Mostly sunny

this morning then
becoming mostly
cloudy with a 30
percent chance of
snow showers this afternoon.
Partly cloudy tonight with
the snow showers continuing.
Highs in the lower 30s and
lows 15 to 20. See page 2.
Upfront
Sports
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
World briefs 10
Index
Saturday, November 23, 2013 50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Lady Cats falter in opening
hardcourt action, p6
Thrift Shop holiday connection,
p5
www.delphosherald.com
Park Giveaway
tickets on sale
The Fort Jennings Park
board has announced tick-
ets are now on sale for
the FJ Park Giveaway.
The cost is $20 per
ticket and there will be
a total of $10,000 in
cash prizes awarded.
Starting in March, there
will be 20 $300 weekly win-
ners with numbers matching
the Monday evening Ohio
Lottery 3-digit number.
One $3,000 winner and
five $200 winners will be
drawn Friday evening dur-
ing Fort Fest on Aug. 15.
To purchase a ticket,
contact any park board
member or email fjpark-
board@bright.net.
Football films to be
viewed Monday
Due to the Thanksgiving
holiday, the St. John’s
Athletic Boosters weekly
football films will be
held at 8 p.m. Monday
in the Little Theater.
All Blue Jay fans and
friends are welcome.
Wagner new Spencerville Elementary principal
BY CYNTHIA YAHNA
Herald Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
SPENCERVILLE —
Susan Wagner will serve as
the Spencerville Elementary
principal. Wagner was hired
at Thursday’s board of educa-
tion meeting.
Wagner accepted the posi-
tion beginning on Wednesday
for a two-year, 8-month con-
tract. She was in attendance
at the meeting, with many
congratulating her.
High School Principal
Scott Gephart gave an update
on the partnership with
Rhodes State College for
the new math course to be
offered in 2014-15.
“We had our ALICE/
Evacuation drill on Nov. 8
and the bus drivers’ ALICE
training and on Nov. 15, the
K-12 evacuation drill was
held. It all went really well
and the next one is in the
spring,” Gephart added.
The all-school musical
held on Nov. 8 and 9 was a
huge success.
The third annual NWC
sportsmanship conference
highlights public service
announcements with the
students will be aired on
Channel 44 during the Andy
Lynch Show and Dr. Ross
(OHSAA commissioner) was
the guest speaker.
The high school band/
choir Christmas concert will
be held at 3 p.m. on Dec.
8 and on Dec. 9, the sixth-
and eighth-grade band/choir
Christmas concert will begin
at 6:30 p.m. The public is
invited to attend both con-
certs.
Other upcoming events
include the K-3 Christmas
program, starting at 6 p.m.
on Dec. 2; the middle school
Christmas program at 6:30
p.m. on Dec. 9; the fifth-
grade DARE trip on Dec. 18;
and the middle school spell-
ing bee on Dec. 19.
Superintendent Joel
Hatfield reported the staff
Christmas breakfast will be
on Dec. 20, with serving at
6 a.m.
“Concerning the building
and grounds, we met with
Sprint Electric and Graybar
about the electrical issues in
the K-12 building,” Hatfield
said. “We are looking at
grounding issues and wiring
for the cameras. We need to
replace equipment approxi-
mately nine of the cameras
with a newer, more up-to-date
version and put these new
digitals down the main hall-
ways because the digitals do
not need an electrical source.
We think it is an internal issue
with our electrical system. It
is going to be a trial and error
for us. We are looking to find
a retired electrician to come
in and look over the electrical
issues and do the upkeep.”
In other business, the
board:
- Set date and time for
staff evaluations and change
date of the regular December
meeting to Dec. 16;
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Delphos residents Lance and Annette Brown were friends with Jim Winget
for many years. Jim and Lance had known each other since fourth grade and had been best
friends ever since — they were best men at each other’s weddings.
After attending The Ohio State University, Jim worked in Washington D.C. In 2011, he was
diagnosed with Lupus, which he learned to live with.
“This summer, Jim was working on a Habitat for Humanity house when he started experi-
encing a lot of back pain,” Annette explained. “Doctors found a large tumor on his spine, which
was removed but then grew back even larger within a week of his surgery.”
Jim anticipated that he was not going to survive the cancer and approached Lance on grant-
ing his last wishes, which was for his ashes to be put into fireworks and scattered somewhere
in the great state of Ohio.
“Jim said to me, ‘Just in case I don’t make it, you’re in charge of the funeral’,” Lance said.
During this year’s 4th of July holiday, Jim was in the hospital and that was where the Browns
and all of Jim’s family and friends went to visit him.
Friend given a grand finale
Getting to know ...
... a local blacksmith and metalsmith
The Brumback Library
Brumback Library again
named among best in U.S.
BY ED GEBERT
Times Bulletin Editor
news@delphosherald.com
VAN WERT — For the third straight year, the Brumback
Library has been recognized as one of the best in the country.
Brumback Library was named as one of America’s Star
Libraries by Library Journal, one of 32 Ohio libraries to
receive a star designation.
In comparison to libraries with similar budget and funding
levels in its respective category, the Brumback Library was
ranked eighth in the nation and first in Ohio. For this honor, the
Brumback Library was given a four-star rating. Last year, the
library also received a four-star rating and in 2011 was given
a three-star honor.
“These rankings clearly demonstrate that the resources, ser-
vice and programming efforts the Brumback Library provides
are well-utilized by Van Wert County residents of all ages,”
remarked Brumback Library Director John Carr.
See BRUMBACK, page 11
See WAGNER, page 11
BY ERIN COX
Staff Writer
news@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — After more than 35
years as an artist, Michael Bendele
still feels like a beginner.
Bendele is an artist who works
with forged metal. He heats bars of
metal and while it’s hot, he shapes it
to create art.
“Metal is a challenging material to
work with and I’m always learning
something new,” he said.
His art does not consist of sculp-
tures just to be admired but they serve
a purpose and have meaning.
“It’s solving problems in a creative
way and it’s providing something
that you can’t get anywhere else,”
Bendele said.
He makes railings, tables, candles,
bowls and more for individuals and
he also creates pieces for churches
and organizations.
One of his most recent pieces
was revealed last week at the new
Wassenberg Art Center facility at
the location of the former Van Wert
Armory. He created a archway to be
located in front of the building.
“The Armory was going to be
demolished and this provides an out-
side symbol to show re-purposing,”
Bendele said. “You know this is no
longer just an armory because of the
sculptures in the front and you can
probably tell its related to art.”
On another level, Bendele wanted
the sculptures to serve as a portal or
an archway from the street.
“My idea creates an interest to
cause people to come in off the streets
and see what’s inside,” he said.
For each piece that he creates,
coming up with the idea for it is at
least half of the job.
Winners in the
annual “Win-a-Turkey
Sweepstakes” have been
chosen. Those who will
receive a turkey and the
location they entered
the contest are:
Mary Martin —
German Mutual
Alvin Donaldson
— Easy Auto Credit
Shirley Stemen —
Hickory Pit BBQ
Michael Lawrence —
Delphos Discount Drugs
R. Tobias — Save-
A-Lot Grocery
Charles Cook —
Patriot Arms
Jill Wood —
Kitchens Inc.
Reindel Farms —
Pitsenbarger Supply
Laura Peters —
First Federal Bank
Melissa Moore —
Ottoville Bank Co.
Wayne Ledyard — Tri-
County Do-It Center
Ralph Bonifas —
Reliable P&H
Phyllis Kinkle —
Superior Auto
Caroline Jackson —
Ottoville Hardware
Barnett — Mattress Mart
Marietta Morris —
Chief Supermarket
Ronald Williamson —
Delphos Trading Post
Keith Heitmeyer —
PEAK/Total Solutions
Turkey winners
Michael Bendele stands beside a gateway he created for the new Wassenberg Art
Center facility in Van Wert. (Delphos Herald/Erin Cox)
Bendele demonstrates how he sculpts bars of steel using
a power hammer.
See BENDELE, page 11
See FINALE, page 11
2 – The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERALS BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
FROM THE ARCHIVES
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 144 No. 116
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising
manager
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Trivia
Answers to Friday’s questions:
The longest record attack of hiccups lasted 65 years; the
longest sneezing fit lasted 978 day; and the longest yawn-
ing ordeal took five weeks.
Goosebumps are a vestige from the days when humans
were covered with hair. When it got cold, the hairs stood
on end, creating a trap for air and providing insulation.
Today’s questions:
How much is the human body worth?
On the $1 bill, what do the words Annuit Coeptis mean?
Answers in Monday’s Herald.
Wheat $6.20
Corn $4.02
Soybeans $13.16
ODOT releases weekly road report
Information submitted
The following is a weekly
report concerning construc-
tion and maintenance work
on state highways within
the Ohio Department of
Transportation District 1,
which includes the counties
of Allen, Defiance, Hancock,
Hardin, Paulding, Putnam,
Van Wert and Wyandot. This
report is issued each week
beginning in April and con-
tinues through November.
For the latest in statewide
construction, visit www.
ohgo.com. Please contact us
at 419-999-6803 with any
information needs.
Construction and
Maintenance Projects
Week of November
25, 2013
I-75 Reconstruction Project
For the most recent
information concerning the
I-75 reconstruction proj-
ect through Lima and Allen
County, and the safety
upgrade of Ohio 117/309 on
Lima’s east side please visit:
www.odotlima75.org
· I-75 between Fourth
Street and Ohio 81 in Lima
will have occasional night-
time lane restrictions during
reconstruction of the existing
lanes of pavement, replace-
ment of mainline bridges
and reconstruction of the
interchanges. Work began in
March 2013 and will con-
tinue through fall of 2015.
Traffic is maintained two
lanes in each direction the
majority of the time. Lane
restrictions generally occur
from 7 p.m.-10 a.m. the fol-
lowing morning. The follow-
ing is project information for
the coming week:
I-75 Mainline
-Construction of the noise
walls along I-75 between
Ohio 117/309 and Reservoir
Road is underway and will
continue through the winter.
Construction is taking place
on the east side of the inter-
state first.
-Traffic in both the north-
bound and southbound direc-
tions is now traveling on the
new concrete pavement from
just south of Fourth Street
to a point prior to the Ohio
117/309 interchange where
traffic is then transitioned
back to the existing pave-
ment.
- By mid-December traffic
on I-75 will be traveling on
new concrete pavement from
just south of Fourth Street to
Reservoir Road and then be
transitioned back to the exist-
ing pavement.
- Paving of asphalt in the
median area between Ohio
81 and Stewart Road will
continue. Daytime lane clo-
sures will occur in this area
on Saturday. Motorists are
cautioned to watch for trucks
entering and exiting the high-
way as the operation contin-
ues.
-Embankment work
between Ohio 81 and
Reservoir is ongoing and will
continue for the next several
weeks. Motorists are cau-
tioned to watch for trucks
entering and exiting the zone.
- Occasional nighttime
lane closures will continue
on I-75 throughout the zone
from Fourth Street to Ohio
81 generally from 7 p.m. until
approximately 10 a.m. the
following day. Normal traffic
patterns of two lanes in each
direction will resume during
daytime hours.
- Motorists should be
aware that all entrance and
exit ramp merge areas have
been shortened throughout
the project area. Drivers on
I-75 are encouraged to use
the passing lane through the
zone if they do not wish to
exit. Signs advising this have
been placed throughout the
project area.

Ohio 117/309 interchange
- The southbound entrance
and exit ramps to and from
I-75 closed Oct. 7 and will
remain closed until mid-
December. The closure
allows for the construction
of the new ramps at the inter-
change and facilitates con-
struction of the Ohio 117/309
roadway itself. Traffic wish-
ing to access I-75 northbound
or southbound is directed
to Ohio 117 east to Greely
Chapel Road to Fourth Street.
I-75 southbound traffic wish-
ing to access Ohio 117/309 is
directed to Fourth Street to
I-75 northbound back to Ohio
117/309.
ST. RITA’S
A girl was born Nov. 18 to Stephanie Edlen and Donald
Bolinger II of Spencerville.
A boy was born Nov. 21 to Angela and Shawn Birkemeier
of Cloverdale.
St. John’s
Week of Nov. 25-29
Monday: Hamburger sandwich/pickle and onion, sweet
potato fries, Romaine salad, peaches, fresh fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Chicken wrap/ lettuce/ tomato/ cheese, black
beans, Romaine salad, pears, fresh fruit, milk.
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: No school. Thanksgiving
break.
————
Delphos City Schools
Week of Nov. 25-29
Monday: Ham patty sandwich, scalloped potatoes, fruit,
milk.
Tuesday: Turkey hot shot, bread and butter, mashed
potatoes w/gravy, peach cup, milk.
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: No school. Thanksgiving
break.
————
Ottoville
Week of Nov. 25-29
Monday: Hot dog, baked beans, corn chips, peaches,
milk.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: No school.
Happy Thanksgiving.
————
Fort Jennings
Week of Nov. 25-29
Chocolate, white, or strawberry milk served with all
meals. High School - additional fruit and vegetable daily.
High school - a la carte pretzel and cheese every Friday and
salad bar every Wednesday.
Monday: Chicken Parmesan, green beans, breadstick,
fruit.
Tuesday: Meatloaf, mashed potatoes, corn, fruit.
Wednesday: BBQ pork sandwich, baked beans, cookie,
fruit.
Thursday, Friday, No school. Happy Thanksgiving.
————
Spencerville
Week of Nov. 25-29
Monday: Turkey and noodles, mashed potatoes, gravy,
fresh veggies and dip, yum yum cake, fall applesauce, milk.
Tuesday: Buckeye burger sandwich, beat Michigan
baked beans, Brutus broccoli and dip, marching band
mixed fruit, dot the ‘I’ ice cream cup, milk.
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: No school. Happy
Thanksgiving.
One Year Ago
Knights of Columbus members pre-
pared and delivered more than 150
Thanksgiving meals to shut-ins and
the elderly on Thursday. The Knights
have provided a free Thanksgiving
meal for more than a decade. Among
those helping with the dinners were
Mike Beckmann, Joe Lehmkuhle, Kevin
Backus, Jerry Backus, Dave Burnett,
Ben Neumeier, Shelly Kundert and
Mike Grubenhoff.
25 Years Ago – 1988
Petitions for membership of Debra
Schurger and Patricia Laudick to
Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary 3035
were accepted at a recent meeting of the
auxiliary. They were initiated along with
Phillis J. Hasenkamp. The next meet-
ing will be Dec. 15 with a covered-dish
dinner. Voice of Democracy winner and
runner-up will be guests and present
their theme essay and receive awards.
Chairwomen are Mary Lou Harman,
Earline Williams and Debra Schurger.
Morris Chapel United Methodist
Church will be having a “country gour-
met bazaar” Dec. 10. Items include
homemade chocolate candy, Christmas
cookies and some craft items. Pre-orders
will be taken for Morris Chapel home-
made chicken noodle soup, mincemeat
and other entrees. Orders may be placed
with Linda Mox, Carolyn Brenneman,
Betty Brenneman or Anita Dunlap.
Division IV state runner-up Kalida
used excellent free-throw shooting to
offset the three-point field goals of
Lincolnview and hold on for a 57-56
win in the season opener for both teams
Tuesday night at Lincolnview. Brian
Vorst led Kalida with 16 points. Dan
Wurth and Alan Gerding each chipped
in 10.
50 Years Ago – 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald, 24, a pro-Castro
Marxist who defected to Russia in 1959,
was charged with the assassination of
President Kennedy. Oswald made no
confession and insisted he knew nothing
about the assassination of the President
or the serious wounding of Texas Gov.
John Connally.
The November meeting of the Green
Thumb Garden Club was held this
week with a luncheon at NuMaude’s
Restaurant. Highlighting the meeting
were plans for the Christmas flower
show, which will be held Dec. 6-7 at the
Public Library. Chairmen for the show
will be Mrs. E. L. Staup, Mrs. Leslie
Peltier and R. N. Stippich.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank X. Weber and
daughter Judy of Ottoville and their two
sons, Leonard and Herbert, students
at Josephinum Seminary, Worthington,
attended the ceremony and reception for
their son Larry Saturday at Glencoe, Mo.
The Webers’ son Larry will be known
hereafter as Brother Vincent Markus.
Associated Press
Today is Saturday, Nov. 23, the 327th day of
2013. There are 38 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Nov. 23, 1936, Life, the photojournalism
magazine created by Henry R. Luce, was first
published.
On this date:
In 1765, Frederick County, Md. became the
first colonial entity to repudiate the British Stamp
Act.
In 1804, the 14th president of the United
States, Franklin Pierce, was born in Hillsboro,
N.H.
In 1889, the first jukebox made its debut in
San Francisco, at the Palais Royale Saloon.
In 1903, Enrico Caruso made his American
debut at the Metropolitan Opera House in New
York, appearing in “Rigoletto.”
In 1910, American-born physician Hawley
Harvey Crippen was hanged at Pentonville
Prison in London for murdering his wife, Cora.
(Crippen’s mistress, Ethel Le Neve, was acquitted
in a separate trial of being an accessory.)
In 1943, during World War II, U.S. forces
seized control of Tarawa and Makin atolls from
the Japanese.
In 1959, the musical “Fiorello!,” starring Tom
Bosley as legendary New York Mayor Fiorello
LaGuardia, opened on Broadway.
In 1963, the classic British science-fic-
tion series “Doctor Who” premiered on BBC
Television, starring William Hartnell as the first
incarnation of the time-traveling title character.
In 1971, the People’s Republic of China was
seated in the U.N. Security Council.
In 1980, some 2,600 people were killed by
a series of earthquakes that devastated southern
Italy.
In 1996, a commandeered Ethiopian Airlines
Boeing 767 crashed into the water off the
Comoros Islands, killing 125 of the 175 people
on board, including all three hijackers.
Ten years ago: Five U.S. soldiers were killed
in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan. Eduard
Shevardnadze resigned as president of Georgia in
the face of protests.
Five years ago: The government unveiled a
bold plan to rescue Citigroup, injecting a fresh
$20 billion into the troubled firm as well as
guaranteeing hundreds of billions of dollars in
risky assets. A gunman shot and killed a woman
and a man who came to her aid inside a church
in Clifton, N.J. (Suspect Joseph Pallipurath, the
estranged husband of the dead woman, Reshma
James, is awaiting trial.) Spain clinched an
improbable, come-from-behind Davis Cup vic-
tory over Argentina.
One year ago: Actor Larry Hagman, best
known for playing the scheming oil baron J.R.
Ewing on TV’s “Dallas,” died at the age of 81.
Supporters and opponents of Egyptian President
Mohammed Morsi clashed in the streets of Cairo
and other major cities, in the worst violence since
Morsi took office nearly five months earlier.
MCCABE, Thomas F., 70, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin at 10 a.m. today at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Charles Obinwa
officiating. Burial will follow in St. John’s Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to St. John’s Parish Foundation
and St. Rita’s Hospice. Online condolences may be shared
at www.strayerfuneralhome.com.
EDINGER, Nancy, 76, memorial service will be held
at 11 a.m. today at the First United Brethren in Christ
Church, with Pastor Jody Harr officiating. Calling hours
are 9-11 a.m. prior to the service. Interment will follow
at a later date of Maple Grove Cemetery in Bluffton.
