Implementation of Microsoft Visual Source Safe 2005

Architecture
Visual SourceSafe consists of server, client, and database components. The following figure reflects the architecture of a Visual SourceSafe network.

Visual SourceSafe Server
The Visual SourceSafe server software is responsible for managing databases and running server-side modules. The current version of the server supports as many databases as your team needs, depending on the capacity of the server computer. To establish and maintain database security, a person designated as the database administrator should be responsible for your server. This person will primarily use the Visual SourceSafe Administrator program to configure the services required for user access to the team database(s), set up the database user list, assign sharing permissions and project rights, and maintain the databases.

Visual SourceSafe Database
Your database administrator can create a Visual SourceSafe database on the server computer or on a remote computer that communicates with the server. Alternatively, you can create your own database on a client computer for personal use.

Visual SourceSafe Clients
Visual SourceSafe clients can be any one of the installed programs, for example, Visual SourceSafe Explorer. Alternatively, a client might be a third-party application that integrates Visual SourceSafe functionality. Basic Installed Clients

The installed clients for Visual SourceSafe are Visual SourceSafe Explorer, Visual SourceSafe Administrator, the Visual SourceSafe command line utility SS, and the maintenance tools. Each installed client communicates with the database by direct file access. Third-Party Clients Visual SourceSafe functionality can be integrated into several third-party programs as a source control package. Clients that Extend Visual SourceSafe Functionality Visual SourceSafe supports a set of automation interfaces that let you write your own applications, for example, a customized application that you use instead of Visual SourceSafe Explorer. A client of this type generally communicates with the database using direct file access.

Requirements for a Developer Environment If your site supports a developer environment, you might want to consider the following requirements when installing Visual SourceSafe: • Adopt a file system structure that matches the file system structure on the build server, and mirror it on all client machines. This is especially important for directories that contain Visual Studio .NET solutions and projects. • Developer workstations must meet the minimum recommended requirements for Visual Studio. Therefore, they have the same hardware requirements as the build server. See "Build Server Requirements." • After setup of a developer workstation, consider creating a workstation image, which you can deploy to other computers using third-party disk-imaging software. • Prepare the workstations with the plan of storing all user data (including solutions and projects) on a separate partition or physical disk. This type of storage allows you to install a workstation image over the existing C drive. You can deploy minor updates and additional software through Group Policy in Windows 2000 Active Directory Services. • You can use Visual Studio Enterprise Templates to help encourage good development procedures and standard practices across development projects. For more about the templates, see Enterprise Templates for Distributed Applications in the Visual Studio Help.

Server Machine Requirements Visual SourceSafe server contains Visual SourceSafe software, along with the services required by source control packages to run in third-party programs, for example, the SourceSafe plug-ins for Visual Studio. Generally the server also contains the databases for your team. The server hosts the databases on a drive that is accessible to all Visual SourceSafe clients. If you want to use the server machine as a workstation, you can also install Visual SourceSafe client software. However, in anything but the smallest team environments, you will want a more powerful system, closer to the recommended specification for a Visual Studio developer workstation. Remember that the amount of time taken to perform routine Visual SourceSafe database administration tasks is greatly affected by the processor speed and amount of available RAM. You should also aim for a hard disk capacity approximately twice the size of your Visual SourceSafe database. The following table lists specifications for the Visual SourceSafe server. Platform

PC Operating System Windows Server 2003. File System Configuration NTFS Communication Protocol TCP/IP, server authentication certificate; necessary for use of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) File Server Any Windows-compatible file server, for example, Windows NT, Novell, Banyan Maximum Database Size 4-6 GB Maximum File Size 2 GB Available Disk Space 141 MB or higher for server 59–72 MB for client (optional) 57–59 MB for MSDN Additional 43–59 MB for Internet Explorer Processor 233 MHz or faster processor; 300 MHz Pentium or faster processor recommended Memory 96 MB for Windows NT 4.0 4.0 (128 MB recommended) 128 MB for Windows 2000 and Windows XP 128 MB minimum (256 MB recommended) for Windows Server 2003 Drive CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Display VGA or higher resolution (Super VGA recommended) Software Visual SourceSafe server and client software (Visual SourceSafe Administrator required) Internet Information Services (IIS) 5.0 or later MSDN Library (optional for development environment) Internet Explorer 4.01 SP1 or later Windows Access Permissions Administrator Visual SourceSafe Access Permissions Administrator Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) Requirements Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000 Server

Internet Explorer 4.01 SP1 or later MS Certificate Services to allow creation of server certificates (optional)

The following table lists specifications for a Visual SourceSafe client machine that is not hosting a database. Platform PC Operating System Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000 File System Configuration NTFS Communication Protocol TCP/IP; necessary for use of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) Available Disk Space 141 MB or higher for server 59–72 MB for client (optional) 57–59 MB for MSDN Additional 43–59 MB for Internet Explorer Processor 486DX/66 MHz or faster processor; 300 MHz Pentium or faster processor recommended Memory 128 MB minimum Drive CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Display VGA or higher resolution (Super VGA recommended) Software Visual SourceSafe client software Visual Studio 6.0 and later (required only to run Visual SourceSafe plug-ins); no express versions of Visual Studio are compatible MSDN Library (optional for development environment) Windows Access Permissions Administrator Visual SourceSafe Access Permissions User or administrator

The following table lists specifications for a backup server. Platform PC Operating System Windows 2000 Professional with Windows 2000 Server Windows XP Professional File System Configuration NTFS Processor 486DX/66 MHz or faster processor; 300 MHz Pentium or faster processor recommended Pentium II-class processor, 450 MHz for build server; recommended Pentium III-class, 600 MHz Memory 96 MB for Windows 2000 Professional (128 MB recommended) 192 MB Windows 2000 Server (256 MB recommended) 160 MB for Windows XP Professional (192 MB recommended) Drive CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Display 800x600, 256 colors; recommended high-color 16-bit Software If the server is simply providing storage, it needs only the software necessary to store the backup. However, if you use the backup server for redundancy with the server computer, this server must have the same software configuration as the Visual SourceSafe server machine. Windows Access Permissions Administrator Visual SourceSafe Access Permissions Administrator

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful