaking,” Hahl said. “... (People are) just realizing that even if there hasn’t been many natural storms, they can still book a vacation and still come up and get good skiing.” Being a winter destination spot, resort success is closely tied to community success. “Particularly in the lean years, if we didn’t have snowmaking, people would’t be coming,” Coughlin said. “You’ve got to have those resorts open. (For) the local business, the restaurants, it’s devastating when you have a bad winter.” Yet the ability to make snow when Mother Nature fails to comes at a cost.

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THE IT ’S THE L IKE STILL YOU

S CIE N C E T HE

PA RT

O F

I T, – I T T H E
COST OF DOING BUSINESS “It’s extremely expensive to make snow,” Coughlin said. “... We’re running up electric bills running our water pumps and running out air compressors.” When asked how much it costs to make snow, the consensus was it varies, based on weather conditions and equipment. In an effort to be more cost-efficient, Larmore said Northstar has been investing in lower energy-consuming guns. “(They) allow us to make more snow with less energy, which is really the big story,” he said. For the past two years, significant investments in Squaw’s and Alpine’s snowmaking systems have been made. In 2012, $2.6 million was invested in Squaw’s system, with $600,000 at Alpine, Richmond said. In 2013, a total of $2 million was invested into both resorts’ systems. These funds went to fully automating both resort systems, piping work at Squaw to allow water to flow up and down the mountain and the purchase of new, low-energy guns - all to increase the efficiency of the system. “The game in snowmaking now is everybody’s got their systems at the size they more or less need,” Couglin said. “Now, it’s how can we do it less expensively? Where can we find more energy-efficient ways to do it?” Larmore said even though the money-saving aspect is important, it’s not the driving force behind updates to Northstar’s system. Rather, as Richmond agrees, it’s all about the guest and the guest experience. “At the end of the day, it gets you out on the mountain, and you’re able to pursue the sports that you love,” she said.
Margaret Moran is a reporter for the Sierra Sun newspaper in Truckee and Tahoe City. She can be reached at mmoran@sierrasun.com.

T E CHN O L O G Y E L SE . G U Y I T Y E T O N

T E CHN O LO G Y AN Y THIN G TAK E S C A N ’ T T H E THE T O

I M P R O VE S

GRO U N D

GE T

R I G H T.

OVERES T I M AT E L I N K .

H U M AN

D AV E H A H L | M T. R O S E S K I TA H O E

Inside Squaw Valley’s snowmaking building, with the resort’s new fully-automated system.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: MATT PALMER / SQUAW VALLEY

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Foothill Friendly

People are friendly up in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Maybe it’s the natural beauty, or the pace of country life. Friendships blossom at our colorful independent living cottages and picturesque assisted living lodge. You can join in on the many planned activities and trips, enjoy a game of croquet, take a walk to the pet park, meet friends on the putting green, or just sit by the fireplace with a cup of hot cocoa. Housekeeping, advanced technology and personal services keep life easy, too. So, call or visit us at Eskaton Village Placerville. Live here ... Live at your own pace.

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Relationships grow and flourish in Nevada County. Maybe it’s the fresh air, or all the choices available at Eskaton Village Grass Valley. Multiservice retirement featuring independent living and assisted living apartments is what you’ll discover at this beautiful gated community. Join in on the recreation and excursions, enjoy water aerobics, meet friends for a game of cards, or just relax by the fireplace with a good book. The choices are endless, and all yours. Housekeeping, advanced technology and personal services keep life easy, too. So, call or visit us at Eskaton Village Grass Valley. Live here ... Live your ideal lifestyle.

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ITALI

ORA T S I R AN

NTE

DINING
After a long day in cold weather, most guests want to warm up with local cuisine. Businesses around the lake welcome you to cozy up next to a fireplace with a warm drink or wind down with a great selection of soups. Whether you’re looking for an aprés ski spot or just good food, our picks will point you in the right direction.

PHOTO FROM THINKSTOCK TAHOE MAGAZINE 133

D I N I N G

S O U P S

Warm up this winter with some of these savory options from throughout the Truckee/Tahoe region
BY SIMONE GRANDMAIN

T

he weather may have taken a dip, but chances are your appetite hasn’t. The conundrum is how to address that insatiable need to eat yet still fit into your slinky/ sporty slope gear. Refreshing salads and chilled fruits, once your friend, have lost their appeal. Ice cream, for some perverse reason, is still a “go to.” Plus, you can’t load up on the beloved carbs unless you want to sleep through the “pow” days. The answer, my friends, is mmm, mmm good - you got it - soup. There are dozens of establishments in the Truckee-Tahoe area serving up soup-as-meal options to enjoy at their table or take home to enjoy at yours. For those of you with even moderate kitchen facilities, there are terrific ready-for-fixin’ selections for creating your own soup de jour. The options are endless. Following are some recommendations on great ways to warm your cockles. (“Cockles” can either mean “the tiles around your fireplace,” “a mollusk” or “the chambers of your heart.” Let’s go with the heart thing, unless you are having clam chowder.) Ramen noodle soup has been fortifying many a broke college student for centuries, but you can kick it up a notch to achieve full, gourmet-meal status. For your base, purchase a packet of good Ramen noodles. In most local grocers you can find Asian Creations or Nogshim-brand Ramens, but should you happen upon Dr. McDougall’s ramen, snap it up. If you are skiing Squaw, Alice’s Market in the Village has a full selection of Dr. McDougall’s soups, but really, any package of ramen
WINTER 2013 / 2014

can be dressed up to impress. Add sauteed garlic, onion, shiitake mushrooms, a splash of sake and soy sauce for starters. Top with sliced fish cake or shredded imitation crab legs, bean sprouts, cubed tofu, shredded chicken, toasted sesame seeds, shredded kale or a fried egg. Really, the sky’s the limit when it comes to what you can do to ramen. Sam Okomoto, owner of Drunken Monkey Sushi in Truckee, is a world-renowned chef who has taken ramen to a whole new level. He offers several different soupas-meals options, but I like his Kyushu-style Ramen Noodle Soup topped with char-shu pork, kaiso, kimchi and fried garlic cloves. If the combination of kimchi and garlic does not warm you up from the top of your head to the tip of your toes, you might want to make your way to the nearest emergency room to check on frostbite. Another soup/meal to keep your eye out for is Bouillabaisse or Cioppino, a seafood stew in an aromatic tomato-based broth. It can be a very time-consuming and pricey dish to make at home, but it doesn’t have to be. For a “Pour Man’s Easy-to-Make Cioppino” pick up a jar of Dominic’s San Francisco-style Cioppino sauce in Save Mart’s seafood section. To make sauce, add one 14-ounce can chopped tomatoes, two small cans clams with juice, one pound of raw shrimp, peeled or unpeeled (depending on how messy you want to get) and one pound firm white fish like mahi or cod. Heat over medium heat for 20 minutes, top with chopped parsley and serve with garlic bread. Other great soups in the premade seafood soup category include

Safeway’s new Lobster Bisque in the deli section (add 1/4 cup sherry) and Bear Creek’s clam chowder soup mix available at Safeway and most grocers. In fact, as you make your way around the lake, there are no shortages of specialty shops and delis offering fresh homemade soups and or easy-toassemble soup “kits.” Tahoe House Bakery & Gourmet in Tahoe City cooks up a daily batch of homemade soup, including Tomato Dill and a French Onion with cheese and croutons, just to name a couple. It also offers a tasty selection of refrigerated and frozen soups. The Cork & More in South Lake Tahoe has killer daily soups which run out fast, including White Bean and Bacon and Tomato Bisque, or mixes to make at home. Earthly Delights in the Village at Northstar makes a mean Minestrone or Butternut Squash with the added plus of fresh baked breads on hand, and Village Market in Incline is a fabulous gourmet grocer which serves daily soups or chili in its deli, or, again, many soups to prepare en suite. For a more ribsticking “soup,” make up a pot of Carroll Shelby’s Chili (available at most grocery stores) and add canned Ortega

chilies and black beans, then back it up with a wedge of cornbread, or, take a cue from Best Pies New York Style Pizzeria and Restaurant in Truckee and add pasta and sausage in an effort to recreate their signature pasta e fagioli. Finally, if all the soup options seem overwhelming, you know what you need to do. Buy a can of Campbell’s Creamy Tomato and slice up a grilled cheese sandwich. It works every time.
Simone Grandmain is an internationally published travel and food writer who currently calls Truckee-Tahoe home. She welcomes your recipes, kitchen “must-haves” and food news at simone_ grandmain@hotmail.com.

PHOTOS BY SIMONE GRANDMAIN

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MULLIGATAWNY
Soup for the Soul
Chicken soup has been a first responder to the common cold since man, well, broke sweat. Turns out our congested ancestors knew what they were talking about. Researchers believe colds are caused by viral infections in the upper respiratory tract. The body responds with inflammation, which triggers white blood cells to migrate to the afflicted area to devour and kill off the virus. The side effect to this well-intended attack is the stimulated production of mucus which leads to stuffy heads, coughs and sneezing. Studies have shown, however, that the presence of chicken soup decreases the number of cells that migrate, thus blocking or slowing the amount of cells congregating in the lung area, relieving the development of cold symptoms. Following is one of my favorite chicken soup recipes. Ideal for a stuffy, healthy, or big heads - it is just all-around perfection. The added spices kick up the flavor and heat a notch, making for great winter fare, and, if all else fails, it is fun to say.

INGREDIENTS
2 ½ cups chicken broth 2 cups cooked, shredded, (or chopped if you like more broth) chicken 1 cup chopped green or any mildly tart apple 1 cup chopped carrots 1 can (14.5 ounces) whole, peeled tomatoes, drained and chopped ½ cup chopped celery ¼ cup chopped onion ¼ cup raisins 2 ½ teaspoon curry powder 1½ teaspoon lemon juice ¼ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 ½ cups prepared orzo pasta.

P R E PA R AT I O N :
Combine chicken broth, apple, carrots, tomatoes, celery, onion, raisins and all spices over medium heat. Bring to low boil, stirring, for about 20 minutes. Reduce to low simmer. Next, add the chicken and simmer on low until chicken is heated through, about 10 minutes. Gently stir in pasta, heat for another 10 minutes. It’s ready to serve.