Preferred memorials are to the First United Brethren in
Christ Church.
ELWER, Elizabeth J., 78, of Fort Jennings, Mass of
Christian burial will begin at noon today at St. Joseph
Catholic Church, the Rev. Charles Obinwa officiating.
Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call one
hour prior to the Mass at the church. Preferred memorials are
to St. Rita’s Hospice or Putnam County Home Healthcare.
To leave condolences, visit harterandschier.com.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly sunny
in the morning. Then most-
ly cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of snow showers in
the afternoon. Colder. Highs
in the lower 30s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
snow showers. Lows 15 to
20. Northwest winds 10 to
15 mph. Gusts up to 25 mph
through midnight.
SUNDAY: Partly cloudy.
A 20 percent chance of
snow showers in the morn-
ing. Highs in the mid 20s.
Northwest winds 10 to 15
mph.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy through midnight then
becoming mostly clear. Lows
15 to 20. Southwest winds 5
to 10 mph.
MONDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the mid 30s.
MONDAY NIGHT AND
TUESDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of
snow showers. Lows in the
upper 20s. Highs in the upper
30s.
Volunteers needed for clean up
Information submitted
CLOVERDALE — Clean up efforts are progressing nicely
but volunteers are still needed. Volunteers are requested to
report to the gravel parking lot at the corner of Main and
First streets at 9 a.m. today and 11 a.m. Sunday. Dress for the
weather and bring rakes and work gloves if available.
The response to requests for donated clothing has been
overwhelming and we are asking that no more be brought at
this time.
Cloverdale residents are encouraged to visit the Oak Haven
Care Center (donation site) to take advantage of the donated
clothing, water, canned goods and baby items.
The Putnam County Long Term Recovery Task Force has
established the Nov. 17 Recovery Fund. One hundred percent
of monies donated to this Task Force remain local as the mis-
sion of the LTRTF is “placing recovery resources in the hands
of those who need it most.”
Donations may be made at any Putnam County Huntington
Bank or Fort Jennings State Bank. For a tax deductible dona-
tion, checks may be mailed to the Nov. 17 Recovery Fund at
PO Box 472, Ottawa, OH 45875.
From Putnam County EMA:
Persons with homes impacted by the storms on Nov. 17 are
asked to contact the Putnam County EMA office to report dam-
ages by calling 419-538-7315 by Wednesday.
See ARCHIVES, page 11
See ODOT, page 11
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Friday:
Mega Millions
17-23-35-36-44, Mega
Ball: 8
Megaplier
3
Pick 3 Evening
5-0-9
Pick 3 Midday
1-9-0
Pick 4 Evening
6-2-9-8
Pick 4 Midday
4-9-3-9
Pick 5 Evening
9-7-6-0-8
Pick 5 Midday
5-7-6-9-0
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $50
million
Rolling Cash 5
03-10-11-25-27
Estimated jackpot:
$257,000
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
2
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756 W. Ervin Rd. • Van Wert • 888-590-1685
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10,000 miles per year
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888-590-1685
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www.grevechrysler.com
We have them in stock NOW!
The Lincoln Highway
garage will be opened under
new ownership next Monday
morning.
Theodore Noirot, of Scott’s
Crossing, has purchased the
garage from Frank Scherger,
trustee in bankruptcy for V.L.
Bowyer, and will operate the
place hereafter.
Mr. Noirot, formerly
resided on a farm near Scott’s
Crossing. Mr. Bowyer will be
employed as mechanic at the
garage.
Several minor changes
are being made to place the
garage in readiness for the
reopening.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 2, 1927
—————
Drivers Escape
Serious Injury
Two drivers, Virgil Thines,
503 East Second St. and C.C.
Jenkins, Rushmore, were for-
tunate in escaping death or
serious injury when the cars
they were driving crashed at
Scott and Fourth streets at
about 9:20 Saturday morning.
Thines was driving south
on Scott street with the M.B.
Lindemann grocery truck and
was crossing Fourth when the
Jenkins machine, a Ford tour-
ing car, struck the right side of
his truck near the rear wheel.
A wheel was broken off the
truck and it overturned forty
feet from the intersection.
Thines was pinned under the
machine until Jenkins went to
his aid.
The Jenkins car turned
completely over, landing right
side up, after which the driver
crawled out through the bro-
ken top which was complete-
ly crushed and other damage
was done.
Thines sustained only a
slight contusion on the side
of his head. Jenkins was not
injured. Both are congratulat-
ing themselves on their fortu-
nate escapes.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 2, 1927
—————
New Locomotives Are
Painted Olive Green
And Striped With
Red and Gold
Are railway locomotives
to follow the example of the
automobile industry in the
matter of style and color?
Twenty new locomotives,
which will be delivered to the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
next week by the Baldwin
Locomotive Works, will be
painted olive green, striped
with red and gold, and put into
service on the passenger trains
between Washington and New
York.
So far as is known, this is
the only railroad to change in
recent years of its locomotives
from the usual sombre black.
When these verdant giants
of the rail haul their burdens
between the Eastern Cities,
they will also bear the names
of the Presidents of the United
States, in addition to the usual
numerical designation, com-
mencing with the first presi-
dent. The 5301 will become the
“President Adams,” the 5300
will become the “President
Washington,” the 5302, the
“President Jefferson,” down
to President Arthur.
Saturday, November 23, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
This
and
That
by HELEN KAVERMAN
Lincoln Highway 100
BOB HOLDGREVE
Window
to the
Past
Will operate Lincoln Way garage here
See WILL, page 11
The year is almost over but there is still one month
to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Lincoln
Highway. We can celebrate that this coast to coast high-
way, sometimes called “Main Street Across America,”
especially since it goes right down Fifth Street in our
town.
The Lincoln Highway began in Times Square, at
Broadway and Forty-second, in New York City and
ended at the Pacific Ocean in Lincoln Park, San
Francisco, 3,389 miles west. From New York, it angled
southwest through Trenton and Philadelphia, where
it turned west, beginning its path across 12 states;
New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana,
Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and
California.
Carl Fisher is known as the father of the Lincoln
Highway. Fisher was a man of ideas. In 1912, he
hatched a new idea, a coast-to-coast highway. In
September of that year, he threw a large dinner party
for the leaders of the Indianapolis automobile manufac-
turing people. He knew the enthusiasm and capitol of
these men could get the highway started. He told them
that a gravel highway could be built from coast to coast
for about 10 million dollars. This would be for basic
road building materials. He thought counties and cit-
ies along the route could provide labor and machinery.
(Note: Fisher was the man responsible for paving the
Indiana Motor Speedway and inaugurating the “Indy
500” in 1911.)
Fisher was also the founder of the Prest-O-Lite
Company, the maker of carbide headlights. Fisher’s
speech at the dinner was well received with the
first major pledge, a $300,000 offer from Frank A.
Seiberling of Goodyear. The time had come — the first
Model T rolled off the Ford Assembly line in 1908 and
people were getting automobile fever. Fisher wanted
his dream highway finished in time for 25,000 cars to
cross the continent for the Panama – Pacific Exposition
in San Francisco, only two and one half years away.
During the spring of 1913, Fisher hurriedly called
several informal and closed meetings in Detroit, the
heart of the automobile industry. As a result, sub-
stantial subscriptions for the highway came from
the Hudson Motor Company and Willys – Overland.
Henry Ford did not support the program because he
thought roads should be paid for by everyone through
taxes. However, Henry B. Joy, of the Packard Motor
Company came onboard. He’s the one who suggested
the highway be in honor of Abraham Lincoln. This was
before the Lincoln Memorial was built in Washington,
D. C. and many people were anxious to do something
in honor of Abraham Lincoln.
In July 1913, the group met again in Detroit, where
they acted to put the organization into official exis-
tence. Those in attendance were: Henry Joy, Roy
Chapman, Emory W. Clark, Arthur Pardington and
Henry Bodman. Fisher was absent. He and Joy could
not agree on the chosen route. Joy became presi-
dent of the Lincoln Highway Association; Fisher and
Pardington, vice presidents; and Clark was elected
treasurer. Pardington was also placed on the payroll
because he administered the day-to-day operations of
the association. Now all they needed was the route.
Joy’s route was chosen because of its directness and
easy terrain and the fact that a motorist could reach the
high point across the mountains at less than 9,000 feet.
It was not chosen for its scenic beauty but for a direct
route. Fisher wanted to take the road through Kansas
and Colorado. Officials of those two states were very
disappointed with the chosen route.
The public announcement of the highway route was
made 14 September 1913. October 30 was set aside
as a national day of celebration for this memorial to
Lincoln. The farmers in Indiana marked the occasion
by combining it with Halloween and set jack-o-lanterns
on fence posts along the route. Parades, bonfires and
fireworks were held in towns along the route.
By early 1914, it was apparent to the directors
that the association was in financial difficulty. Joy,
Fisher and other founders personally underwrote the
preliminary expenses. The group realized roads of
gravel would not last so they suggested concrete. A.Y.
Gowen, of Lehigh Portland Cement Co. offered a dona-
tion, thinking the ocean-to-ocean highway might be
a proving ground for his new road building material.
They would create sample strips of concrete, called
seedling miles. The first seedling mile was completed
near DeKalb, Ill., in the fall of 1914. The year of 1914
saw the first effort in making the red, white and blue
Lincoln Highway markers. In 1915 they poured seed-
ling miles of concrete in Nebraska, Illinois and Indiana.
The Lincoln Highway bridge over the Auglaize River between German Road and Resurrection Cemetery east of
Delphos. (Submitted photo)
See LINCOLN, page 11
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Delphos, OH 45833
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Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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safety deposit box, desk drawer or closet ... or
are you not sure at the moment?
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inconvenience and lost money for you and your
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.
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Delphos, OH 45833
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Description Last Price Change
Dow Jones Industrial Average 16,064.77 +54.78
S&P 500 1,804.76 +8.91
NASDAQ Composite 3,991.65 +22.49
American Electric Power Co., Inc. 47.70 +0.07
AutoZone, Inc. 467.69 -1.65
Bunge Limited 80.72 +0.81
BP plc 48.03 +0.68
Citigroup, Inc. 52.41 +0.68
CenturyLink, Inc. 30.67 -0.41
CVS Caremark Corporation 66.68 +0.59
Dominion Resources, Inc. 66.62 -0.12
Eaton Corporation plc 73.00 +0.46
Ford Motor Co. 17.01 -0.08
First Defiance Financial Corp. 26.44 -0.16
First Financial Bancorp. 16.14 +0.18
General Dynamics Corp. 92.15 +1.05
GGeneral Motors Company 37.63 -0.49
GThe Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 21.75 +0.05
Huntington Bancshares Incorporated 9.14 +0.16
Health Care REIT, Inc. 57.76 -0.97
The Home Depot, Inc. 79.18 -0.65
Honda Motor Co., Ltd. 42.70 +0.27
Johnson & Johnson 95.25 +0.05
JPMorgan Chase & Co. 57.46 +0.24
Kohl’s Corp. 55.15 +0.35
Lowe’s Companies Inc. 47.90 -0.30
McDonald’s Corp. 98.269997 +0.57
Microsoft Corporation 37.57 +0.17
Pepsico, Inc. 85.74 +0.12
The Procter & Gamble Company 84.95 +0.28
Rite Aid Corporation 5.40 +0.12
Sprint Corporation 7.83 -0.12
Time Warner Inc. 66.99 +0.04
United Bancshares Inc. 13.7501 -0.2498
U.S. Bancorp 38.95 +0.09
Verizon Communications Inc. 50.22 -0.16
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. 79.81 +0.95
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business November 22, 2013
Where has the year gone?
It’s already November and we’ve had
our first snowfall.
To many people’s surprise, we’ve
already had a Christmas story in the paper.
I’m sure with the economy, the Delphos
Community Christmas Project will need
every bit of time they have to pull together
a nice holiday for those who need a little
boost. It’s tough out there and every penny
will count.
It will be that way for many of us, I fear.
Most of us are fortunate and have jobs. It
may not be the one we want or need but a
job none the less.
And here comes the quandry: What
place will Thanksgiving have this year?
I’ve written several times of how I feel
perhaps one of the most necessary of holi-
days — the one where we are supposed to
count our blessings and be thankful for
what we have — is going to be lost in the
commercial frenzy known as Christmas
shopping season.
Stores are already offering Black Friday
pricing to move as much merchandise as
they can before the dreaded Christmas
markdown. Trees and tinsel have popped
up everywhere.
Christmas shopping no longer starts on
Black Friday. Many stores are open on
Thanksgiving. I saw on the news a guy was
already set up in a parking lot earlier this
week to be first in line on Friday. Really?
What could possibly be so important on his
list to waste a week of his life in a parking
lot?
Maybe his time would be better spent in
a homeless shelter or soup kitchen so he
can see what is really important.
In my little corner of the world, I’m
plotting and planning that special meal that
brings our families and loved ones together
for food, fellowship and yes, football.
The turkey will roast and fill the house
with that delectable, mouth-watering smell.
The potatoes will be bubbling on the stove
and the deviled eggs will disappear before
the meal hits the serving dishes.
We’ll bow our heads and say a prayer of
thanks for all who are around our table and
those who could not be there for whatever
reason.
My sister-in-law and I will chat while
we clean the table, put away leftovers and
do the dishes.
The men will head into the living room
to watch a game and soon the soft con-
tented sound of snoring will waft into the
kitchen.
Now that’s what I’m talkin’ about.
Thanksgiving will be a tough holiday
for some, too. A Thanksgiving feast may
be out of reach and some will find little to
be thankful for. But it’s the little things we
need to give thanks for.
If you are breathing, be thankful. Many
will face a Thanksgiving with one or more
empty chairs.
If you have a roof over your head, be
thankful. Many are homeless.
If you have food, be thankful. Many
people are wondering where their next
meal will come from.
If you have a job, rejoice. You all know
what it’s like out there.
If you have your health, dance.
There is always someone else who has
less.
“We learn from history that we do not learn from history.”
— Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, (1770-1831) philosopher
4 — The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013
VIEWPOINT
www.delphosherald.com
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Moderately confused
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
2
NANCY SPENCER
On the
Other hand
The Delphos Herald wel-
comes letters to the editor.
Letters should be no more
than 400 words. The newspa-
per reserves the right to edit
content for length, clarity and
grammar. Letters concerning
private matters will not be
published.
Failure to supply a full
name, home address and day-
time phone number will slow
the verifcation process and
delay publication.
Letters can be mailed to
The Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, Ohio
45833, faxed to 419-692-7704
or e-mailed to nspencer@
delphosherald.com. Authors
should clearly state they want
the message published as a let-
ter to the editor. Anonymous
letters will not be printed.
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
One of a kind-ness
WASHINGTON -- Meet
Simile and Sui Generis.
Simile, to refresh memo-
ries, is a favorite rhetorical
device of writers that com-
pares two essentially unlike
things that nonetheless have
similar characteristics: The
quarterback was like a loco-
motive.
Sui generis, the Latin
phrase meaning unique or
one of a kind, is a help-
ful restraint upon the former.
Some things, even if they
share certain characteristics,
shouldn’t be compared. Sui
generis is the braking system
on a rhetorical locomotive, or
at least it should be. That was
a metaphor, by the way, and
not a very good one.
We in the news busi-
ness could stand to apply
the brakes to our runaway
impulse to “similize.” I per-
sonally love a good simile,
which is often a way to inject
levity into a column. But
lately we’ve seen instances
of simile-itis that might have
saved readers and viewers
some angst, even if writers
and pundits were left with
less to say. (Let’s go light on
the air horns, please.)
In the past several days,
we’ve heard news people and
others compare Obamacare to
Katrina and Iraq. Sarah Palin
compared our national debt
to slavery. Countless times
in recent years we’ve seen
“Nazi” applied to people with
whose policies or politics we
disagree, none so frequently
as George W. Bush, though
President Obama, too, has
had a few turns.
All of the above are clear-
ly sui generis and should be
retired from any future simi-
les unless they are referring
to truly like things, not just
a single person’s impression
of the world while musing
on current events. Katrina is
like Sandy because they were
both natural disasters, though
significantly more people
died in Katrina than in Sandy.
Iraq is sui generis and noth-
ing like Vietnam, to which it
was sometimes compared.
Nazis and the Holocaust
shouldn’t be compared to
anything else. The system-
atic, state-sponsored extermi-
nation of 6 million Jews, as
well as others, is sufficiently
horrific to stand alone. Pro-
lifers who sometimes charac-
terize abortion as a Holocaust
are probably not helping the
cause of revelation.
Finally, slavery merits its
own place in America’s mem-
ory. To compare it to anything
else, especially something as
mundane as debt, is wrong on
its face. Indentured servitude
to China might have been a
better choice for Palin, who
prefaced her remark with,
“This isn’t racist, but ...”
Note: Anytime you start
a sentence with “This isn’t
racist, but ... ,” you probably
shouldn’t finish it.
In Palin’s defense, she
obviously meant no offense
and the attacks in response
have been so vicious that
the attacks themselves are
beyond comparison. One
in particular was so awful
that I won’t repeat it. Just
as Palin didn’t deserve such
an onslaught, people read-
ing this column in good faith
don’t deserve to have such
wretched thoughts imposed
on their psyches.
These recent examples
of similes gone awry raise
two questions: What is the
impulse that drives our need
to make such comparisons?
And why do we react so vis-
cerally when we do?
The impulse is usually to
elucidate, i.e., this is as bad
as that. But it is also partly
lazy. Do we really have so
little imagination that all we
can do is summon Katrina
every time an administration
fails to meet our expecta-
tions? Or Hitler to denote our
impression of bad? Surely it
is a rhetorical crime to turn
someone so evil into a cliche.
From a purely political
perspective, the impulse may
be driven by the desire to
remind people of the past
transgressions of political
foes. Thus, when commenta-
tors say Obamacare is like
Katrina, the mind flits from
Barack Obama to George W.
Bush and only the differences,
rather than the single similar-
ity of administrative incompe-
tence, register: People died in
Katrina and President Obama
only wants to help people.
Through subliminal jujitsu,
the real comparison lands in
the community psyche.
Conversely, as Salon polit-
ical writer Brian Beutler sug-
gested during a recent con-
versation, even Republicans
may see benefits to this com-
parison in that it neutralizes
the ongoing, negative liabil-
ity of Katrina for the GOP.
But then the cycle continues
into absurdity. If Obamacare
collapses and Republicans
present Americans with
Ryancare, we likely can
expect Democrats to char-
acterize every glitch as the
GOP’s Katrina II.
To the most important
point, comparing a horrific
tragedy or atrocity to any
thing else trivializes and
diminishes it. By trying to
capture, quantify and cate-
gorize others’ suffering, we
trespass on the sacred.
Some things are like noth-
ing else -- and should be left
to rest in peace.
Kathleen Parker’s email
address is kathleenparker@
washpost.com.
DEAR EDITOR:
I want to say “thank you” to a very special organ donor who in November 1997, allowed
me to be alive today!
I received a heart transplant at the Cleveland Clinic. I will always remember the day my
donor’s little sister asked if she could hear her brother’s heart beating in my chest. I will never
forget the big smile and happy tears on the face of that 11-year-old younger sister. She just
hugged me and said Aaron, her brother’s name, and looked up and smiled.
