:.

\:s.
-

a

:,

i

COLONEL FOURTH

NEW YORK HEAVT

ARTILLERY, BREVET MAJOR-GENERAL U.

8.

V

C. T.

DILLINGHAM,

Publisher,

718 Broadway,

New

York.

COPYRIGHT,

1890,

BY HYLAND

C.

KIRK.

BURR PRINTING HOUSE,

FRANKFORT AND JACOB STS.

,

N.

V.

STACK

ANNEX

PREFACE.
HAT
the Rebellion which terminated a quarter
of a century ago actually threatened the life of the nation, and that it was successfully en

countered and conquered by the soldiers consti tuting the Union armies, goes without saying.

The Fourth Regiment of New York Heavy Artillery participated in this work from near the beginning to the close of the war and as the recollections of that period are fading out of mind, and the surviving actors themselves
;

passing away, it seems entirely proper that a permanent record of the regiment's career should be made. Steps in that direction were taken at a reunion of sur vivors of the regiment held at Canandaigua, N. Y., October

and at subsequent meetings. (See Appendix.) There are certain advantages, doubtless, in delaying the preparation of this history until the present time. The smoke of the battle has now cleared away, the torch of war that fired the feelings has given place to peaceful influences and a calm realization of the conditions and circumstances
12th, 1886,

of that period and if petty jealousies or private enmities existed within our own ranks, time, which heals all wounds and rectifies all wrong, has served to impress us with their
;

comparatively trivial character, to increase our respect for the organization to which we belonged, and to unite us the more firmly in our adherence to one country and one flag. Believing that peace is the proper state of man and not war, and that a united country is the only means by which peace can be secured and maintained, we do not pride our selves so much upon the deeds achieved as upon the result obtained. For peace we fought, for peace many of the bravest among our numbers yielded up their lives, and for the sake of perpetuating that peace, of impressing those

iv

PREFACE.

after us with the need of its maintenance, this record is attempted. Of the work itself, the effort has been to restrict the nar rative to an accurate account of the operations of the regi ment, introducing such general matters only as seem necesAnecdotes of an s;iiy to a clear elucidation of its career. authentic and probable character have been freely intro duced,- constituting, as they frequently do, a part of legiti mate history, and serving to enliven the narrative. That it has been impossible to give the details of each individual' s course will be apparent, both from the difficulties of secur ing the data and from the size of the organization, which,

who come

as an artillery regiment, included, from December, 1861, to October, 1865, upward of thirty-eight hundred members.

This has been to some extent accomplished, however, in Part Second of the volume, where the names of every man in the regiment, with a sketch of his life and services, as extensive as could be made from the facts furnished, will be found. The acknowledgments of the author are due to many members who have contributed data, quoted or referred to in the text, and also to the authorities at Washington and Albany, who have rendered material assistance in the preparation of the work.

NEW

YOKK, December

15, 1889.

TE^*&f***.^r-

tiHeBvyArtiJlery>

CONTENTS.

PART
CHAPTER.
I.

FIRST.
PAGE 9

II.

The Original Organization Movement to the Capital

24
31

Across the Anacostia IV. A Change of Base V. Artillery Practice VI. Defending the Capital VII. Organization of the Third Battalion
III.

36

47 66
87
96

VIII. In Pennsylvania

IX. X. XI. XII. XIII.

New York The
Consolidated...*

Draft Riots of 1863.

103

118 137
the First Battalion
the Second Battalion

Good-by, Cannon In the Wilderness In the Wilderness

148 170
183

XIV. In

the Wilderness- the Third Battalion

XV.

K XVI. XVII. At the North Anna XVIII. At the Totopotomoy XIX. Cold Harbor XX. Crossing the James XXI. The Halt at Petersburg XXII. The Bombardment at the Mine Explosion
XXIII. Entrenched, Sharpshooting and Shelling XXIV. Deep Bottom Hancock's Cavalry XXV. Ream's Station An Unlucky Horseshoe XXVI. In Winter Quarters

Spottsylvania May 19th Batteries D, H, and

19*
217

XXVII. Opening the Campaign of 1865 XXVIII. Sutherland's Station and the Final Pursuit

XXIX. XXXI.

Experiences of the Captured
Burksville to Washington

XXX. From

Consolidation of Regiments, and Muster Out

234 248 257 270 275 296 313 327 333 364 373 382 398 419 427

PART SECOND.
SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN.
Field and Staff Officers Non-commissioned St.-iff
. . .

435 462

11

CONTENTS.
PACK

Line Officers

Company

A
B
C

464 478 494
508 525 544 557
571

D
E P

G

H
I

K
L

587 604 615
629 644

M
Appendix
;

Reunions of Regiment

658

LIST OF MAP6.
Defences of Washington, showing Forts and Roads Fort Ethan Allen
27
73
99

Gettysburg and Vicinity Military Position South of the Potomac Battle of the Wilderness
Spottsylvania Streams Crossed in Campaign of 1864 Battle-field of the North Anna
Battle-field of

138 154
196
.... 235

Cold Harbor

Siege of Petersburg

Deep Bottom Battle of Ream's

Station

Ream's Station Richmond and Petersburg Pursuit and Capture of the Confederate Army Frank Denio's Map of Sutherland's Station

238 260 280 328 341 358 365
383

647

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
Portrait of General

John

C. Tidball

FRONTISPIECE
9

Recruiting Office

(Initial)

Company

Letters

12-21

Camp

Fire (Chapter-end)

30 39 44

Washington Bridges Ancient Arms and Armor (Chapter-end)

CONTENTS.
Panoramic View of Washington and Vicinity " What Do You Call Sir ?"
this,

Ill

in 1862

PAGE 45

Artillery Practice "Give Me the Old

50 53
56
59
61

Shotgun Yet"

Artillery Practice with Parrott Pieces Portrait of Major-General George B. McClellan

Fort Marcy (Looking in) Fort Marcy (Looking out) Inspection Through a Glass
Gallic

62

63 64 65

Arms
"

(Chapter-end)
Russy") Colonel T. D. Doubleday t H. H. Hall

Portrait of General G. A.

De

83

Company
The Mob

Letters

92-3
104 106 107

Attack on Provost-Marshal

Mob

Chasing Negroes Hanging Negroes " "A Desperate but Final Struggle

108 116 122 125
.
'

New York Harbor Washington in War Time
Forts in

The Attack on Fort Ethan Allen

135

Portrait of Brevet Brigadier-General Thomas Allcock " " " Captain T. C. Parkhurst

"

"
" " " "

" " Adjutant H. J. Kopper " Lieutenant Colonel Frank Williams " Brevet Captain M. E. Gordon " " Major G. L. Morrison " Major T. D. Sears " General Alexander Hays " Major-General John Sedgwick " Lieutenant James Walker " Major-General G. K. Warren

142

155

164
165
171

Crossing the Rapidan Portrait of General James S. Wadsworth " " Major-General W. S. Hancock Second Corps Batteries in the Wilderness
Portrait of General Ulysses

172
178

184 190

" " "

" Brevet Major Theodore Price " Lieutenant Ulysses D. Eddy " Brevet Major William B. Knower
F. B. Littlefleld

Doubleday

207

" "
" " "

" Lieutenant William M. Waterbury " Captain E. C. Knower " Lieutenant William A. Flint
Captain John B. Vandeweile " Lieutenant Michael J. Lee
.

"

225

After (he Battle.

230

IV

CONTENTS.
Major Edward F. Young Lieutenant Horace E. Kimball
H. W. Hayden William Barnes Major William B. Barnes Lieutenant H. D. McNaughton First Sergeant Joseph Hulse Thomas Smith Lieutenant T. S. Wallace T. N. Marcotte " William S. Ball " G. W. Mears T. A. Bailey Brevet Major Rodney Dexter

Portrait of

" " " " " "

"

"

"
" " " "

"

" "

"
"

"
"

'

"

" " "
" " " " "

" W. C. Furrey " Captain Charles Morrison " Quartermaster J. H. Thorp " Lieutenant E. C. Clarke " Brevet Major Nathan S. Wood " Lieutenant H. G. Harris " First Sergeant August T. Wilder " " " Oscar Knapp " Lieutenant Edgar W. Dennis

239

" " " "

Captain Henry L. Smith " " George W. Ingalls " Lieutenant S. W. Doubleday " Frank
C. Filley

"

George

W. Bemis

Abner Seeley W. C. Bartholomew M. J. Nolan
" " " "
General Philip H. Sheridan " Major H. T. Lee " Lieutenant William C. Edmonston D. D. McPherson
249

"

" " "
"

" " " "

H. L. Kelly Brevet Major J. H. Wood Lieutenant George W. Young Captain Richard Kennedy Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel D. F. Hamlink " Lieutenant N. C. Parshall
E. O. Gates
,

253

265

Tidball's Batteries at Cold

Harbor

268
269

Figure from Curtain in the Shelton House Portrait of Captain D. K. Smith Jones " " Surgeon Hartwell C. Tompkins

279
291

The Bombardment

at the

Mine Explosion

303

Portrait of Captain A. C.

Brown

307

CONTENTS.
The Army Mule (Chapter-end)
Ream's Station
Position of the Fourth

V
PAGE 332

New York

Artillery

345

Portrait of Captain

James M. McKeel

350 355
359 368 374
375

Major William Arthur " Lieutenant Frank L. Burdick Going to Work on the Forts at Night Portrait of General A. A. Humphreys " " " Nelson A. Miles " " Sergeant James Bogan " " " FrankDenio " Colonel " Robert Nugent " " " Seward F.

" "

*'

385 391 396 396

Gould (Opposite)

The Grand Review Portrait of Major Henry E. Richmond Dismounted Cannon (End-piece) The Muse of History (Initial Letter, Part Second)
Portrait of Dr. C. P. Lawrence"!

423 429 434 435

" " "

"

"
" " " " " "

" "
'

M. J.Davis A. F. Mudie

r

George Bayles William M. Hendrickson. Lieutenant W. D. Herrick
"
Lieutenant

.

456 458

"
" "

W.

C. B.

Gray

1

" "

Chaplain William H. Carr Lieutenant Edward Wheeler Brevet Colonel S.P.Corliss

C

463

" Lieutenant M. V. B. Aiken " "

Thomas Delanoy
William H. Burt Charles H. Burghardt..'
465 465 466 466 466 467 467 467 470 472 473 474 475 475 476 477

" "

" Captain H. L. Carpenter " Lieutenant George Chichester J. C. Crombie Ichabod Flanagan O. L. Dearborn
Captain A. S. Eddy " Lieutenant H. C. Kirk J. D. McNeil "
"

"

Captain J. W. Sweetman Captain E. A. Tudor at Fort Bennett Portrait of Lieutenant William L. Thurber

"

"
"

William E. Van Name George H. Warner William H. Winans. " Sergeant I. N. Teed " Corporal W. H. Sweetman " Alonzo A. Knapp f"' " J Corporal Louis Deion

VI

CONTENTS.
Horton Theodore Quick " Lieutenant N. B. Lynes " Corporal William E. Kniffln " Sergeant George E. Northey

Portrait of Sergeant V. E.

" " " " " " " " " "

" " " " " " " " " " " " "

Matthew Quinu James H. Lyon David Rogers Edward A. Teed
Albert Bunyea
First Sergeant Harrison Silas Haviland

'

Totten
480 483 484 485 487 487 489 490 490

Jarvis Cole

Sergeant James Hyatt Edgar Hitt
J. T.

Lockwood

E. B. A. Miller

"

W. H. H. Miller " Sergeant Mills Reynolds " James H. Still " L. H. Secor " Sergeant C. E. Wright " L. E. Gallahue " S. B. Weeks
"

Corporal Star V. Totten

" "
"

" Sergeant Anthony Wallard " Lieutenant J. W. Nixon
S.
I.

More

"

" " " " " "

Jacob Snyder " Thaddeus Laymon "First Sergeant James Barr

"A.S.Thomas
" " " " " "
Isaac

f

McKeever James Porter George L. Andrus
".

"
"

A. E. Borthwick William C. Oakley. John H. Snyder " Sergeant J. N. Wright " Daniel Torpy " R. T.
Miller "

496 503 505 507

" " "
" "

John Dailey " John Bradley " John F. Phillips
" " "

}

508

Hugh

McPhillips
Beattie

Andrew

"
"

D. Robinson " Nelson Moore

W.

CONTENTS.

Vll

PAGE
Portrait of Patrick A. Corey

" "

" "

" " " " "

^

Patrick Boyle E. R. Dusenbury

George Deitz E. C. Smith O. T. Hubbell
G. S. Farwell.

'

Off Picket.

James Beckwith

513 515 516

Portrait of Corporal B. L. Keelar

" Daniel E. Keyes Halt at the Sally-port, J. B. Wilder,

"

J.

H. Bishop, and Sergeant

L. J.

McVicker
Portrait of

517 518

"

" " " " " " " " " " " " "
" "

D. Milliken " William D. Robinson " Sergeant A. R. Walker " James F. Debeau " R. M. Reed " L. B. Hawley " W. D. Brouson
" "

W.

520

V

...

524

" Corporal " A. J.

Corporal Nelson Moore Sergeant J. W. Martin j
F. S. Cooley

Downing " Ira W. Lockwood " Corporal J. H. Mead
Lieutenant Richard Price

528 529 535 536

"

" Gabriel Zabriskie " Sergeant Abram Stoothoff
Patrick Farrell

544

" James Mullen " Garret
Sergeant
S. C.

Tyson
.

Van Houghton

" Wra. H. Beasley The Mahoney Brothers John, Dennis, Michael
Portrait of Sergeant Joseph Aspinall

545 552

"

" " "
"

" Corporal John H. Dunn " John H. Sanders " Sergeant Charles W. Brewer " Thomas G. Stenson
"j

i-

557
558 569

" Israel L. Emerson

575

"
" " "

" First Sergeant T. A. Theban") " Sergeant David B. Jones

"E.W.Burge

"
" "

"

" Sergeant G. W. Brownell " Wellington Beecher " Sergeant Herman J. Eddy
"

j

j

588
591

J.C.Jones
.'