OPPOSITE TOP: Best Pies Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria’s Organic Chicken Tortilla is one of its daily soup specials.This winter, the restaurant will serve its famous pasta fagioli, a tomato-based Italian chili with pasta, white beans and sausage. OPPOSITE BOTTOM: Sam Okomoto, owner of Drunken Monkey Sushi and Asian Tapas, takes Ramen to a whole new level. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO ABOVE: The heat is on – mulligatawny soup combines the curative, flavorfull properties of chicken soup with a spicy curry.

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A P R É S

D I N I N G

An inside scoop on the incredible aprés ski scene around Lake Tahoe and Truckee
BY JENNY LUNA

Looking for the best happy hours, most happening spots or finest places to cozy up after a day on the slopes? Here are our top picks for the best aprés ski scenes around Truckee-Tahoe. THE VILLAGE AT NORTHSTAR TAVERN 6330’

5001 Northstar Drive, Truckee 530-562-1010 northstarcalifornia.com

8001 North Village Drive, Suite 8114, Truckee 530-562-3200 northstarcalifornia.com

If the kids still have energy after the mountain, the Village at Northstar is a great place for the family to keep playing. Parents can enjoy an aprËs ski libation under heat lamps in the cabana area while watching the little ones ring around the rink. Making it off the mountain a little early is a must because, at 3 p.m., s’more roasting begins over The Village’s fire pits. Those looking for a more intimate aprËs can check out the Overlook Bar, situated above the ice skating rink. The bar has just enough seclusion to snuggle up with a ski buddy and a hot toddy.

Just a few steps off of the Big Springs Gondola, skiers and riders can begin an aprËs evening at Tavern 6330’ at Northstar. The restaurant is fairly new but has earned a quick reputation for pouring the mountain’s best Bloody Marys. Enjoy live entertainment on weekends and food from award-winning chef Daniel Carter, who is known for the dinner favorite of braised beef short rib - which of course must be followed by his infamous S’mores Pie with Guinness Ice Cream.

The Village at Northstar’s outdoor fire pits are irresistible for children and parents alike.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA

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D I N I N G

A P R É S

RIVER RANCH LODGE AND RESTAURANT
Highway 89 and Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City 530-583-4264 riverranchlodge.com

Riva Grill’s lakefront view on the South Shore keeps skiers and riders coming back.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: RIVA GRILL

music, great giveaways and a hard-to-beat happy hour of dollar beers and dollar nachos MondayFriday keeps Hacienda del Lago a happening place.

Still feeling a bit chilly? Get cozy around the fireplace and warm up from the inside out at River Ranch Lodge and Restaurant. Located at the entrance to Alpine Meadows, this restaurant sits right on the river and is a classic aprés ski location. A famous “River Rum Heater” will raise your temperature along with River Ranch’s much loved ahi poke chips. Each week on a “Wild Winter Wednesday” River Ranch raffles off great giveaways and offers food and drink specials. Proceeds from the event benefit the Disabled Sports USA-Far West team in Alpine Meadows.

RIVA GRILL ON THE LAKE
900 Ski Run Blvd., South Lake Tahoe 530-542-2600 rivagrill.com

Ahi poke chips are a favorite appetizer to warm up to at River Ranch.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: RIVER RANCH

HACIENDA DEL LAGO

The fireplace inside keeps guests warm as the views of the lake seem to stretch out forever. Order a Thunderbird Margarita or a famous Wet Woody and watch the sun go down at the waterfront locale. Riva Grill is one of the few restaurants right on the lake of South Shore and known for a great place to unwind after a day on the slopes. The South Shore favorite brings in live music every Friday and Saturday night with local musician Jackie Dauzat. And the infamous Fish Taco Friday means a packed restaurant at Riva Grill.

760 North Lake Blvd., No. 30, Tahoe City 530-581-3700 hacdellago.com

MAMASAKE

Hacienda’s aprés ski scene is quite giving, especially if caught on the right day. The Mexican restaurant’s “Unofficial Thursdays” offers food and drink specials as well as thousands of dollars worth of gear giveaways. The 12-week series is hosted by big names like Darron Rahlves and Julia Mancuso; each week’s proceeds benefit a different local charity. On Fridays, the latest upand-coming bands play to a packed house. Good
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1850 Village South Road, No. 52, Olympic Valley 530-584-0110 mamasake.com

Known for the killer deal of a hand roll and a beer for five dollars, Mamasake is a great place to go raw at Squaw. The fish is sustainable and always fresh and the location is always packed. Chef owner Elsa Corrigan knows a few things well: Tahoe, travel and food. The chef brings these three things together in her sushi, tapas and Cal-Asian cuisine in Squaw Valley. Mamasake’s

After a long day at Squaw, Le Chamois still is the place to catch up with friends and see up-and-coming winter athletes.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO: SQUAW VALLEY

and exceptional location fool you - Big Water Grille offers great prices like the six-dollar appetizer menu that lasts all night. Bartender Jeremey Schweitzer pours great martinis and the wine list at Big Water Grille is extensive. Big Water Wednesday is a night for locals to meet up, catch up, and enjoy drink and food specials. The dining room is fancier but the bar is laid back, so whether in suits or ski boots, guests feel welcome at Big Water Grille.

NEPHELES

1169 Ski Run Blvd., South Lake Tahoe 530-544-8130 nepheles.com

aprËs ski happy hour goes from 3-5 p.m. although the restaurant is always packed full of skiers, riders and sushi fans.

of room, so you know you can get up to the bar.” And it’s well known during aprés ski that easy access to the bar is customers’ priority.

always been known as the mountain’s watering hole. An open downstairs area provides space for families looking to enjoy aprés together.

PETE N PETER’S
395 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City 530-583-2400

LE CHAMOIS & THE LOFT BAR

HIMMEL HAUS
3819 Saddle Road, South Lake Tahoe 530-314-7665 himmelhaustahoe.com

For 37 years, this local bar has had its priorities straight - Pete N Peter’s is adamant about local prices. If you’ve still got some energy after the mountain, this bar is a great place (and one of the few in town) to get a pitcher of beer and play a few rounds of pool. And with Za’s restaurant reopened next door, guests can get great food too. Bartender Mandy Duarte says Pete N Peter’s is a great hang out because “it’s so open, with a lot

1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley 530-583-4505 squawchamois.com

schnitzel, sausage platters and bratwurst. Game meat is another specialty - every other week guests can venture out with dishes such as alligator, elk, or camel. Skiers come aprËs for the music, five dollar brat special, or for the 3-liter boot. Monday night is open mic night and Wednesday is trivia night at Himmel Haus.

This restaurant and bar is one of Squaw’s oldest hangouts and is remnant of the resort’s iconic past. While sipping a cold beer and enjoying cheesy pizza you’ll be able to catch up on your local pro trivia as the walls are decked out with memorabilia from the famous athletes that once called Squaw Valley home. It’s easy to spot up-and-comings as well because Le Chamois has

Looking to get your bier and dance on? Himmel Haus of South Tahoe is a German restaurant and bierhaus for those eager to carry day into night. Season-pass holders (for any resort) receive a 10 percent discount while all Heavenly employees enjoy 15 percent off. Beer lovers will enjoy nearly 40 German and Belgian beers to accompany Himmel Haus’ contemporary spin on

BIG WATER GRILLE

341 Ski Way, Incline Village 775-833-0606 bigwatergrille.com

Named for the Greek goddess of epicurean delights, Nepheles is the place to for a good drink and soak after the slopes. One of South Shore’s oldest restaurants, the quaint old house has two dining rooms and a charming “Cheers”-like bar with cocktail service to the hot tubs outside. Towels are provided as well as open canopy views of the stars. Chef Mark Vassau offers a changing menu of seafood specials as well as wild game. After a day at Heavenly Valley, followed by a good drink and hot spa, Nepheles becomes heavenly itself.

Chef Chris Daniels brings a Southern twist to the menu at this local favorite nestled in the mountains of Incline Village. Don’t let the 5000 sq. feet restaurant, fine dining atmosphere

Jenny Luna is a freelance reporter for the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza and Sierra Sun newspapers in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee. She may be reached at jluna0928@gmail.com.

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Spectacular
Lakeview Dining
FRESH FISH · STEAK · PRIME RIB

VOTED NORTH TAHOE’S BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT

relax in an atmosphere of comfortable elegance while you savor the culinary delights that make chart House famous.

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CALENDAR
Each shore of Lake Tahoe has its own culture maintained by locals and businesses. Every winter, venues around the lake host a variety of events to entertain you. Resorts host several activities and competitions over the course of a few months, some of which draw big-name athletes to their slopes. Our comprehensive list can help point you in the right direction. Turn the page to find out what’s happening while you’re here.

PHOTO BY AMY EDGETT

The Carve Tahoe event pits world-wide snow carving teams against one another for a chilling weekend of competition to benefit the Sierra Avalanche Center.

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C A R OLE S ESKO O P E N A RT S TUDIO / H OLI D AY S ALE
NOV. 29, 30, & D E C . 1 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit Carole Sesko’s art studio or a holiday show and sale, featuring contemporary mixed media paintings, whimsical boxes and bowls, art jewelry, and more at 10326 High St., central Truckee, 530-587-7750, www.carolesesko.com

NO VEMBER
N O V. 2 0 Home Brew Film Series #1: John Morrison 7 p.m. Join local hero John Morrison for the first of Alpenglow’s Home Brew Series. John will inspire with tales of skiing in the Great White North, Greenland, Antarctica and more. Free event, Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. N O V. 2 2 Annual Downtown Holiday Festival & Tree Lighting 4 p.m. Kick off the holiday season at

the annual Downtown Holiday Festival & Tree Lighting Ceremony in historic downtown Truckee produced by the Truckee Downtown Merchants Association and Rotary Club of Truckee. Lighting of the “Bud” Fish Tree, Santa, hot chocolate, caroling. Elementary school children will decorate Christmas trees. At 4:30 p.m., Santa will arrive. The Bud Fish Tree Lighting Ceremony is slated for 5:15 p.m. in front of the train depot. N O V. 3 0 Tahoe City Holiday Hop noon to 6 p.m., Downtown Tahoe City. Get ready to kick off the holidays season in style at the Tahoe City Holiday Hop. Stroll through stores and begin your holiday shopping
ARTWORK BY CAROLE SESKO

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while enjoying wine, snacks and festive surroundings. Be sure to pick up your shop local card at the same time start shopping to win great prizes. Santa photos at Watson Cabin from 2-4 p.m., www.visittahoecity.org

and more. Take the little ones Santa will be at Northstar and available for pictures, www.northstarcalifornia.com D E C . 6 Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony Join Santa and Mrs. Claus for the annual Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony, North Tahoe Event Center, 8318 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach. Enjoy a cookie swap, photos with Santa, complimentary soup and cocoa, arts and crafts stations and Friends of Kings Beach Library book sale! Produced by the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe, North Tahoe Public Utility District, North Tahoe Event Center, and North Tahoe Business Association, 530-546-9000, www.northtahoebuisness.org D E C . 6 Parents’ Night Out 6-10 p.m. Children ages birth-12 years of age are welcome. A donation of $10 per child per evening is requested. This is a drop-in program at the First Baptist Church of Tahoe City, 390 Fairway Drive, 530-5831534, www.tahoeministries.com D E C . 7 Free Community Backcountry Ski 9 a.m. Join Alpenglow Sports and Black Diamond ski Ambassador Brennan Lagasse for a community backcountry day. All abilities are encouraged to attend. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. D E C . 7 Annual Tree Lighting Celebration 4:306 p.m. Join the ladies and gentlemen of The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe to welcome the holidays during the 4th Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony in the Living Room. This special evening includes s’mores with the Marshmologist, hot

DE C E M B ER
D E C . 4 Hospitality Holidays at North Tahoe Event Center 5-10 p.m. Kings Beach. A celebration of community, Hospitality Holidays kicks off the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/ CVB/Resort Association event with cool holiday decor. From 7-10 p.m. enjoy DJ One Truest, Sneaky Creatures and a Community Christmas Party with live music and dancing. Photos with Santa and the elves, no host bar, restaurants and silent auction, www.gotahoenorth. com/events D E C . 5 Winter Film Series #2: Freddie Wilkinson 7 p.m. Join New England legend and Mountain Hardwear athlete Freddie Wilkinson for global climbing adventures at the second of Alpenglow’s Winter Film Series. Squaw Valley’s Olympic Village Inn. Free event. Raffle proceeds benefit Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue, 530-583-6917. DEC. 5, 12 AND 1 9 Noel Nights at Northstar California 5-8 p.m. Put on your hat and mittens and join Northstar California’s Noel Nights taking place the first three Thursdays of December. The Village at Northstar will be festive winter wonderland with a decorated 35-foot tree, ice skating until 9 p.m., fire pits, holiday carolers, shopping deals,

chocolate, cookie decorating, ornament making and holiday performances by Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe and Tahoe Expedition Academy children. The event is complimentary and open to the community, 13031 Ritz-Carlton Highlands Court, Truckee, 530-562-3000, www.ritzcarlton. com/laketahoe D E C . 8 Feast of St. Nicholas 5:30 p.m. Familyoriented potluck dinner including photos with St. Nicholas! Open to all, with or without a dish to

COOL PICK

E ARLY S E ASO N J U MP STA RT SKI C L I NI C
DE C. 4 - 7
NASTC’s answer to getting your ski legs on. Get ahead of the crowds and start your improvement early. Ski four days with NASTC’s top instructors, the teachers of teachers. North American Ski Training Center, 10710 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, 530-582-4772, www.skinastc.com, ski@skinastc.com

COURTESY PHOTO: NASTC

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HA N DM ADE S IERRA HOLI D AY FINE ARTS A N D C R AFTS S HOW
D EC . 7
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sierra College Tahoe-Truckee will host an emporium of handcrafted wares by local fine artists and craftspeople. Sponsored by the College’s student art club, the†event will include music, food, and a variety of artworks for sale in all price ranges. Email ttcsierracollegeart@gmail.com
share, St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 855 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-4713, www.stnicksepiscopal.org, stnicholastc@yahoo.com. D E C . 1 3 Community Avalanche Evening with PIEPS 7 p.m. Hone your avalanche safety skills with industry leader PIEPS. Event is free and snow safety topics will get you prepared for the upcoming season. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. D E C . 1 4 - 2 0 Excellence in Education Skiing for Schools Fundraiser at Sugar Bowl Sugar Bowl was the first resort to host the foundation’s “Skiing for Schools” drive in 1991 and has raised more than $200,000 to date. The Tahoe Truckee Excellence in Education Foundation supports quality public education within the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District. Visit exined.org, www.sugarbowl.com D E C . 1 4 Santa Ski Crawl at Mt. Rose Ski Area 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Join the traditional Santa Ski Crawl. Lift ticket discounts for male or female Santas in full garb and bar specials. Visit www.skirose.com D E C . 1 4 Breakfast with Santa 9 a.m. to noon. Join the Tahoe City Public Utility District and the Rotary Club of Tahoe

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City for a day of sledding, pancakes, and Santa. Event is free to the public at the Tahoe City Winter Sports Park (Tahoe City Golf Course). Co-sponsored by Tahoe City Rotary and TCPUD Parks & Recreation. Visit www.tahoecitypud.com D E C . 1 4 Full Moon Ski and Snowshoe Tour and Dinner 5-8 p.m. Moonlight ski and snowshoe tour, dinner and wine tasting. The cost is $45 for adults and $30 for 12 and under. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530587-9494, www.tahoedonner. com/cross-country DEC. 14 AND 15, 2 1 A N D 2 2 Carole Sesko Open Art Studio / Holiday Sale 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Featuring contemporary mixed media paintings, whimsical boxes and bowls, art jewelry, and more. 10326 High Street, 530-587-7750, www.carolesesko.com D E C . 1 7 Free Community Ski with Black Diamond 9 a.m. Join Alpenglow Sports and Black Diamond ski ambassador Brennan Lagasse for a community backcountry day.†The author of “State of the Backcountry,” Brennan will take you on an enjoyable, mellow tour. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917, www.skihomewood.com D E C . 1 8 Home Brew Film Series #2: Brennan Lagasse Join Points North Heli guide Brennan Lagasse for tales of deep backcountry powder from Alaska’s Chugach Mountains. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917.
COURTESY PHOTO: NORTH TAHOE ARTS

D E C . 1 9 Winter Concert 6 p.m. The North Tahoe High School Music Department Winter Concert will consist of Middle School and the High School musicians in the high school gym and the concert is free. There will be a mix of holiday, winter and concert tunes. D E C . 2 1 Ski with Santa, Homewood Mountain Resort Santa will be tearing up the mountain on his new Christmas skis, handing out candy, and taking pictures. Find Santa, take a picture with him and tag #skihomewood on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter to be entered into a drawing to win a 2013-14 season pass, 530-5846839, www.skihomewood.com D E C . 2 2 Lessons and Carols. 6 p.m. An ecumenical service of song and scripture, open to all. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 855 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-5834713, www.stnicksepiscopal. org, stnicholastc@yahoo.com. DEC. 24 AND 25 Santa and Penguin Pete visit Diamond Peak 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Santa and Penguin Pete will be at Diamond Peak handing out candy canes and visiting the kids. D E C . 2 4 Christmas Eve services Squaw Valley Chapel, Children’s Pageant, 4 and 5:30 p.m.; Carols and Candle Lighting, 7:30 p.m. at 444 Squaw Peak Road, Olympic Valley. Rev. Art Domingue, www.squawvalleychapel.com D E C . 2 4 Christmas Eve services 5 p.m. family service; 9 p.m. Holy Eucharist; 11:15 p.m. Midnight service. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 855 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-

4713, www.stnicksepiscopal. org, stnicholastc@yahoo.com D E C . 2 4 Christmas Eve services Northstar California, candlelight Christmas Eve service in Sierra/Martis room of the Conference Center. 4 p.m. Hot chocolate, coffee, and cookies will be provided, 530-523-3095.

COOL PICK

H O L LY ART S, A WIN T E R CE L E BR ATI O N
T HRO UGH DE C. 30 Are you looking for a one-of-a-kind gift? North Tahoe Arts offers an ARTisan Shop and two galleries filled with fine art and handcrafted work for your holiday gift giving. The ARTisan Shop Annual Open House Event will take place Saturday, Dec. 14, noon-4 p,m. Everyone is welcome. Refreshments will be served. North Tahoe Arts is located at 380 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City. ARTisan Shop and gallery hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, closed Tuesdays, 530-581-2787, www. northtahoearts.com

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of the line Celestron telescopes and wine and hot cider around a fire pit. Dogs on leashes are welcome. For more information, call the Cross Country, Telemark & Snowshoe Center at 530-562-3270, www. northstarcalifornia.com D E C . 2 7 Cross Country Equipment Demo Day 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Reps will have their latest and greatest equipment to demo including equipment by Fischer, Swix, Salomon, Madshus, Rossignal and others. Free with trail pass. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-5879494, www.tahoedonner.com/ cross-country D E C . 2 7 Snowball Launching Contest Try your luck at hitting snow targets. Tahoe Donner Snowplay, 12750 Northwoods Blvd., Truckee, 530587-9437, www.tahoedonner. com/snowplay D E C . 3 1 Torchlight Parade on New Year’s Eve Intermediate skiers and riders ages 10 or older who can ski or ride unassisted. Arrive early to secure a spot in the parade. A DJ and snacks will be provided in the bar area prior to the parade. Sign-ups are from 4:30-5:45 p.m. with a chair loading time at 6:15 p.m. This is a free event. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530587-9444, www.tahoedonner. com/downhill-ski
COURTESY PHOTO: TOR JOHNSON