Have you considered being an organ donor? You could help to give the gift of life to another.
Thank you for considering it.
Bob Grothouse
DEAR EDITOR:
Wednesday morning, we the City of Delphos, lost one of our most dedicated public servants
we had, Tom McCabe.
Sgt. Tom McCabe worked, lived, and died supporting the Delphos Police Department and
the City of Delphos.
Tom was my superior officer when I started in law enforcement and was basically in charge
of breaking me into law enforcement. He did his most to lay the groundwork for me in law
enforcement; just wish I had absorbed his photography skills.
Tom was not only one of my most loyal and dependable officers I ever had served with, but
one who had moral and ethical qualities. He was a friend you knew was forever.
Thanks for being a good cop Tom and loyal employee.
If I may borrow a favorite saying from Tom, “This is a bunch of bull----,”; we wish you
still were here.
May your soul rest in peace but you be spiritually with us forever.
Dennis M. Kimmet
Retired Police Chief
Delphos
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THE DELPHOS HERALD
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PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
BY SENATOR ROB
PORTMAN
There are two paint-
ings beside the desk in my
office. One is of George
Washington, the man who
helped establish the Union.
The other is of Abraham
Lincoln, the man who saved
it.
One hun-
dred and
fifty years
ago — or
seven score
and 10 years,
as he might
have put
it—Abraham
L i n c o l n
stood on a
wi nd- s wept
battlefield at
a tiny rail-
road cross-
ing in south-
ern Pennsylvania. He was
not the featured speaker
that day. That honor fell to
Edward Everett. Everett’s
speech would last two
hours; his first sentence was
more than seventy words
long.
Lincoln had come to ded-
icate a cemetery, a burial
ground for the soldiers who
only a few months before
had fought outside of a town
called Gettysburg. The Civil
War was two years old then,
and though it would rage
for another two more, there
was a sense that the tide
had turned, that the war
would end with the Union
preserved, albeit after many
thousands more lives were
sacrificed. And so while
Lincoln was there osten-
sibly to set aside a final
resting place for those who
had died in battle, his true
purpose was even greater
than that.
Part of the genius of the
F o u n d e r s
was that they
were able to
look beyond
their own
times and
their own
s t r u g g l e s
to see that
the colo-
nies, united
together and
“dedicated to
the proposi-
tion that all
men are cre-
ated equal,” could change
the world. But that Union,
with that goal, was a work in
progress. As Supreme Court
Justice Clarence Thomas
has said, it was not perfect,
but it was perfectible. It was
the striving for that per-
fection—the perfection of
freedom—that was the great
task Lincoln spoke of.
But Lincoln knew some-
thing else, too. He had set
out to save the Union. In
this, he had failed. At least,
he had failed to save the
Union as it had existed
before. Change was inevi-
table. “A new birth of free-
dom” was needed. And only
by rededicating ourselves
to that central principle at
the heart of the Declaration
of Independence—that all
people are born free—could
our nation endure.
We still hear Lincoln’s
call today. The work of
which he spoke is still
unfinished. Liberty is our
goal, freedom our watch-
word. Sometimes we come
up short. Sometimes we
don’t live up to our own ide-
als. But though we stumble,
we will not fall.
Lincoln sometimes
got things wrong, too.
The world will never for-
get the sacrifices made at
Gettysburg, but neither will
they forget the words that
Lincoln spoke there. The
Gettysburg Address is a
founding document. It ranks
alongside the Declaration
of Independence and the
Constitution as a corner-
stone of our nation. Today
we honor it, and we honor
Abraham Lincoln.
But we must do more than
remember. One hundred and
fifty years after Lincoln
spoke at Gettysburg, we
must once again rededicate
ourselves towards achiev-
ing what those honored dead
throughout the centuries
have been willing to give
their lives to accomplish—
“that government of the
people, by the people, for
the people, shall not perish
from the earth.”
The Gettysburg Address, remembered
Someone else has less
1
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH WOMEN
211 E. Third St., Delphos
ARE INVITING YOU TO ATTEND THEIR ANNUAL
Christmas
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Wed., Dec. 4
Serving from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
MENU: Beef or Ham, Noodles, Whipped Potatoes & Gravy,
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THE GENERAL STORE OPENS
AT 2:00 p.m. UNTIL 7:00 P.M.
(Baked goods - Home made candies - Crafts)
All proceeds go toward special church projects.
$
8
00
Adults
$
4
00
Children (Thru 12)
Carry-Outs Available at Rear Parking Lot Entrance - Upstairs
Pre-sale tickets only for Home Delivery are available by
calling the Church Office 419-692-0651
This message published
as a public service
by these civic
minded firms.
AUTO DEALERS
•Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
AUTO PARTS
•Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS
•First Federal Bank
FURNITURE
•Lehmann’s Furniture
•Westrich Home
Furnishings
GARAGE
•Omer’s Alignment
Shop
HARDWARE
•Delphos Ace
Hardware & Rental
242 N. Main St., Ph. 419-692-0921
Mon.-Fri. 8-6:30 Sat. 8-5
Hardware
Delphos
Candleberry Candles
& Candle Warmers
•Best Smelling Candles
•Large Selection of Fragrances
Fresh
CANDY & NUTS
NOW IN!
Better Than Ever!
Happy
Birthday
1
Saturday, November 23, 2013 The Herald — 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
Ottoville Immaculate
Conception Church
NOV. 24
Greg Grothous
Ryan Weeden
Mandy Ulm
Josh Rose
Becky Hirn
NOV. 25
Carla Horstman
Jessica Miller
Angela R. Koenig
Jamie Saum
Kyla Hershey
Sharon Lause
Evan Mox
Leah Hodgson
Steve Miller
Quentin Samons
PET CORNER
Rizzo is an extremely
smart girl that knows her
basic commands well. She
is loving and loves her milk
bones. She came in and we
had to take a tumor out
of her tail. She’s a great
little lady that would love
to have your attention and
be in your fur-ever home.
The Humane Society of Allen County has many pets
waiting for adoption. Each comes with a spay or neuter,
first shots and a heartworm test. Call 419-991-1775.
The following pets are available for adoption through
The Van Wert Animal Protective League:
Cats
M, F, 1 year and older
M, 1 1/2 years, golden yellow tiger, good mouser, name
Jack
Kittens
M, F, 9 weeks, shots, dewormed, black and white, white
and gray
M, F, 6 months, angora, gray striped
M, F, 6 weeks, orange, tabby
M, F, 6 weeks to 6 months, gray, gray tiger, tan, black
and white
Dogs
Dachshund, M, 12 years, long haired, shots, named Indy
Brown Lab, F, 12 years, spaded, shots, name Montana
Rotweiller, F, 3 years, spayed, shots, not kid-friendly,
name Bella
Chocolate Lab, M, 2 years, name Max
Papillon Japanese Chin, F, 2 1/2 years, brown and white,
name Snookie
Puppies
Fox Terrier, M, 4 months, white and black spots, name
Lucky
For more information on these pets or if you are in
need of finding a home for your pet, contact The Animal
Protective League from 9-5 weekdays at (419) 749-2976.
If you are looking for a pet not listed, call to be put
on a waiting list in case something becomes available.
Donations or correspondence can be sent to PO Box
321, Van Wert, OH 45891.
Vida is a domestic medi-
um-haired female. She
is 7 months old and was
born at the shelter. She is
extremely playful and full
of energy. You bring out
the toys and she will love
you forever.
From the Thrift Shop
BY MARGIE ROSTOFER
Many have asked for an
up-date on my son-in-law,
Scott, who suffered that trau-
matic brain injury from a
fall on Aug. 16,
2012. While he
continues to see
several doctors,
I am happy to
report that he has
recently been
able to com-
plete nearly two
weeks of four
10-hour days.
Each time he has
returned to work,
he has been able
to withstand a few
more hours each day. He
began with some days only
able to work 2-3 hours but
the return to work has made
him (and us) feel better and
greatly improved his sense
of self-worth. There are still
some issues to work through
and it will still take another
2-3 years for his brain to
heal, the doctors say, but we
remain thankful for the mir-
acles that were granted. As
we approach Thanksgiving
Day, let us all be thankful not
just on that day but each and
every day for all the bless-
ings in our lives that God has
given us.
Speaking of being
blessed, the Delphos chapter
of the Junior Catholic Sons
of America recently held a
food drive and donated their
collection of canned goods
to the Thrift Shop. The Food
Pantry really needed that
boost, especially as the hol-
idays are approaching and
we want to be able to help
out as many families as we
can. Challenge your family
members to all
bring a canned
good or two to
your get-togeth-
ers and then
donate those to
the Thrift Shop’s
Food Pantry.
What a way to
make everyone
feel good and
blessed.
In conjunc-
tion with the
Community Unity
Meals On Us program on
Thursdays at the United
Methodist Church, Thrift
Shop’s Social Services
Director Becky Strayer is
working on putting together
some classes and instruction-
al materials for those who
are attending the dinners.
The goal through these
classes and materials is to
help equip the clients with
information and helpful sug-
gestions to make their lives
better. Some are so broken
and depressed and we want
to be more than a band-aid.
We want to be a hand up and
not just a hand-out. It’s the
“teach a man to fish” philos-
ophy. Topics and materials
should be available shortly
for presentation at the din-
ners.
As we’ve done for many
years now, it was decided
to again donate several
hundred gift certificates to
the Delphos Community
Christmas Project. We also
will continue to donate
Christmas trees, decorations,
lights and ornaments to the
project as in past years.
Please don’t throw away
your old artificial trees, even
if they’re in pieces. Drop
them off and we’ll get them
to the guys at Hohenbrink’s
who will re-work and repair
them.
The Thrift Shop will be
closed on Thanksgiving
Day but will have regular
shopping hours on Friday
and Saturday. We will also
be opened for our regular
shopping hours on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday after the
Christmas and New Year’s
holidays.
Plans are underway and
are being discussed for a
Prom and Bridal Show,
which will hopefully be
held some time in January.
We will post all the details
when the plans are finalized.
Many beautiful dresses have
already been donated but we
will greatly appreciate any
more you care to donate,
along with shoes and jew-
elry. All donations are tax-
deductible; just ask for a
receipt.
For all the news that matters,
subscribe to The Delphos Herald.
419-695-0015
TODAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m.-2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
1:30 p.m. — Amvets Post
698 Auxiliary meets at the
Amvets post in Middle Point.
4 p.m. — Amvets Post 698
regular meeting at the Amvets
post in Middle Point.
7:30 p.m. — Sons of
Amvets Post 698 meet at
Amvets Post in Middle Point.
MONDAY
9 a.m.-7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
6:30 p.m. — Shelter from
the Storm support group
meets in the Delphos Public
Library basement.
Rostorfer
See SHOP, page 11
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF
NATURAL RESOURCES
Division of Wildlife
The Lake Erie Fish Ohio Report
LAKE ERIE
Regulation to Remember: The daily bag
limit for walleye on Ohio waters of Lake Erie
is six fish per angler; minimum size limit is
15 inches. … The daily bag limit for yellow
perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters
of Lake Erie. … The trout and salmon daily
bag limit is 2 fish; minimum size limit is 12
inches. … The black bass (largemouth and
smallmouth bass) daily bag limit is five fish
per angler with a 14-inch minimum size limit.
Lake-wide
Walleye: Recent weather has limited
fishing opportunities.
Where: Most walleye anglers have been
fishing nearshore from Catawba Island to
Kelleys Island and Cedar Point to Vermillion;
fish have also been caught off traditional fall
pier locations.
How: Troll using deep-diving crankbaits
such as Reef Runners or Deep Husky Jerks,
fished in the middle portion of the water col-
umn or higher. On the piers, anglers are using
traditional techniques.
Yellow perch
Where: For some of the big-
gest perch of the year, try tra-
ditional fall spots, such as the
green buoy off Catawba State
Park; Green and Rattlesnake
islands; Ballast Island; Kelleys Island shoal;
east of Kelleys Island airport; between
Kelleys Island and Lakeside; the Marblehead
Lighthouse; north of Cedar Point; the south
end of the sandbar offshore between Vermilion
and Lorain; and just off most of the ports from
Huron to Conneaut.
How: Perch-spreaders with shiners, fished
near the bottom.
Smallmouth bass
Where: Bass start moving shallow to feed
as water temperatures drop. Try fishing rocky
areas along both island and mainland shore-
lines to find feeding smallmouth bass; areas
with gizzard shad, shiners or gobies will be
best.
How: Tube jigs, drop shots
with goby imitations, and
crankbaits or jerkbaits.
Water Temperature: The
water temperature is 42 degrees
off Toledo and 49 degrees off
Cleveland, according to the
nearshore marine forecast.
———
Spaces available for Certified Fishing
Instructor Workshop in Findlay
FINDLAY – Spaces are available for edu-
cators, leaders, or conservation clubs who
have a sincere interest in taking kids fishing
and want to become certified fishing instruc-
tors, according to the ODNR, Division of
Wildlife. A free workshop is available from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 11 and will take place
at Wildlife District Two Office, 952 Lima
Avenue, Findlay, Ohio 45840.
Passport to Fishing is a 1-day instructor
training program that qualifies individuals to
become Division of Wildlife certified fishing
instructors. All participants will need to pass
a background check before being certified.
Passport to Fishing was developed by the
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and adopted
by the Recreational Boating and Fishing
Foundation. Workshops teach volunteers the
basics of fishing and how to run a 4-station
fishing program with a fishing event. These
instructors then go back to their communities,
with a written curriculum and training aids,
to teach youngsters and beginning anglers the
basics of fishing.
By becoming a certified instructor, attend-
ees will not only be able to help in reconnect-
ing students with the outdoors but will also
have the skills and resources to do it in a more
successful way. Resources available include
grants, equipment, brochures and training.
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
St. John’s took about 16 minutes to
really get untracked in its 42-10 Region
24 semifinal rout against Tiffin Calvert a
week ago.
The eighth-seeded Blue Jays don’t
want to see that happen tonight as they
take on sixth-seeded Arlington in the
Regional finals at Lima Stadium.
Head coach Todd Schulte looks at the
offense — a one-back, 3-wide, 1-tight
end look — first.
“They are big and strong up front.
They open a lot of holes for their back,
Austin Rettig, who has over 2,000 yards
rushing,” Schulte explained. “Just in the
last two weeks, he has 505 yards rushing
and seven scores. They run a lot of power
plays out of their set; they want to run the
ball primarily.”
That will test a Blue and Gold defense
— ceding 21.6 points and 341.3 yards
(202.8 rushing). Linebackers Cody
Looser (82 solo stops, 49 assists) and
Austin Heiing (61 and 37) lead the effort,
along with Evan Hays (48 and 36; 2 picks),
Jordan Mohler (50 and 17; 2 picks),
Tyler Jettinghoff
(37 and 25),
Luke MacLennan
(44 and 12) and
Jason Wittler (23
and 30).
“Defensively,
they rotate a lot
between 4-man-
and 5- man
fronts; they use
the 5-man front
usually against
a tight end. We
have seen a lot
of different fronts
but that is what we
have seen the last two weeks,” Schulte
continued.
The Blue Jays’ offense — averaging
25.9 points and 286.6 yards (237.2 rush-
ing) a game — is topped by the 3-head-
ed backfield monster of senior tailback
Jettinghoff (228 rushes, 1,384 yards, 27
touchdowns; 7 grabs, 73 yards; 22.9-yard
kickoff return average), senior fullback
MacLennan (96 totes, 829 yards, 7; 15
catches, 251 yards. 2; 25.4-yard punt
return average; 4 pancake blocks) and
junior quarterback Nick Martz (122 tries,
578 yards, 5; 44-of-106 passing, 574
yards, 2 TDs, 10
picks).
Outside, his
top targets are the
junior Hays (8
grabs, 103 yards)
and seniors
Andy May (7
for 105) and
Ben Wrasman (5
for 38; 36-of-42
extra points, 39
total points; 38
punts, 37.2-yard
average). Up front,
senior left tackle
Spencer Ginter has 14 pancake blocks,
along with junior left guard Wes Buettner
(6) and senior center Ryan Shumaker (4).
“Controlling the line of scrimmage
this week is the biggest key for both
teams. We both want to run the ball,
which means we have to establish the line
of scrimmage,” Schulte explained. “It’s
all about execution up front. Defensively,
it’s about stopping their run and forcing
them to drive the football.
“Also, special teams and turnovers get
more and more important because if you
can get a short field for your offense, that
helps you a lot. As well, you want to give
a long field to your opponent.”
The Jays exploded for the final 42
points in last week’s playoff win.
“When we looked at the films, it just
seemed that we weren’t quite ready to
play. Their 80-yard touchdown simply
came because a linebacker didn’t cover
the cut-back lane,” Schulte added. “We
simply didn’t execute very well early
on but neither the coaches nor the play-
ers panicked; we have had to fight from
behind a lot this year, so everyone stayed
calm. We just started to execute better
and I felt we wore them down.
“Overall, we have made less and less
mistakes as the season has worn on. We
have gotten better at making the little
adjustments on the run.”
Red Devil head coach Dick Leonard
have only had three losses this season.
“We lost to playoff teams in the
Blanchard Valley Conference — Liberty-
Benton and McComb — and outside
to Liberty Center, who just missed in
Division V. We lost by five to McComb
and Liberty Center and by two scores
to Benton,” Leonard explained. “In the
games we won, we managed to run the
ball very well — that is our game —
especially when we got off to a quick
start. However, for the first time in our
program, we have a 1,000-yard passer
to go with a 2,000-yard runner, so we’ve
been more balanced this season than
ever.
“Defensively, the development of our
line has been the key. As that group has
come along, that has made our entire
defense better.”
The Red Devils (9-3) are led by that
2,104-yard runner, Austin Rettig (235
rushes, 41 touchdowns; 11 catches, 77
yards, 2); that 1,365-yard passer, Andrew
Hunter (84-of-174 passing, 13 TDs, 14
picks; 61 rushes, 380 yards, 6); Xavier
Martinez (65-of-74 extra points, 71 total
points); and receivers Aaron Starr (19
grabs, 324 yards, 5 scores), Josh Elledge
(18 for 334, 2) and Jared Green (13 for
210, 3).
They are led on defense — which
gives up a mere 113.0 yards per game
rushing and
73.4 yards pass-
ing — by Josh
Elledge (49
solos and 39
assists, 22 for
loss; 3 intercep-
tions), Bryce
Hartman (27
and 53, 21 for
loss), Chase
Glick (22 and
36, 15 for loss),
Koltin Marquart
(19 and 34), Matt
Glick (16 and
34), Hunter (6 picks) and Aaron Starr (24
punts, 36.6-yard average).
“We have a lot of respect for the St.
John’s coaches and program. A Todd
Schulte team is always well-prepared,
well-coached and well-disciplined; so are
its coaches,” Leonard added. “It’s a solid
team all over the place; we don’t see
many weaknesses. They have really good
linebackers and a really good backfield
to start with. They want to run the ball as
much as we do.
“Games like this — with two basi-
cally evenly-matched teams — come
down to which team can make the fewest
mistakes, whether turnovers, penalties,
missed assignments, whatever.