594 598 605

"
"

" Corporal A. H. Reed " William O. Babcock.

.

Gascoigne " " W. Casey " Almon Stotenbur " Richard Rudd " W. Osgood " Wm. Frary " Geo. Samuel Beswick 615 Portrait of Sergeant " " " " " " Charles H. Boughton 644 " '. R. Cross 652 653 " " 655 " Henry B. Second Annual Reunion 659 . Deyo " J. Smith " H. H. A. Thos.Vlll CONTENTS. Seward F. 645 " "S. C. Robinson " John H. Smith " Chas.H. Guarded by Portrait of Edward Holland " Col. J. H. Boyce " " Corp'l M. " Murphy Company L 635 " " " " " " " Chas. . H.P. H. Gould " " John A. Kirk " Frank Denio " Wm. Marcy " Lt. Smith " Philo Warner '. Rowley at Rochester. Lewis " " Chas. 627 629 Trains of Second Corps. .Putnam "C. H.Robinson " Ellery C.

three men were discussing the young war and the military situation. at that time em ployed in the Quartermaster's office. D. at that \~~ time QuartermasterGeneral on the staff of Governor E. some time in the month of October. Morgan. A HISTORY OF THE FOURTH NEW YORK HEAVY CHAPTER IZATION. I. another was Henry J.HEAVY GUNS AND PART FIRST. somewhat older than the other two. The conversation turned on the expediency . Hall. and the third Lieuten ant Henry H. ARTILLERY. Kopper. 1861. a brother of the late President. One of these was William Arthur. Arthur. THE ORIGINAL ORGAN N - the office of Ches ter A. LIGHT. who had served in a Mississippi regiment with General Tay of entering a* lor's division during the Mexican War.

C. : War and HEADQUARTERS STATE OF NEW YORK. Comd'g Fourth. Following is the official order . By order of the Commander-in-Chief. To GENERAL ALLCOCK. Allcock. com New York Volunteer Depot. and as they could rely upon the co-operation of Major Thomas the military service. D. The Fourth A. D. Doubleday will report from time to time to this De partment the progress of the organization. 465. ALBANY. York Heavy Artillery. November 1. cided to number the artillery regiments without reference . of General Charles Gates. ent. The need of more troops was appar The quota of New York under the President's call of April 15th had been filled. authorizing Mr. Mr. It happened about this time that letters were received by the Adjutant-General of the State. 1861. Mr. Fifth. Thomas D. Doubleday to raise and organize a regiment of heavy artil lery and under this authority they decided to act and as sist in securing the requisite number of men for the pro posed regiment. and Twelfth Militia. they decided to avail themselves of their opportunity in organizing a select body of troops for the artillery branch of the service. ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE. The various branches of the service were discussed. from the Secretary of manding the General McClellan.10 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. at that time Aide-de-camp to General Gates. T. SPECIAL ORDERS. Doubleday is hereby authorized to raise and organize a force of heavy artillery of not more than a regiment of eight companies and not less than one company for such service as they may be assigned to by the War Department. Artillery was originally known as and subsequently as the First New The Adjutant-General having de New York Doubleday' s Artillery. Sixth. In accordance with tae recommendation of General Mc Clellan and the request of the Secretary of War. but the required number had not been entirely raised under the call of May and July for five hundred thousand men. No.

11 to the distinctions of light and heavy ordnance. Under the proclamation of the President. the regiment. consisting originally of eight companies. was called into the service of the United States for the period of three years from Decem ber 13th. The following shows the muster-roll of the original field and staff : NAMES.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. the regimental number was changed to the Fourth. 1861. and there being a First Regiment of light artillery already organized. .

' " ' fled in armistice resulted. the entire command fol lowing. which had been organized as Troops A and B of the Lancers. supported by fifty other stalwarts. from Groton. on the boys that they should be compelled to find quarters . Among the other officers were Colonel Graham. The eating-house resembled a pandemonium for a few min utes. T. and the First United States Lancers disbanded. The company was mustered by F. six from New York City. at Port Richmond. taking quarters at Port Richmond. S. including tin plates. Sears. four teen were from Brewster's. Of the total number ninety enrolled. Major Urban joining the same organization. sidered in detail. An The Lancers were being organized by a Polish exile. whom some of the officers soon charac terized as more of a stick than a Pole. and fourteen by Martin Van Buren Aiken. after which the rights of all were rigidly observed. D. Colonel Samuel Graham becoming Colonel of the Fifth New York Artillery. Majors Urban and Taffe. Westchester. disorder. etc. Captain in the Twelfth In It was thought a little severe fantry. as Companies and B of the First of The the organization companies will be con Artillery.. they made a grand charge on the six hundred. r A MAJORITY Company A of the original members of were enrolled in Putnam. and twelve from Of these. Trouble ensued in the organization. flying in all directions. " The Fifty-second gave way and Then they came back. twenty-one were enrolled by H. thirteen by Frank Williams. cups. and Captain Maluski.12 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Not the six hundred. hot beans. Lee. and Dutchess counties. one Colonel Smolinski. and the two companies. but not. Lamed. w ere secured for Colonel Doubleday's artillery and accordingly returned to Staten Island. eight from Pawling. with missiles of a most unique character. thirty-two by T. thirty-seven Paterson. mush. boiled pork.

Orderly James M. . Henry T. Lewis B. Joseph Burke. and yet there were times dollar subsequently when they would have gladly paid a apiece per night for as comfortable accommodations. Rogers. Third Oscar Sergeant Benjamin Dickens. Louis Deion. . Theodore Quick. Robinson. Totten. Sixth Corporal. Daniel Scott. Alexander Collard. George Northey. George R. Robert A Reynolds. William H. . Joseph H. Sergeant Washburn. Isaac N. B. George Clements. Third Corporal Alonzo A. George S. . James McDonald. Sutton A. Augustus Thomas. Lindon J. Bernard McNally. George H. David H. Thomas Lane. William H. Nathan Penny. Henry C. Lee. Henry Drews. Harrison Totten. Moses Waters. Shedrach Dingel. Terrill. in a barn while 13 on fetaten Island. William B. Baker. Emerson See. Fourth John W. Trowbridge. Mitchel B. Wilson. Knapp. Will iam E. George Dumbard. Norman B.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. . : W. John W. Bailey. Abram Kennedy. Theodore L. William McDon James Morey. Second Lieutenant Martin V. Lewis G. Isaac S. Captain Williams. John Knapp. James Wynn. Amos Butler. Wixon. Totten. James C. Ephraim Davis. Edwin Rockwell. Butler. . Dickens. Wilcox. William H. Wallace. Teed. Peter Carr. Fourth Sergeant Second First Oscar Corporal . Corporal Knapp. Hatter. Ganning. Joseph Sprague. Second Sergeant Henry W. George W. Cowl. Elbert Wilson. James P. Bogan. . Alexander Degolyer. William E.. George Vanderburg. Washburn. Edward Bland. McKeel. Knapp. Star V. Moses Y. Elijah Wilson. . Stephen D. Elbert S. Kniffin. Arthur D. Alonzo Townsend. David Reed. Horace Eastwood. Sweet-man. Cree. . Patrick McGlocklin. nell. . Stephaniah Denny. Hynard. John S. : The following were the original company officers Thomas D. Rogers. Charles Davis. Samuel F. Doane. The rank and file of the original muster-in were Thomas Aked. Charles Mosier. William Donnell. Norman Davis. Merritt Washburn. Elijah Penny. Purdy. Martin Britto. Freeman Light. Tryon. Turk. First Lieutenant Frank Sears. Theodore Price. . Hubbard. Knapp. Wixon. First Sergeant Elbert S. Patrick Cronin. Aiken. Hayden. Fifth Corporal Corporal . Silas Haviland. Daniel Townsend. . Dearborn.

Wakeman. The original officers of Company B were Charles Morri son. Driggs. Stephen D. Burton Tompkins. though not without some white-tipped noses and ears. sweeping ice. and thirty-four from Gilboa. Delaware County five from West Troy. masse. More. Aldelbert E. when they were struck by a gust mingled with fine snow which brought the whole company to the ice en . Jacob Shoemaker. Schoharie Coun ty six from Moresville. the State which had been also tempo rarily organized as Lancers. First Lieutenants . Samuel J. Second : Lieutenants. . Farquher. Captain Yandewiele gives an account of a somewhat re markable inarch he made with some thirty recruits from Gilboa. was raised in the southeastern and river counties of . across the Hudson River in the latter month. Furrey. three of the members being from Blenheim. Twelve recruits were enrolled by Captain Morrison. George Chichester. and to make a rush when the lull came. In this way they reached the east shore and the depot. Albany County seventeen from Brooklyn. on the It was very cold and the wind was hilarious. and eleven from Staten Island. Harris. Corporals William C. Sergeants Abram Shoemaker. and one from Roxbury. The work of recruiting was continued from September to December. Captain . . and they found the only way to escape defeat and serious consequences from the freezing cold was to drop on their hands when the enemy charged. They did not realize this till they were some rods from the west shore. ten by Major Casper Urban. ten by Lieutenant Morrison.14 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Yandewiele and Henry G. Frederick Yan Segger. Morrison and William E. down the river with a force which seemed irresistible. Gardiner L. seven from New York City. : Arthur H. John B. Their onward course became a battle with the elements. and fiftyseven by Lieutenant Yandewiele. one from Conesville. . Soules. Yan Namee. COMPANY. Howard G.

Patrick Mangan. Amos Silver. Francis G. Lawyer. William H. Ferdinand Smidt. Wright. C. Benjamin Fanning. Steele. Edward Grove. Felix Timmons.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. Patrick Murphy. D. Thomas C. Duncan. Wilber White. \Villiam Hayes. Alex ander Borthwick. James Bennett. Thomas McAdam. Hiram T. Frederick Brinkman. Andrus. Winslow P. Alvah M. Eri P. Homer De Silva. William C. COMPANY When City was originally recruited at for the Ira Harris Cavalry. Bernard Mangan. Lewis Bailey. Fickel. James Ryan. Ames. Roscoe Harris. Wilcox. Thaddeus Laymon. Nathan M. Sidney Thomas. Anthony Londrush. John W. Henry Y. Joseph Monroe. : 15 Those originally mustered as privates were Francis C. Maham. Oakly. Vanthem Magle. Habble. break up the organization and distribute the members among the other companies of the cavalry This proposition w as not accepted. Rogers. Martin Mosher. Lemily. George J. James Gannoir. George L. John McHugh. Patrick Colgan. Walter S. Anthony Mangle. Frederick Yanderheide. Charles M. Peck. Robert Getty. George Strack. however. Will iam E. Of the seventy-nine members of the origr . Siemon. George Kolsch. the regiment officers and a majority of the men preferring to retain the organization and go into Colonel Doubleday's Regiment of Heavy Artillery. the company reached New York it was found that the cavalry regi ment had its full complement of com The proposition was made to panies. Sil vester Clapper. Jenkins. Silva. Oakley. Samuel Batty. Oakley. Hay. George Lemily. Brendle. Hay. S. John L. Henry De Henry Alfred Dibble. John Henry Gow. Henry Siemon. Henry T. Weismer. Marcus Richtmyer. Melbourne Weismer. John Muller. John Johnson. Bowers. James W. D. Willard Scehmerhorn. Porter. James Hanlon. Charles Saxe. Samuel Lemily. Henry Monroe. Whited Silleck. Rochester. John W. Alexander Vanloan. Martin Richtmyer. Stephen Finch. Christian Wohlero. George Shaefer. Michael Welch.

Elijah Tracy. Phillips. Lindorf A. James O'Donahue. Miller. Smith. Barnes. Theodore Covert. W. First Ser geant George J. Jackson. Henry Steinberger. Lansing. Peter Cain. Joseph Pageot. and Sergeants Lansing and McPherson. . : Romanta T. Third Sergeant James Walker. Fourth Sergeant James H. D. Lieu tenants Wood and MoNaoghton. Arthur Simpson. McYicker. Scott. Third Corporal William H. Carley. Oakley. Second Corporal George W. thirteen from Scottsville. Seventh Corporal. William McMillen. Mc Pherson. John F. Philips. Eddy. William Grow. Patrick Powers. John W. four from Mumford. Fourth Corporal F. J. Decker. Knapp. Artificer. . Jedediah Burger. Silas W. L. Louis J.16 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Ball. Daniel V. David Huftelin. John Quinn. Sixth Corporal John Haw kins. Edgar Barber. Henry S. The following privates were mustered Alexander F. Farnsworth. Weldon. James J. E. Chester R. Aaron Nixson. Henry Ott. Lyman Bloss. J. William Marsh. six from Hornellsville. Crane. Benjamin Parmeter. Hamlink. Peter Pero. James Hughes. Lowery Blackburn. Abner Green. McNaughton. two from Geneseo. . Second Lieutenant D. George Northy. Newton Taplin. H. Michael McCabe. . Bishop. The recruiting was chiefly done by Captain W. . Michael Fitzgerald. Burt. Arthur Tracy. A. Second Lieutenant H. Second Sergeant D. B. B. Daniel Quinn. . First Lieutenant Adelbert S. F. Lucius A. Nott. . Patrick Barry. Shadbolt. George Van Wormer. sixteen from Oswego. Hugh Mc: . James M. . James Moore. AVilliam C. . Carley. . Smith. F. and the re mainder from other small towns in the vicinity of Roches ter. Trunbridge. Michael Kelly. Lyon. McNaughton. Frank Munson. Hyde. inal company twenty-one were from Rochester. Thomas Nolan. Robert McMillen. John I. . Solomon R. First Corporal Norman L. Wood. Thomas H. . Fifth Corporal AYilliam Rolson. Seven joined the company at Port Richmond. Doane. Joseph Patterson. G McElroy. Turnbridge. Captain James H. D. Barnes. The following is the original list of officers W. John Hoyt. James H. D. . Thomas Reardon. Alphonzo Underwood. . Rich ard Handee. John E. Robinson.