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L AST C H AIR FES TIVAL
J AN . 9-11
Join Squaw Valley for a music and culture celebration. The festival will host some of the hottest names in music, as well as lively cultural seminars. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com
Tahoe City, 530-583-4713, www.stnicksepiscopal.org, stnicholastc@yahoo.com D E C . 2 5 Christmas Day Pancake Breakfast with Santa Breakfast starts at 10 a.m., followed by a half day of skiing and riding with Santa. The ski lifts will open at 11:30 a.m. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530-587-9444, www. tahoedonner.com/downhill-ski D E C . 2 6 Star Gazing Snowshoe Tours Take advantage of the Tahoe dark skies with star guide and poet Tony Berendsen during Star Gazing Snowshoe Tours at Northstar California. Every tour is as different as the starry skies above, however each will include a poem reading, a fun space quiz, a laser tour of the stars and constellations, a telescopic viewing using top

D E C . 2 4 First Baptist Church of Tahoe City 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Candlelight Christmas Eve services at 390 Fairway Drive in Tahoe City, 530-523-3095. D E C . 2 5 Christmas morning Eucharist 10 a.m. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 855 West Lake Blvd.,
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J A N . 3 Parents’ Night Out 6-10 p.m. Children ages birth-12 years of age are

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welcome. A donation of $10 per child per evening is requested. This is a drop-in program at the First Baptist Church of Tahoe City, 390 Fairway Drive, 530-5831534, www.tahoeministries.com JAN. 4, FEB. 16, MAR. 9, APRIL 6 Backcountry Ski Day Enjoy a full day of guided backcountry skiing off Donner Summit with top guides from The North American Ski Training Center, 10710 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, 530-582-4772, www.skinastc.com J A N 6 - 1 0 National Learn to Ski Week Discounted Learn to Ski Packages will be offered in celebration of national Learn to Ski & Board month to encourage new people to try out cross country. The cost is $30 for tour only or $59 for trail pass, rental and tour. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-587-9494, www.tahoedonner.com/crosscountry JAN. 6-10 AND 1 3 - 1 6 Learn-to-Ski or Snowboard Month Celebrating Learn-to-Ski or Snowboard Month with Learn-to-Ski or Snowboard packages for $39. These packages are only for first timers, which include all-day lift ticket, rental equipment, and a 1.75hour group lesson for anyone ages 7 and up. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530587-9444, www.tahoedonner. com/downhill-ski J A N . 7 Free Community Ski Day 9 a.m. Join Alpenglow Sports and Black Diamond ski Ambassador Brennan Lagasse for a community backcountry day. The author of Tahoe’s “State

of the Backcountry,” Brennan will take you on an enjoyable, mellow tour. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. J A N . 9 Winter Film Series #3: Kim Havell 7 p.m. Join Salomon athlete Kim Havell for the third installment

Dinner” menu. In the spring of 2010, Lee became a media sensation on the Food Network’s popular hit TV show, Top Chef Masters. Advanced reservations are required. The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe, 13031 Ritz-Carlton Highlands Court, Truckee, 530-562-3053, www.ritzcarlton. com/laketahoe

of Alpenglow’s Winter Film Series as she tells of her ski mountaineering adventures in the Grand Tetons. Squaw Valley’s Olympic Village Inn, free, 530-583-6917. J A N . 9 Celebrity Chef Dinner Featuring Susur Lee 5:30-9 p.m. Cost is $110 per person, $150 per person with wine pairings. Chef Lee will create and prepare a four-course, prix fixe menu for up to 150 dining guests at Manzanita, featuring a “Game

COOL PICK
OLYMPIC HERITAGE GUIDED SNOWSHOE AND CROSS-COUNTRY TOUR
JA N. 11
of the 1960 Olympic Trails 12:30 p.m. Sugar Pine Point State Park, 530-5839911. Free event, parking fee applies.

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J A N . 1 1 Backcountry Demo Event 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Join Lake Tahoe’s original backcountry shop for their 8th annual backcountry demo event. Try the latest and greatest in alpine touring, telemark and snowboards from DPS, Black Diamond, Dynafit, Volkl, Moment, Jones, Venture, G3, Voile and more. Event is free but participants must have a valid day or season pass. Alpine Meadows Ski Resort, call 530-583-6917. J A N . 1 1 Winter Trails Day & Demo Day 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. National celebration of winter fun. Winter Trails Day offers those new to snowsports the chance to try cross country skiing and snowshoeing for free with registration at www. rei.com/sacramento.com. Donations accepted to help support the local cross country school ski teams. Hosted by REI and Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-587-9494, www. tahoedonner.com/cross-country J A N . 1 1 Olympic Heritage Celebration 10 a.m. Restored 1960 Olympic Trail System opens for the season at Sugar Pine Point State Park, 530583-9911. Free event, parking fee applies. J A N . 1 1 Olympic Heritage Celebration Opening Ceremonies Lighting of the Caldron and Olympic Welcome 11:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served. Sugar Pine Point State Park, 530583-9911. Free event, parking fee applies. J A N . 1 1 Olympic Heritage Dedication and Celebration 11:45 a.m. Native
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American dance by Eagle Wing Dancers, Sugar Pine Point State Park, 530-583-9911. Free event, parking fee applies. J A N . 1 4 - 1 6 Euer Valley Moonlight Skiing During this week, a specific night with the best conditions will be selected for an adventure encouraging folks to ski The Euer Valley by moonlight. Enjoy soup and salad after and drink specials. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530587-9494, www.tahoedonner. com/cross-country J A N . 1 5 Home Brew Film Series #3 Dave Campbell 7 p.m. Join Alpenglow for the third installment of their popular Home Brew Series. Patagonia athlete Dave Campbell will tell snowboard tales of adventure in the High Sierra and beyond, free event. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. J A N . 1 6 Olympic Heritage Museum of Sierra Ski History and 1960 Winter Olympics Open House Meet and greet with Olympians. 5:307:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Boatworks Mall, 760 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-9911. J A N . 1 7 Olympic Heritage Celebration Nordic Legends Dinner, 6 p.m., Granlibakken Resort, Granlibakken Road, Tahoe City, 530-583-9911. J A N . 1 8 Ice Bar Kickoff Party Celebrate the grand opening of Alpine Meadows’ legendary Ice Bar, recognized as one of Tahoe’s most unique spots to hang out with friends and soak up the California

COOL PICK
C ARV E TAH O E
JA N. 28 T O FEB . 2
Free and open to the public at Northstar California Resort. The best snow carvers from around the world will be sculpting breathtaking masterpieces out of 20-ton blocks of snow with the awards ceremony taking place on Feb. 2. Each donation made with a fan vote will be given to the Sierra Avalanche Center. Visit http://carvetahoe.com

PHOTOS BY AMY EDGETT

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sunshine. Boasting inevitable and hilarious snowball battles, live on-snow music and barbecue sandwiches. Alpine Meadows, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, 800-403-0206, www.SkiAlpine.com J A N . 1 8 Olympic Heritage Celebration Citizens Against the Clock Biathlon event at Sugar Pine Point State Park to benefit the North Tahoe Cross-Country Ski Team, 530583-9911. Free event, parking fee applies. JAN. 18-20 AND F E B . 2 1 - 2 3 Avalanche Level I Course Intensive seminar designed to teach an understanding of avalanche formation, observation skills, ability to use a transceiver and probe, and how to dig a snowstudy pit. This is a minimum amount of know how if you want to ski or ride safely in the backcountry and sidecountry. North American Ski Training Center, 10710 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, 530-582-4772,

www.skinastc.com, ski@skinastc.com. J A N . 1 9 Olympic Heritage Full Moon Snowshoe Hike Enjoy the night sky on snowshoes, 6:30 p.m. for lessons, hike begins at 7 p.m. Cost of $25 includes snowshoes, park entrance and guided hike. Reservations required at West Shore Sports, 530-525-9920. J A N . 1 9 - 2 7 National Safety Awareness Week Squaw Valley joins the National Ski Area Association in promoting safety awareness throughout the resort. Remember to wear a helmet, slather on that sunscreen, and be knowledgeable about avalanche awareness. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com J A N . 1 9 - 2 7 National Safety Awareness Week Alpine Meadows joins the National Ski Areas Association in promoting safety awareness

SEARS — Locally owned and operated by Charlie Riley, Sears offers exceptional products in a large selection, with the high quality and competitive prices you want. Delivery and Installation available. Same prices, same value without driving to Reno or Sacramento.

Open 7 days a week! M-F 9-6:30, Sat 9-6, Sun 11-4
Phone orders gladly accepted with a SEARS card.
Truckee’s Hometown Sears at Tri Counties Bank Plaza 12047 Donner Pass Road, Truckee 530-550-0110
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throughout the resort. Remember to wear a helmet, slather on sunscreen, and be knowledgeable about avalanche awareness. Alpine Meadows, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, 800-403-0206, www.SkiAlpine.com J A N . 2 0 Skoogsloppet Race at Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center 10 a.m. Organized by school cross country ski teams as a fundraiser. Choose a 15km or 7.5km course. A 2km course option for 12-year-olds and under will be available. Everyone is welcome and all participants enter the drawing for some great prizes donated by friends of the school teams. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530587-9494, www.tahoedonner. com/cross-country J A N . 2 4 - 2 6 Ullr Fest Diamond Peak reminds event attendees to come dressed in the best Ullr attire as the event is named for the Scandinavian god of winter and snow, who is widely regarded as the patron saint of skiers, www.ivgid.org J A N . 3 1 Sierra College Insights 7-8:15 p.m. “Sir Edmund Hillary, the Dalai Lama, and Miss Nepal: Unexpected Encounters in Nepal Through the Decades” is a free community presentation presented by three Sierra College instructors on the Sierra College, Tahoe-Truckee campus, 11001 College Trail, Truckee, 530-550-2290, www.sierracollege.edu J A N . 2 4 - 2 6 All Conditions/All Terrain Ski Clinic Alpine Meadows; Feb. 24-26, Squaw Valley; March 21-23, Northstar-at-Tahoe. This clinic is designed to help
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you move past your advanced or intermediate plateau, and skiing the entire mountain well, whatever the conditions. Three consecutive days of instruction and feedback from nationally ranked ski instructors (members of the PSIA Alpine Instructor Team). Address technique and tactics as you rip around Alpine, Squaw or Northstar for three full days of coaching and fun, 10710 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, 530-582-4772, www.skinastc. com, ski@skinastc.com

F E B . 7 - 1 0 Avalanche Level II Course Intensive seminar taught by long-time AIARE school in Truckee, the North American Ski Training Center. This course builds on the Level I, adding the factors

critical to stability analysis, trip planning, terrain selection, companion rescue, and more, 10710 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, 530-582-4772, www. skinastc.com, ski@skinastc.com.