“All three phases become so much
important, especially special teams. A
dropped punt snap can be a game-chang-
er, like what happened in their game
against Leipsic.”
Kickoff tonight is 7 p.m.
6 – The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Ginter
May
Shumaker
Indians open with ‘W’
over Lady Jeffcats
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — There were a number of reasons for
Jefferson’s 64-42 opening-night girls basketball loss to non-
league foe Fort Recovery Friday night at Jefferson High
School — and they applied at various times.
The one constant was poor shooting for the night — 13-of-
60 (2-of-13 downtown) for 21.7 percent.
“We had nine games last year where we shot under 29 per-
cent from the field. We had some shots from the outside that
didn’t fall; we just have to finish inside,” Jefferson mentor
Dave Hoffman explained. “We play way too scared the first
half and had too many turnovers; then we didn’t get back quick
enough to stop their transition and gave up way too many easy
baskets.”
The Wildcats were minus a pair of 3-year letterwinners in
Hannah Sensabaugh and Makayla Binkley due to off-season
knee surgeries.
Fort Recovery head coach Doug Bihn was pleased with his
team’s effort overall.
“We try to use our athleticism and feel we’re deeper than
most of the teams we play,” he added. “We played with a lot
of energy tonight; that is the key for us every night. We want
a high tempo.”
Jefferson turnovers were a part of the problem in the first
period against the Lady Tribe’s 1-3-1 3/4-court and half-court
defense: the Lady Wildcats committed six of their 17 for the
game in the span. If it hadn’t been for a 17-10 supremacy on
the glass in the quarter (7-3 offensive), they’d have trailed
much worse than the 13-11 they did. Both teams were look-
ing to push the pace and extend their defense but the Indians
only had two miscues (25 for the night) in the first period. Tori
Lennartz netted five of her team-high 21 markers (9 boards,
3 assists) for the Purple and White but Red and White senior
Rileigh Stockwell scored six of her game-high 22 (to go with
10 boards). It was fellow senior Gabby Pimpas who hit the
1st-of-2 singles with 17.4 ticks to go to reduce the visitors’
lead to 13-11.
Lennartz scored five in the second period but got a bit more
help than her Wildcat counterpart: Stockwell notched five of
her own, including the only two fielders the hosts made (out
of 10 shots). They still turned it over seven times (5 for the
visitors) but the Indians seized command of the glass 16-8
(9-2 offensive; winning the battle for the contest 58-39, 19-17
offensive). When Recovery’s Sierra Pugh (4 assists) notched a
3-point play with 27.2 ticks on the board, the guests led 30-18.
Delphos took supreme care of the ball the third period, not
turning it over once. However, they could only can 5-of-20
efforts from the field. Early on, senior Katie Goergens hit a
pair of 3-pointers (8 markers, 5 rebounds, 4 steals) around
two singles by junior Brooke Culp (7 markers, 3 steals) to get
within 30-26 at the 6-minute mark. However, Lennartz scored
nine straight points (11 in the canto) and the Indians ran off a
24-8 spurt the remainder of the period. When Julie Wendel (8
counters, 6 caroms) hit a long two from the left corner with 6.0
seconds showing, the guests led 54-34.
Jefferson forced seven straight turnovers to open the finale
(14 in the period) but could only counter with a Stockwell
basket at the 7-minute mark to make it 54-36. They could not
make it any closer from then on.
The Tribe finished 27-of-63 from the field, 4-6 of 6
triples, for 42.9 percent and 6-of-15 at the line (40%). Caley
Schoenherr added 14 markers. Kendra Siefring and Cassidy
Rammel led the guests with 11 caroms each. They concluded
with 20 fouls and will host St. Marys Memorial tonight.
Jefferson senior Rileigh Stockwell goes for a bucket
against the defense of Fort Recovery’s Haley Knapke in
girls cage season-opening action Friday night at Jefferson
High School. (Delphos Herald/Randy Shellenbarger)
Jays, Red Devils seek ball-control offense tonight
Information Submitted
Minster handles
LadyCats in season-opener
KALIDA —Minster out-
scored Kalida 16-8 in the
fourth period to escape with
a 42-36 girls basketball vic-
tory Friday night in season-
opening action at Kalida
High School.
M i n s t e r
received 10
points each
from Claire
Fischer and
Kayla Richard.
The LadyCats were led
by Kylie Osterhage with 13
markers.
There was no junior var-
sity game.
Kalida hosts St. Marys
Memorial 6 p.m. Tuesday
for Parents Night.
MINSTER (42)
Claire Fischer 2-2-0-10,
Kayla Richard 2-0-6-10,
Mariah McKenzie 1-0-0-
2, Alexis Wuebker 0-0-0-
0, Logan Arnold 0-0-2-2,
Lauren Roetgerman 2-0-2-6,
Hannah Sherman 2-0-0-4,
Hannah Schmitmeyer 0-0-
0-0, Taylor Trego 1-1-1-
6, Kathy Prenger 0-0-0-0,
Marissa Luthman 0-0-0-0,
Alicia Arling 1-0-0-2. Totals
11-3-11-42.
KALIDA (36)
Nicole Recker 1-0-2-
4, Mckenna Vorst 1-0-0-
2, Brittany Kahle 2-0-1-5,
Nicole Reindel 0-1-2-5,
Kennedy Hoffman 1-1-0-
5, Kylie Osterhage 5-0-3-
13, Allison Recker 1-0-0-2.
Totals 11-2-8-36.
Score by Quarter:
Minster 13 4 9 16 - 42
Kalida 10 11 7 8 - 36
Three-point goals:
Minster, Fischer 2, Trego;
Kalida, Reindel, Hoffman.
———-
B-W stings Lady Jackets
for first loss of 2013-14 sea-
son
BEREA – It was a rough
night for the Defiance
College women’s basketball
team as the Yellow Jackets
of Baldwin-Wallace took
care of business at home by
a score of 87-55. DC drops
to 1-1 on the year, while
B-W ups its record to 3-1.
In the defeat, freshman
Kelsey Tietje chalked up
another fantastic perfor-
mance. The center scored
25 points (9-of-15), while
raking in 10 rebounds and
a steal. That marks two
straight 20-10 double-dou-
bles to open up her colle-
giate career.
Action didn’t start off
well for the Purple and Gold,
as B-W jumped ahead quick-
ly by a score of 6-15 in just
over four minutes. However,
a 6-0 run by Defiance cut
into the deficit and brought
it within three at 12-15.
Unfortunately, DC never
again got that close to the
host Yellow Jackets. A well-
balanced offensive attack
by the home team began to
pull away in the contest, as
it with a 7-0 spurt of its
own. B-W then took a 37-21
advantage into the locker
room at the break.
In the second half,
Bal dwi n- Wal l ace
extended its lead
to 21 points within
three minutes of
intermission. But
the Purple and Gold
put together one last
push on the shoul-
ders of Tietje.
During the 14-3 run by
the Yellow Jackets, Tietje,
the Patrick Henry High
product recorded nine of the
points on four field goals
and a make from the char-
ity stripe. A hit from behind
the arc from senior Maggie
Neanen trimmed B-W’s lead
to 45-35.
However, with every
attempt Defiance made to
get back into the game,
Baldwin-Wallace always had
an answer. B-W racked off
nine-straight points to bring
the home lead back up to
54-35 with just over 10 min-
utes to play.
The host Yellow Jackets
cruised through the rest
of the contest in the open-
ing round of the Baldwin-
Wallace tournament.
In two games for Tietje,
the sensational freshman has
now posted averages of 24.5
points (62.1 percent) and
10.5 rebounds to go along
with one steal and a block.
Other contributors
on the night were Ashley
Birchmeier (Vaughnsville/
Columbus Grove),
who totaled eight
points and four
boards and Neanen,
who scored six
points on a pair of
three pointers.
B-W’s offen-
sive attack was just
too much for the Purple and
Gold, as the home squad
had eight different players
account for five or more
points.
After shooting above 50
percent from both the field
and behind the arc against
Alma, DC struggled tonight
by shooting 20-of-54 (37
percent) inside the 3-point
line and 2-of-11 (18.2 per-
cent) from long range.
Defiance did hold the
advantage on the glass as it
outrebounded the Baldwin-
Wallace 36-31. But turn-
overs plagued the Purple and
Gold as they committed 24
to B-W’s 13.
DC will now play in the
consolation contest today
against the loser of the Ohio
Wesleyan and Calvin match-
up. The game is slated to
begin at 2 p.m.
Local Round Up
See WILDCATS, page 7
Wildlife Ohio
See WILDLIFE, page 7
JIM METCALFE
COLLEGE:
OLE MISS:
Ole Miss needs a
signature win to tell
people “I am here.”
This is it, especially
at home.
OKLAHOMA
STATE: Maybe this
is a heart pick (a
Buckeye fan) but
Cowboys are more than capable at
home.
UCLA: Pasadena is rocking again
and it ain’t the Rose Bowl! Bruins take
another step to their full-blown come-
back.
WISCONSIN: Midwest weather is
hitting us hard. The 3-headed tailback
monster in Madison is too much for
Gophers. How much is the debacle
in the desert costing Badgers AND
Buckeyes in BCS?
TEXAS A&M: LSU defense is talent-
ed but not quite there. Not good against
a very motivated Johnny Football.
Should be a shoot-out.
NOTRE DAME: Simply because
this is in South Bend, I give the edge to
Fighting Irish.
PRO:
GREEN BAY: Has Packers defense
had to be better without Mr. Rodgers in
the neighborhood? Yes. They are.
CLEVELAND: Steelers have owned
this rivalry lately but Browns had have
some recent success. Methinks the
Browns get a close win on the lake.
DENVER: Patriots should be livid
after that ridiculous non-call in the
Monday-Nighter. However, the Pats
defense is too beat-up against high-
powered Broncs.
NY GIANTS: G-Men making a late
run to the playoffs. Jerry Jones is giving
his “boy” — Jason Garrett — a “vote of
confidence.” Speaks volumes.
ARIZONA: A dome team like Colts
heading to the desert. Good luck, Luck!
CHICAGO: Which Rams’ team will
show up? I think a better-than-expected
Bears’ team will.
——-
BOB WEBER
COLLEGE
OLE MISS
– Rebels have
been playing
pretty good lately
and have played
some really good
teams close and
just last month
beat LSU.
OKLAHOMA
STATE – The
Bears are awesome but I need the
Cowboys to knock off the Bears so they
don’t climb over the Bucks.
ARIZONA STATE – Sun Devils pull
off the upset over the Bruins.
WISCONSIN – The Badgers are
simply the better overall team. Paul
Bunyan ax goes home to Wisconsin.
LSU – “Johnny Football’s” visit to
Death Valley Saturday will be a very
long night and I think this will make or
break his Heisman hopes.
BYU – The Cougars will put another
loss on the Irish, sending them to the
Poinsettia or Cracker Barrel Bowl.
NFL
GREEN BAY – Two teams going
nowhere this year. Going with the Pack
at home.
CLEVELAND – Do I pick this game
with my heart or my brain? Do I side
with the Mrs. and her beloved Steelers,
or go with a team that stunk against the
Bengals? If this game was offense vs.
Offense, I would pick the Steelers hands
down; however, defense vs. defense is
where the Browns will win the game and
I hope Big Ben survives.
NEW ENGLAND – Peyton vs.
Brady? It sounds like the weather could
be really nasty for this game – I want
Peyton to win but going with the Patriots.
NY GIANTS – The Giants are sim-
ply playing better right now.
ARIZONA – No great logic here with
this pick, just going on a hunch!!
CHICAGO – The Bears! I think I’m
undefeated picking them this year. Well
– that statement just jinxed me (Editor’s
Note: You are now doomed!)!!
———
ERIN COX
COLLEGE:
Ole Miss
- Going with
the home team
advantage on this
one to continue
their winning
streak.
Baylor -
Baylor has been
playing strong
and I don’t think
they’ll falter under pressure.
UCLA - I really like blue. That’s my
favorite color (EN: That’s my girl!!!).
Minnesota - I don’t know that I’ve
ever heard of Minnesota before but
they’re the Golden Gophers and that’s
just awesome.
LSU - They’re defense has allowed
less points so they can stop Johnny.
Brigham Young - Just pulling names
out of a hat now. College football isn’t
my forte.
NFL:
Minnesota - The Packers are noth-
ing without Aaron Rodgers.
Cleveland - The Browns like to
throw a few wins in there to surprise us.
I think they’ll do it this week.
Denver - I love Peyton and I do not
like Tom Brady or the Patriots — ever.
Dallas - If my ‘Boys lose this one,
football season for me might be over
with.
Indianapolis - I’m going with Luck
on this one.
Chicago - McCown has proven that
he can play well in Cutler’s spot but I’m
sure he wants to prove that he deserves
it as his own so he’ll be fighting hard
for this win.
———
BRIAN BASSETT
College:
Ole Miss: Going out on a limb
here, especially with James Franklin
coming back to Missouri, but some-
thing has been off about Missouri to
me this season. Plus Ole Miss has the
talent to stick with the Tigers.
Oklahoma State: Maybe wishful
thinking here but Baylor still hasn’t
really played anyone other than a
sub-par Oklahoma team. Oklahoma
State is far and away the best team
Baylor will have played this season
and I think it will be an eye-opening
experience for the Bears. I’m taking
the Cowboys, big.
Arizona State: I think the Sun
Devils are sneaky good this year and
only getting better. UCLA is a solid
team with a good quarterback but I
think Arizona State will use this as its
coming-out party.
Wisconsin: The Gophers have put
a very solid string of games together
but it will come to an end Saturday
with a loss to the Badgers, who are
a lot better than people give them
credit for.
Texas A&M: Only because Johnny
Manziel is underrated as a quarter-
back, seriously.
Brigham Young: Two of my least
favorite teams in the entire NCAA
going at it. But I’ve said it before, I will
never pick Notre Dame because of my
intense hatred for the Irish. BYU!
Pros:
Minnesota: We all saw how ter-
rible the Packers are without Aaron
Rodgers against the Giants last week.
The Vikings don’t have a quarterback
either but they have Adrian Peterson,
so I’ll side with them.
Cleveland: If my Browns are going
to get the Steelers, this will be the
year. The Steelers are probably going
to win this game but I just don’t feel
right picking them.
Denver: The Patriots are too busy
crying about the no-call Monday, that
they probably haven’t even realized
they have Peyton Manning coming to
town Sunday.
Giants: Purely coin toss for me
but picking against Tony Romo just
feels right.
Colts: Somehow they find ways
to grip wins from the jaws of defeat.
Probably will be much of the same
against the underrated Cardinals.
St. Louis: The Bears are seem-
ingly falling apart and with Cutler out,
I like the Rams.
Saturday, November 23, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
PIGSKIN PICKS
I KNEW I should have taken USC last week — didn’t I write that? Yes, I did!
Plus, the officials missed all kinds of illegal procedures on Michigan’s tying field goal versus Northwestern, thus cheating me out of another successful pick!
My — MY? — Patriots got hosed by the official choke — or is it official’s choke? — Monday; again, do they KNOW???
LOL!!!
Anywho, four of us had pretty good weeks — should have been better (grumble, grumble, grumble)!
Regular Bob Weber had the best at 9-3 (4-2 college, 5-1 pros) to extend his strong mark to 83-49 — 46-20 and 37-29).
I, regular Bob Boninsegna and guest picker Charlie Warnimont each went 8-4: I and Charlie went 4-2 and 4-2 and Dave 5-1, 3-3.
That improves me to 75-57 (39-27, 36-30) and Dave to 72-59 (39-26, 33-33).
With second GP Brian Bassett going 3-9 (3-3, 0-6), the GPs are now a combined 131-107 (68-51, 63-56)
Brian returns this week and Herald Correspondent Erin Cox is pinch-hitting for Charlie this week (family emergency).
Due to technical reasons, Dave’s picks won’t be in this week.
Here are the Games:
College: Missouri at Ole Miss; Baylor at Oklahoma State; Arizona State at UCLA; Wisconsin at Minnesota; Texas A&M at LSU; Brigham Young at Notre Dame.
NFL: Minnesota at Green Bay; Pittsburgh at Cleveland; Denver at New England; Dallas at NY Giants; Indianapolis at Arizona; Chicago at St. Louis.
(Continued from page 6)
Jefferson finished 2-of-13
downtown and also struggled
at the line, hitting 14-of-
29 (48.3%). Junior Shelby
Koenig added six boards and
a pair of blocks. They fin-
ished with 12 fouls and host
Antwerp tonight.
“We did a lot of things
better the second half: we
took care of the ball, for an
example. We just struggled
to shoot the ball,” Hoffman
added. “We got to the line
quite a bit, the same thing we
did last year when we shot
far more free throws than our
opponents. We just have to
make more. We also got out-
rebounded; we gave up way
too many second and third
shots. We have to come back
out (tonight) and be better,
especially in our guard play.”
In junior varsity action,
Fort Recovery won 20-14.
Kirsten Jutte led the vic-
tors with nine points. For
the hosts, sophomore Taylor
Stroh netted four.
VARSITY
FORT RECOVERY (64)
Caley Schoenherr 6-1-14, Sierra
Pugh 2-1-5, Kara Jutte 1-0-2, Haley
Knapke 0-0-0, Julie Wendel 4-0-8,
Kendra Siefring 2-1-5, Tori Lennartz
8-2-21, Cassidy Rammel 3-1-7,
Kirsten Jutte 1-0-2, Katie Stammen
0-0-0, Jocelyn Kaiser 0-0-0. Totals
23-4-6/15-64.
JEFFERSON (42)
Heather Pohlman 0-1-1, Brooke
Culp 1-5-7, Lindsay Deuel 0-0-
0, Katie Goergens 3-0-8, Rileigh
Stockwell 8-6-22, Gabby Pimpas
0-1-1, Shelby Koenig 1-0-2, Jasmine
McDougall 0-1-1. Totals 11-2-14/29-
42.
Score By Quarters:
Ft. Recovery 13 17 24 10 – 64
Jefferson 11 7 16 8 – 42
Three-point goals: Fort Recovery,
Lennartz 3, Schoenherr; Jefferson,
Goergens 2.
———
JUNIOR VARSITY
FORT RECOVERY (20)
Audra Metzger 0-1-1, Mikayla
Post 1-0-2, Whitney Will 1-0-2,
Chelsea Timmerman 0-0-0, Kelsey
Evers 1-0-2, Hallory Leuthold 0-0-0,
Tori Vaughn 0-0-0, Kasey Vogel 0-0-
0, Kirsten Jutte 4-1-9, Jocelyn Kaiser
2-0-4, Grace Gehle 0-0-0, Devin Post
0-0-0, Katie Stammen 0-0-0, Logan
Ranly 0-0-0. Totals 9-0-2/3-20.
JEFFERSON (14)
Taylor Stroh 2-0-4, Mackenzie
Hammons 0-0-0, Kelsey Berelsman
1-0-2, Lindsey Jettinghoff 0-1-1, Tori
Black 1-0-2, Jessica Pimpas 1-0-2,
Regan Nagel 0-0-0, Bailey Gorman
1-1-3. Totals 6-0-2/13-14.