Barber. Lawrence. The remaining enlisted men were : Charles H. Perry. Third Corporal Marcus Burras. Harkness. Casey. . First Corporal Arnold T. Charles Adams. Captain . B. list The following is the original of officers : George W. Potter. Seventh Corporal John . Lansing. Armstrong. was recruited large ly in Saratoga County. Richard Bills. eleven at West Day. Jones. Gilbert F. . John B. three at Edinburg. Second Sergeant . Fourth Cor Moses Lewis. Elihu Ellis. Henry Barkley. Jr. Hofman. Vernando W. William Bortell. Blood. Braman Ayers. Low- . Fifth Sergeant William H. officers Ballston Island. poral William A. Adams. Third Sergeant Edwin R. Fair banks. Bruce. John Clome. Gordon Dimmick. Martin Hunter. James W. Isaac De Forest. . John E. Sergeant Abram G. Y. and eighteen on Staten Batchellerville. Ingalls. . . Emery L. . Ingalls. Frank C. John Fredericks. John Howard. Bradt. Alexander Chricton. Franklin R. Sher man. Malcolm Waterbury. . Eighth Corporal. Patrick H. Hunt. James Lynch. Brown.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. George Dickerson. three at Northville. Ayers. Douglass. Edmond. First Lieutenant W. Second Lieutenant D. First Jonas B. Charles Herrick. FilC. William Hall. Thomas Anders. . De Long. Charles T. James Daniels. William A. Lewis Lane. Herrick. Smith Jones. The enrolling were Cap tain George W. Daniel A. Dennis. . Ingalls. of the which in the outset was also designed for cavalry. First Lieuten . N. ant W. Albert P. Robert Fox. Cromwell. John Barrett. . McLean. Bortell. Bradt. . Jacob Lansing. Henry T. James H. Henry C. members having been enrolled one at at Spa. Second Lieutenant Ashel W. Charles D. Fourth Ser geant William Bradt. Thomas Brady. Edward B. Bryant Gray. . George C. Ira J. Cromwell. Black. . Ford. K. Charles H. Sergeants McLean and Ayers. fifty-three . Kenyon. George H. 17 COMPANY. Philo R. James B. Edwin Bishop. Second Corporal John Walls. . Joseph Garry. ley. Thomas C. Fifth Corporal Sixth Corporal Henry P. Samuel Fensworth.

Charles Massy. Lorenzo Mason. by Captain Al ston. .18 ery. Young. John Campbell. The following is the original . Miller. Charles H. COMPANY 1861. Crocker. Lieutenant Young. Vincent Decker. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Second Sergeant Garrett Tyson. where Captain Alston at that time Ten were from Cohoes. Decker. Edward H. Third Sergeant Elihu P. Following is the original list of privates Hugh Brady. Patrick Farrell. Charles Willoughby. Second Cor poral John Mullen. Hedenberg. Thomas Depew. Theodore Crowle. John Downey. William Weatherwax. Second Lieutenant William Young. Alonzo M. First Sergeant Michael J. David Miller. Wolfe. Captain George W. John H. Vilery West. John H. Mears. George Ralph. James Bannon. Albany lived. . John M. The men of the company possessed the strong lungs and muscular build usually resulting from an active life on the water. Sidney R. Nolan. . . Decker. John W. William Fasshaber. Newman. James Flynn. William Webb. Wells. John McGuire. 1862. Second Lieutenant Henry L. Smith. William Beasley. Sheffer. was recruited in December. Harris T. Willetus Taft. Vanarnum. James McLean. Webster. Booth. list of officers : First Lieutenant . . Abijah Ovell. . and January. Green. Abraham Decker. . William C. County. Charles Cole. E. . First Corporal Charles W. Bartholomew Dillon. James P. First Lieutenant George W. Japhet Alston. Henry Coddington. James H. . Henry : Cowles. Bleauvelt. John Clark. Bernard Dougherty. Third Corporal. Weatherwax. Wilson Milliman. William H. Arthur Whitney. George Walker. . Martin V. Joseph Baker. John White. William Smith. Jackson. Slocnm. Henry E. Albert Dunn. and Recruiting Officer Terrell. Charles W. William Conner. Lafayette Decker. Matthew Fagan. Fourth Sergeant Charles Bates. Michael Normile. Benjamin Severance. Henry Beachen. They were chiefly fisher men and boatmen residing on Staten Island. Mahlon Robinson.

was raised originally in New York City. George Van Pelt. David Conklin. Tudor. Charles W. Third Sergeant William H. . John Donohoe. Captain William Rimmer. Kopper. Mat thews. Timothy Hickey. Thomas Murphy. Peter Dailey. William Hunt er. Isaiah Brower. Second Corporal John Williams. Clayton. James A. Thomas Flemming. William Liske. . Abraham Stoothoff. William Pangborn. Price. Sharrott. Thomas S. 19 Genmore. James E. First Lieutenant Henry J. Harvey Carpenter. William Vaughan. Brit ten. Richard Kennedy. Baily. James H. James Riley. Samuel Van Houten. Edward Moore. Joseph W. Bernard McKenna. James Brady. Patrick Foley. Abraham B. Robert J. John Heidenrich. William W. Jones. . . Thomas Rudds. Ingalls. John A. The privates were Peter Bracken. Hulse. First Corporal Larry O'Lahan. William Hayden. George A. Patrick Learny. . Christopher Gegan. Dennis Mahoney. John Haggerty. Fourth Sergeant Edward Hartley. William Leslie. Robert Freeland. Roger Gordon. John G. Gabriel Zibriski. Martin. John Merrill. Joseph F. . Thomas Lynch. John LawL. Richard Dorre. Henry Raythen. Third Corporal. L. Richard A. Hill. Second SergeantThomas Wilson. Moore. Morritz Mendleshon. James John son. : . Timothy Sullivan. with the exception of twelve members. Thomas Ryan. . John Flanagan. William Bur ton. James Mullen. John Hoyt. Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant First Sergeant . Roswell Lombard. Thomas A. William Taffay. Bernard Mullen. John Jennings. Brower. John Parker. eleven of the remaining twelve being enrolled on Staten Island. William Barnes. John Knox. Stillwell. . COMPANY. Matthias Moore. Moses Harris.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. Captain Tudor was following is chief recruiting officer. Sharrott. William H. Gude. Henry Leslie. The the original list of officers : Edward A. Thomas Sharrott. Hatch. William Heines. Kirk. . John Dailey. Jeremiah Kellerer. Luke Boy Ian. Henry E. G. Dunn.

Richard Carey. A. J. Stephen Streeter.Sergeant John WolsJames McNamel. James Foley. Patrick McMahon. Henry Ott. P. Edward Yogel. . William Austin. . . Edward Young. Peck. Patrick Mack. First Corporal Thomas Smith. Pierre Carrie. Peter Reeling. H. Gardner. Abram R. J. Fourth Company G joined the regiment at Fort Corco Corporal. T. . Second Corporal ley. Grover. Second Sergeant George E. Wait. in October. Michael Fedan. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. William Bartels. Michael Dougherty. James Henderson. George W. raised till the summer of when it was recruited in New York City Captain Young and Lieutenants Kimball and Horn were the recruiting officers. Fourth Sergeant Daniel Cole. Francis Burns. Bernard Connolly. James L. L. Charles Gray. Borden McGinty. Thomas Ryan. John Van Outersterp. Tyrell. Third Sergeant John Hartley. as a light battery. . John Ling. Abner 1 Smith. Lester C. Sanford. Thomas Smith. . Horace G. F. Joseph Mount. John H. Josiah Layton. Ulster County. Kimball. Tompkins. ran. COMPANY was not 1862. Thomas Smith. Joseph Conklin. Richard Gibney. Va. Quartermaster. William R. Following is the original roster of company officers : Horace E. First Felix Lieutenant Daniel T. John McDonnell. Griffin. .. Nelson Layton. John V. Charles Barley. Timothy Collins. Patrick Riley. Third Corporal Joseph Howe. Elias Bernhardt. Michael O Donnelly. Captain . John : Baker. Peter Carlin. Lorenzo H. John Ryan. Second Lieutenant Franck. . Benjamin W. George McGomery. Wyncoop. William McCrackin. Layton. Michael J. Wilson. George Bassett. John Harrington. Thomas Bergen. Newman. First Sergeant James B. Samuel McChesney. John Cunningham. Edward Anderson. James Heden. 1862. . Smith. William Scott. . James Quinn. Saunders. . Five of the original mem bers came from Rondout. James Dovetan. William \V. Sharp. John Haggerty. Horn. James H. Newman. Palmer.20 renson. The rank and file originally mustered were John Adams. Mongeyor.

Bemis. Amos N. First Lieutenant Com manding William Arthur. Samuel S. The following is the original list of offi cers George Bliss. . Elijah F. Ontario County. Francis Myers. John Minton. James Scannell. Henry Mier. Second Lieutenant. Patrick Kirk. Edward Bland. Lyke. Warner. Sergeants Herman porals : Cuyler W. John Wheat. William Sanderson. John F. William E. Richard York. A : . James McGuire. Carley. Isaac Jacobs. nett. Henry Simpson. Michael Hogan. Johnson. Stephen D. James H. Douglass. Charles Williams. Charles Kaul. Patrick McGowan. Lincoln. James W. was made of two detachments. Hezekiah Morse. James Ben William Brindle. Jr... James Murtangle. First Lieutenant George W. Thomas Tindell. Otto Kenkel. Lawrence Schell. Benjamin Bourdon. John Saunders. James Daniels. Second Lieutenant Edward C. Jr. Bowers. majority of the members were farmers. Jr. George H. James Conner. John Smith. Solomon R. Butler. George Dickerson. Edmonston. Doane. Lawrence Raine. which George Bliss. 21 Thomas John son. : Mangle Anthony. Edward Reilly. Locke. Dennis. Henry Owens. . Captain. The privates were erick Blaise. Lewis L. detached on Governor Morgan' s staff as Assistant Adjutant. Filghinan H. Bruso. J. . COMPANY. John 0' Connell. Stephen Dietz. William H. William Stephenson. Thomas Mangan. Jeremiah O' Brien. John Wenenberg. Patrick McDennott. William Brooks. Miller. The one recruited in the counties of Albany and Saratoga. Meyer. Fred John Barrett. Charles M.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. Van Blarcum. Dennis. Alexander McAdory. Jacob E. Thomas . Eddy. Jedediah Burgon. was the first captain.. John Herdman. Cor Louis Holberton. : William B. Bailey. Arthur D.General Edgar W. Butler. Knower. and the of other at Canandaigua. Stephen Murphy. John Leary. Richard Bills. William Kehol. James Miller.

John Hoyt. and arrayed in new artillery uniforms they presented a very creditable appearance. with a horse fully caparisoned for service. Reilly. Francis H. William Fitzsimmons. John McGuire. the regiment then stationed at Camp Ward. James Hughes. George N. D. Torrell. Abijah Ovett. they proceeded to smash the lamps and pitched the A curi bar. James Stevens. and the day. Port Richmond. Michael Normil. Patrick Quinn. Treflier Santon. John Johnson. Dickens. Gilbert T. in behalf of the officers of the regiment.22 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Patrick Murray. Hoffman. was made memorable by what became known as the Duffy raid. Jackson. George Strack. Gilbert. Herrick. After the inspection Colonel Bliss presented Colonel T. 1862. Doubleday. Thomas Katny. Wixon. had lost not only their sense. Emmonds. It then numbered six hundred and ten men. David J. Franklin Wowgar. Peter Gotien. Robert Toben. Johanes Muller. it was discovered. but the indications were that afternoon that a great deal of it was being sold. Christopher Wohlers. Joseph Sprague. in behalf of the officers under your I command. George W. and some of the boys. Staten Island. Charles Herrick. Thomas McAdam. Dunn. The first pay was received by the regiment at Port Richmond. or more exactly the night. Moses J. Anthony On February 5th. with most of the other furniture. ous thing about these proceedings was that no one in the regiment seemed to have had any hand in it. William Ferguson. James Gannon. Louis Gerome. George Hubbard. Charles F. No one had the right to sell fire-water in that vicinity. Michael Kelly. was inspected by the Adjutant-General of the State. Owen Egan. and so a self-appointed committee visited the place and the saloon men being unwilling to give any satisfac tion. present you with this horse fully equipped for : . Wixon. Charles D. This loss was asserted to have occurred in Duffy's saloon near the dock. Abraham Kennedy. Arthur Simpson. William Hayes. Thomas McCreeden. Thomas Reardon. Emory L. In making the presen tation Colonel Bliss said " Colonel Doubleday. into the dock. Edward Grove. but all their money. Charles Massay. Mahlon Robinson. 0. Alfred Jickel.

strong. Guide on our banner. To Lieu tenant-Colonel Hall. our soldiers are strong. Lieutenant-Colonel H. after cheers for Governor Morgan and staff. Immediately after the presentation the guests and officers adjourned to the Coles House. . the following being the last stanza : " Then rally to our banner and make no delay The heavy artillery. followed by other songs. we are marching along. and shall start for Washington in one week. having special reference to the representative present. would say that we have marching orders. I cannot find my heart. an<J assisted in the ceremonies. was sung. and with hearts firm and To battle for the Union we're marching along. 23 the field." after which Colonel Doubleday responded as follows : ' : This is the proudest moment of words to speak the emotions that fill my life.) The band then struck up the " Star. will on the shed new lustre honored name you that you and when the guns of Fort Sumter again open their on the doomed city of Charleston. the company broke up in harmony.THE ORIGINAL ORGANIZATION. A patriotic song composed by Lieuten ant Frank C." (Applause. as we're marching along . in conclusion. Hall and Majors Allcock and Doubleday were present." (Great applause. fire casion. who has served his country on the blood-stained fields of Mexico." and Various toasts were then given.Spangled Banner. For God and our country we are marching along. may the name of Doubleday shine as bright then as it did on the former oc bear. our Colonel Doubleday We will follow him to death. I am indebted for the splendid body men I have the honor to command and. Filley and dedicated to the regiment. It is unnecessary to tell what great deeds you But I feel assured are expected to accomplish together. where a fine collation was spread. Marching along. Our cause it is just. H. and to the gallant and cour teous Major Allcock. . to which ample justice was done by the ladies and gentlemen present.) of I .

one of the lucky number. Staten Island. it well illustrated " the patriotism of the City of Brotherly Love. Colonel Thomas D. CAPITAL. Bemis. and were fed Artillery. the First New York Heavy in Philadelphia. Doubleday's command. was a cold day when Port Richmond. stopped at this saloon. on the Camden and Amboy Railroad. 1862. arranged in two sections. was left by the Fourth Regiment of Artillery a very cold day. The wind and snow seemed in hearty ac cord to bid them farewell as officers and men wended their way from the barracks to the steamer Kill van Kull. loaded with the substantial of life. Of this place Lieutenant George W. due somewhat to the numerous and extensive tables." Organized soon after the war broke out.CHAPTER MOVEMENT TO THE II. spread out to his view. gives the following description The interior wears a bright and attractive appearance to the weary soldier. for the purpose of feeding volunteers en route for the seat of war. The latter place was soon reached.M." From the records of the institution we find that February loth. and the command quickly aboard the cars. Few soldiers who passed through Philadelphia during the war will fail to remember the establishment known as " The Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon. bound for Philadelphia. having an antiquated : ' ' . six hundred strong. The walls of brick. which was reached about 10 o'clock P. and there seemed to be no special eagerness on the part of the boys to stand on the deck and take in the animated scenes the bay afforded as they crossed to the Perth Amboy depot.