COOL PICK

FEB R UARY
F E B . 2 Groundhog Day Scavenger Hunt Search for the groundhog. Tahoe Donner Snowplay, 12750 Northwoods Blvd., Truckee, 530-5879437, www.tahoedonner.com/ snowplay F E B . 3 Ski Orienteering Organized by The Bay Area Orienteering Club. See www. BAOC.org for details. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-587-9494, www.tahoedonner.com/crosscountry F E B . 7 - 1 4 Free DPS Ski Demo Go on down to Alpenglow to try the hottest skis on the planet, DPS, Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd, Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. F E B . 7 Parents’ Night Out 6-10 p.m. Children ages birth-12 years of age are welcome. A donation of $10 per child per evening is requested. This is a drop-in program at the First Baptist Church of Tahoe City, 390 Fairway Drive, 530-5831534, www.tahoeministries.com

RAH LVE S BAN Z AI T O UR
Showcasing racing in its purest form of four at a time going head-to-head in ski and boarder-cross style action. Get ready to compete in the ultimate test on the mountain. Pre and aprés parties spanning four weekends from Feb. 8 through March 16 at Kirkwood Mountain Resort, Alpine Meadows, Squaw Valley and Sugar Bowl Resort, the Rahlves’ Banzai Tour is sure to be a showstopper, www.rahlvesbanzai.com

FEB . 8- 9

COURTESY PHOTO: JEFF ENGERBRETSON

F E B . 7 Sierra College Insights 7-8:15 p.m. Sierra College Insights presents “$3 million for 30 seconds: Are Super Bowl ads worth it?” with Sierra College Business Instructor Kurt Heisinger, free, 11001 College Trail, Truckee, 530-5502290, www.sierracollege.edu F E B . 8 Biathlon Clinic Ski Orienteering 10 a.m. In the spirit of the Olympic games, join Olympian Glenn Jobe who will give a special, informative presentation and clinic about the Olympic sport of Biathlon, Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-587-9494, www.tahoedonner.com/crosscountry F E B . 1 1 - 1 3 Euer Valley Moonlight Skiing During this week, a specific night with the best conditions will be selected for an adventure encouraging folks to ski The Euer Valley by moonlight. Enjoy soup and salad after as well as drink specials. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center, 15275 Alder Creek Road, Truckee, 530-587-9494, www. tahoedonner.com/cross-country F E B . 1 4 - 2 2 Kid-ORama Squaw Valley comes alive with a week-long kid’s extravaganza. Kid-O-Rama offers non-stop fun for kids of all ages. Check out Big Truck Night in the Village featuring fire trucks, snowplows, and grooming machines, as well as street parties and kids’ concerts. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-4030206, www.squaw.com FE B. 14 T O MA R C H 1 Alpenglow Mountain Festival, Winter A two-week celebration of human-powered winter

sports. Backcountry ski/board and Nordic focused. Seminars, demos, races, films, music and more. North America’s premier mountain lifestyle festival. Free (mostly). Lake Tahoe’s North Shore and Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917, www.alpenglowsports.com F E B . 2 0 Winter Film Series #4 Adrian Ballinger 7 p.m. Everest guide Adrian Ballinger is back with tales of skiing on Ama Dablam, Everest and other Himalayan giants. Squaw Valley’s Olympic Village Inn, free. Raffle proceeds benefit the High Fives Foundation. Big Truck Hats will be on site sewing custom lids, 530-583-6917. F E B . 2 2 Children’s Glow Stick Parade and Carnival A kid’s version of the Torchlight Parade with glow sticks for children 10 or younger who can ski or ride unassisted in the dark on Snowbird run. Arrive early to secure a spot in the parade and get glow sticks by playing free carnival games. Music and snacks will be provided in the bar area prior to the parade. Sign-ups and carnival start at 4:30 p.m. with the parade starting at 6:30 p.m. This event is free. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530587-9444, www.tahoedonner. com/downhill-ski F E B . 2 2 Squaw Valley Prom 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. The Squaw Valley Prom is back for its 10th year! The event is hosted by the High Fives Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising money and awareness for athletes who have suffered a life-altering injury while pursuing their dream in the winter action sports community.

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B A NANA S PLIT E XTRAVAGA NZA
1:30 p.m. Help devour an incredible 200-foot banana split. This event is free. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530-5879444, www.tahoedonner.com/downhill-ski
All ticket proceeds from the event will benefit the High Fives Foundation. Prom theme is “Diamonds in the Sky.” Tickets are $100 for a couple and $200 stag. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com F E B . 2 7 Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival As part of the Alpenglow Mountain Festival, the Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival is back! Join Alpenglow, Tahoe Cross Country and the Tahoe Cross Country Ski Education Association for an evening of fun, humorous and adventurous film shorts. $10. All proceeds benefit the Ski Education Association. Alpenglow Sports, 415 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. FEB. 27 TO MARCH 4 Celebrity Winterfest (Special Olympics) Join an event-filled weekend. Saturday, the public is invited to come to watch corporate teams, with celebrity and Special Olympics athletes racing toe-to-toe at Diamond Peak Ski Resort. The event concludes on Sunday with “Plungefest,” an opportunity for brave souls with warm hearts to raise additional funds for the Special Olympics.

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F E B . 2 8 SnowFest! Opening Ceremonies and Fireworks Squaw Valley kicks off the 33rd annual SnowFest!, a celebration of North Lake Tahoe and all of the region’s winter activities. The fun-filled week starts at Squaw Valley with a colorful fireworks show, extreme food eating challenge and live music. Check out the full SnowFest! schedule at www. TahoeSnowFestival.com. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com

M A R C H 8 Kings Beach SnowFest! Parade 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The North Tahoe Business Association hosts this annual fun-filled event featuring entertaining entries from 30-40 local community and nonprofit organizations and businesses. To participate in the parade or for more information call 530-546-9000, www.tahoesnowfestival.com M A R C H 1 3 Winter Film Series #5: Emily Harrington 7 p.m. North Face climber Emily Harrington will round out Alpenglow’s Winter Film Series with tales of rock climbing in Morocco, China and beyond. Squaw Valley’s Olympic Village Inn, free, 530-583-6917. M A R C H 1 4 Positive Psychology 7-8:15 p.m. Sierra College Insights presents “Unlocking the secrets to optimal well-being” with Sierra College Psychology and Personal Development Instructor Christopher Old, LMFT. Free, 11001 College Trail, Truckee, 530-550-2290, www. sierracollege.edu M A R C H 1 5 - 1 6 Sugar Bowl Silver Belt Banzai final tour stop of the Rahlves’ Banzai Tour Join Sugar Bowl resort ambassador Daron Rahlves for the exciting finish of the Banzai tour at Sugar Bowl, where it all started and where it all ends. Sugar Bowl Resort, www.sugarbowl.com, 530-426-9000. M A R C H 1 5 Springs Music Series Begins This spring, unwind and soak up the rays every Saturday with Alpine Meadows’ Spring Music Series. Skiers and snowboarders will enjoy the tunes of local,

talented musicians while kicking up their boots on the deck of the Alpine Meadows Lodge. The whole family is invited to attend the free concert series performances. Alpine Meadows, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, 800-403-0206, www.SkiAlpine.com

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M AR C H
M A R C H 1 Winter Beach Party Noon. Tropical fun, live music, food and games. A great time for the whole family. This event is free. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530587-9444, www.tahoedonner. com/downhill-ski M A R C H 1 Alpenglow Mountain Festival Nordic Demo 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Try the latest and greatest in cross-country ski equipment from industry leaders Fischer, Salomon, Rossignol, Madshus, Atomic, Atlas and MSR. Demos, clinics, seminars, kid’s events, women’s events and more. Part of the Alpenglow Mountain Festival (www.alpenglowsports. com). Tahoe Cross Country, Tahoe City, 530-583-6917. M A R C H 1 Mardi Squaw 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Celebrate Mardi Gras and dance the night away at Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com

SN O WFE ST ! O F NO RT H L AKE TA H O E
FEB . 28 T O M A RCH 9
Looking for some winter time fun? Then you will find it in the 10 days of SnowFest! This winter carnival showcases life in the Sierra, including events at ski areas, North Lake Tahoe towns, lakeshore business, kids’ events, dogs, adults, and more! Get out your neon, headbands, and disco balls folks as the theme of this year’s SnowFest! is “Bringing back the 80s.” This is a mustattend event for all ages! SnowFest!, 551 North Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, 530-583-7167,