Score by Quarters:
Ft. Recovery 4 1 13 2 - 20
Jefferson 7 5 6 5 - 23
Three-point goals: Fort Recovery,
none; Jefferson, none.
(Continued from page 6)
To register for the workshop, please call
Linda at 419-429-8347 by Dec. 3. For addi-
tional class information, visit www.wildohio.
com.
——-
Wildlife Hotline hours extended for
Ohio’s deer-gun hunting seasons
COLUMBUS –The Division of
Wildlife’s toll-free 800-WILDLIFE (945-
3543) general hunting information hotline
will offer extended hours during the youth
deer-gun season and prior to and during the
deer-gun season.
The white-tailed deer-gun hunting sea-
sons are when many of Ohio’s hunters have
last-minute questions and staff will be ready
and available to assist. Special call center
hours include:
8 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday for
youth deer-gun season.
8 a.m.-7 p.m., Nov. 30 to Dec. 8 for deer-
gun season.
The hotline will be closed Thanksgiving
Day.
Ohioans are encouraged to help enforce
state wildlife laws by reporting violations
to the division’s Turn-In-a-Poacher (TIP)
hotline by calling 800-POACHER (762-
2437). Established in 1982, the TIP pro-
gram allows individuals to anonymously call
toll-free to report wildlife violations. The
800-POACHER hotline is open for calls 365
days a year, 24 hours a day.
Tips concerning wildlife violations can
also be submitted at wildohio.com. Tipsters
may be eligible to receive a cash award.
———
Ohio hunters can purchase and use
antlerless deer permits through Dec. 1
COLUMBUS – Ohio white-tailed deer
hunters can still purchase and use antlerless
deer permits through Dec. 1, according to
the ODNR.
Hunters can tag and check antlerless deer
with an antlerless permit through Dec. 1.
After that, hunters must possess or purchase
an either-sex deer permit to pursue bucks and
does until Feb. 2, 2014. Either-sex permits
can be purchased online at ohiogamecheck.
com or at a license vendor.
Deer bag limits are now determined
by county. The statewide bag limit is nine
deer but a hunter cannot exceed a county
bag limit. Hunters may harvest only one
antlered deer in Ohio regardless of hunting
method or season. Only one antlerless deer
may be checked per county using an antler-
less permit. Ohioans are again reminded
that antlerless permits will not be valid after
Dec. 1 unless used for a DOW authorized
controlled hunt.
Ohio offers many opportunities to deer
hunters in the coming months. The youth
deer-gun season is Saturday and Sunday.
The deer-gun season is Dec. 2-8. Deer-
muzzleloader season is Jan. 4-7, 2014. Deer-
archery season is open through Feb. 2, 2014.
Find complete details in the 2013-2014
Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations or
online at wildohio.com. Hunters with questions
can also call 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).
——-
Ohio’s hunters get more prime hunt-
ing time when deer-gun hunting season
opens Dec. 2
COLUMBUS – Deer-gun season, one
of Ohio’s most revered hunting traditions,
begins Dec. 2 with 30 more minutes of prime
hunting time each day. Ohio’s deer-gun sea-
son is open through Dec. 8.
Hunting time is extended 30 minutes for
all deer-gun seasons. Hunters were already
allowed to hunt deer 30 minutes before sun-
rise and this year an additional 30 minutes
has been added after sunset for gun seasons.
“We are eager to increase opportunities
for Ohio’s sportsmen and women,” said
ODNR Director James Zehringer. “Ohio is a
top 10 whitetail hunting destination and the
extra half-hour after sunset will give hunters
more opportunities to bag a deer.”
Deer hunting in Ohio continues to be a
popular activity for many who enjoy the out-
doors. The ODNR Division of Wildlife antic-
ipates 80,000-90,000 deer will be harvested
during the weeklong hunt. Approximately
420,000 hunters are expected to participate
in this year’s season, including many out-of-
state hunters. Hunters checked 86,964 deer in
the 2012 weeklong deer-gun season.
Deer can be hunted with a plugged shot-
gun capable of holding no more than three
slugs, a muzzleloader .38 caliber or larger,
a handgun .357 caliber or larger and bows
during deer-gun week.
“Hunters are reminded to use safety
precautions while hunting, including wear-
ing required hunter orange clothing, using a
safety harness while in a tree stand and safe
handling of firearms,” said Scott Zody, chief
of the ODNR, Division of Wildlife.
A valid deer permit is required in addi-
tion to a valid Ohio hunting license. Hunters
must purchase an additional deer permit to
hunt more than one deer.
A new tagging procedure administered
by the ODNR Division of Wildlife requires
hunters to make their own game tag to attach
to a deer. Game tags can be made of any
material (cardboard, plastic, paper, etc.) as
long as it contains the hunter’s name, date,
time and county of kill. Go to the Deer
Hunting Resources page at wildohio.com for
more information on changes to the game
check process.
More deer hunting information can be
found in the 2013-14 Ohio Hunting and
Trapping Regulations and at wildohio.com.
Hunters can share photos by clicking on
the Photo Gallery tab online.
Hunters are encouraged to harvest more
antlerless deer in some areas of Ohio this
season to help the needy in their area and
also manage deer populations. The DOW
is working with Farmers and Hunters
Feeding the Hungry (FHFH) to help pay
for the processing of donated venison.
Hunters who donate a deer to a food bank
are not required to pay the processing cost
as long as funding for the effort is avail-
able. More information about this program
can be found online at fhfh.org. Hunters
can also donate venison through Safari
Club International’s Sportsmen Against
Hunger program by learning more at safa-
riclubfoundation.org. Whitetails Unlimited
chapters also use local funds for programs
such as venison donation. Go to whitetail-
sunlimited.com to find a local chapter and
make a donation.
Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident
hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associ-
ated with hunting-related industries. Hunting
has a more than $853 million economic
impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment,
fuel, food, lodging and more, according to
the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s
Hunting in America: An Economic Force for
Conservation publication.
ODNR ensures a balance between wise
use and protection of our natural resources
for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website
at ohiodnr.gov.
Wildlife
Wildcats
Roethlisberger looks to pad mark against Browns
By TOM WITHERS
Associated Press
CLEVELAND — Growing up in
Ohio, Ben Roethlisberger knew all about
the Steelers-Browns rivalry, once the NFL’s
nastiest intra-division spat.
It used to be a somewhat fair fight. But he
has tilted the series almost single-handedly.
Pittsburgh’s quarterback carries a 15-1
career record against the Browns into
Sunday’s matchup between teams hanging
on the fringe of the AFC playoff race.
Browns linebacker D’Qwell Jackson
knows that despite Pittsburgh’s record and
any rumors swirling around Roethlisberger
and his future, that as long as the imposing
No. 7 is under center, the Steelers (4-6) are to
be taken seriously.
“He’s had a great career over there,”
Jackson said. “We know we’re going to have
our hands full.”
Following a 0-4 start, the Steelers (4-6)
have turned their season around and can
move themselves closer to playoff conten-
tion by beating the Browns (4-6), who are
still smarting from a disappointing loss last
week in Cincinnati. Cleveland scored the
game’s first 13 points before unraveling
in the second quarter, when the Bengals
blocked two punts, scored on
a fumble recovery, scored 31
straight points and coasted.
Roethlisberger passed for
367 yards and four touchdowns
last week in a win over Detroit.
The strong performance helped
subdue talk fueled by a recent
report the 31-year-old will seek a trade in
the offseason. Roethlisberger dismissed the
notion, saying he wanted “to be a Steeler
for life.”
That’s not comforting to the Browns or
their fans, who have only celebrated five
victories over Pittsburgh in 30 games since
1999.
To stop the Steelers, the Browns must
slow Roethlisberger — and that’s never easy.
Ray Horton, Cleveland’s defensive coor-
dinator, spent seven seasons on Pittsburgh’s
staff and knows firsthand how tough the 6-5,
240-pound Roethlisberger is to handle.
“I don’t think there’s been a quarterback
in the league that has taken unabated shots
and shrugged guys off, made more big
plays, than Ben in the history of the
league,” Horton explained. “I told
our players, he was a shortstop in
baseball; you’d think he would be
a pitcher. He was a point guard in
basketball; you’d think he would be
the center. And he punts left-footed.
So this guy is the most athletic guy
that we’ll face, meaning total package of
completeness.”
Horton marvels at Roethlisberger’s abil-
ity to turn a broken play into a big gain to
his receivers.
“He’s a unique guy,” he added. “They’re
a unique bunch in that their wide receiv-
ers thrive on getting open after contact and
going up the field and creating plays that
are really school-yard basketball plays: Go
behind the Subaru and take a left and I’ll hit
you. They make a ton of big plays that way.”
Buckeyes take on Hoosiers
and history on Saturday
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Hoosiers and history are on the checklist
for No. 4 Ohio State this Saturday.
The Buckeyes carry a 22-game winning
streak into their one-sided series against
Indiana — the longest active major-college
streak.
On top of that, however, if the Buckeyes
win they’ll eclipse the school record set by
the 1967-69 Ohio State teams.
That accomplishment comes only if
they take care of business, however.
“Right now, we’re just focusing on beating Indiana,” center
Corey Linsley said. “Because Indiana doesn’t really care about
our winning streak.”
Even coach Urban Meyer, who runs screaming from just
about anything other than the X’s and O’s of the next game,
says it would be an impressive accomplishment.
“Any time a player plays at a place like Ohio State and you
can make a name for yourself or a dent in this great tradition,
that is certainly worth being recognized,” Meyer added.
The Buckeyes (10-0, 6-0) can also clinch a division title and
a spot in the Big Ten championship game.
Here are five things to watch for in the game:
GET YOUR POINTS HERE: Ohio State won last year’s
matchup, 52-49. This year, the two offenses may be even bet-
ter — they’re combining for more than 1,000 yards per game.
Plus, the defenses may be worse.
“Defensively, it’s a couple teams that have given up some
points,” Indiana coach Kevin Wilson said.
Don’t be shocked if 40 points are scored — by the end of
the first quarter.
FAILING HISTORY: The Buckeyes have made it an almost
annual occurrence to beat the Hoosiers. Not only are they a
32-point favorite this time around but they’ve won the last 17
meetings with Indiana.
Amazingly, that’s still not their longest streak in the series.
The Buckeyes did not lose to the Hoosiers from 1952 to 1986,
going 31-0-1 and winning the last 23 in that span.
MOVING ON UP: Ohio State is third in the BCS rankings
and needs to impress voters and the computers over its final
two games plus a potential date with Michigan State in the Big
Ten title game.
Meyer is angry with himself that he’s been distracted by
all of the BCS talk and that in turn his players have been dis-
tracted by it.
“When I started getting asked questions about the BCS, (I
should have just said), ‘Move on’,” Meyer said. “Because (the
players) watch me and I’m saying, ‘Don’t pay attention to it’
and I’m paying attention to it. Then it’s a mixed message. But
the best thing they can do is just play.”
CLOSING STRONG: The Hoosiers (4-6, 2-4) need to win
their final two games — they finish up at home against archri-
val Purdue on Nov. 30 — to be bowl-eligible.
If they were to accomplish that, it would be Indiana’s first
bowl trip since the 2007 Insight Bowl and only the second
since 1993. But it’ll take a huge upset, first.
“With two weeks to go, (we still have a) chance for a
bowl opportunity,” Wilson said. “Our goal is always constant
improvement. I just met with our leaders, our seniors. I need
their best two weeks. We need to get better on offense from a
week ago. We’ve got a great challenge this week and we have
to bring every phase of our defense along.”
SENIOR LIVING: Ohio State bids a fond adieu to 18
seniors, along with redshirt junior CB Bradley Roby who has
already announced he’s giving up his final season of eligibility
to jump into the NFL draft.
Bengals’ team of extremes in control of AFC North
By JOE KAY
Associated Press
CINCINNATI — No dull moments with this Bengals team.
There’s always something big going on.
Big lulls followed by big comebacks. A Hail Mary
pass that ties the game followed by a loss in overtime.
Andy Dalton setting club records for touchdowns one
month, throwing interception after interception the
next month.
And maybe that’s the personality of a team that
seems to play its best after putting itself behind. As
coach Marvin Lewis put it, “I guess we will continue to major
in thrilling at this point.”
The real thrills — or yet another huge disappointment —
are still to come.
The Bengals (7-4) have taken control of the AFC North
with the toughest stretch of their schedule behind them.
They’ve got a 2-game lead in the loss column over Baltimore,
Pittsburgh and Cleveland, all 4-6 heading into the weekend.
They have a late-season bye that should get them closer
to full strength for the final push. Only one of their final five
games involves an opponent that currently has a winning
record — Indianapolis — and they’ll get to face the Colts at
home.
Three of the last five will be at Paul Brown Stadium, where
the Bengals are 5-0 this season.
All they need is a few more wins and they’ll not
only be headed to the postseason for the third year
in a row — something the Bengals have never done
— but they’ll be in the running for home-field advan-
tage deep into the playoffs.
They were in very good shape heading into the
bye-week break.
“We’re first in the division and we’ve got more than a
2-game lead and the truth is you’ve done something obvi-
ously pretty good to be to this point,” offensive tackle Andrew
Whitworth said. “So I don’t think there’s any point to putting
ourselves down.
“Let’s find out where we can be even better and finish this
thing the way we need to and we’ll be right where we want
to be.”
The Bengals’ two defining traits so far have been inconsis-
tency and resiliency.
8 – The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
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OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Home Improvement
CALL
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
• interior design service
• furniture • rugs • accessories
• custom draperies
Deborah Miller • Kelley Balyeat
CALLDEB
419-991-4400
For appointment time.
• interior design service
• furniture • rugs • accessories
• custom draperies
1747Allentown Rd. • Lima, OH45805
Miscellaneous
JIMLANGHALSREALTY.COM
419-692-9652
integrity • professionalism • service
Thinking of
Buying or
Selling?
Since 1980
Providing full-time service
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
WORK
WANTED
Any
• Carpentry • Framing
• Siding •Roofing
• Pole Barns
•Any repair work
FREE ESTIMATES
30 years experience!
419-733-6309
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
T S B
Construction
BUILDING &
REMODELING
419-235-2631
Roofng, Garages, Room
Additions, Bathrooms,
Kitchens, Siding, Decks,
Pole Barns, Windows.
30 Years Experience
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Ne ws p a p e r s
provide a daily
source of informa-
tion from around
the globe. Expand
your horizons.
Subscribe
today!
The Delphos
Herald
419-695-0015
UNION BANK COMPANY
Marketing Officer Position
Would you like to be part of a winning team and
serve your community? If so, The Union Bank
Company has a full-time Marketing Officer posi-
tion open. This is the lead marketing position
for the bank. Extensive marketing experience is
required, within the industry preferred. Bachelor’s
degree required. The bank is an Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer. Please send your resume
along with cover letter and salary requirements to:
hrresumes@theubank.com
ATTN: Human Resource Manager (MO)
or
The Union Bank Company
P.O. Box 67, Columbus Grove, OH 45830,
ATTN: Human Resource Manager (MO)
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7
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Sales Representative Position
Times Bulletin Media is searching for a
full-time sales representative. If you appreciate
working as part of a team, enjoy working with
businesses large and small, thrive in a busy
and creative environment, and love using the
web and social media sites, this position may
be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales
possess above average written and oral
communications skills, work with multiple
deadlines and projects, and demonstrate
effective organizational, time management,
and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and
work with Times Bulletin Media’s many
products. Applicants must demonstrate a
working knowledge of the internet and active
participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the company’s online campaigns
and social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using
a draw and commission plan. The parent
company offers a full schedule of benefts
including Health Insurance, 401K and Vacation.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
For consideration, please forward a
professional resume and cover letter detailing
how you will apply your skills and experience to
the marketplace. Incomplete applications will
not be considered.
Mail to: Kirk Dougal, Publisher
P.O. Box 271, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
E-mail to kdougal@timesbulletin.com
Or deliver to The Times Bulletin Media offce:
700 Fox Road, Van Wert, Ohio
00070858
“The Key
To Buying
Or Selling”
940 E. FIFTH ST., DELPHOS
419-692-7773 Fax 419-692-7775
www.rsre.com
19074 Rd. 19, Ft. Jennings
Price Reduced!
$164,900-Ft Jennings SD
3 bedroom, 2 bath brick/vinyl ranch home with open
floor plan on 1.24 acre lot. Many updates. Includes
24’x24’ attached garage and 36’x24’ Morton building.
Move in ready! (42) Brad Stuber 419-236-2267/Derek
Watkins 419-303-3313
7040 Elida Rd., Elida
$112,000-Elida SD
Brick ranch with 3 bedrooms and 1 full bath. Remod-
eled in 2004. Detached 2 car garage built in 2008.
(51) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607
BY APPOINTMENT
1 OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 1-3 PM
1 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-2:30 PM
$65,000-Elida SD
Cute 3 bedroom, 1 bath 1 ½ story on nice 66x132 lot.
Built in 1920, appx. 1378 sq. ft. of living area, enclosed
breezeway. (122) Bonnie Shelley 419-230-2521
$74,000-Delphos SD
1-1/2 story home with 3BR/1BA and over 1800 sq ft
living space. Many updates including updated bath
w/whirlpool tub/shower, newer windows, roof & water
heater. Basement. Detached garage w/loft.
(75) Barb Coil 419-302-3478
FARM FOR SALE
Approx. 30 acres in Union Twp, Van Wert County. Ap-
prox. 20 ac tillable w/ balance wooded.
(188) Devin Dye 419-303-5891
00080659
$119,900-Elida SD
New Listing!
Quiet 3 BR/2 BTH country ranch on appx. 1
acre, built in 1945, appx. 1652 sq.ft. Features:
Natural gas, outbldgs, 3 pane windows, newer
roof, poured basement, & 2 car att. garage.
Gazebo wired for lighting. Seller is providing
home warranty for buyer.
(33) Bonnie Shelley 419-230-2521
$164,900-Columbus Grove SD
Enjoy this move in ready, well maintained one
story home in a peaceful country setting on
1.24 acres. 24x24 attached garage and 36x24
Morton building with concrete floor and all the
extras. Home features a newer room addition,
newer roof, newer windows, and built in shelv-
ing. The open floor plan and vaulted ceilings
lend a more spacious feel. Well groomed yard
is bordered by large evergreens for privacy and
weather protection. Must see!
(42) Brad Stuber 419-236-2267/
Derek Watkins 419-303-3313
$90,000-Elida SD
Price Reduced!
Two story home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths in
quiet neighborhood. Large rooms, eat-in kitch-
en, skylights. Deck, fenced-in back yard. 2 car
attached garage.
(57) Kathy Mathews 419-233-3786
$74,000-Delphos SD
3BR/1BTH, 1 ½ story home on nice 80’x150’
lot, over 1800 sq. ft. living space. Many up-
dates including updated bath w/whirlpool tub/
shower, newer windows, roof & water heater.
Basement. 24x26 detached garage w/loft.
Make offer! (75) Barb Coil 419-302-3478
$38,500-Lincolnview SD
3 BR/1 BTH ranch, built in 1955, appx. 948
sq.ft., 1 car att. garage. Would make nice start-
er home or great for empty nester.