Our supper was bountiful and of the best variety. and after a hasty repast.MOVEMENT TO THE CAPITAL. almost o'clock. the train started for Washington. They P9ssessed seats temporary seats. and about 4 Disembark o'clock P. Our boys enjoyed it mightily. Every door and window was filled with shouting men and women. a compro mise was effected. and ' ' ' ' returned the compliment in their own way. the regiment again took the cars. the was passed by the men spread out on the floor of the night mond.M. An association also existed in Baltimore for feeding vol unteers. and when passing a group of girls crying out Good-by. Before marching into supper. consisting of sandwiches and coffee. while the old flag was thrust out over our heads at almost every step. while the ceiling is fancifully decorated with tissue-paper devices and pendent memorials The capacity of this saloon may be of former battles.' ' " After this bountiful " feed the regiment marched to the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad depot. new cars being furnished. ing the counterpart of the farewell demonstration at Port Rich After a sumptuous repast on bread and coffee. look. and took the r It w as not a fast train. After some two hours' wrangling. but in other respects were not according to contract. estimated from the fact that two hundred thousand men have been fed there. 10 was about a snow-storm encountered.M. and such demonstrations of enthusiasm I have seldom witnessed. are whitewashed 25 and hung with pictures of heroes and warlike representations. As a contract had been made for comfortable transportation. and the newly uniformed artillerymen were somewhat sensitive as to their rights at that period. we paraded the streets. eight regiments in one night. and the last-named city was not reached until noon of Tues day. cheering lustily for the Stars and Stripes.' then would strike up I wish ' ' I was in Dixie. Captain Burt states that the first mules encountered were heard to bray at the Relay House. this side of Balti more. . there was some disposition on the part of the regiment to find fault with the open cattle cars offered for their accommodation. gals. cars again about 2 o'clock A.

Com MAJOR You will again post your guard at Fort Ricketts as soon as the guard of the Fifty-ninth is withdrawn. as we learn from the following order : . DOUBLEDAY. one hundred men of the regiment were detailed to go over the east branch of the Potomac and arrange quarters for the regiment' s accommodation. During the month a de tail from the regiment was also made to guard Fort Ricketts. Major Allcock at Fort Snyder.. : Artillery. The companies were distributed as follows Companies C. Thurs day morning. I am. ARTILLERY. or Anacostia River. that this regiment has been ordered to take Fort Ricketts in charge by Brigadier-General Berry. Colonel commanding. Fort Carroll. and by quite a circuitous route via the Navy Yard. day. another term for mud at that time. Fourth New York manding at Fort Stanton. through Washington's streets. As located. Your obedient servant. The stream itself r . D. they were designed mainly to protect the Arsenal. and a hubbub going on most of the night. A : HEADQUARTERS FOURTH REGIMENT N. . Colonel T. very respectfully. the doors constantly Wednes open. at the beat of the drum. C. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall command ing Companies E and G at Fort Stanton. February 19. FORT CARROLL. though newly constructed. and the Capitol from cannonade. the Navy Yard. Major Tfiomas Allcock. and H. Soldiers' Retreat. headed by the Colonel and other field officers. . first sending word to Colonel Tidball at Fort Baker. Doubleday commanding Companies B and F at Fort Greble. February 12th. D. THOMAS D. the floors being very muddy. Major commanding and Company Ulysses Doubleday commanding. D. 1862.26 HEAVY GUNS AXD LIGHT. Y. The forts which the regiment garrisoned at this period were w ell situated. a building not likely to inspire very pleasing recollections in the mind of any soldier who occu pied it. some five miles to the forts across the East Branch. seven companies took their way. at headquarters.

Sumner Ward. tliis Map garrisoned by the Regiment. Greble. Corcoran. Worth. Alexander. Strong (De Kalb).DEFENSES OFTOVS Showino FOR T S ABU B OAD 8 Forts on Albany. Barnard. Martin Scott. Bennett. Stanton. ' Ethan Allen. Snvder. Richardson. Berry. Kicketto. J)r knv-y. Carroll. Woodbury. Haggerty. Scott. Beno (Pennsylvania). Gainee. Reynolds. Marcy. Cameron. (Franklin). . Tillinghast. Vermont. Craig.

" Defenses of Says the author of the Washington" " From Fort Stanton to Fort Meigs the ridge is contorted and extremely narrow. and the difficulties of : Numerous selecting proper sites thereby greatly increased. unless an enemy were in of the Potomac below Washington. were dashes of cavalry at the bridges or the occupation of the heights by artillery and the guards were specially instructed to be on the lookout for the detection of signal lights and other suspicious objects. having em brasures or port-holes. furnishing no room for large works. The situation was not favorable to were cramped for room. Except Fort Stanton. they possessed no casemate guns. If any civilian happens to read these pages. form con l cealed approaches. or one who . The companies for the ost part m The men were mostly supplied with Sibley tents. . but they were really better adapted for defence than any brick-and-mortar structures. with the adjacent of the forts. the heavy guns being placed en bar bette for firing over the wall. It was generally thickly wooded. circular. though it mounted. What the possession regiment really had to guard against. rising twenty feet from the ground. were mere shanties used for storing the Commissary and Quartermaster's stores. Fort Carroll. the headquarters of the regiment. the construction of extensive fortifications.' leading up to the very counterscarps The plateau below Fort Stanton.28 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. on which are Forts Carroll and Greble. with a stove in the centre. Their chief component was mud. therefore. taking their origin at or near the crest. on that practicable side. was not at that time completed. but even there the slopes on either side toward Oxen Run and the Potomac could not be brought under view from the " crests of the works. ravines. afforded sufficient protection against assault except for Such operations were almost im siege-like operations. has. let him not get the idea that these forts were composed of brick and mortar. and the officers with square wall The only wooden buildings tents. however. much more convenient. lateral dimensions. had no opportunity of viewing the fortifications around Washington during the war. indeed.

perhaps. it expands. tion of this fort deed. Fairfax Seminary. A from the report of the Commission of Engineers appointed " by the Secretary of War to examine and report upon the system of defenses for the city. and platforms for two or three rifled guns on the east front. into a plateau of considerable width. which was commanded by the guns of the fort. rather an un- large and well built. and overlooks Washington. " Fort Carroll. at a level one hundred and thirty feet lower. Washington. It is a large and powerful work. and other points of interest. South of the ravine already spoken of the character of the summit between Oxen Run and tne Eastern Branch changes. and Eastern Branch. while to the south a full view was afforded of the Potomac. A spur toward Oxen Run gives a fine view of its valley from opposite Fort Snyder to opposite Fort Greble this point is occupied by a battery inclosed at gorge by a stockade. well built. is " Fort Greble occupies the extremity of the piateau. on old barbette car The loca riages. The fort itself : ." We quote 11 Fort Ricketts is a battery intended to sweep the deep ravine in front of Fort Stanton. Arlington House.MOVEMENT TO THE CAPITAL. " Fort Stanton occupies the nearest point of the ridge to the Arsenal and Navy Yard. At Fort Carroll this plateau narrows so as to afford a view of both slopes. where General McClellan' s quarters were then located. It is a work of consid erable dimensions. . and Arlington Heights. Instead of a narrow ridge. Alex andria. was delightful and the view very fine in To the west. the Potomac. were visible. more definite idea of these forts may be gained. and tolerably well armed. studded with encampments. well provided with magazines and bomb-proofs. and two thirty -pound Parrott rifle-guns." On February 15th a four-inch fall of snow. fourteen thirty-two-pounders. guarding the head of one branch of the ravine just mentioned. " Fort Snyder may be regarded as an outwork to Fort Stanton. Casemates for reversed fire are recommended in northwest and southwest counterscarp angles. 29 redoubts. Georgetown.

tended to give variety to the experience of the regiment without adding any spe cial pleasure to the situation. Nearly every tent on both sides of the Potomac was prostrated and some Company C found shelter in a neighboring and various new quarters were taken possession hay-mow. of or hastily improvised by the others. On February 24th a gale occurred such as few members of the regiment had ever before witnessed. Says Lieutenant carried away. and there was little or no comfort in it." ' ' : . and with additional ropes and The soil here is sand. having in charge these unfinished forts. and the ordinary pins don't answer. We stuck to Bemis. made out to save it.30 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. writing of this blizzard at the time our tent like a dog to a bone. it disappeared without the discomforts of mud incident thereto on the other side of the river. usual occurrence for the latitude. Up to yesterday we officers had messed with a corps of engineers. stouter pins. As the soil is very sandy.

fHEN in the regiment reached Washington. Well. some time was occupied in arranging quarters The before the regular military duties could be performed. camp by 1862 in a letter dated Bemis. their posts.CHAPTER III. though the District of Columbia was of Brigadier-General Wadsthen Military Governor. There is an Officer of the Day. all drawn up in line. The gunners were at command worth. ACROSS THE ANACOSTIA. who sees that the guard who have been on duty two hours are duly relieved by a fresh guard. Every day there are about sixty men detached for guard these are divided into three squads. the brother of our Colonel and our Major. February 16th. Lieutenant routine is thus described George W. . always a Captain. always a Lieutenant. of Fort Sumter fame. who is located at the guard tent. and as General Doubleday and his staff appeared a salute from every gun in Fort Carroll greeted him which shook the earth and caused some commotion across the river. 11 You may be interested to know the routine of military life. each serving two hours : . the regiments. . to determine the holding or discharge of any person arrested a Sergeant of the Guard. it re ported directly to General Doubleday. every day has its duties. As these forts had been newly built and were without barracks. The first visit of our department commander will be remembered. and commander of the Department of Military Defenses north of the Potomac a part of whose command we now formed. . who has in charge the care and disci pline of the camp for twenty-four hours an Officer of the Guard.

" guard mounting.M. Surgeon's call. The daily routine. o'clock for roll-call. which are so arranged as to be sighted at five hundred. " Peas upon a trencher. " leave the could followed by which soldier after no Taps. trencher. The Assembly." dress parade. and relieving each other during twenty-four I was put on Officer of the Day on Friday morning.M." at 7. was as follows " Reveille" at twenty minutes to 6 o'clock. on the Virginia are in the midst of rebels.30 P. the army regulations requiring that a commissioned officer shall be present on that occasion three times a day. A brass band was organized at Fort Carroll of experienced musicians.32 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and nine hundred yards. according to stated signals. the guns from which are occasionally heard by us. at 4. which could soon play very agreeably. was the signal for breakfast. This was a for men the to rise and the sentinels to leave off chal signal : " lenging. about twelve miles off." battalion " The drill. "Roast beef. and in some cases no connection between the barrel and nipple." when the First Sergeant conducted the able sick to the hospital. and consequently was up all night. " Monday Morning. One of our guards told me he saw at 1 o'clock a large fire in the direction of Washington. hours. at 12. side of the Potomac. at 9 o'clock." These arms were subsequently found to be worthless.'' at 9. is a rebel battery. which was still raging at 3 o'clock." dinner. Below us. company drill at 10 o' clock. Our men have the Belgian rifles. and on the guard firing the fellows decamped. lights were ' ' ' ' . Company roll-call" at 6 o'clock. at a time. Retreat." all without roll-call After quarters permission. It is strict duty. the barrels soft. It has rained nearly all night. tunities to spike our guns. " The " Troop. They were exchanged for Springfield rifles. seven hundred.M. as we and they are watching oppor The night before our arrival there was an attempt of this kind on the guns in Fort Stanton. and I was up at reveille at 6 still pours. freezing as it comes. at 6 P. " Peas on a " Tattoo. when soldiers not excused and absent were detailed for police duty. at 2 P. " To the Color." supper. the best imported arms.