COURTESY PHOTO: ROB RETTING

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MARCH 19-23 Nature Valley U.S. Alpine Championships Squaw Valley is proud to host the 2013 event, a culmination of the ski racing year which brings together the U.S. Ski Team and hundreds of young, talented athletes from across the country. Spectators are encouraged to join the actionpacked week, as some of the world’s top skiers face-off on the slopes followed by celebrations in the Village. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com M A R C H 2 8 - 2 9 Pain McShlonkey Dress up in your most outrageous ski duds and go out to Squaw Valley for a day full of belly laughs, camaraderie and philanthropy in celebration of legendary skier Shane McConkey. Festivities include the Extreme Small Mountain Invitational and the Chinese Downhill, where pros and amateurs battled it out on snowblades for the highly coveted Golden Saucer trophy and ultimate bragging rights. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-403-0206, www.squaw.com M A R C H 3 1 SKINNY Ski-A-Thon 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The SKINNY Ski-A-Thon at Squaw Valley invites High Fives Foundation supporters to ski as many laps as possible on the infamous KT-22 chairlift. Donations are gathered on a flat rate or per-lap basis en route to raising money and awareness for the High Fives Non-Profit Foundation, www.highfivesfoundation.org

of age are welcome. A donation of $10 per child per evening is requested. This is a dropin program at the First Baptist Church of Tahoe City, 390 Fairway Drive, 530-583-1534, www.tahoeministries.com A P R I L 5 Spring Evening Ski Party at Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area Enjoy the barbecue, live music and a special outdoor bar. Skiing will be extended to 5:45 p.m. Attendees will also be entered into a free drawing to win a 2014-15 season pass. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530-587-9444, www.tahoedonner.com/ downhill-ski A P R I L 6 Homewood Ski Resort knows how to make Easter fun! 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Get on your skis and snowboards at Homewood for the Easter Bunny Hunt and Egg Hunt! Find the Easter Bunny who will be skiing all over the mountain and take a picture with him. Tag the picture with #skihomewood on either Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter to be entered to win a Homewood season pass for 2014-2015. There will be a public egg hunt at 11 a.m. behind the North Lodge. The Ski School Egg Hunt will be behind the North Lodge at 1 p.m., 530-584-6839, www.skihomewood.com A P R I L 1 1 All about dance! 7-8:15 p.m., Sierra College Insights presents fascinating talk with choreographer, dancer and Sierra College dance and yoga instructor Jennie Pitts-Knipe, free, 11001 College Trail, Truckee, 530-550-2290, www.sierracollege.edu

COOL PICK
E A ST E R C ELEBR ATION
What better way to spend Easter Sunday than on the slopes with the whole family? Search in the spring snow for colorful eggs during Alpine Meadows’ two Easter egg hunts - one for the kids and one for the adults. In true winter fashion, guests to Alpine can also do some searching with the help of technology during the Beacon and Eggs Avalanche Beacon Scavenger Hunt. Alpine Meadows, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, 800-4030206, www.SkiAlpine.com.

APRIL 20

M A R C H 1 6 The Gold Rush at Royal Gorge XC Celebrate the triumphant return of one of Tahoe’s iconic crosscountry races, complete with competitor prizes and spectator festivities. Royal Gorge Cross Country, www.royalgorge.com, 530-426-3871.

COURTESY PHOTO: XXXXXX XXXXXXX

APRIL
A P R I L 4 Parent’s Night Out Children ages birth-12 years

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A P R I L 1 2 - 3 1 Annual Snow Golf Tournament Ditch the ski jacket for a collared shirt and khakis. Alpine Meadows’ Annual Snow Golf Tournament is back! As the only top-to-bottom snow golf course, this highly anticipated spring event is a unique way to spend a day on the slopes with the whole family. The nine-hole course starts at the top of Summit Express Chair and meanders its way down the mountain with the last holes bringing competitors back to the bottom of Alpine Bowl Chair. Alpine Meadows, 2600 Alpine Meadows Road, Tahoe City, 800-403-0206, www.SkiAlpine.com A P R I L 1 3 Downhill Dummy Contest and Rail Jam Enjoy food and beverage specials, bounce house, live music, plus the popular Boxing Match Rail Jam and traditional Downhill Dummy event. Teams build unique dummies to send sliding down the hill and off a massive jump. This year’s theme is “Places around the World.” Prizes will be awarded for best design, best air and best crash. You can also get full-day lift tickets at half-day rates. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area, 11603 Snowpeak Way, Truckee, 530-587-9444, www.tahoedonner.com/ downhill-ski A P R I L 1 3 Palm Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m. Historic Squaw Valley Chapel, built for the 1960 Winter Olympics and the only Protestant church in Squaw Valley. Everyone is welcome. Refreshments provided, 444 Squaw Peak Road, Olympic Valley, 530-581-4011, www.squawvalleychapel.com

A P R I L 1 9 TahoeTruckee Earth Day Celebration Celebrate the earth and join Squaw Valley for live music, a “Trashion” show, and environmental fun at the largest eco-event in the North Lake Tahoe and Truckee area. The event gives participants the opportunity to learn about earth-friendly practices including recycling, composting, alternative energy, and sustainability. A diverse array of agency representatives and earth-friendly vendors will be present to help participants learn more about how they can reduce their ecological footprint. Squaw Valley, 1960 Chamonix Place, Olympic Valley, 800-4030206, www.squaw.com A P R I L 1 9 Trains Freestyle Ski & Snowboard Contest A locomotive of high-flying freestyle action, TRAiNS is an on-snow event with music, chicken wings and a unique contest format for all ages to witness the best skiers and snowboarders take to the air, www.highfivesfoundation.org A P R I L 2 0 Easter Services at High Camp and Squaw Valley Chapel Free cable car rides to High Camp will begin at 7 a.m. for all those not carrying skis or boards. Light refreshments will be provided by Squaw Valley and music by the Chapel musician with Tuck Wilson and other local artists. A different service will follow at 10 a.m. in the Chapel on the Valley floor. Refreshments provided, 444 Squaw Peak Road, Olympic Valley, 530-581-4011, www. squawvalleychapel.com.

Winter Water Smart Tips
Winterize your Pipes
Make sure that all outdoor spigots are winterized; this will avoid frozen pipes and potential interior and exterior damage.

Insulate

Insulate hot water pipes to reduce the amount of water that must be run in order to get hot water to a faucet. This conserves water as well as minimizes water heating costs.

Locate your home shut-off valve

Locate and mark your shut-off valve for quick identification in the event of a frozen or broken pipe. If you do not have a home shut-off valve, consider installing one in the fall or spring. During regular working hours, there is no charge for the District to turn on/turn off water service to your property.

Shovel a path to your shut-off valve

Be sure to shovel a path to your shut-off valve after each snowfall event. Things look a lot different under two feet of snow and, in a broken pipe emergency, being able to quickly locate and shut off the valve is critical.

Check for leaks in pipes, hoses, hose connections and faucets

Even a tiny leak can equate to thousands of gallons of wasted water in a surprisingly short period of time. Repair or replace any plumbing or equipment leaking water immediately. Not only do these leaks waste a valuable resource, if you have a water meter, they cost you money.

If your pipes do freeze

The District is here for you 24/7 should your pipes freeze. Call 530.544.6474 and help will be on the way. We’re always here when you need us–never a doubt! South Tahoe Public Utility District A Proactive Partner in the Community 1275 Meadow Crest Drive South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150

bringing back the 80s

10 fun filled days of fireworks, parades, theme parties, kids events, music, animal contests, ski races, and much, much MORE!
For complete schedule & lodging packages go to:

Feb 28-March 10, 2014
www.tahoesnowfest.com

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BARTON FESTIVAL OF TREES AND LIGHTS
Barton Foundation’s Festival of Trees and Lights will celebrate its 50th anniversary. This year, the Tallac Association will perform three production of “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” a family comedy about the meaning of Christmas. Performances will take place Dec. 5, 6 and 8. A Teddy Bear Brunch will take place Dec. 8. This year the Barton Foundation Board has elected to donate festival funds to Barton Cardiology, led by Cardiologist Dr. David Young. The growing service line is focused on preventing heart disease and addressing cardiac health through diagnosis, intervention, referral and rehabilitation. For a schedule and information, visit www.festivaloftreeslaketahoe.org

DE C . 4-8

NO VEMBER
N O V. 2 2 - 2 4 18th Annual Holiday Faire at Valhalla Grand Hall The Valhalla Grand Hall will be decorated in a festive holiday mode for the annual holiday faire. Twenty-five local vendors and artists will offer an assortment of handmade and other items for purchase. Santa Claus will visit and school choirs and other musical groups will perform. The faire will take place from 5:308:30 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5

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p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Information: 530541-4975.

D E C E M B ER
D E C . 7 Breakfast with Santa Join Santa for a pancake breakfast from 9-11 a.m. at Kahle Community Center, 36 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, Nev. Orange juice and hot chocolate will also be available. Santa will also pose for photos with children, but parents must bring their own camera. Information: 775-586-7271. D E C . 7 Light up South Lake Tahoe Businesses along Highway 50 will turn on their lights in a wave and “Light up South Lake Tahoe” as the South Lake Tahoe Fire Department truck, South Lake Tahoe Police Department Command Vehicle and Snow Plows are decorated in festive holiday lights. Procession will begin at 6 p.m. and will take place from Stateline to the “Y.” Information: 530-542-6106. D E C . 1 2 North Pole phone call 4:30-6:30 p.m. For ages 3-6. Register starting Dec. 1 at Kahle Community Center, 236 Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, Nev. Free. Information: 775586-7271. D E C . 1 5 Jingle Jog A jingle jog hot chocolate run will tae place at Lakeview Commons, located at Highway 50 and Lakeview Avenue. The run will begin at 10 a.m. Hot chocolate treats will be available at the finish line. Prizes will be given for best costume and most ridiculous costume. Information: www.tahoefunruns.com.

D E C . 2 1 Santa visits Sierra Santa and his helpers will visit Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort Base Lodge. Visits will take place from 11 a.m. to noon and from 1-2 p.m. Candy Cane Limbo and holiday face painting will take place from noon to 1 p.m. Brings your camera to take photos of your children with Santa. Cookies and hot cocoa will also be available. Information: www.sierraattahoe. com. D E C . 3 1 New Year’s Eve Celebration Music, games, fireworks and the gondola ball drop will take place at Heavenly Village. Festivities will take place from 6-9 p.m. Entertainment includes an outdoor concert, ice-sculpting performances, fire dancers, a snowboard simulator, a photo booth and face painting. The ball drop will be timed to the East Coast New Year’s Eve at 9 p.m.

Inside MontBleu Casino

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775.588.1677

J ANUARY
J A N . 1 1 Winter Trails Day The city of South Lake Tahoe Recreation Department and the U.S. Forest Service will offer a variety of guided snowshoe hikes for adults and children ages 10 and older. Trail experiences feature wildlife habitat and forest health, the watershed and water quality impacts, and historic aspects of settlement in Lake Tahoe. There is no fee to participate and hot cocoa and snacks will be provided. Participants must provide own snowshoes and dress appropriately including hat, gloves, sunscreen, sunglasses, and bring plenty of water. Information: 530-542-6091.