(38) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607
COMMERCIAL
$250,000-Elida SD
3 parcels totaling .925 acres, two separate
buildings-one built in 1990 and currently
occupied; the other built in 1960 and vacant.
Would make great restaurant.
(45) Devin Dye 419-303-5891
Phone: 419-695-1006 • Phone: 419-879-1006
103 N. Main St. Delphos, OH
www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
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move without us!
View all our listings at
dickclarkrealestate.com
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It’s Been A Pleasure
Serving You!
Happy Thanksgiving
and many thanks for your
valued business!
HOME FOR SALE
Very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath
brick ranch with basement.
Located at
505 William Avenue
in the Menke sub-division
on the west edge of Delphos.
Call Dan Irwin of
Irwin Real Estate
at 419-523-5151 for more details.
NOTICE OF EXAMINATION
The Delphos Civil Service Commission will be
conducting an open examination for the position of
FIREFIGHTER/EMT in the Delphos Fire Department.
The examination will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Thurs-
day, December 19, 2013. It will take place at the Jef-
ferson Middle School Cafeteria. Applicants should
enter through the north door off of Third Street.
A grade of 70% is required to successfully pass the
examination. The passing scores will also serve as
an eligibility list. This eligibility list shall be valid for a
period of one year.
CLASSIFICATION
POSITION: FIREFIGHTER/EMT
ANNUAL SALARY: $40,000-$45,000
(Depending on level of certification)
HOURS: Includes 24 hours shift
BENEFITS: Sick leave, vacation, health insurance
JOB REQUIREMENTS: The candidate must be
between the ages of 18 and 41. No person shall be
eligible to receive an appointment on and after the
person’s 41st birthday. The candidate must have
a minimum Ohio Certification Firefighter Level II
and a minimum Ohio Emergency Medical Techni-
cian Basic Certification and maintain and upgrade
as directed. The candidate must be truthful in all
matters, falsification of any document will result in
the candidate being declared ineligible for employ-
ment. The successful candidate must reside in Al-
len or Van Wert County or a county contiguous to
Allen or Van Wert. The candidate will be subject
to a physical, a psychological examination, and
a thorough background investigation. The candi-
date must be willing to become a Paramedic when
deemed necessary by the City and maintain the
certification as a condition of employment.
Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at
the Municipal Building November 25 through Decem-
ber 6, 2013 during regular business hours, or on-line
at www.cityofdelphos.com.
All applications must be mailed to: The Delphos
Civil Service Commission, P.O. Box 45, Delphos,
Ohio 45833. All applications must have a postmark
of no later than Friday, December 13, 2013. Any ap-
plications which are postmarked after this date shall
be considered invalid and will not be accepted. ALL
APPLICATIONS MUST INCLUDE A COPY OF THE
FIREFIGHTER LEVEL II CERTIFICATE AND EMT
BASIC CERTIFICATE.
Applicants, on the day of the examination, you must
bring a valid Ohio Driver’s license and proof of military
service, if applicable.
Customer Relationship Specialist
Job #11075
Farm Credit Mid America is seeking a Customer Relationship
Specialist to serve Delphos, Ohio. The Customer Relationship
Specialist provides exceptional, frst-level, internal and external
customer service. Responsibilities include helping to market,
cross-sell and deliver credit and other fnancial services to our
customers and prospective customers. This position also provides
administrative support for others in the feld business development
division, and maintains information and reporting as directed.
CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS: Establishes, develops and maintains
strong internal and external customer relationships by consistently
providing quality service that is timely, thorough and responsive
and exceeds customer expectations. Receives walk-in customers
and incoming customer calls, and provides administrative support
to feld business development division team members, including
sales offce staff, crop insurance and Agribusiness team members.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: This level of Customer Relationship
Specialist is fully functional in the role, except in the delivery and
servicing of credit. High school diploma and at least three years
of successful experience in two or more of the following areas:
administrative support, fnancially related customer service or
computer operations.
To be considered an applicant, you must:
• Meet minimum qualifcations for the position
• Submit your resume by 11/29/2013 to:
www.e-farmcredit.com Careers, Job Opportunities,
indicating the specifc position for which you are applying
Check out our Benefts!
• Once on our Web site, click on Careers, Employee Benefts,
then click on Employee Benefts Presentation
© 2013 NAS
(Media: delete copyright notice)
Delphos Herald & Putnam County Sentinel
Paulding Progress
2.5" x 5"
Van Wert Times Bulletin
2.528" x 5"
B&W
We are proud to be an EEO/AA employer, M/F/D/V.
Brock Grain Systems
B & S Millwright • 419.795.1403
• Bucket
Elevators
• Dump Pits
• Dryers
• Bucket
Elevators
• Dump Pits
• Dryers
Brock Grain Systems
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. It’s
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
125 Lost and Found
LOST: BLACK Cat
w/gold eyes, 11/17
vicinity of Brickner Rd &
US-30. Answers to
Ninja. Please call
419-695-9201
305
Apartment/
Duplex For Rent
1 NICE downstairs
bedroom apartment
w/range, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. $425.00 in
Ottoville. Phone:
419-453-3956
2 BEDROOM, 415 E.
8th, Delphos. Appli-
ances, curtains, lawn
care. No pets. $410/mo.
419-236-9301
419-692-7441
320 House For Rent
OPEN FRI-SUN
9am-7pm
111 N. CANAL ST.
DELPHOS, OH
Remodeled 3-4
bedroom, basement,
30x36 attached garage.
New central cooling,
updated flooring,
paint, lighting,
kitchen and bath.
Charming woodwork.
$93,000. Approx.
$499.24 per month.
www.chbsinc.com
419-586-8220
3 BEDROOM, 1 Bath,
central A/C. 430 Euclid
St., Delphos. No pets.
$495.00/month.
419-695-5006
604 S. Clay St, Delphos.
2BR Washer / Dr yer
hook-up. No pet s.
$475/mo+deposit. Avail-
abl e now. Cal l
419-234-7505.
DELPHOS AREA:
2-Story, 4 bedroom
home. 2 car detached
garage. $750/month +
deposit. Call
419-235-0639
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT OR Rent to Own.
1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile
home. 419-692-3951
545 Firewood/Fuel
SEASONED
FIREWOOD: Oak, Ash,
Hickory. All split, well
seasoned, 18” in length.
419-910-1404
583
Pets and
Supplies
FREE PUPPIES:
Pug/Dachshund mix. (3)
females, 6 weeks old.
Call 419-969-0365
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
610 Automotive
2006 BUICK Lacerne
CXL, 4 door, candy ap-
ple red, hand leather
heated seats, V-6, auto-
matic on steering col-
umn, bench seat, 39,000
miles. Must see, $14,900
obo. 419-647-4492.
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
665
Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping
INTERIOR CHRISTMAS
DECORATING: setup,
lighting and decorating
of existing Christmas
trees, wreaths and gar-
lands. Call Diverse De-
si gn Landscape at
724-889-5856 for free
consultation. Serving the
Tri-County area.
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080 Help Wanted
DRIVERS: CDL-B:
Great Pay, Hometime!
No-Forced Dispatch!
New Singles from
Springfield to surround-
ing states. 2 yrs req exp.
Call Now:
1-855-204-3216
080 Help Wanted
DRIVERS: START up to
$.41/mi., Home Weekly
or Bi -Weekl y, 90%
No-Touch, 70% D&H.
CDL-A 1yr. OTR exp.
Req. 877-705-9261
GLM TRANSPORT hir-
ing for our regional fleet.
Safety, performance and
referral bonus programs.
401(k) and direct de-
posit. Home weekends.
Mileage paid via PC
Miler practical miles. Call
(419)238-2155 for de-
tails.
OWNER OPERATORS:
100% No-Touch! Dedi-
cated Loads. $1.23/mi.
+FS. Newer Tractor,
CDL-A, 12mo exp.
Tabitha:800-325-7884x4
R&R EMPLOYMENT &
R&R Medical Staffing.
Experienced Sales Rep-
resentative to conduct
b2b sales, Sanitation,
Producti on Workers,
PRN, LPN, RN and Die-
tary. Accepting applica-
tions for CNA classes!
Apply online
www.rremployment.com
or call 419-232-2008
R&R EMPLOYMENT,
Inc. will be accepting ap-
plications and conduct-
ing open interviews for
multiple positions in the
Van Wert area on No-
vember 26t h f rom
1:00pm-3:30pm at 147
E. Main St., Van Wert.
Resumes encouraged
but not required. Clean
backgrounds are de-
sired. Questions call
419-232-2008
REGIONAL DRIVER:
earn up to $.50/mile.
Clean CDL, min. 10 yrs.
requi red experi ence.
1-800-537-2569
SAFETY DIRECTOR
Needed. Dancer Logis-
tics is looking for some-
one for our DOT safety
posi ti on. Experi ence
needed. Please apply at
900 Drive, Delphos,
Ohio.
080 Help Wanted
VANAMATIC
Vanamatic Company in Delphos, Ohio
is seeking Screw Machine Operators
with 2+ years experience.
Ideal candidates will have the
following skills and experience:
• Blueprint Reading
• Basic Gaging and Measurement
• Screw Machine Operation
• Tool Adjustments
• Set‐Up Experience a Plus
Starting wage commensurate with
skills and experience.
Vanamatic has served the precision
machining industry for 58 years.
Stable employment with flexible shifts,
climate controlled manufacturing
facility and competitive wage and
benefit programs including
gainsharing.
Please submit resumes to:
Vanamatic Company
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, OH
Attn: Scott Wiltsie
scottw@Vanamatic.com
(p) 419‐692‐6085
(f) 419‐692‐3260
Unity, Empowerment, Teamwork
“The Right People, Making the Right
Decision, At The Right Time”
SCREW MACHINE OPERATORS SCREW MACHINE
OPERATORS
Vanamatic Company in
Delphos, Ohio is seeking
Entry Level Screw
Machine Operators.
Ideal candidates will have
the following skills and
experience:
• Blueprint Reading
• Basic Gaging and
Measurement
• Screw Machine Operation
• Tool Adjustments
• Set-Up Experience a Plus
Starting wage
commensurate with skills
and experience.
Vanamatic has served the
precision machining
industry for almost
60 years.
Stable employment with
fexible shifts, climate
controlled manufacturing
facility and competitive
wage and beneft programs
including gainsharing.
Please submit resumes to:
Vanamatic Company
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, OH
Attn: Scott Wiltsie
scottw@Vanamatic.com
(p) 419-692-6085
(f) 419-692-3260
Unity, Empowerment,
Teamwork
“The Right People, Making
the Right Decision,
At The Right Time”
* BUY
*SELL
*TRADE
Place an ad
today in
the
Classifieds!
Call
419-695-0015
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Van Wert County
Mildred A. Kreischer
Family Living Trust to
Steven D. Barnes, Rita M.
Barnes, portion of section
17, Ridge Township.
Greg P. Johnston,
Teresa L. Johnston to
Donald E. Illyes, Pamela
K. Illyes, inlot 295, Middle
Point.
Linda J. Seffernick,
Linda Seffernick to
Stephen Seffernick,
outlots 10-1, 10-3,
Delphos.
Estate of Richard E.
Manken to Joseph W.
Hinhliffe, portion of section
5, York Township.
Catherine I. Zehpyr,
Catherine Zephyr to
Timothy A. Dealey, Stacy
A. Dealey, portion of
section 6, Tully Township.
Estate of Betty E.
Thompson to Robbie
R. Thompson, Julie
R. Steingass, portion
of section 1, Ridge
Township.
Mark A. Bidlack, Kay
A. Bidlack to Richard E.
Harper Jr., inlot 4326, Van
Wert.
Daniel H. Krouse,
Shelly L. Krouse, Shelly
Clark, Shelly L. Clark to
Daniel H. Krouse, portion
of section 1, Harrison
Township.
Floyd D. Huse, Mary
L. Huse to Darcy E.
Vaske, inlot 2008, Van
Wert, lot 32-6, Van Wert
subdivision.
Suzanne Perazzo to
Scot Eggleston, inlot 708,
portion of inlot 707, Van
Wert.
Eric Hurless, Courtney
Stemen, Courtney Hurless
to Lee W. Mathewson,
inlot 3686, Van Wert.
Estate of Glenn D.
Gehres to Michelle R.
Gehres, portion of section
34, Tully Township.
Gordon H. Moenter,
Gordon Moenter, Imelda
E. Moenter, Imelda
Moenter to Bowtie LLC,
portion of section 14,
Washington Township.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Sunday Evening November 24, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Music Awards Local
WHIO/CBS The Amazing Race The Good Wife The Mentalist Local
WLIO/NBC Football NFL Football Local Dateline NBC
WOHL/FOX Simpsons Burgers Fam. Guy Amer. Dad Local
ION Any Christmas Defending Santa Christmas Twister
Cable Channels
A & E Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D.
AMC The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Dead The Walking Dead Comic Men Walk:Dead
ANIM Lone Star Lone Star Wildman Wildman Finding Bigfoot Wildman Wildman Finding Bigfoot
BET Precious Little Richard T.D. Jakes Pre. Popoff Inspir.
BRAVO Housewives/Atl. Thicker Than Water Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset Housewives/Atl.
CMT Ghostbust OC Choppers Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Ghostbusters II
CNN Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. CNN Special Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd.
COMEDY Bill Cosb Kevin Hart: Laugh Tosh.0 Key South Pk South Pk South Pk Ferris Bueller
DISC Alaska: The Last Fro Last Frontier Yukon Men Last Frontier Yukon Men
DISN Liv-Mad. Austin Dog Jessie Good Luck Jessie Dog A.N.T. Farm
E! Total Divas Total Divas Total Divas The Drama Queen Total Divas
ESPN SportCtr Countdown MLS Soccer SportsCenter SportCtr
ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball CrossFit CrossFit ESPN FC
FAM Fred Claus Fred Claus J. Osteen J. Meyer
FOOD Guy's Grocery Games Restaurant Express On the Rocks Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Express
FX Kung Fu Panda 2 Kung Fu Panda 2 The One
HGTV Beach Beach Beach Beach House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl Beach Beach
HIST Ax Men Ax Men American Jungle Top Gear Ax Men
LIFE Kristin's Past Witches of East End Witches of East End Kristin's Past
MTV The Longest Yard Awkward. Awkward. Miley Teen Mom 3
NICK See Dad Instant Scooby-Doo 2 Friends Friends Friends
SCI Raidrs-Lost Ark Troy The Ruins
SPIKE Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue
TBS The Wizard of Oz The Wizard of Oz Shrek
TCM The Thrill of It All 36 Hours Lost
TLC Medium Medium Long Island Medium Breaking the Faith Long Island Medium Breaking the Faith
TNT The Lincoln Lawyer The Lincoln Lawyer
TOON Stuart Little Burgers Fam. Guy Fam. Guy China, IL Aqua TV Venture
TRAV Monumental Mysteries Mysteries-Museum America Declassified America Declassified Mysteries-Museum
TV LAND Roseanne Roseanne Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden King King
USA NCIS NCIS NCIS White Collar NCIS
VH1 Greatest Songs Greatest Songs Austin Powers Saturday Night Live
WGN Pirates of the Caribbean Pirates-Worlds
Premium Channels
HBO Identity Thief Boardwalk Empire Getting Ja'mie Boardwalk Empire Getting Ja'mie
MAX Tombstone Date Movie The Campaign Depravity Chemistry Oceans 12
SHOW Masters of Sex Homeland Masters of Sex Homeland Masters of Sex
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Saturday, November 23, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2013
Home and living conditions should
be your focus this year. Add to
your comfort and share your space
with people who contribute to your
happiness. Open-mindedness will
lead to knowledge and skills that will
encourage you to strive to acquire a
better position.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Money matters may limit what you
can and cannot do. You are best to
take care of your debts before you
take on more responsibility. Don’t let
emotions influence negotiations.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Send out your resume or set up
a plan that will help you earn more
money. An investment must not
be allowed to limit your cash flow.
Protect your interests and your
possessions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Keep a close watch over what
transpires around you. Someone will
try to limit your chance to follow your
dream. Let your heart lead the way
and impulses take over.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Get together with old friends or
colleagues. The discussions that
unfold will help you make choices
that will improve your financial and
personal situation. Romance is
favored.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Restlessness will take over if you
aren’t busy. Get out of the house and
do whatever makes you feel good
or adds to your skills or confidence.
Mingle and have fun.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Participate, take action and do things
that enhance your relationships with
key people in your life. Refuse to let
an emotional situation ruin your day.
Live, love and laugh.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- A
change in the way you do things or
the people you hang out with will
give you an idea of what can be
accomplished. Home improvements
will be a good place to start.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
With a little extra effort and physical
force, you will receive recognition
and good fortune. There are profits
to be made, and unique contributions
will boost your reputation.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Walk
away from trouble. You will benefit
far more from doing what works
for you and letting others fend for
themselves. An opportunity will
develop through a secret connection.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Attend an event that is geared toward
a personal interest. Discuss plans
that include travel or positive lifestyle
changes. Unique offers will capture
your attention.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Nurture and improve personal
relationships. Offer help or
compromise in a situation that
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2013
Make personal changes that
will bring you greater comfort,
confidence and peace of mind. Not
everyone will be happy with the
choices you make, but if you don’t
follow your heart, you will be living
a lie. Speak up and prepare to do
what’s best for you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Avoid conflicts. Put more effort
into family matters and taking care
of responsibilities. A change of heart
will be based on secret information.
Don’t share personal opinions.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- There is plenty to accomplish. Set
your goals high and be persistent
in your pursuits. Don’t let anyone
guilt you into lending or making a
donation. Charity begins at home.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Play by the rules and stick to a
budget or plan if you don’t want to
be subjected to discord or end up
in a compromising position. Listen
carefully and do what’s necessary.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- False information will surface
and must be sorted out quickly
before someone gets the wrong
impression. Offer what you can, but
make sure you take care of your
personal situation first.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Double-check what you are getting
for your money before making an
impulsive purchase or financial
decision. Minor ailments will be due
to stress and poor choices.
Saturday Evening November 23, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC College Football Local
WHIO/CBS How I Met Crazy Criminal Minds 48 Hours Local
WLIO/NBC The Voice The Blacklist Saturday Night Live Local Saturday Night Live
WOHL/FOX College Football Local Animation Domination Local
ION Monk Monk Monk Monk Monk
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Flipping Vegas Flipping Vegas Storage Storage
AMC Remember the Titans Remember the Titans
ANIM Too Cute! Pit Bulls-Parole Pit Bulls-Parole Pit Bulls-Parole Pit Bulls-Parole
BET Preacher's Kid Precious
BRAVO Forget Sarah Forget Sarah
CMT The Guardian OC Choppers Swamp Pawn Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Cops Rel.
CNN Inside Man Anthony Bourd. Parts Unknown Inside Man Anthony Bourd.