A mule was shot by the picket guard near headquarters one night by mistake. Yet directly after his departure it be came very certain that a new supply of the ardent had been received by some of the sons of Mars. it w as said. It was unlawful to sell w hiskey to the soldiers. w hen the darkness came on. . they were so jolly The milk-cans were inspected more and demonstrative. carne to Major Allcock from headquarters to remove the family and destroy the Burke house. the first encounter with graybacks occurred. Adjutant. but. 33 extinguished except in the quarters of the Colonel." reading It appears. that this raid was not wholly with out results for while the gallant Major was interviewing the ladies. in spite r somehow they seemed to secure it. There were but few " moving accidents by flood and field" encountered at this post. Forts Stanton and Carroll supplied the soldiers with milk. had an occult power. Berky 's mysterious visions. burned on this account. of discerning mysterious lights indi cative of prowling desperadoes and base conspiracies. living between of Burke' s house. some portion of the command Tinder Sergeant George Burrows discovered three base conspirators. Another incident was the razing A man named Burke. Police. After marching up hill and down dale closely. Major Hamlink reports that at Fort Carroll. He poured milk the day out of every can. pretending to consisted of .ACROSS THE ANACOSTIA. Surgeon Berky. but whether by mistake or not is uncertain. however. and a twoyear-old heifer was shot similarly near Fort Stanton. when it was found that with certain cans the spout had no connection with the interior that the spout was full After which an order of milk and the can full of w hiskey. the heritage left by the engineer construc The tents had to be taken down and the frames tion corps. r r r : for about four miles in a bee-line for said light. The conspirators ' ' two very old ladies. Says " I recall being in command of Major James H. of all precaution. we located the conspiracy in a quiet farm-house. One milkman's cans were inspected. and Guard. one of them engaged in the Bible to the other. Wood about twenty men on a raid induced by one of Dr.

inspecting their quarters. Greble.secessionists were in his neighborhood making trouble. to be real service. were eaten the next day at dinner with ! cranberry sauce the flesh tasting not unlike that of turkey. of having performed our duty. Captain Edgar W. however. Dennis. finding nothing to molest or make afraid. where she afterward destroyed the Cumberland and Congress. concealed in the branches of a cherry-tree in the back -yard. Commander Dahlgren. of the Navy Yard. writes of his experience as follows 11 : Standing guard on a freezing. that two contrabands and one Confederate cap tain had been captured by his command that the former had been given up. we quietly re turned to camp before daylight. sciousness. and guarding portant roads and strategic points for a few hours . not having captured even & had the con potato as a memento of our expedition. One night in March a negro came into camp and reported that the ." When in March the Merrimac appeared in Hampton We Roads.disturbance." Alexander E.34 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. well illustrating how much better it would have been if those three had remained in the Union roost. located at Fort states . the culprits were immediately seized as It it and executed. and the uncertain light only served to heighten our imaginary dan Our operations were confined to the questioning of gers.set out after dark. A -detachment of about twenty men under Lieutenant Harris . strange may appear. Borthwick. in a letter of that period. however. drizzly night brought as many imaginary foes and discomforts as in after winters were realized when we knew the enemy was light over there within gunshot. for the scene of This was our first call for what might prove . be asleep. some im and then. " One expedition I remember from this place. negroes. Though but a few of the party were there. It was midnight of a moist March day.Company B. and the conflicting emotions that strove for mastery in each patriotic breast were hardly settled before our march of three or four miles brought us upon the field. with the negro as guide. and. came . was a foul conspiracy. of . and the latter locked up.

why the boys were not well suited with their situ ation at this period the sound of the cannon from across the Potomac could be heard daily. The timely arrival of the Monitor prevented the need and use of this battery. and soon after it was re ported that General McClellan. ! . how ever." An opportunity of this kind was soon offered. They were satis fied in time Accounts of the surrender of Fort Henry and of Fort Donelson were received in February. There was another reason.ACROSS THE ANACOSTIA. and all sorts of rumors . the quarters occupied by the men were not very comfortable. also of Burnside's cap ture of Roanoke Island. growing impatient for more active service. and the weather much of the time during our stay here unpropitious. . Every man was fully aware that the regiment had been mustered into the United of prospective States service as heavy artillery for the purpose of garrison ing the fortifications about Washington but to many a few months of this life was quite enough. contemplated an early advance on the enemy so that. Newspapers were not very plenty. at least. and they were beginning to fear that the war would close before they had opportunity to have a hand in. on the whole. As has been stated. It was hoped that they might have the satisfaction. Early in March descriptions were read of the battle of Pea Ridge.Major Allcock that he had ordered a battery of twelve-inch mortars sent to the Major's command. and in some instances to satisfy the craving for military glory. 35 over to Fort Stanton and informed . who had taken command of the Army of the Potomac. however. and active military operations as well. aside from these dis comforts. officers and men were . but they managed to re ceive quite as much news as the country afforded. as an advance of the Confederate fleet was expected on Washington. of invading the " sacred soil. and they longed for some change to break the monotony.

march "The annual change of May is . was sent over to occupy Fort Corcoran some days in advance. and with cheerful hearts.' all cast a lingering glance at our late home. having reached the con clusion that the Southern defenses were not sufficiently garrisoned. Wood. A CHANGE OF BASE. and at 9 o'clock the reunited regiment formed for the road. Captain Dennis. the Colonel commands Battalion for the band strikes up ward. who command ed the district. But as the Fourth is all amiable. route step. the hysterical and the irascible into aregiment that packs up before breakfast and goes off with bag and baggage within an hour then the chances are de cidedly in favor of high words.CHAPTER IV. gives the following account of the removal of the remainder of the regiment first : of abode of a large family on the considered quite a task. then. the tents struck. arms at will. Put. the haversacks supplied with rations. is apt to cause ex citement with nervous people and wrath with those of quiet temper. in command of Lieutenant J. H. bidding many an audible farewell to Car- we . The colors are given to the breeze. an order came about the beginning of April. the knapsacks filled and slung. let it be imagined that in perfect order the wagons were loaded. ' ' ! " ' To Dixie's land I am bound to travel . Company C. in a letter of April 9th. transfer ring the regiment to the forts south of the Potomac. ENERAL WADSWORTH.

trickling and under my bed. about half a mile farther. a terrible storm At first composed of sleet and hail. though disastrously for some sufferer. where we went into . cloudy. to watch regiments with interest. roll 37 and to Maryland. But. with twelve horses to a piece. with heads erect and elastic tread. numerous cheers greeted us. it changed to a set in. Borthwick says a short halt at Fort Corcoran our Company B went on to Fort DeKalb. The day was cool. and then gradually settled down to a steady. E. a heavy fire has just taken place on the Avenue. the mud fairly reached the muzzles of the guns. mak ing everybody wet and uncomfortable before adequate shel ter could be secured. having accomplished the dis tance of about eight miles without fatigue.A CHANGE OF BASE." Just as the regiment arrived. driving snow squall. and one of the horses. A. which penetrated tents and clothing. making a noise like an tent through my ' ' : infantile Niagara !'' for several days. cold rain. and. reached be Fort Corcoran at 1 o'clock. To say that our battalion attracted notice would But I will be permitted to state that self -laudation. after two halts for resting. " After Speaking of this removal. fortunately for us. we take the first step in our march The citizens of the Capital have ceased for Washington. however. : . actually strangled in the mud. " Through Georgetown and across the Aqueduct bridge we wound our way. and large crowds were on the streets. and well suited for marching. measured off the long stretch of that magnificent thoroughfare upon which Washington is tastefully strung. Says Captain Dennis Waking in the morning I heard the music of a and discovered a fine mill-privilege coursing rill. and Captain Burt relates that the red mud of the wagon road had assumed The storm continued the consistency of a mortar-bed or sewer so that Captain Burns' s Battery coming along. getting down amid the struggles of the others. and that very many white handkerchiefs were waved by fair hands as our glorious tooys. Darkness came on and the storm kept up with unabated violence all night.

which was garrisoning Fort Corcoran upon our arrival. Companies C. the water having been shut off and the floor being over laid with planks. One day a man with very strong anti-Union senti ments was caught putting a villainous compound into the spring from whence the regiment obtained drinking-water." The regiment now occupied five of the forts south of the Potomac viz. The main object of these fortifications was the protection of the Aqueduct This bridge had been formerly an aqueduct for the bridge. in a drizzling rain and sleet. took our former position at Fort Carroll. with the exception of Fort Corcoran. occupied these forts. Early in the winter of 186162. our first impression on For the sacred soil of Virginia being decidedly adhesive. he said he meant to poison the Company H Yankees ! . and our discomforts were not much lessened by being called out on guard duty. Several amusing incidents will be recalled as occurring here. On being remonstrated with. which had Corcoran. and throughout the entire period of the war was recognized as an important adjunct to the defenses of Washington and the military movements across the river. Company B Bennett. About the last of April we received two months' pay. left for Cloud' s Mills to guard a portion of the Alexandria and Orange Railroad. we soon settled down to regular drill. a detail from headquarters beins: at Fort The Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania. Artillery practice was resumed here with good range and target at sixteen hun dred yards. . the last seen of specie payments for years. D. which with a few of us included a gold dollar. Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Company F and Hag. our hopes of being called to join our comrades on the Peninsula becoming less camp every day. which we managed to break up about every practice day. Corcoran. it was converted into a military bridge.. . gerty. the next two days it rained and snowed most of the time. and the Ninetyseventh New York. Companies A and E DeKalb. camp and picket routine. and H Woodbury. .38 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. afterward known as Fort Strong. However.

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A subsequent search revealed the fact.A CHANGE OF BASE. and afterward the men were reprimanded generally. that the juvenile was loaded in the original style.' On being ushered into the guard-house and exam ined. In this sorry plight she was permitted to return. Island. and she was turned back. of dramatic enter A tainments and other gatherings at Fort Corcoran. Finally there was a purse made up for the poor man. as her visits ended right there. having probably had enough of the aqneduck. That the command did not neglect relaxation from labor or fail in securing all needed recreation at this period is horse race may be recalled on Analostan probably true. leading a little girl about eight years old. which fully reimbursed him for the loss of his pig. and her own skirts be ing clear. indeed. when Lieutenant Wood rode Captain Barnes's black horse and Sergeant Jones the other. Reminiscences may still linger in the minds of certain officers. 41 After shaving his head and applying molasses and flour. she was allowed to pass. the men amused themselves by chasing the poor wretch back across the bridge into "Washington. with rounded skirts. accompanied by his wife. dressed in gaudy attire. Yet no one seemed to know anything about it. when a suspicion arose that there was a bear in the fence. She was allowed to pass several times un ' molested. Then she changed her tactics. It was known that Poke Smith and Mike Fitzgerald had just skinned a pig. made frequent trips from Georgetown to our camp across the Aqueduct bridge. about a dozen pint flasks of whiskey were found sus pended beneath her skirt. Then the fun commenced. It was believed that some of the officers had a piece of that pork. The woman was soused into the old canal and dragged out. " of the col A ored persuasion." says Lieutenant Bemis." One day an Irish resident of Virginia. She appeared again. 11 stalwart female. the following will refresh their memories : If not . appeared at headquarters with a doleful complaint about having a pig stolen. however. and. there was an aroma like the odor of fresh pork when cook ing pervading the camp at that moment.

ye Winds of Morning V. from . Full Company.Tom Pion. Banjo Solo T. \1th. Blow. : you while you listen the origin of the same The sun stood still on Gideon. . H. deftly fingered by Lieutenant Foster. Mapes. II. Ore. Columbiad Twist Crinoliniana By One who Prof. has Travelled. in Pion. Railroad Galop . Local Song Full Company. SECOND CONCERT OF THE COLUMBIAD MINSTRELS. In these affairs the strains of the light guitar. B. Old Bob Ridley with a Tom Walk Around. PART I. will take part. The whole Miss to conclude which Miss Sally Port and Abby T. Hans Pike. Guitar Solo II. PART I. Medley II. And as two days ran into one. Annie of the Vale . B. May I. IV. written by W. 1862. Seeing Nelly Home VI. IV. AT FORT CORCORAN. The Fourth New York Artillery of Colonel Doubleday. Runnion. . Tom Pion. To fight for peace . that made the Doubleday. might have been distin guished. By Amateurs. The surname I'll tell of our Colonel is one of Bible fame. Overture. Quartette III. PROGRAMME. chaplain to say that his Sunday service It is due our was attended by a . in which the origin of the Colonel's name was explained as follows : (Are OP THE GAMBOLIER. VA. III.) New York State we come and Union. DANCE. Saturday Evening. we left the North and home We left our friends behind us and proudly marched away. Ore.42 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Nixon. by command of Joshua. It was on one of these festive occasions that a song was sung. Join in our cheerful chorus. This amused many besides Chaplain Carr.

Jocko could Once on a time a tail unfold . . melodeon of course. though it is to be hoped that not all of these met the unfortunate fate referred to in the following sad requiem : ON THE DEATH OF A FAVORITE MONKEY. 1862. FORT CORCORAN. 43 number at this time. and the drill. Mrs. WHOSE CAUDAL APPENDAGE HAD BEEN CUT BY THE FROST. and now his bust To parts unknown has been detailed. the main body were absent. were granted to visit the city of Washington. incessant. The same day the regiment marched seven miles to a review of the division. and afterward with great regularity. though so If the boys did not sing. in the shade. President Lincoln. in the words of the modern near. Piece to his end he's gone. inspected the At Fort Corcoran he was received with a salute of forts. true to life's decay. have acquired that reputation as artillerists awarded them by President Lincoln and other dignitaries. at which the Presi dent was also present. end first. A furnished the instrumental music. August 5th. to be referred to farther on in this work. SQUIB. Like other monkeys. though. and daughter were usually present. Colonel Doubleday. Where monkeys we trust. twenty-six guns. it could Not stand the pinch of winter's cold. The heat was so oppressive that Few passes several were forced to fall out of the ranks. Notwithstanding the enjoyments of this period.at 99 F. are. Curtailed he was. when the thermometer stood . particularly the artillery Had it not been so the regiment would not drill.A CHANGE OF BASE. But. The details for guard duty were very large. re-tailed. the work was as arduous and the regulations as strict as at any time afterward. Inspections were frequent. May 7th. song. with a number of general officers. That there were numerous pets harbored both by officers and men during their stay here seems probable." they fully realized the fact. " Thou art so near and yet so far. her son.