T’s
Mesquite Rotisserie
Open Daily 11:00 - 8:00

901 Tahoe Blvd. #3
Next to 7 Eleven and the Cinema Incline Village • 775-831-2832
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H EAV E N LY HOLIDAYS
DE C . 21-31
The Heavenly Village transitions into a holiday winter wonderland with lights, decorations, carolers, magicians, jugglers, ice sculpting, ice capades and a Ripperoo Parade. It all cumulates on New Year’s Eve, with a live band and brightly-lit Gondola that descends over the crowd, signaling the start of the New Year and a festive fireworks show. Information www.skiheavenly.com

COURTESY PHOTO: HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT

Pir CC’S

ate Treasure

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3330 Lake Tahoe Blvd, S. Lake Tahoe, CA Inside the Lakeview Plaza

ate Trading Company r i P

Fun and unique gifts & souvenirs
~ Over 35 styles of Pirate Flags ~

Unique & Whimsical Home Décor
Furniture, wall art, windchimes. decorative items ~ Opening mid-Dec 2013 ~

Pirate apparel & accessories, hats, costumes, baby pirate jewelry, candles, toys
160 WINTER 2013 / 2014

530-544-9777 ccspiratetreasures.com

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S WAT C H FRE E RID E WO RL D T O U R
FEB . 27 T O M A RCH 3
Sixty of the best big mountain skiers and snowboarders on the planet will be at Kirkwood Mountain Resort for this event. They will challenge themselves on the Kirkwood’s permanently closed section known as “The Cirque.” The FWT is an international event and Kirkwood is one of only two stops in North America and is the last stop before the tour concludes at the Swatch Xtreme Verbier presented by North Face in Switzerland. This event will also be streamed live at www.freerideworldtour.com. Information www.kirkwood.com

TAHOE URGENT CARE

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OPEN DAILY 8AM-6PM NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED CALL US AT 530.541.3277

HENNING MEHRENS M.D.
FAMILY CARE • MINOR SURGERY INJURIES • X-raY & LABORATORY

PHOTO BY JIM GRANT

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F E B R UA RY
F E B . 8 - 9 Rahlves Banzai Tour The Rahlves’ Banzai Tour is the world’s premier big mountain freeski meets ski / boarder-cross event on the planet! Taking place at four Lake Tahoe resorts. The event pits some of the Tahoe region’s best skiers and riders against competitors from across North America and the world. The race is head-to-head action four at a time, top to bottom, down a wide open course over natural terrain and snow conditions. At Kirkwood, the competitors begin by dropping into “The Wall,” the legendary steep face off of chair 10, and then race down 2,000 vertical feet down some of Kirkwood’s most challenging terrain. This event is action packed and a not to be missed weekend Kirkwood. Information: www.kirkwood.com or www.rahlvesbanzai.com. F E B . 8 - 9 Burton Riglet Park Snowboard Games Using Riglet Technology, riders can experience the excitement of competition just like their favorite Olympians. This free event will teach kids 6 and under how to limbo and ollie, navigate through the gates, ride through the mini pipe, and catch (mini) air in the slopestyle course. Information: www.sierraattahoe.com.

COOL PICK
U.S . FRE E ST Y L E C H AMP IO N SH IP S
MA RC H 2 8 - 30
Building on a long-standing tradition of freestyle skiing and competition, Heavenly will host the U.S. Freestyle Championships. The moguls of Gunbarrel, made famous by the Hot Dogging contests of the 1970s, were also the site of the U.S. Freestyle Championships in 2013 and 2004 and the FIS World Cup Freestyle events in 1999 and 2000. At the 2013 Championships, the resort brought a Heavenly twist to the traditional event, with a live band and a thrilling post-event fireworks display which elicited an overwhelming positive reaction from athletes, spectators and event organizers. The most accomplished freestyle skiers, such as Heavenly’s own Sho Kashima, a U.S. Ski Team athlete, will showcase their talents, as they return from the 2014 Olympics in Sochi. Information: www.skiheavenly.com.

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M A R C H 2 8 - 3 0 Tanner Hall Invitational Fifteen of the world’s best skiers and Tanner Hall come together at Sierra-atTahoe to session a unique feature in a fun jam format contest. A contest for the riders, by the riders. Brought to you by Tahoe South, Inspired Media and Sierraat-Tahoe Resort. Information www. sierraattahoe.com.

APRIL
APRIL 12-13 Legendary Kirkwood Banked Slalom This season marks the 20th anniversary of Kirkwood’s Legendary Banked Slalom race. The race is a Tahoe favorite and fun for the whole family. The competition is open to any 5 years and older. As in years past competitors make their way down Snowsnake Gully hoping to win glory and to leave their mark on this historic event. Information: www.kirkwood.com A P R I L 2 0 Easter Eggstravaganza Easter activities will take place at Thunder Gulch at Sierra-at-Tahoe from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Easter Bunny will leave treasures for children to find. A bunny hop contest and chubby bunny challenge will also take place. Information: www.sierraattahoe.com.

H I GH ROLLER H OLD ‘ E M
APR IL 5
Heavenly will play its ace again this spring by hosting High Roller Hold ‘Em, the industry’s most high-energy, innovative big air competition. Infusing an X Games-worthy big air competition with a little South Lake Tahoe casino gambling twist, High Roller Hold ‘Em will take place on the World Cup run at Heavenly with a monster big-air jump, celebrity host and a $50,000 jackpot at stake. Some of the world’s top professional snowboarders will compete again in this high-production, signature night-time event, which will also feature a live DJ, an exhibition with local athletes, fireworks, laser lights and the Heavenly Angels. This will be an epic party befitting Lake Tahoe’s south shore! Information www.skiheavenly.com.

COURTESY PHOTO: HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT

TAHOE MAGAZINE

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North Lake’s BEST Pizza . Fresh Salad Bar

Pizza & Sports Bar

THE TREEHOUSE A Magical Place for Children of All Ages
Unique Children’s Clothing for Boys & Girls

The BEST Bloody Marys...

Bloody Devotion
17 HDTVs 2 Pool Tables FREE Wi-Fi Big Screen Games & Darts Full Bar

featuring our signature

Happy Hour Everyday 3-6pm
www.LakesideTahoeCity.com 850 North Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA (Drive behind Safeway)

Newborn - #16 Dancewear & Dress-up Books • Dolls • Educational Toys Thomas and Friends Seasonal Necessities
Open 7 Days a Week

530.583.2000

(530) 587-4883
10104 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee

ENTERTAINMENT
Entertainment venues around the lake offer a variety of shows, from bluegrass to electronic dance music. Whether you’re looking to attend an adventure film festival or move your feet to a local band, entertainment at the lake is a one-of-a-kind experience. Here’s a look at just a few of the events happening at Lake Tahoe this winter.

PHOTO FROM THINKSTOCK TAHOE MAGAZINE 165

C A L E N D A R

E N T E R T A I N M E N T

Once again, JackieGreene will return to the Crystal Bay Club for New Year’s weekend this winter.
PHOTO BY JAY BLAKESBERG

Lake Tahoe is worldrenowned for its bountiful entertainment opportunities. Winter slows the activity only slightly. Here’s a look at what some of the larger venues around the lake are offering this winter.

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE
15 U.S. Highway 50, Stateline Information: 800-427-7247 www.harrahslaketahoe.com

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS: Arty the Party SATURDAYS: DJ Rick Gee, DJ SN1 NOV NOV NOV NOV DEC JAN JAN FEB 22 29 30 30 21 18 25 01 DJ Leslie Perez DJ Carisma Tower of Power Clinton Sparks Chubby Checker Booker T. Jones Pablo Cruise Toad the Wet Sprocket

LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
1 College Way, South Lake Tahoe www.snowglobemusicfestival.com DEC 29-31

CRYSTAL BAY CASINO
14 State Route 28, Crystal Bay Information: 775-833-6333 www.crystalbaycasino.com NOV 22 NOV 23 NOV 29 NOV 29 NOV 30 DEC 06 DEC DEC
166 WINTER 2013 / 2014

SnowGlobe Music Festival featuring TiÎsto and Snoop Dogg

DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC JAN

13 14 20 21 27 28 29 31 10

The Silent Comedy Dead Winter Carpenters Peter Joseph Burtt and the King Tide Drop Theor y Radar Love, classic rock tribute Jackie Greene Band Jackie Greene Jackie Greene Band Fan Halen, Van Halen tribute The Duhks Galactic

MONTBLEU RESORT CASINO & SPA
55 Highway 50, Stateline Information: 775-588-3515 www.montbleuresort.com NOV 19 NOV 23 NOV NOV DEC DEC DEC 29 30 13 14 21

07 08

Keyser Soze Tumbleweed Wanderers New Riders of the Purple Sage DJ Gurbtron and Heidalicious Locals Last Waltz The Herbert Bail Orchestra Head for the Hills Dragon Smoke

FEB 17 MAR 16

Shaggy, Thrive “Into the Mind” movie premiere Black Uhuru Porter Robinson Terr y Bradshaw Tahoe Adventure Film Festival Daniel Tosh

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C A L E N D A R

E N T E R T A I N M E N T

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK

S NOWGLOBE MUSIC F ESTIVAL
Superstar DJs TiÎsto and Kasakade headline this annual South Shore electronic dance music festival. Snoop Dogg is also among the festivals major draws. SnowGlobe runs from Dec. 29-31 at the soccer field next to Lake Tahoe Community College. Tickets start at $164.

PHOTO BY ADAM JENSEN

168

WINTER 2013 / 2014

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE’S PREMIER GAMING AND NIGHTLIFE RESORT

FOR MORE INFORMATION
CLICK OR CALL MONTBLEURESORT.COM

888.829.7630 | FOLLOW US

TROPICANA ENTERTAINMENT CASINOS | TROPICANACASINOS.COM

C A L E N D A R

E N T E R T A I N M E N T

‘INTO THE MIND’
This critically acclaimed ski film takes a unique look at skiing. “With stunning cinematography and groundbreaking storytelling techniques, the Sherpas blur the lines between dream state and reality, and immerse you into the mind of a common skier as

he attempts to climb and ski the ultimate mountain,” according to Sherpas Cinema. The film makes its South Shore debut 8 p.m., Saturday Nov. 23 at MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa. Tickets are $15.

PHOTO BY RENAN OZTURK

170

WINTER 2013 / 2014

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET
The name started out as a Monty Python joke, but the band sold millions of records and notched several radio hits. The band broek up in 1998, but got back together in 2006. Toad the Wet Sprocket plays Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 7:30 p.m. Feb. 1. Tickets are $29.70 plus fees.

PHOTO BY ROB SHANAHAN TAHOE MAGAZINE 171

C A L E N D A R

E N T E R T A I N M E N T

DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS
Another local favorite, this rollicking roots rock band offers plenty of homegrown fun. They’ve quickly grown their audience and taken the show on the road, playing festivals like the High Sierra Music Festival in Quincy, Calif. The band plays familiar territory with a 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14 show at Crystal Bay Casino at Lake Tahoe’s North Shore. Tickets are $15.

PHOTO BY RYAN SALM PHOTOGRAPHY 172 WINTER 2013 / 2014 PHOTO BY ZACK SMITH

GALACT IC
New Orleans funk masters Galactic are sure to show their audience a sweaty good time when they return to Lake Tahoe March 16. The fivepiece outfit plays Crystal Bay Casino 9 p.m. Sunday, March 16. Tickets are $30.

DIRECTORY

OF

ADVERTISERS

Alpenglow Sports ........................................... 20 Alpine Mini Storage ........................................ 59 Ann Nichols & Co. ......................................... 57 Austin’s Restaurant......................................... 132 Backstreet Framers .......................................... 80 Barton Health ................................................ 69 Basecamp Hotel............................................. 34 Boathouse on the Pier ...................................... 65 Beacon Bar & Grill ........................................... 3 Bella Lago Aesthetics............................. North178 Bite American Tapas ..................................... 140 Bluestone Jewelry ......................................... 131 Burger Me! ................................................. 136 Burton Creek Veterinary Clinic......................... 174 Camp Richardson ............................................. 1 Coldwell Banker Select Realty ............................. 8 CC’S Pirate Treasures .................................... 160 Cedar House Sport Hotel................................... 4 Chart House ................................................ 140 Chase International - Incline Village/Tahoe City ... 97 Chase International - South Lake Tahoe ............... 35 Cierra Steak + Chophouse ....................... South 2 Cobblestone Center ..................................... 130 Coldwell Banker Select Real Estate ...................... 8 Cottonwood Restaurant.................................. 140 Diamond Peak Ski Resort ................................. 27 Dickson Commercial Realty ............................ 177 Dickson Realty - Troy & Cindy Browning .............. 69 Edgewood Tahoe ................................. South 178 Elk Grove Subaru ........................................... 13 Eskaton Village - Placerville............................. 128 Eskaton Village - Grass Valley ......................... 129 Firesign Cafe ................................................ 99 From Here & There ....................................... 130 Gallery Keoki ................................................ 61 Gateway Urgent Care..................................... 61 Geared for Games ....................................... 100 Goldfish Properties ......................................... 63 Granlibakken............................................... 101 Gravity Shop ............................................... 131 Give Back Tahoe.......................................... 174 Harrahs & Harveys Lake Tahoe ....................... 167 Heavenly Lake Tahoe ........................................ 3 Heavenly Sports ............................................. 10 Himmel Haus ............................................... 143 Homewood Mountain Ski Resort ....................... 44 Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa & Casino . 42 Illusion Fusion .............................................. 111 Incline At Tahoe Realty..................................... 73 Incline Creek Estates ......................................... 8

Incline Vacation Rentals.................................... 71 Incline Village Parks & Recreation ...................... 59 Jack L. Semmens, DDS................................... 130 James Harold Galleries .................................... 57 Kalifornia Jean Bar ........................................ 131 La Mexicana Taqueria ................................... 136 Lake Tahoe Asian Massage ............................ 153 Lake Tahoe Cigar Company ........................... 159 Lake Tahoe Cruises/Snowmobile Center ........... 102 Lake Tahoe Deluxe Vacation Rentals ................. 100 Lake Tahoe Real Estate .................................... 71 Lake Tahoe School .......................................... 18 Lake Tahoe Snowmobiling ................................ 15 Lake Tahoe Specialty Stove & Fireplace .............. 18 Lake Tahoe Yoga Studio................................... 57 Lakeshore Realty Associates ................................ 4 Lakeside Inn & Casino ..................................... 65 Lakeside Pizza ............................................. 164 Lather & Fizz................................................ 132 MacDuff’s Pub ............................................. 143 Marynell Hartnett ........................................... 99 McKinney & Associates ................................... 33 Mellow Fellow ............................................... 55 Montbleu Resort Casino & Spa ....................... 169 Mountain Hardware ....................................... 44 Mountain Home Center ................................... 49 Mountain Postal Pack and Ship ....................... 102 Nevada Opera Association ............................. 77 North Tahoe SnowFest! ................................. 157 Northstar California ........................................ 51 Obexer’s General Store ................................... 99 Pablo’s Gallery & Frame Shop ........................ 130 Paco’s Truckee River Bicycle .............................. 73 Paradise Real Estate Inc ................................... 85 Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation .............. 153 Powder House Ski & Snowboard .................... 164 Reno Philharmonic Orchestra ............................ 23 Reno Tahoe Rustic Decor ............................. 176 Resort at Squaw Creek .................................... 15 Ritz Carlton Residences .............................North 2 Rookies Sports Bar & Grill ............................. 144 Royal Gorge ................................................. 11 RPM Mortgage .............................................. 37 Ruffles & Ruffnecks ........................................ 131 School of Thought........................................... 11 Scraps Dog Bakery ....................................... 101 Scusa Italian Ristorante .................................. 132 Sears Hometown Store .................................. 151 Serenity Spa .................................................. 93 Shake Rattle & Pole ......................................... 23

Shoreline of Tahoe .......................................... 34 Sidestreet Boutique ........................................... 7 Sierra Nevada Properties ................................. 75 Sierra Sports Care & Chiropractic ................... 130 Sierra State Parks Foundation .......................... 100 Sierra Verde Interior Design .............................. 63 Sorensen’s Resort ............................................ 77 South Tahoe Public Utility District ...................... 157 Sowing Basil ................................................. 49 Sports Exchange ............................................ 55 Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows .......................... 5 Suddenlink Communications ........................... 174 Sugar Pine Gifts ............................................. 77 T’s Mesquite Rotisserie ................................... 159 Tahoe Blue Vodka ............................................. 9 Tahoe Center for Orthopedics ........................... 69 Tahoe City Downtown Assoc .......................... 100 Tahoe City Downtown Assoc .......................... 101 Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area .......................... 73 Tahoe Dave’s Skis & Boards ........................... 102 Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Center ............. 91 Tahoe Expedition Academy .............................. 43 Tahoe Forest Health System .............................. 25 Tahoe Keys Marina ........................................... 6 Tahoe Mountain Brewing Co. ......................... 130 Tahoe Rug Studio ......................................... 131 Tahoe Sport Fishing......................................... 85 Tahoe Sports LTD ............................................ 19 Tahoe Urgent Care ....................................... 161 Tahoma Lodge ............................................... 99 Tep’s Villa Roma ........................................... 144 Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum .................... 87 The Fresh Ketch ................................................ 6 The Getaway Cafe ....................................... 144 The Ritz Carlton, Lake Tahoe ............................. 17 The Store .................................................... 101 The Studio Lake Tahoe ..................................... 69 The Treat Box................................................. 59 The Treehouse .............................................. 164 Village Center...................................... South 177 Lake Tahoe Transit........................................... 80 Truckee-Tahoe Community Foundation. ................ 80 Truckee-Tahoe Medical Group .......................... 16 Truckee-Tahoe Pet Lodge .................................. 65 Uncorked Tahoe City..................................... 131 Vacation Resorts International ............................ 71 Village Ski Loft ............................................... 55 West Shore Sports .......................................... 99 Willard’s Sport Shop ..................................... 101

TAHOE MAGAZINE

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On your way back... GIVE BACK!
A Tahoe visit is brief, but the memories last forever.
530.583.8587 Monday–Friday 8 am–5 pm

Old Mill Rd

Fabian Way

28
Lakewood Dr.

Preserve future memories in Tahoe... we can’t do it without YOU!
To leave your contribution, visit www.givebacktahoe.org
Powered by Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation

Medical Surgical Dental Daytime Emergency Services

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A true bundle.
Satellite can’t do that.
CALL 530-550-3900 TODAY!
10607 W River Rd Suite 3D | suddenlink.com

parting shot

COREY RICH PRODUCTIONS, HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT

A SKIER HEADS DOWN THE SLOPES AT HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT ON THE SOUTH SHORE.

Village Center
Top Brands, Unique Shoppes

S O u T h Ta h O e ’ S M a L L aT S TaT e L i n e
Apparel
Adore Hot Cha Cha Savvy Sidestreet Boutique Sidestreet Formal Wear Sidestreet Kids Sidestreet Leathers & Furs Top Drawer

We have it all!

Art Galleries
Artifacts Jon Paul Gallery Marcus Ashley Gallery Sun Art Gallery Untamed Art Wyland Galleries

Eateries
Baja Fresh Blue Dog Pizza Jamba Juice Raley’s Deli Starbucks Subway

Services
Bike Rentals - Sports Ltd. Buckingham Vacation Properties Century 21 Elevated Fitness Imagine Salon Raley’s Pharmacy Raley’s Superstore Rio Nails & Spa Wells Fargo Bank

Specialty Shoppes
Alpaca Exotic Imports Beads ETC. Dog.Dog.Cat. Lake Tahoe Holidays Simpson’s Jewelers Sports, Ltd. Tahoe Trading Post True Value Hardware

At Highway 50 & Heavenly Village Way • South Lake Tahoe • One Block from Stateline