COMEDY Bill Cosby: Far From Finished Dave Chappelle Kevin Hart: Laugh Chris Rock: Bigger & Blacker
DISC Yukon Men Penguins: Waddle Penguins: Waddle
DISN Jessie Up Lab Rats Kickin' I ANT Farm Shake It ANT Farm Dog
E! White Chicks 40-Year-Old Vir
ESPN College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Football Score College Football
FAM Ice Age Ice Age: Melt Happy Feet
FOOD Cupcake Wars Iron Chef America Diners Iron Chef America Iron Chef America
FX Grown Ups Hall Pass Sons of Anarchy
HGTV Love It or List It Love It or List It Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It
HIST Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
LIFE Kristin's Past Love at Christmas Kristin's Past
MTV Wild/Out Wild/Out Diary-Black Wild/Out Wild/Out Wild/Out
NICK Sam & Cat Hathaways Thunder Thunder Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends Friends
SCI Space Twister Stonados Ice Twisters
SPIKE Cops Cops Glory Cops Die Hard With a Vengeance
TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Ground Trust Me Evan Almighty
TCM Breathless Sugarland Exp. Who's-at Door
TLC Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER Untold Stories of ER
TNT Sherlock Holmes The Lincoln Lawyer A Time to Kill
TOON Jingle All the Way Regular Adventure King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Bleach Naruto
TRAV Ghost Adventures Transylvania Ghost Adventures Transylvania
TV LAND Brady Brady Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King
USA Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Law & Order: SVU
VH1 Love & Hip Hop Love & Hip Hop Love & Hip Hop 40 Funniest Fails 40 Funniest Fails
WGN Pirates of the Caribbean Pirates-Worlds
Premium Channels
HBO Identity Thief Sarah Silverman: We Boardwalk Empire Identity Thief
MAX Die Hard 2 Strike Prometheus Strike Back: Origins
SHOW The Master I'm Still Here Sex
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Don’t sit still waiting for someone
else to make a move. Take control
of a situation you face, and you will
make interesting discoveries that
result in personal benefits.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Nurture an important relationship
with diplomacy and patience. Listen
to what’s said and respond honestly.
Emotional misrepresentation and
arguments will not solve a personal
dilemma.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Don’t feel pressured because
someone wants to make an
unexpected change. Continue
along a safe and comfortable
route that shows personal promise
and financial safety. Romance will
improve your evening.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Expect
demands, but don’t let anything stop
you from taking part in or attending
something you’ve been planning.
Make a couple of adjustments, and
you should be good to go.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- A serious look at someone or
something from your past will bring
you up to speed, helping you move
forward without regret. A romantic
evening should be planned.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Helping others will make you feel
good as long as you don’t overdo it
or let anyone take you for granted.
Complete the jobs that pay before
you get involved in freebies.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Expand your interests and your
friendships. The people you interact
with now will give you plenty in
return. Focus on making your
surroundings more conducive to
reaching your creative desires.
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK
FOR UFS
requires keeping the peace to avoid
a costly casualty. Put love first.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Travel plans or taking part in a
challenge or physical activity add to
your pleasure. Endorse an unusual,
but clever, plan that will improve your
current living arrangements.
10 – The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Answer to Puzzle
by Gary Clothier
Q: I hope you can solve a
60-year-old mystery for me.
In the late 1940s, the war was
over and I was in elementary
school. There was a young,
attractive Englishwoman
who lived next to us. She was
a member of some English
espionage group, and she
talked freely of her spy activi-
ties behind enemy lines. She
said she was a piano player.
As a kid I didn’t think much
about this, but as I got older, I
could not figure out what she
actually did. Did the English
have some type of USO that
entertained troops? -- E.T.N.,
Bristol, Tenn.
A: It’s possible that she
was a member of the Special
Operations Executive (SOE).
The SOE was formed in 1940
by Winston Churchill to con-
duct acts of espionage, sabo-
tage and reconnaissance in
Europe. It was Churchill’s
plan that because of this
underground activity, German
troops would be pulled out
of combat to guard railroad
lines, bridges and tunnels. As
the war progressed, the scope
of the SOE expanded. As for
your friend the piano player,
“pianist” was a nickname for
an SOE radio operator.
DID YOU KNOW? As a
young man, Pierce Bronsan
was a fire-eater in a circus
act.
Q: True or false: Actor
Woody Harrelson’s father
was a convicted contract kill-
er? -- L.K.,
Medford,
Mass.
A :
It’s true.
In 1973,
C h a r l e s
V o y d e
Harrelson
was given
a 15-year
prison sentence for the 1968
contract killing of Texas busi-
nessman Sam Degalia Jr. In
1978, he was released after
serving only five years of
that sentence. One year later,
Harrelson was arrested for
assassinating U.S. District
Judge John H. Wood Jr. in San
Antonio. Harrelson suppos-
edly received $250,000 for
the murder; he also received
two life sentences.
In 2003, one of the
two brothers implicated in
the conspiracy stated that
Charles Harrelson was not
involved in the murder. He
claimed that Harrelson was
framed because he was try-
ing to blackmail the broth-
ers. Harrelson died of natural
causes in his maximum-secu-
rity cell on March 15, 2007.
He was 69.
Q: I have incredibly fond
memories of New Year’s Day
with my whole family, gath-
ering at my grandparents to
enjoy conversation, food and
drink and, of course, foot-
ball. One year, my grandfa-
ther told me that the game
we were watching was being
played at Kidd Field, which
was my last name. He said
it was named after me. I
didn’t believe him until the
announcer mentioned the
name. You can’t imagine the
excitement I experienced.
I’m now a grandmother,
and to this day the story still
brings a smile to my face and
tears to my eyes. What was
the name of the bowl game
played at my namesake sta-
dium? -- M.F., Roanoke, Va.
A: It was the Sun Bowl,
which was played in El
Paso, Texas. The first three
games were played at the El
Paso High School Stadium.
In 1938, the game moved
to Kidd Field, where it was
played until 1963, when it
was moved to Sun Bowl
Stadium. Today, Kidd Field
is an athletic facility used
primarily by University of
Texas at El Paso for track and
field meets.
Q: I recall reading that
once a diamond is formed
deep in the Earth, it takes
about 1 billion years for that
diamond to work its way to
the surface. I’m wondering,
do scientists know the age
of the oldest diamond ever
found? -- C.L., West Palm
Beach, Fla.
A: Most natural diamonds
are formed under high-pres-
sure and high-temperature
conditions existing at depths
of about 100 miles in the
Earth’s mantle. In 2007,
National Geographic News
reported that minuscule
gemstones were found that
are 4.25 billion years old,
roughly the age of Earth.
The article, “World’s Oldest
Diamonds Discovered in
Australia,” goes on to say the
tiny diamonds were found
trapped in zircon, a rare yet
stable material.
I came across a short
blurb in BBC Knowledge
Magazine’s April issue that
reports that diamonds have
been found embedded in a
meteorite that is at least 5
billion years old. That’s older
than our solar system!
Q: A few weeks ago you
answered a question about
Bob Keeshan (Captain
Kangaroo). This reminded
me of an email I received
about actor Lee Marvin and a
conversation on “The Tonight
Show.” During his visit, he
told Johnny Carson about
an experience he had during
World War II when he was
wounded during the inva-
sion of Iwo Jima. He went
on to extol Keeshan’s heroic
a c t i o n s
d u r i n g
the battle.
I’ve often
wondered
if this is a
true story.
The email
is a tran-
script, and
it sounds
b e l i e v -
able. --
J.L.C., Manhattan, Kan.
A: Lee Marvin was, in
fact, wounded in World War
II, but it was during the inva-
sion of the island of Saipan.
He was wounded in July
1944, and he spent the next
13 months in Navy hospitals
before being discharged. The
Battle of Iwo Jima occurred
while Marvin was still hos-
pitalized.
Keeshan was more than
three years younger than
Marvin. By the time he was
18 the war was nearly over.
Most biographers tend to
agree that he saw little -- if
any -- action during the war.
I, too, have seen the tran-
script of the interview
between Marvin and Carson.
I don’t think the interview
ever happened. I can’t believe
Lee Marvin would fabricate
such a story on national tele-
vision. If any reader did see
the interview, please let me
know.
(Send your questions
to Mr. Know-It-All at
AskMrKIA@gmail.com or
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut St., Kansas City, MO
64106.)
Was she a pianist or a spy?
Woody
Harrelson
Lee Marvin
Ask Mr. Know-it-All
Detained American’s wife asks for his return
PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — The
wife of an 85-year-old veteran detained
in North Korea implored authorities
on Friday to let her husband return to
his anxious family and end what she
called a “dreadful misunderstanding.”
“We have had no word on the
state of his health, whether or not
the medications sent to him through
the Swedish Embassy in North Korea
have been delivered or why he was
detained,” Lee Newman said in a pre-
pared statement released in California.
Meanwhile, North Korean offi-
cials told the Swedish Embassy in
Pyongyang that they were holding
an American but did not confirm it
was Merrill Newman, who was pulled
from a plane Oct. 26 while preparing
to leave the communist nation after a
10-day tour.
The Swedish Embassy is nego-
tiating on a daily basis on behalf of
Newman because the U.S. has no
diplomatic ties to North Korea, State
Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki
told reporters in Washington.
Until his planned departure,
Newman’s trip had seemed posi-
tive, with postcards describing good
times and knowledgeable guides, Lee
Newman said in her statement.
“The family feels there has been
some dreadful misunderstanding lead-
ing to his detention and asks that
the (Democratic People’s Republic of
Korea) work to settle this issue quickly
and to return this 85-year-old grandfa-
ther to his anxious, concerned family,”
she said.
David Thompson at Juche Travel
Services’ London office said in an
email that Newman and his compan-
ion had booked a private tour through
the agency, and arrangements were
handled in North Korea through the
Korea International Travel Co., the
state-run tourism office.
“Mr. Newman had in place all nec-
essary and valid travel documents to
take his tour,” Thompson said.
Newman has been described as
an inveterate traveler and long-retired
finance executive. His son, Jeffrey
Newman, said his father wanted to
return to the country where he spent
three years during the Korean War.
It’s unknown why he is being
detained, but his father’s travel-
ing companion, Bob Hamrdla, said
Newman earlier had a “difficult” dis-
cussion with North Korean officials
about his experiences during the war,
according to Jeffrey Newman.
Hamrdla, who lives in the same
11-story Palo Alto retirement apart-
ment building as the Newmans, has
led more than 40 travel programs
to Central Europe for Stanford
University.
By agreement with the Newmans,
Hamrdla declined an interview.
North Korea has detained at least
six Americans since 2009, including
two journalists accused of trespassing
and several missionaries accused of
spreading Christianity.
Kenneth Bae, a Korean-American
missionary and tour operator, has been
detained for more than a year.
Newman doesn’t fit the pattern of
the other detained Americans.
“It is hard to fathom how an
85-year-old senior citizen could
pose any threat to the regime,” says
Victor Cha, who holds the Korea
Chair at the Center for Strategic and
International Studies in Washington,
which researches international public
policy issues.
“The incident requires the U.S.
government to make a forceful and
high-level statement deploring such
acts and promising consequences if
Bae and Newman are not returned,”
Cha said.
Kerry, Russian FM
join Iran nuclear talks
GENEVA (AP) — Secretary of State John Kerry and for-
eign ministers of other major powers lent their weight to the
Iran nuclear talks after envoys reported progress Friday in
marathon negotiations to curb the Iranian program in return for
limited sanctions relief.
After a third day of talks, State Department spokesperson
Jen Psaki said Kerry was en route to Geneva to “help narrow
the differences.” Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov
arrived in Geneva late Friday.
British Foreign Secretary William Hague announced he
would also travel to Geneva. A French diplomat, speaking
on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to
release the information, said French Foreign Minister Laurent
Fabius would join the others here.
The announcements followed a day in which diplomats
appeared more and more optimistic that a deal could be struck.
As talks adjourned, a diplomat said Iranian Foreign Minister
and top European Union diplomat Catherine Ashton had made
progress on a key sticking point — Iran’s claim to a right to
produce nuclear fuel through uranium enrichment
Iran’s official IRNA news agency quoted Iranian Deputy
Foreign Minister Abbas Araghchi in Geneva as saying that
Iran’s right to uranium enrichment must be part of any deal.
Enrichment is a hot-button issue because it can be used both
to make reactor fuel and to arm nuclear missiles. Iran argues
it is enriching only for power, and scientific and medical pur-
poses. And it says it has no interest in nuclear arms.
But Washington and its allies point to Tehran’s earlier
efforts to hide enrichment and allege it worked on developing
such weapons.
Wind energy company
pleads guilty to eagle deaths
WASHINGTON (AP) — The govern-
ment for the first time has enforced environ-
mental laws protecting birds against wind
energy facilities, winning a $1 million set-
tlement Friday from a power company that
pleaded guilty to killing 14 eagles and 149
other birds at two Wyoming wind farms.
The Obama administration has champi-
oned pollution-free wind power and used
the same law against oil companies and
power companies for drowning and electro-
cuting birds. The case against Duke Energy
Corp. and its renewable energy arm was the
first prosecuted under the Migratory Bird
Treaty Act against a wind energy company.
“In this plea agreement, Duke Energy
Renewables acknowledges that it constructed
these wind projects in a manner it knew
beforehand would likely result in avian
deaths,” Robert G. Dreher, acting assistant
attorney general for the Justice Department’s
Environment and Natural Resources
Division, said in a statement Friday.
An investigation by The Associated Press
in May revealed dozens of eagle deaths from
wind energy facilities, including at Duke’s
Top of the World farm outside Casper, Wyo.,
the deadliest for eagles of 15 such facilities
that Duke operates nationwide. The other
wind farm included in the settlement is also
in Converse County and is called Campbell
Hill. All the deaths, which included golden
eagles, hawks, blackbirds, wrens and spar-
rows, occurred from 2009 to 2013.
The Charlotte, N.C.-based Duke has a
market capitalization of nearly $50 billion.
“We deeply regret the impacts of golden
eagles at two of our wind facilities,” said Greg
Wolf, president of Duke Energy Renewables Inc.
in a statement. “Our goal is to provide the ben-
efits of wind energy in the most environmentally
responsible way possible.”
A study in September by federal biolo-
gists found that wind turbines had killed at
least 67 bald and golden eagles since 2008.
Wyoming had the most eagle deaths. That
did not include deaths at Altamont Pass,
an area in northern California where wind
farms kill an estimated 60 eagles a year.
Until Friday’s announcement, not a single
wind energy company had been prosecuted for a
death of an eagle or other protected bird — even
though each death is a violation of federal law,
unless a company has a federal permit. Not a
single wind energy facility has obtained a permit.
In 2009, Exxon Mobil pleaded guilty and
paid $600,000 for killing 85 birds in five states.
The BP oil company was fined $100 million
for killing and harming migratory birds during
the 2010 Gulf oil spill. And PacifiCorp, which
operates coal plants, paid more than $10.5 mil-
lion in 2009 for electrocuting 232 eagles along
power lines and at its substations.
Wind farms are clusters of turbines as
tall as 30-story buildings, with spinning
rotors as wide as a passenger jet’s wingspan.
Though the blades appear to move slowly,
they can reach speeds up to 170 mph at the
tips, creating tornado-like vortexes.
Flying eagles behave like drivers texting
on their cellphones; they don’t look up. As
they scan for food, they don’t notice the
industrial turbine blades until it’s too late.
The wind farms in Friday’s settlement
came on line before the Obama administra-
tion drafted voluntary guidelines encour-
aging wind energy companies to work
with the Fish and Wildlife Service to
avoid locations that would impact wildlife.
Companies that choose to cooperate get
rewarded, because prosecutors take it into
consideration before pursuing prosecution.
51 dead in grocery
roof collapse in Latvia
RIGA, Latvia (AP) — As
Latvian rescue workers searched
Friday for bodies in the rubble
of a supermarket collapse that
killed dozens, speculation about
the cause focused on a garden
and a playground being installed
on the grass- and gravel-covered
roof.
The death toll from the
Thursday evening rush-hour
roof collapse at the Maxima
supermarket in Latvia’s capital
had risen to at least 51, including
three firefighters, police said.
Police opened a criminal
investigation into the cause of
the tragedy at the award-winning
building — once vaunted as a
place where high-rise residents
could step out of their homes,
stroll along a shady garden and
pick up a couple of items for
dinner.
Riga Mayor Nils Usakovs
told reporters that large bags of
construction materials and soil
were left on a weak spot on
the roof and could have caused
the collapse. It had rained for
days, leading to speculation that
the soil had become soaked and
weighed down.
Deputy Mayor Andris
Ameriks said that several rein-
forced steel beams fell over at
once, which might indicate that
engineers failed to properly cal-
culate load pressure on the roof.
He blamed budget cuts for a lack
of construction controls.
“In recent years due to the
economic crisis many institu-
tions, including construction
oversight, … were closed in
Latvia in order to save money,”
Ameriks told Latvian television.
An enormous crater-like hole
gaped in the supermarket’s roof,
while building materials were
still stacked on the remaining
sections.
It was the largest tragedy for
the Baltic state since it regained
independence from the Soviet
Union in 1991. Latvia’s gov-
ernment declared three days of
mourning starting Saturday.
At least 35 people were
injured, 28 of them hospitalized,
including 10 firefighters struck
just as they entered the unstable
building, emergency medical
officials said.
The store was filled with
shoppers when an enormous
section of the roof caved in. Two
hours later, while rescue workers
searched for survivors, a second
and larger section of roof caved
in, trapping and killing firefight-
ers.
Nina Kameneva, a retiree
who lives on the seventh floor of
an apartment building overlook-
ing the supermarket, said she and
her husband were in the kitchen
when the first collapse occurred
at approximately 4:45 p.m. on
Thursday — producing a jolt so
powerful it shook their building.
She said they both rushed out
onto their balcony, from where
they saw survivors trying to
scramble out of the store through
a cloud of dust.
Philippine
typhoon death toll
rises above 5,000
MANILA, Philippines
(AP) — The death toll from
one of the strongest typhoons
on record has risen above
5,000 and is likely to climb
further, although recovery
efforts are beginning to take
hold, Philippine officials said
Friday.
Interior Secretary Mar
Roxas said 4,919 people were
killed on Leyte, Samar and
nearby islands in the Eastern
Visayas region. Civil defense
chief Eduardo del Rosario
said 290 others died in other
parts of the central and south-
ern Philippines.
The regions were battered
two weeks ago by fierce winds
and tsunami-like storm surges
from Typhoon Haiyan, locally
called Yolanda.
Del Rosario said there were
1,611 people still missing.
“That is the sad record of
Yolanda’s passage through
our country,” Roxas said. But
he added that “The worst is
over.”
He likened the region to a
patient that has been moved
out of the emergency room
into an intensive care unit.
“We have overcome the
most difficult part,” he said.
“In the first week we can say
we were in the emergency
room … this second week we
are now in the ICU, still criti-
cal but stabilized.”
He said the hard-hit Leyte
provincial capital of Tacloban
reported 1,725 dead. “I believe
this number in Tacloban city
is not yet final,” he said.
Most of the bodies have
been buried in mass graves,
many of them unidentified,
he said.
“It is possible that some
of the missing are among the
unidentified,” he said.
Journalists in Tacloban say
the stench of death from piles
of debris, upturned vehicles
and remnants of what once
were homes indicates that
bodies remain trapped under-
neath.
Roxas said the situation
was stabilizing, with major
roads on Samar and Leyte
cleared of debris and some
banks, grocery stores and gas
stations now open.
More troops and police
have been brought to the
region from other parts of the
country to beef up law and
order.