July llth. 26. These were the first officers to leave the regiment. Centreville. 18. First Lieutenant in Company B. resigned. Craig. 16. 20. London & Hampshire R. Long Bridge. Fairfax Court House. First LIGHT. Patent Office. : 1. Corcoran. 5. 31. 13. Port Tobacco. Woodbury. 14. 17. Henry G. Aquia Creek. Fredericksburg. Capitol. Church. 3.44 HEAVY GUNS AND June 21st. Navy Yard. Aqueduct Bridge. and. Arsenal. Matthias Point. etc. 7. 6. Richardson. 9. Chain Bridge. First Lieutenant com manding Company H. 28. 32. 27. President's House. 11. Maryland Shore. 8. Dennis. Orange Manassas Junction. Alexandria. 25. Indian Head. 2. Shipping Point. Falls 15. Maryland Point. Georgetown. Arlington House. of Company Edgar W. 21. 30. and on the 15th of the same month Surgeon Reese B. 33.R. Fort Washington. Vienna. 4.R. General Post Office. . 10. & Alexandria R. On the opposite page the following points of interest in and about Washington and vicinity in 1862 are shown F. Runyon. Albany. Harris. 23. Bull Run. 19. died September 10th. Berky and Acting Adjutant Mears both resigned. Forts Scott. 24. 29. 22. Washington. Smithsonian Institute. Bennett. Lieutenant William Rimmer. Mount Vernon. 12.

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ARTILLERY PRACTICE. While at Staten Island the officers were taken over to Fort Hamilton and other forta about the harbor and instructed in. L. and one on a casemate carriage also four six-pound rifled guns. where Company A was located. two guns of the same calibre on barbette carriages. Company B. having a battalion drill of the whole. and the artillery work was chiefly done with eight-inch siege guns mounted on barbette car At Fort Greble the target was usually a buoy riages. . EAYY of artillerymen. mounted two twenty-four-pound smooth-bore guns on siege carriages. . south of the Potomac. and one siege mortar. three thirty-pound Parrotts. two on casemate car also one twenty. had to drill on twenty-fourpound siege guns. Morrison dis tinguished himself on the occasion of a visit of InspectorGeneral Barry to this post by splitting the buoy. Belgian rifles were used in the infantry drill. were subjected to more kinds of drill than the volunteers of any other branch the military service. Across the Anacostia the com panies were required to drill two hours a day as artillery and two as infantry.CHAPTER V. anchored out in the river. artillery practice by Major Ulysses Doubleday. regiment at Fort Carroll every Friday. Lieutenant G. of which there were four mounted on siege carriages. the Enfield being the gun used. at Fort DeKalb. riages rifle . it is safe to say. one on a barbette carnage. A portion of the regiment were also drilled in infantry movements and the use of muskets. Fort Woodbury.four-pound brass field howitzer.

at Fort Bennett." The General smiled and said " Let me see you do that again. he immediately brought " that position to a present. suavely 11 Let me take your piece. May 5th Company Corcoran and joined Strong). The soldier had just joined the command. sir. After asking a number of questions about the movement. and not unf requently broken up on practice as the weather As soon day. in com mand of the division. should one ap When he saw General Whipple approaching on foot pear. " his musket was at a Halting and right shoulder shift." The confiding sentinel promptly handed over his gun. riages." the gun from facing to the front. and two ten-inch Company H. Some rivalry was developed among the drill-sergeants and cannoneers on these occasions. at Fort Haggerty. were limited to four twenty-four-pound smooth bores mounted on barbette car Company F. siege mortars. : : . The other companies at Fort Corcoran had two eight-inch sea-coast howitzers and three three-inch rifled Parrotts to try their skill upon." The guard repeated the movement with great precision. one six-pound field gun. E came from headquarters at Fort Company B at Fort DeKalb (Fort became settled infantry drill and on both light and heavy pieces was re artillery practice sumed by all the companies. the General said. but had been instructed to halt and present arms to a general officer. made a personal inspection on several One visit of General Whipple practice days of the work. will never be forgotten probably by the sentinel who was on guard at the entrance to the fort that day. sir. General Whipple. Targets made of heavy timber were put up at various ranges of from two hundred to two thousand yards. had the benefit of practice on two eight-inch sea-coast howitzers and three twenty-fourpound smooth bores.48 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. four thirty-pound Parrotts.

the command had been given. addressing Sergeant Benjamin A. sternly. : . Cor sir. right face to your posts march !" and the cannoneers took their positions promptly. At the fort named in his honor he made a complimentary speech. said state of considerable trepidation. Dickens. visited the forts. The Sergeant. One afternoon at Fort Woodbury. " Go right on with your work. A sentry from the same Company pursued quite a differ ent course with General Banks." said the Sergeant. He did not seem in the best of humor for some reason unknown to the subjects of his in The nearest detachment had halted in the rear spection. Now. of a thirty-pound Parrott. on one occasion. " 49 Here. the General com parapet. let me see if you know what a cannon is what do you call this. He would not allow the General to go on to the As he was acting under orders. where Company A was " stationed. said ." said the officer. At the conclusion of his visit the General had the unfor tunate sentry released. " Cannoneers. walking up to the rear of the gun. at Fort Alexander. plimented him highly. the commands. who was acting as chief of piece. Meanwhile the officer had dismounted. evidently. He gave : " Before you commence firing. when there was quite a little excitement developed among the men by the sudden arrival of a volun teer inspecting officer. sir ?" " The cascable. and. who was drilling the squad. " The cascable 2 What is the breech ?" " The breech is the mass of metal behind the bore which extends to the cascable. but was in a he did not show it. saluting. con gratulating the command on their fine military appearance.ARTILLERY PRACTICE. what kind of a guard are you ? !" this man to the take guard-house poral. Some time in August General Corcoran. after giving him some suggestions." The officer. to march !" had and detachments the several your posts reached their guns. thin man with blue eyes and light hair. a tall. a little put out with himself. Sergeant. Cannoneers.

A similar incident occurred at Fort Ethan Allen." your target What charge do you use for that distance ?" " Three and one-quar ter " pounds. and had the satis faction of grazing the top of the target. go on what do you call this 1" " The re-enforce. Some chiefs of pieces could not answer promptly the questions put to them. et. When .if you don't know something about it. sir. and Colonel Tidball became excited. be . of Company B." said the officer. The Sergeant acted as gunner.. and things were not in the best shape. " Load by detail load !" The men went through their various parts without a break. had come up. on the efficiency of your com mand. The visit was unexpected. I. SIR?' " Three and one-quar ter degrees." " Very well." The Sergeant had recovered his equilibrium completely. now go on. where we were inspected several times by General Barnard. in this piece ?" " A wrought-iron jack shrunk on to the gun." elevation?" "At what WHAT DO YOU CALL THIS. let us see what you can do. Well. as he rode away. in command of the fort. sir . The last piece inspected was a forty-two-pound siege gun commanded by Sergeant S. Meanwhile Cap tain Sears." . sir. This was particularly notice able in the case of the Sergeant in charge of the mortar. He gave the command." " What is it made of .HEAVY GUNS AND " I'll LIGHT. 11 cast-iron Correct what range ?" is " About fifteen hun dred yards. " I congratulate you. after Colonel Tidball took command of the regiment. More.

and the shot sped wide of the mark. The Colonel was evidently pleased and interested.ARTILLERY PRACTICE. evidently much excited." The command to fire was given. target. grape." The Sergeant again sighted the gun and hit the : . it is all right let 'er go. The Sergeant sighted the gun." To every question Sergeant More gave prompt and ready answers. Sergeant." " What do you use ?" " Solid shot. do you command this gun ?" " I do. Captain Morrison. Sergeant ?" "I have. 51 the inspectors reached his gun the Colonel was exceedingly angry and the Inspecting Officer very critical.old United States head blowed off let your Chief of Piece fire. going completely over the target." " What are those ?" " The sir. anxiously. Walking up to the piece. saying. Colonel Tidball said. sir. " Now. the General expressed a desire to see some firing. sir. of the cascable. Looking . After becom that satisfied the was ing fully Sergeant properly acquainted with his piece." "What is this?" putting his hand on the knob of the : cascable." was the prompt reply." Captain. and spherical can-shell. Turning to the Captain. sharply " Keep away from that gun. " What kind of a gun is it ?" " A forty-two-pound siege." trunnions. " Knob " What is this ?" " First re-enforce." answered More. for his face brightened and his brow cleared. he said " Sergeant. and was about to fire when Captain Charles Morrison came up. or you will get your . " Let me said the : see.. . sir. through the breech-sight he turned the elevating screw down two threa'ds. and asked " Have you got that right.

who was to give him the signal for letting the potatoes go. had been a militia officer." was the member of the squad whose duty it was to pull the lanyard after the gun was sighted. and the other chap over head. fire !" to the great amusement of the boys. At Fort De Kalb. leaned back. "Gun squad No. on one occasion. when the command was inspected by President Lincoln. let go the half it when . Captain Charles Morrison. men for some time Whenever any disturbance occurred among the men. This trick was arranged to be executed while the com pany were on parade. mutiny !" in being understood that the latter was to lean backward the potatoes were to drop. was sitting in his bunk opposite the door. and rush ing to the barrack' s door. heartily. James L. the " Captain was wont to use the expression." ex claimed Inspector. Captain Morrison noticed the absence of this latter soldier from parade after the company had been formed. to avoid being seen. looked up at the bunk. 2. fire!" he yelled. " The best shot on the line and the Banner Squad. 2. some of the boys had put up a job on another member of the command. The man. on one occasion. known as " Buck Bailey. especially anything not in accordance with his wishes. One of the men was up over the door. Colonel Tidball looked happy. the first Captain of Company B.52 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. This became a catch-phrase among the afterward. instead of giving the proper command. and another. Cap tain Morrison was so excited that. Bailey. but was likely to be excited on occasions where the cause was slight. Mutiny there's ! camp At Fort Marcy. and arranged that when he entered the barrack's door. and was very rigid in his ideas of discipline.General Barnard. for the " Siege-gun Squad " had redeemed all. Captain Morrison was in a state of great trepidation. a half bushel of potatoes poised above the door should come down upon his head. " Buck Bailey No. taking the movement for the signal.

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there's : Damn my The result camp !" mutiny was that both of these men were put in the in guard-house. but was so out of breath that he could not give the order. which came rattling old Captain. The old man wanted to see the commander of the fort. the men " Fix bay being at company front.ARTILLERY PRACTICE. double-quick !" They were out near the Leesburg Pike. "Halt! Mutiny! Damn my finally to say there's mutiny in : camp !" Captain Morrison thought the world of his men. Old Captain Morrison happened to be upon the parade ground and noticed the altercation at the sally-port. and came back with some poultry. person. One day while drilling his men in company evolutions at Fort Marcy. so they increased their speed beyond the regulation limit. and after the de tails of the manoeuvre had been gone through. potatoes. lanky old man ap peared at the entrance to the fort. Charge bayonets !" and then. He moved off in front of the centre of the company and directly up a hill. who happened to be one of the soldiers in the previous day's expedition." said the sentry. he gave the command. and beef. he managed soul. Next morning quite early. At the brow of the hill was a rail fence. Meanwhile the bayonets were touching his coat. The old . " You cannot pass. which they ber of the had procured from some source. A num command had been down to Lewinsville. Sputtering and blowing. As they got in proximity to this the bayonets of the men behind him were very close to the Captain's He suddenly turned around to halt the command. sir. bushel of potatoes. 55 down around the He " ran out of the barracks. and sent his orderly down to see what was wanted. Some of the men thought it would be a good chance to get off a joke on the old Captain. and was challenged by the sentry. " " Forwardonets !" then. a very tall. yelling at the top of his voice soul. Captain Morrison explained to them about the way they should act in making a charge.

you are entirely mistaken. but I am so unfor tunate as to be in com mand of a lot of damned beef the ! Methodists. GIVE ME THE OLD SHOTGUN YET. belonged to this fort. while en gaged in artillery prac the of the were fort tice. President Lincoln in command spected the Before several times. . the ball striking the ground and throw ing dust on the target. before he could get a further hear ing. without a word moved on to the next gun." This put off the old until the return of and man of secesh proclivities Major Doubleday. on Fort Corcoran leaving one occasion. The President. and that he wanted to see the commander of the fort. "my soldiers steal chickens 2 No. General Sturgis and staff. was being a range of two thousand yards The gunner made an indifferent shot. who. When the old man reached him he gave Captain Morrison a pitiful account of having been deprived of his poultry and day previous by some soldiers. young Stanton. " Let him pass right in.56 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT." said the Captain. first stopped at. they won't steal anything. sir Old man. some two hundred yards. which was a smoothbore casemate howitzer used for clearing the ditch. with several other officers.'' Secretary Seward. man said his name was Ganz. and being fired at com The gun they fired at paratively short range. who was holding Tad up in his arms to see the result. I am a good Catholic my self. "What!" said the old Captain. companies surprised by a visit from the President. he believed. accompanied by his son "Tad. a rifled piece.