Saturday, November 23, 2013 The Herald — 11
www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from page 3)
The new color scheme was adapted for
these locomotives in order to have these
locomotives have the whole train harmo-
nized. The coaches as well as the mail,
express and baggage cars, in use on the B. &
O. are olive green and the new locomotives
will match this hue, with a little touch of red
and gold added to enhance their appearance.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 2, 1927
—————
Has Suggestions to
Eliminate Scott’s Crossing
P.J. Backus has a suggestion to overcome
the dangers of Scott’s Crossing. He would
re-route Harding Highway on the north side
of the railroad by turning the road to the
east a short distance to the crossing at the
elevator.
His letter to editor of the Herald follows:
“Editor,
“Will you please tell the people this, for
more safety at Scott’s Crossing. For the
lives of the traveling public on the Railway
trains and those traveling in cars on the
Highway.
“Run a detour through Scott’s Orchard,
so the west bound traffic on the highway
can avoid dangering their lives and the lives
of the people on the fast trains. Another
good point is that it would parallel the traf-
fic, causing the auto driving public to slow
down and making it possible for them to
cross the tracks on a level. In case a fast
train was ever derailed by an automobile, it
could not go into the Auglaize River Valley,
if the surface was level at this elevator
crossing.
“Until an overhead or underground cross-
ing can be installed, one crossing should
be plenty, for the present traffic. I tried to
put a highway through Scott’s orchard in
1899, and this is 1927. Nothing could have
saved the children’s mothers’ lives, which
were lost here last Saturday, but a by-pass
through Scott’s orchard. Also this would do
away with one of the most dangerous cross-
ings in Ohio.
Yours sincerely,
P.J. Backus
(P.S. Mr. Backus of Delphos, invented
many things, including railroad gates. R.H.)
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 1, 1927
—————
Partial obituary, one of the oldest residents
of Washington Township, Van Wert County.
One of the oldest residents of Washington
Township, Mrs. Cresentia Smith, answered
the call to the great beyond at her home
about three miles west of Delphos Thursday
morning. She had contracted a cold last
Tuesday and on Wednesday was able to go
about her work at her home in the usual way.
Flu developed Thursday morning, proving
too great a task, due to her advanced age.
Mrs. Smith was born to Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Baldauf on August 24, 1842 in
Regansburg, Germany. At the age of nine
years, she and her parents came to this
country and resided at a little settlement
at French Creek, Ohio. The past sixty-one
years were spent at the old home place
where she passed away.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 1, 1927
—————
Ads
For Sale - Outhouse
Phone Jackson 1372
——-
For Sale - April Fool
candy. Palace Sweet Shop
——-
For Sale - Four large
window panes - Holly 1164
Delphos Herald,
Mar. 31, 1927
Will
Lincoln
(Continued
from page 3)
That same year, Carl
Fisher stepped away from
an active role in the orga-
nization and moved to
Florida. Henry Joy was an
outdoorsman with wan-
derlust and enjoyed tak-
ing his beloved Packard
on reliability tests. In
1915, Joy and two of
his friends set out for
the west coast. It started
to rain just before they
got to LaPort, Ind., and
rained for days and days.
The roads were bad. Joy
remarked that they were
12 to 20 inches deep in
jumbo. They made 37
miles on Tuesday, driv-
ing in low gear prac-
tically all the way.
They even forded the
DeMoines River, driving
the Packard through mud
and water; water above
the hubs and running
boards but the carbure-
tor and ignition remained
dry. It had taken them
11 hard days to cover
the 1,000 miles between
Chicago and Cheyenne.
In good weather, they
could have done it in lit-
tle more than three days.
They eventually made it
to the Panama – Pacific
Exposition.
Henry Joy and his
companions made a tri-
umphant entrance to San
Francisco and the exposi-
tion. Their unkempt car
was the center of atten-
tion as it crossed the
San Francisco Bay on a
ferry, rumbled through
the city and entered the
exposition grounds, cov-
ered with mud and road
grime. The Packard was
placed on display in the
Palace of Transportation.
His beloved car had
proved to be very reli-
able but Henry Joy was
a little disappointed in
the coast-to-coast road.
It took them 21 days
to make the trip from
Detroit to San Francisco.
The Lincoln Highway
was no highway in the
spring of 1915. It was a
mud hole extending from
Illinois to Wyoming.
Later came U. S. Rout
30, which covered parts
of the original route and
since that time Interstate
80 runs along side the
Lincoln Highway or just
a few miles away in some
instances.
Next week, this col-
umn will feature some
of its points of interest
and especially its route
through Ohio and our
City of Delphos.
(Continued from page 5)
We are patiently waiting for
the new doorway between the
current shop and our annex build-
ing to be completed. The foot-
ers are in and the steel for the
sides and the roofing material
is ordered. The biggest hold-up
is, of course, the state-mandated
regulations and “red tape.” We
did paint the step into the annex
a bright, very noticeable orange
to caution shoppers to be careful
upon entering and exiting.
Many nice items are still avail-
able in the Christmas Shop annex
— great knick-knacks and table
decorations, stockings, Christmas
sweaters and sweatshirts, trees
and all the trimmings. There’s
some very beautiful, fancy little
Christmas dresses for the little
girls for the holidays, too.
The Boutique has some very
nice leather jackets and purses
and be sure to browse all the nice
crystal, and china, and the nice
array of porcelain dolls. There are
many clothing items still with the
tags on and shoes, too. Stop in to
check it out!
If you’ve driven up to the drop
off window with a donation and
the window is overloaded, stop
around to the back door of the
shop. Someone is always there
from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday. We’ll gladly help
you unload, too! We very much
appreciate your gently-used,
clean items. Please, never leave
things on the sidewalk; it’s against
the law as people may stumble
over it and those nice items are
then subject to the weather and
may not be able to be used if left
in the rain or snow.
The Thrift Shop has a nice
“problem.” Our business keeps
getting bigger and bigger. To help
alleviate an overload of duties on
just one person (the shop coor-
dinator), the board has decided
to separate those duties and des-
ignated Barb Haggard as the
volunteer coordinator and Kelly
Williams as the retail coordina-
tor. Each of these gals can now
dedicate the time needed to make
the Delphos Thrift Shop the best
in the area.
As always, if you’d like to
volunteer your help, please
call the Thrift Shop at 419-
692-2942. Or, if you’re in
need of assistance, please call
us to arrange for an appoint-
ment with the Social Services
Director.
All of us at the Thrift Shop
wish you a time of joyful,
peaceful reflection about what
you’re truly thankful for and
wish you and your families
a very Happy Thanksgiving.
Shop
(Continued from page 2)
- The entrance ramp from Ohio
117/309 to I-75 northbound remains
closed as well until mid-December.
- The exit ramp from I-75 north-
bound to Ohio 117/309 remains
open. Traffic will be switched onto
the new ramp at some point next
week. The traffic pattern will not
change.
- Traffic on Ohio 117/309 remains
one lane in each direction from
the interchange to Willard Avenue
(Speedway). This traffic pattern will
remain through mid-December.
-Paving of concrete pavement is
occurring in the area of the inter-
change. Motorists are cautioned to
watch for trucks entering and exit-
ing the work zone.
· Ohio 117/309 travel lanes, two
in each direction, are now open
from Ohio 117 to the Allen County
fairgrounds. Work will continue on
traffic signals which will restrict
traffic but only for short periods of
time
· Ohio 81 from just west of
Stewart Road to just west of
Neubrecht Road east of Lima is one
lane in each direction in the exist-
ing eastbound lanes for pavement
reconstruction. The following are
the current traffic impacts:
- The Ohio 81 northbound
entrance and exit ramps to and from
I-75 are open.
- On Sunday, the I-75 southbound
exit ramp to Ohio 81 closed for two
weeks for pavement work. Traffic
directed south to the Fourth Street
interchange to I-75 northbound back
to Ohio 81.
-Traffic on Ohio 81 from just
west of Stewart Road to just west of
Neubrecht Road is maintained one
lane in each direction in the existing
eastbound lanes during reconstruc-
tion and realignment of the existing
roadway.
-Work on paving the new con-
crete pavement continues. It is
anticipated that traffic will be trav-
eling on the new roadway by the end
of the year.
-Traffic on Neubrecht Road
approaching Ohio 81 has been
switched onto the new pavement
on the west side of the roadway.
No change in traffic pattern has
resulted.
Allen County
Ohio 309 at the eastbound U.S.
30 entrance ramp near Delphos
will have occasional lane restric-
tions through the work zone dur-
ing drainage work. The majority of
the work will take place along the
roadside. Work is being performed
by Platinum Painting Services,
Boardman.
Putnam County
The following locations will be
reduced to one lane through the
work zone for sealing of pave-
ment repair areas. Work is being
performed by the Putnam County
ODOT maintenance garage:
-U.S. 224 between the Van Wert
County line and the village of Kalida
-Ohio 190 between Ohio 634 and
U.S. 224
-Ohio 634 between Ohio 190 and
U.S. 224
-Ohio 115 between Ohio 12 and
U.S. 224
Ohio 694 at Township Road 21
drainage work is temporarily sus-
pended. Work is expected to resume
within the next few weeks. The
majority of the work is taking place
along the roadside. Work is being
performed by Platinum Painting
Services, Boardman.
Van Wert County
U.S. 127 survey monument instal-
lation between U.S. 224 and the
Paulding County line is complete.
Ohio 116 between Ohio 81
and Township Road 18 south of
Converse is now open.
ODOT
(Continued from page 2)
75 Years Ago – 1938
James Buchholtz, for the past several
years Jefferson High School’s band drum
major, has resigned his position because
of other activities. Betty Norbeck will take
over the duties of the drum major and will
be seen in her new position for the first
time on Friday when the band plays for the
Santa Claus welcoming.
The students of the Senior Class of
York High School presented their class
play “Girl Shy” at the school audito-
rium Tuesday evening. In the cast were
the following: Wendell Evans, William
Lininger, Lois Johnson, Clyde Rauch,
Junior Couts, Bette Jones, Adell Metzner,
Jean Wentz, Dorotha Dibert, Mary Zeigler,
John Rhoades and Edwin Bolton.
The members of the Alpha Theta Bridge
Club met Tuesday evening. A dinner was
served at Maude’s Restaurant and was
followed by bridge at the home of Ila
Scott. Velma Geary received first honors
in bridge and Mrs. Walter Rosselit was
second high and also received the travel-
ing award.
Archives
(Continued from page 1)
“It was his time to wrap things up and say goodbye to every-
one,” Lance stated.
A few weeks later, the Browns had the opportunity to see Jim
one last time before his passing on July 31.
“He did not want people sitting around in a funeral home,”
Lance said.
“He wanted people talking about and toasting his life,” Annette
explained.
After some research, the Brown’s found the American Fireworks
Company in Hudson, Ohio, who arranged everything including
calling and scheduling the Fort Jennings Fire Department to be on
hand during the pyrotechnic farewell.
“He was a multi-faceted man and liked all kinds of people,”
Annette said. “When they (the fireworks company) asked me
about colors, I said ‘use every color’.”
The Browns said that this past Saturday was the first time all
of Jim’s family and friends could come together for the celebra-
tion of his life — they traveled from Texas, Michigan, Maryland,
Massachusetts and Virginia.
“Jim made sure we had great weather for the fireworks,” Lance
smiled.
“Prior to setting off the fireworks, an employee from the
company showed us the 12 shells containing Jim’s cremains,” the
Browns explained. “We used Sharpies and wrote messages to Jim
on the outside of the shells.”
The Browns said that the experience was awesome and much
more than they had ever expected.
People could see the fireworks display — which lasted 11
minutes — from Landeck and Ft. Jennings and of course, off
of US 30, where people pulled over to watch and/or sound their
horns unknowingly participating in a very unique celebration of an
incredible man’s life.
Finale
(Continued from page 1)
“I try to come up with an idea that
solves a problem to fit a solution,”
Bendele said. “The key thing is I try
to do something unique for each per-
son or organization to fit their needs.
That’s what keeps it interesting: I
don’t do a lot of the same.”
Usually Bendele comes up with a
basic concept that is just clear enough
to him to get started, rather than cre-
ating a model.
“A drawing or a model is one thing
but the material is something differ-
ent,” he said.
The pieces in each work of art
respond to each other, he explained,
and the process of creating the over-
all piece is ongoing. A model may
serve as a basic starting point but for
Bendele, it is not always necessary.
“I couldn’t always do it this way,
but I can now because of where I am
in my career,” he said.
Bendele became intrigued with
metalsmithing when he took a jewelry
class in college.
“Something that intrigued me fair-
ly immediately was the ability to
manipulate something that appears
solid,” he said.
He attended Bowling Green State
University at the time and graduated
with a degree in English education.
In 1976, he started blacksmithing as
a hobby and after a couple years of
teaching, he left in 1978 to become a
full-time blacksmith.
Now, he combines his education
background and his love for metal-
smithing by teaching at national and
state conferences and various craft
schools as a way of giving back.
The initial intrigue, though, still
exists for Bendele.
“Metal can be very expressive,”
he said. “The intrigue with it to take
a piece of steel that’s a cold, lifeless
object and to create movement and
motion, it’s really intriguing.”
That intrigue added to the chal-
lenge of working with metal makes
each experience feel like he is learn-
ing, Bendele said.
“I still consider myself to be learn-
ing, otherwise it’s just a lot of hard
work,” he laughed.
To see more of his work, visit
michaelbendele.com.
Bendele
(Continued from page 1)
- Established the January
Organizations Board of
Education meeting;
- Approved the participa-
tion of interested male and
female students from the
school district to participate
in indoor track meets this
winter;
- Accept donations;
- Employed substitutes;
- Dental Insurance on
behalf of employees who
enroll, the board shall pay up
to $88 for the duration of the
contract
- Approved volunteers;
- Employed Sondra Flack
as a two-hour cook with a
one-year contract;
The board of education
then retired to executive
session for the purpose of
discussing the employment
and compensation of public
employees and negotiations.
The next board meeting
will begin at 7 p.m. Dec. 16.
Wagner
(Continued from page 1)
The Brumback Library
is one of two libraries
in the state to receive a
four-star rating, the other
being the Loudonville
Public Library. Three-
star recognition went
to New Carlisle Public
Library, Orrville Public
Library and Habor-Topky
Memorial Library.
The 2013 rankings,
which are based on 2011
statistics, give star sta-
tus to 263 public librar-
ies, with 32 in Ohio.
Libraries are rated by
Library Journal on their
performance within cat-
egories determined by
operating expenditures.
Performance is then mea-
sured and points awarded
in circulation, library vis-
its, program attendance
and public use of the
Internet. The number of
stars received is based on
the total points earned.
More than 26,000 coun-
ty residents are registered
library card holders. In
2011, the library expanded
services to include access
to e-books, downloadable
videos, audios and music
through the Ohio Ebook
Project, bringing in more
patrons.
In 2012, library patrons
checked out more than
739,000 items. Between
the main library and the
five branch facilities,
the Brumback Library’s
collection is more then
228,000 items.
“The library offers a
service schedule of 179.5
hours per week,” said Joan
Stripe, president of the
Brumback Library Board
of Trustees. “While there
are public libraries that
have much larger incomes
than we have and oth-
ers that are smaller and
able to save large sums
of money due to fewer
demands for their servic-
es, the Brumback Library
has an admirable record
indeed. We have and con-
tinue to be good frugal
stewards of the funds
untrusted to us.”
Over the past 11 years,
the Brumback Library, like
the state’s other 250 public
libraries, has experienced
many funding freezes and
major funding cuts. As a
result, staff reductions, a
slight decrease in hours of
operation, cuts in salaries
and limited reductions in
purchasing some materials
have occurred.
“While many libraries
have cut hours and servic-
es greatly, the Brumback
Library sought to mini-
mize such cuts by reduc-
ing staff size and the like.
In fact, the library pres-
ently serves larger num-
bers of people, many from
area communities whose
libraries’ hours of opera-
tion and purchases of
print and non-print items
were severely cut,” Stripe
added.
The 0. 5-mill levy
which was approved by
county voters in 2005
and renewed in 2010 has
helped greatly. Although
it has not fully compensat-
ed for all the state fund-
ing cuts, it has helped the
Brumback Library keep its
services and resources at
the level county residents
have come to expect.
“We are truly grate-
ful for the support of Van
Wert County’s residents
in passing the aforemen-
tioned levies,” Carr noted.
“Such funds are indeed
vital and are truly appre-
ciated. The doors of Main
Library and the library’s
branches in Convoy,
Middle Point, Ohio City,
Willshire and Wren are
open to one and all. The
Brumback Library remains
a center of lifelong learn-
ing for Van Wert County
residents of all ages.”
Brumback
12 – The Herald Saturday, November 23, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
2
From all
of us at
THE FORT
CONGRATULATIONS
FORT JENNINGS STATE BANK, AND LARRY
AND CREW!
A “Unique” Restaurant and Sports Bar
215 N. Water St. Ft. Jennings, Ohio 45844
419-286-Fort (3678)
The Fort
The Fort Jennings State Bank
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24th 1-4 PM
Fort Jennings Location
TOMORROW
Dave, Mike, Randy, Tammy, Craig & Gary
Serving You For All Your Communication Needs
Sales - Rental - Service - Installation
• Residential or Commercial CATV & Digital CATV
Bright Long Distance • DSL High Speed Internet
Best wishes
on your continued success!
Congratulations
on the opening of your
new office!
Internet Service
Provided by North West Net. Inc.
1-800-899-3447
or visit our offce at
365 N. Water Street, Ft. Jennings
Congratulations
& Best Wishes
to Fort Jennings State Bank!
Mon., Tues., Wed. & Fri. 9:00-5:00; Thurs. & Sat. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
Evenings & Saturday Afternoons by Appointment.
Flower Fort
280 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings, OH 45844
419-286-2844
•Flowers For All Occasions
•Tuxedo Rental starting at $59.95
•Wedding Invitations
On the beautiful new facility!
Here’s to another
95 years of success!
235 N. Water Street,
Fort Jennings, OH
Phone 419-286-2004
Toll Free: 800-686-1770
www.vetterlumber.com
Von Sossan
Contracting
- Quality Construction Since 1963 -
Residential & Commercial
Concrete Construction
Decorative Stamped Concrete
Ph. 419-286-2883 Ft. Jennings, Ohio
Another milestone, way to go!
Thank you for including us in the process!
Best wishes from all of us at:
Auto Home Life Business
Greg Brown
browng1@nationwide.com
20 W. 2nd St., Fort Jennings, OH 45844
(419)286-2660
346 E. Main St., Ottawa (419)523-5527
Nationwide
®
Insurance &
Financial Services
BROWN INS. AGENCY INC.
C
o
n
gratulat
io
n
s
From all of us at
C
o
n
g
ratula
tio
n
s
Fort Jennings State Bank!
W
e wish you the best!
Neiderts
Body Shop
FOR COMPLETE BODY REPAIR!
21405 Rd. 20P, Ft. Jennings
Phone: 419-286-2611 Owner: Art Neidert
Fort Jennings Bank!
Congratulations
to the Fort Jennings State Bank!
Thank you for your dedication to
this wonderful community!
Ft. Jennings, OH
419-286-2086
www.menkebros.com

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