General George B. one company Fourth New York Artillery near it the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania (new regiment). and in Fort Albany two companies of same regiment. J. referred to in the following report of General Barnard. In Forts DeKalb. guns. Craig. August 28. 1862. and Barnard one platoon Fourth New York Artillery each. 57 The target was two a wall tent fly suspended between poles by wires. L. within two this report was made by General Barnard. WASHINGTON. Haggerty. Barnard. Morrison was the gunner. and as General McClellan had also witnessed their work and evinced his high opinion of their skill. and is well used to the use of the . Woodbury. BARNARD. Later on detachments from the regiment were sent to Forts Albany. and Ethan Allen. as he cried out 11 Give me the old shot-gun yet. illustrative of the petty rivalry. an assistant in As spector. McClellan. slapped his leg in seeming de light.ARTILLERY PRACTICE." The piece was afterward known as Uncle Abram's shot : gun. This regiment is about six hundred strong." As President Lincoln had been present at the target practice on several occasions and complimented the officers person ally on the efficiency of the men. Tillinghast. Craig. The gunner took careful aim. In Fort Artillery Ethan Allen. G. Brigadier-General . the report of the inspector aforesaid did not count for much with the boys. . and as the smoke cleared the cen President Lincoln. probably. the Fourth New York near it one regiment of new troops. Alexandria : In Fort Marcy is one platoon. of course belonging to another artillery regiment. tral portion of the fly had disappeared. throwing up his right hand. Tillinghast. Chief after days of Engineers of the United States Army. The following is an official order of similar import : . In Fort Corcoran one company and one platoon Fourth New York Artillery. reported the Fourth Artillery as "indifferent artillerists. Lieutenant G.

that his Excellency. and General Pope had superseded General McClellan. the President of the United States. G. A day or two before the bat tle of Manassas occurred..General STURGIS. on the high state of discipline and drill to which they have attained. It will be remembered that after the close of the Peninsular campaign. An placed in command of the defenses at Washington. engaged in conversation with the Lieutenant. 1862. rode into the fort at Munson's Hill.58 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1862. The General. the battery after Located the battle of Chantilly occurred. A. and through him his officers and men. The General commanding would further avail himself of this occasion to congratulate Brigadier-General Whipple. The commanding General takes pleasure in announcing to the officers and men of Whipple's Division. It also happened that a man for a misdemeanor was tied to a cannon-wheel. it was in the line of the pursuing column of the enemy. General McClellan. GENERAL ORDERS. has been pleased to express himself in the highest degree gratified with the military appearance of the troops and the superior skill displayed by them in the use of the guns. It happened that a detachment under Lieutenant Hamlink were engaged in testing the range and accuracy of the guns. accompanied only by an orderly. without noticing the unfor tunate. MIGHELS. VA. August 6. 31. Colonel Hamlink informs the writer that this did some excellent service on September 2d. morning near Falls Church. Captain and A. with headquarters at Alexandria. the latter had been note. HENRY One visit of R. was occupied by a detachment of the Fourth Artillery during the latter part of August. General McClellan's is decidedly worthy of earthwork or battery called Fort Taylor. By order of Brigadier. HEADQUARTERS RESERVE ARMY CORPS. and expressed himself as well pleased with his observations of their work. some distance beyond the defenses of Washington proper. No. and which elicited so much praise throughout the whole operations of yesterday. and when the Confederate cavalry came . ALEXANDRIA.

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the target being located miles up and as a shot w as T the Potomac. August 31st General McClellan visited Company C at Fort Ramsay and remained a short time. fired. 61 within range of the guns. lo rn td on a cluster of MAJOR-GENERAL GEO. very good Try that over again. commanding heights. and also Cameron and Vermont. Alexander. Ramsay was egg-shap ed and mounted eleven the guns. also Fort Buffalo and Fort Tay lor. were all beyond the defenses of Washing ton. some four Banks was present. Major-General the General. On September 3d Gen eral McDowell visited Fort same fort. six thirty-pound five and Parrotts smooth-bores. but instead had reared upright in the air. Franklin. another at Fort Pennsylvania. This fort." But the firing squad were in dismay. During the summer various details of companies and de tachments from the regiment had been made to other forts and batteries. cried out " Very good. and Major Allcock in com mand of Fort Gaines and a portion of his command garrison ing Forts De Russy. holding his field-glass : ! with both hands. Ripley. for through the neglect of one of their number the big gun had not recoiled properly. MCCLELLAN. Thus we find a detachment at Fort Albany. B. At Fort Alexander on one occasion a detachment of Com pany A were engaged in testing a one-hundred-pound Parbatteries rott at very long range. a few volleys served to stop their course. some four miles west of Arlington. . lying between Four-Mile Run and a tributary of Hunting Creek.ARTILLERY PRACTICE.

" said he." General Augur with other officers was present at Fort Marcy on one practice day. "you can try it some other day. Colonel Pease that his soldiers had attacked and captured teenth New York were stationed near. One day there seemed to be an im addition to the portant post rations in the shape of fresh About the time an old farmer complained to same pork. it may be of two other incidents which occurred later At on. the former post Captain Frank Williams' s Company were located for a short time. FORT MARCY (LOOKING IN).62 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. The General burst into a laugh as he turned and saw the position of the cannon. "Never mind. and complimented the command on its efficiency. While on the subject of artillery practice. Colonel Pease commanding. . one at Fort Franklin and the other at Fort Marcy. and the One Hundred and Seven interest to refer to Volunteers.

and stated that some of his artillery men had evidently been molesting the fanner' s hogs. soldiers had been so sly about it that the culprits failed to be discovered. There being not even a smell of pork to be detected about the infantry quarters. As the other incident reflects on two inspecting their officers. York Heavy Artillery." Yes." said the Captain. " they had blue stripes. It was incidentally found out. An inspection of the Fourth New. that some of the artil lerymen possessed infantry pants. the Colonel sent for Captain Williams. for the real purpose of preferring charges against a commanding officer. after the company left Fort Franklin.ARTILLERY PRACTICE. addressing the " what sort of a stripe they had on their panta farmer." said the farmer That seemed to settle the matter. 63 some of his hogs. however. names are not given. loons " r . The officer in command at Fort . though the infantry FORT MARCY (LOOKING OUT). " Did you notice. had been suddenly and unexpectedly ordered.

they decided to accept his invitation to dine mean while they took another glass of the light summer drink.64 IIKAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. ously the officer in command a friend in the shape of a case containing samples of nearly every variety of known liquor and the light sum mer drink embodied a portion of the contents of nearly every bottle. " Who is in command of this post ?" The officer was sum moned. Marcy was quite friendly to the commanding officer at Fort Ethan Allen. who was a con noisseur in the art. After dinner the company was found drawn up ready for . The officers assented. drew rein tors. who promptly saluted. INSPECTION THROUGH A GLASS. mer ing their horses in charge of an orderly. the fact may be disclosed. and in some way had discovered the purpose of this special inspection but only a few minutes in ad He immediately formed a plan to detain the inspec vance. His servant. He was very po lite. . the quarters were delightful. Things seemed to look differently after the inspecting officers had taken one drink only. and the weather was exceedingly warm. had just prepared a light sum and he would be pleased to have the two officers step into his quarters and participate. giv drink. and as the commandant's dinner was nearly ready. elegantly attired. at Fort Marcy there was no one to be seen except the sentry in front of the officers' quarters. They were charmed with the view from Fort Marcy. mate of its composition. that about a week previ had received a present from . AVhen two young officers. The drink did indeed taste like nec tar of the gods but in order to form a just esti .

65 and one of the officers shaw a spbetter lookin' set They signed a report for the remarked that he " never of men. inspection." entire command without visiting the regimental headquarters a report said to have been prepared by a young man named Price. .ARTILLERY PRACTICE. After being assisted on their horses the inspectors departed in excellent spirits.

that Lee and Stuart with large forces are at Manassas that the enemy. but presume it is a mistake. with one hundred and twenty thousand men. I agree with him fully. he says an old regiment should be added to the force at Chain Bridge and a few regiments distributed along the line to give confidence to our new troops. that there is no garrison in Ethan I have just conversed Allen." This was at 1 P. General McClellan said "Please see Barnard. Reports numerous. and think the enemy is in such force near Manassas as to make it necessary for us to move in : force. Second New York Artillery. intend advancing on the forts near Arlington and Chain Bridge. according to circumstances. his communications to General Halleck. especially Ethan Allen and Marcy. from various sources. as of the first importance. he said further " Colonel Wagner. inci dentally. the day before the battle of Bull Run be gan.M. He reports strong infantry and cavalry force of rebels near Fairfax Court House. " General Barnard telegraphs me to-night that the length of line of fortifications on this side of the Potomac requires . has just come in from the front. and think our fortifications along the upper . events. perfectly secure. DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. two thousand additional batterymen and additional troops At all to defend intervals. with Colonel Holabird.M. I have heard. and be sure that the works toward the Chain Bridge are I look upon these works. with a view of attacking Washington and Baltimore. in a despatch at 10 P.CHAPTER VI. : .

and the movements of the enemy seem to indicate an attack upon these works. of the New York Fourth. under Lieutenant Morrison. and one platoon of Company B. BARNARD. as Colonel Doubleday. On arrived there. sent the day our boys left Fort Corcoran Sumner' s division by General McClellan from Alexandria. the forts about Chain Bridge. Williams." "General-in-Chief. : 29. Assistant Adjutant-Gen Alexandria Please direct the Fourteenth Massachusetts to report to Brigadier-General Whipple at Arlington. is commanding there. already in Fort Ethan Allen arranging the for heavy guns defense. for not sending a part to Fort Marcy. G. I think. Fort De Russy. 67 part of oar line on this side of the river very unsafe with their present garrisons. and the place has always been garrisoned from his regiment. Army. J. September 7th Company C arrived at Fort Ethan Within a week the entire regiment was located in Allen. tributed in Fort Gaines. But General Barnard in the following communi cation to General McClellan seems to have favored the re tention of our regiment at that point : WASHINGTON. . " GEORGE B. Battery Cameron. August Brigadier-General eral. Companies and G were dis H Battery Martin Scott. On the day the battle of Bull Run terminated so disastrously Company A went into Forts Alexander and Franklin across the river. but there are good reasons at the present moment. Brigadier-General. Major-General H. was doing similar duty in Fort this time At Marcy. I will have it distributed in the most important works. 1862. United States Company D. under Captain Jones of our was regiment. MCCLELLAN. HALLECK. Battery Vermont. (Signed) " " Major-General. S. Another regiment was urged for the fortifications at Chain Bridge. and Fort Penn sylvania. W.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. I would relieve part of his regiment and send it to Ethan Allen and Marcy.

No. 23. VA. yet for the most part wiry and tough. It was probably an order for them to re-enforce Pope for in ten minutes they wT ere on the march again. of course. and had fairly settled down to rest when an orderly was noticed bringing despatches to their headquarters. about twenty miles up. referred to in the following . had sent these troops to intercept him. picket-guards. A : HEADQUARTERS WHIPPLE'S DIVISION. and passed over the same route our boys had taken to Chain Bridge and across the river. all looking jaded and dirt-begrimed. RESERVE ARMY CORPS. due to the confusion incident to the defeat. 79. via these headquarters. Eveiy fort on the route was besieged by them. It was rumored that Stonewall Jackson had crossed the river near Pools ville. August SPECIAL ORDERS.68 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. which proved of great service. who seemed to be especially on the alert for the defense of the city. 1862. . are hereby directed to organize the system of patrols. and General McClellan. ARLINGTON. Their appearance was that of a worn-out. seedy army. The difficulty was. and chain of sentinels from Fort Marcy. the greater part of these troops were ordered back. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Other divisions of troops from General McClellan's Peninsular army arrived about the same time. Many of these poor fellows seemed almost in a starving condition.. of the Fourth New York Artillery. both as a defense and as a means of conveying information of the enemy's movements to the Capital. H. and many of our boys found a positive satisfaction in going without their own suppers in order to feed these starving soldiers. to Fort Lyon. After the result of the battle became known. system of patrols was organized by members of the regiment. Hall and Major Allcock. They pitched their tents on a little plateau near Fort Cor coran. They were glad to eat the water melon rinds which they found lying along the road. The daily details which may be required for this purpose will be made from the regiments of this command outside of the forts. and not to any lack of stores at headquarters.

August 30. A. . around the south side of the defenses of Washington. DALTON. Please see that the arrangements are perfected to-night. at Fort DeKalb. 1862. : And on the morning of the 30th. Two days before the battle the cavalry . You are hereby detailed to continue in charge of chains of sentinel pickets and outposts established. proved especially serviceable when the unfortunate battle of Manassas occurred. EDDY. One Hundred and Twenty-fourth.. WHIPPLE.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. : MAJOR ALLCOCK on special service A. at Fort Albany. VA. Very respectfully. RESERVE ARMY CORPS. An order came subsequently. MAJOR The General directs me to inform you may employ the cavalry mentioned as you see fit. One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. G. Brigadier-General. 1862. 69 Lieutenant-Colonel Hall will superintend the lower and Major Allcock the upper portions of this line. C. Please communicate with headquarters often and freely. By command of Brigadier-General WHIPPLE. A. HEADQUARTERS WHIPPLE' s DIVISION. A. in directing the line of pickets. Very respectfully. will detail one Lieutenant each to report for duty to Lieu tenant-Colonel Hall. D. W. directing Major Allcock to take one hundred men from each new regiment entering the defenses of Washington for the purposes of this patrol The special duty in which Lieutenant-Colonel Hall and Major Allcock were engaged. ARLINGTON. August : 28.. The com manding officers of the One Hundred and Seventh New York. D. U. A. W. HENRY E. and One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania. pickets were entirely intrusted to Major Allcock. W. the following ARLINGTON. The commanding officers of the One Hundred and Twentyseventh and One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania will detail one Lieutenant each to report to Major Allcock. that you your obedient servant.

. with two companies of the Tenth New York Cavalry. The following night an amusing incident occurred. Major Allcock. met General Sigel's Corps retreating.70 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. of the Signal Corps. The Major demanded to be taken to General Cox." Major Allcock sent it to the fort at Upton's Hill by Lieutenant Darling. Fugitives are seen to be enter closely. when it came out that the signal officer had sent the countersign Bonaparte^ instead of Napoleon. leaving the cavalry to guard the rear of General Sigel's command. at least those to the south and west of the city. for several nights the guns were shotted and ready for use. The countersign was " Napoleon. and gave the General the countersign. to the Sixth Cavalry. sir consider yourself under arrest. DEAR SIR : Your communication favor. 1862. The Major went to Ethan Allen. WHIPPLE. Brigadier-General. In every fort. and went with a third to a church at Lewinsville. stationed an officer there. Examine them A. The countersign for Saturday. " Not right. W." whispered the Major over the guard's car bine. But the Major was held a prisoner about three hours. who ordered him to halt and give the countersign.50 P." was the astonishing reply. " Napoleon. After this corps had passed the cross-roads. . the labor and anxiety were something quite immense." and the first announcement from an official source that the Federals were not successful was the follow '" ing communication referring to this countersign : Major I Allcock. ing with false passes. was Malvern.M. thank you for the received at 11. He was intercepted in the woods by some cavalry pickets belonging to the Sixth Ohio. who was especially ordered to carry it to General Cox's Division. Though the actual fighting performed by the artillery in the defenses of Washington at this time was unimportant. August 30. started with an orderly for Upton's Hill.

D. : " You will see by garrisoning a fort two miles out from Georgetown. C. the baggage going around by the road. began to assume proportions. Says Lieutenant Bemis. and one of which is constantly looking right at it.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. The only unoccupied ground was low and and before night our city A tremendous rain-storm ' drove some of the men to neighboring barns for the night. and the supernumeraries with their loaded muskets paraded along the wall. ing on their arms. we marched gayly on. 1862. uninviting. while four other com As panies of the same regiment are encamped outside. 71 detachments of cannoneers relieved each other at regular intervals. the men sleep notice. and the Colonel watched these indications of battle through his field-glass with evident interest. requiring but the pull of the lanyard to blow the nota ' ' ' ' ble structure into fragments. and we for this Headed by our brass band. and now we are enjoying our otium cum dignitateS . on short We remained at our guns all night. and on Tuesday night last our de tachments were at the heavy guns. place. the latter bound for Fort Franklin. We have two companies of the One Hundred and Thirteenth New York with us inside the fort. but we set to work. On Monday morning we marched to this post through a by-path. During the afternoon clouds of smoke could be seen rising on the distant horizon. last had to for the few we have sleep you may suppose. as if from artil lery.' whose guns command the Chain Bridge. the guards were doubled. written from Fort Pennsylvania. with Company A. and every precaution taken to prevent surprise. We left Fort Cor coran one week ago yesterday.' the night at Battery Vermont. crossing by the Aqueduct Bridge to Georgetown. Our orders were to pitch our camp inside the fort. my heading that we (Company H) are days with one eye open. and since then we have been getting settled. about dusk. and giving Starthe secesh sympathizers there a touch of the some fetched mistake we By up for Spangled Banner. in a letter of September 7th. The morning brought a quiet to our apprehensions of an attack.

guns. much to the edification of those that understand them. Fort Franklin. It mounted two one-hundred-pound Parrotts. afterward known as Fort Sumner. occupied the highest point of ground north of the village of Tenallytown and between the Potomac and Rock Creek. Scott. Lieu tenant Bemis says in this letter: "Looking out from my tent as I write. and Ripley). lamps. the country to the west and north. which. Franklin. and two twenty-four-pound Coehorns. nine twenty -fourpound sea-coast howitzers. Then comes white with red to its predecessor. was located some two miles west of Fort Pennsylvania and north of the Washington Reservoir. first to the right and then over his head to the left back again now forward and chassez again. fifteen smooth-bore guns. along with Chain Bridge. and Cross (orig inally called. mounting two six-pound James's Chain Bridge at the Maryland end. chiefly twenty-four-pound and three mortars. Battery Vermont was on the south of this Reservoir. com prising three small redoubts. It also had two eight-inch siege howitzers. pieces." Fort Pennsylvania. and with one one-hundred-pound Parrott could reach the more distant hills in advance of the line be tween Forts Franklin to the west and De Russy to the east. outdo centre. respectively. go through the ' back now upright same fantastic evolutions.' In the evening. two ten-inch siege mortars. four thirty-pound Parrotts. commanded . Kirby. which was afterward called Fort Reno. but I suppose it means something. and possessed three sea-coast howitzers while Battery Martin . Alexander. communications with some distant point by means of signals.72 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. The value of the Signal Corps as an auxiliary branch of the service began to be appreciated about this time. it was built to protect. A man is now swinging a flag of black ground and white centre. striving ground 'Tis all Greek to me. com manding with its guns the wide open plain on either side of the river road. single and double. Davis. there is going on from the top of the Col onel's headquarters. besides twelve other rifled ers. which was plainly visible. It overlooked the valley in front and on both flanks.

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performed considerable work in constructing this fort. York Volunteers. entirely dry. strong stockade with large gates was also placed across the Leesburg Pike as security Fort Ethan Allen was against sudden dashes of cavalry. were connected by lines of rifle-trenches. and commodious barracks for the men and comfortable quarters for the officers erected. leaving the rest of the bed. which was covered with huge fragments of rocks. with others. At high water the river. Ethan Allen and Marcy. commanded a portion of the Leesburg Pike. The value of the position on the Virginia side of the bridge. As a means of defense iintil the forts were constructed. resting on masonry abutments and seven masonry piers. had been noted early. which also extended to the banks of the river. with auxiliary batteries.74 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. we find that that regiment. Eleven of these guns were thirty-pound rifled Parrotts three were twelve-pound Whitworths A . as well as the numerous ravines and approaches to the works. both as a means of conducting operations with the army in Virginia and incidentally to the defense of Wash ington. . usually the width of its channel in an angry whole rapid. occupied the site. swept flood. The water usually flowed through a single span next to the Virginia shore. flanked by the river and having a deep ravine in its front. This fort mounted thirty-four guns. During the war a timber-trussed bridge over four hundred yards in length. The two forts. It was materially altered and strengthened after our regiment reached the place. strengthened by increasing the thickness of the parapets on the exposed front and by rebuilding the magazines and bomb j)roofs to protect them from artillery fire. it was altogether a very formidable affair. and for some time afterward. which was carried away by a flood. the floor planks of the bridge next to the Virginia shore were taken up every night by the guard. which. The name "Chain Bridge" was derived from a former suspended structure. and. and in September of the pre vious year the fortifications had been laid out and partly In Judd's history of the Thirty-third New constructed. .

was for a time performed by the infantry supports. remainder in rear. of Company D. five smooth-bores. joined the regiment at Fort Ethan Allen a day or two before the battle of Bull Run occurred " Our first experience was to be ordered out in the middle of the night eight of us green farmer boys were stationed at a brass field-piece. : McCallister. hooked on the lanyard. twenty-four-pound siege Fort Marcy had six thirty-pound and three twenty-pound Parrotts. enemy. Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania. A day or two before the battle of Antietam occurred. extending from the timber to the river. which made the startling announcement " : An attack is expected to-night. nine hundred men. an orderly rode into the post with a despatch from General Barnard. One Hundred and Twentieth tridges each New York. . who. three companies in fort." This order had the effect at least of making things exceed- . the work of our garrisons was by no means light. Until some time after the battle of Antietam was fought. seven hundred men. Captain Zime. which had been performed by the artillery. with one old soldier in charge. one company in fort. balance in rear. ten-inch thirty -two-pound brass howitzers and Coehorns. . mortars six. Says Eugene Cooley. however. The infantry took position in accord with the follow ing memoranda furnished by General Allcock " AT FORT ETHAN ALLEN. at the darkest time of night. 1862. five cartridges each Col onel Jennings. One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania. Colonel On night at the guns." " AT FORT MARCY. and waited nearly a week for the ." the night of August 29th. three. nineteen car Colonel Sharp. : . the men stood all which were loaded with shell and canis ter. Have all the troops under arms. put in the primer. and three mortars. 75 four. We loaded the cannon with a percussion shell. with other recruits. One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsyl .DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. guns shotted and ready for action. vania. The picket duty.

less than a hundred rods from us. writ ten from Fort Pennsylvania : "Since my former letter we have slept at our guns' an other night. and armaments in this vicinity are being put in their fullest and most complete order. all commanding an extensive range of valley. are "The being liberally constructed. They evidently feel to as choose above us. I think the result would be rather decisive on the fate of General Lee's army. as well as a country road. they now would seem to be a design The look of the thing just on the part of the rebel army to go around us and find a way of escape to Richmond on the east side of the Blue ' ' The several divisions of Hancock. As I mentioned before. So you see that this post is one of great importance.76 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Says Lieutenant Bemis. operate above the river. Woodbury. But we must wait for events as time and the Government will ville. but. ' materially impede their escape to the rebel cap Could our army thus succeed in trapping the game among these rugged mountains. and showed what might be done in case of an attack. embracing the turnpike to Har per's Ferry. We are transferring a portion of our twenty-four-pounders to the eastern face of the fort. and new ones.' with a concerted move of McClellan by a short cut via the Manassas route toward GordonsRidge. Some batteries are being enlarged. without the compliment of a call from our rebellious neighbors. being inside but there are several companies of an Albany . county regiment (the One Hundred and Thirteenth) just . as before. though no enemy ap peared. These "night attacks" continued for some time after the battle of Antietam. as well as riflefortifications pits. seem to be crowding their rear-guard. etc. will ital. ours is the of only company heavy artillery attached to the fort. and it is to be hoped that our fire in the rear. develop them. ingly lively along that line of works.. and are to have one or more one hundredpounder Parrott guns put in position. also that leading to Rockville. in a letter of October 20th. all concentrating at Tenallytown.

I will point him to Fort Corcoran. and. As the Lieutenant had complete evidence to the contrary. Lieutenant Hamlink. outside. he would have made his Latin less emphatic. was on one occasion directed to take possession of some property near Fairfax Court House belonging to a prominent Confederate. and represented the infantry as free from it. ' 77 less Some of these companies are more or ' occu pied in throwing up new batteries. when pick often in the face of the enemy's had Lieutenant Bemis foreseen our many months and shovel had to be used fire. If that gentleman will visit this vicinity.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. now encamped a mile from here. which should have been understood in your neighborhood some time ago. etc.' except on the pick and shovel. thrown up by the Sixty-ninth. a compro mise was effected. as statements were made by an orator from your village in the town of Bristol which threw the digging. and had gone himself into the Confederate service. The Lieutenant with six mule teams halted in front of the house.. He found him in a neighboring field. rifle-pits. who had left it in charge of a supposed Unionist. etc. It was discovered that the man's purpose really was to get ." Alas ! of service as infantry. hunted up the supposed Unionist. and any number of similar works constructed by the in fantry alone. leaving his detail in charge of a Sergeant. with a detail from the regiment acting under the command of the Provost Marshal. The One Hundred and Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers (Wayne and Cayuga). and in the service about two months.. have not been drilled at all. During the fall of 1862 several expeditions were made after guerillas and marauding rebels in the vicinity of Falls Church and in other quarters. which This is a fact our boys have never been called on to do. the man agreeing to deliver the goods if the Lieutenant would go alone with him to the house.' The gentleman is welcome to all the otium come dig at ' ' ' ' ' ' tached to his favorite branch of the service. and the man evinced great anxiety to get to the house. on the artillery. and he promptly de nied having any such property in his possession.

and inspired purely by the love of deviltry. in the vicinity of Fort Marcy. was admitted . and a goodly number passed into the building. and they awaited the arrival of the next comer. The next colored member.78 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. that the com of the Provost Marshal were obeyed. lively time ensued. surreptitiously. They seemed to regard the three soldiers with distrust. He and two other members of the regiment being off duty and in the mood. Having decided to go to prayer-meeting. they all proceeded to take a drink out of the canteen. they took their steps in the direction of the building in which those exer cises were held. . he found it was locked on the inside. and he becomes reckless. occu the of the attention pied Regiment for some months. and the goods all delivered at Alexandria in good condition. fun -loving. for they closed the door carefully after them. and deeming it necessary to be filled with the right spirit for the occasion. husband. decided on having a lark and as the first requisite in that direction procured. in which the entreaties of the wife were joined to the threats of the A It is needless to say. a few interspersed by way of variety. together with the regular routine of camp " scares" life. however. It then occurred to them that on that particular evening the colored people were accustomed to hold a prayer-meeting in a contraband settlement. however. fun with the Having darkeys was one means of amuse ment. with an occasional day off duty and a pass to the city. possession of a double-barrelled shot-gun with which he might defend the property. It is a little remarkable what a change one's profession makes in his feelings and motives. and venturesome to a degree he probably never Such was the case with that member of Com anticipated. quiet citizen once don the military garb. Soon the colored brethren began to assemble. Let a steady. mands The daily exercises. a can teen full of whiskey. they halted near the door. pany B who gives us his experience one night at a prayermeeting of the darkeys. Arriving at the shanty before the meeting had opened. this circumstance did not disconcert them in the least. and when one of the trio tried it.

etc."' must fulfil your agreement. "let's take a drink . Again was their effort to enter the prayer-meeting baffled. and the soldiers were full of the spirit of mischief. "on one condition.. and solaced themselves with another draught from the canteen." They solemnly agreed to do as he suggested. however. and we shall." he says. " Very well let's take a drink first. comrades. "you word the three made a grand rush for the door. They had expected that the floor of the building would be on a level with the exterior surface." McKeever then moved back about a rod from the door. and directly in front of his rear. . Finally the build ing was full of brethren and sisters. ! . They retired to the corner of the building. by the . " What did we come for ?" said another. fastenings. it gave way down nearly two McKeever on top hinges." " The African method What is that 1" " I will show Well." replied a comrade." chaps " Forward double-quickmarch !" and "Now. "If we cannot go to prayer-meeting." to which they all assented. you. "Is the United States Army to be baffled by contrabands ? Never !" " " let's take a drink and Well. at the at the command.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. The colored people dumbfounded and . of McKeever. be able to convince the assembled brethren that the dignity of the United States Army is something not to be trifled with. I think." said one. As McKeever struck the door. way. it. of the door sat and his two comrades on top perfectly silent. and that is. 79 with a celerity that prevented their following suit. and went feet below the level of the ground outside. 'Forward. As he reached it McKeever lowered his head and struck the door full in the center with his head and hands." said McKeever. The denouement was quite unexpected to the three men. "Sure enough. the only proper course for us to pursue in a case like this is to follow strictly the African method. that you two follow me whatever happens. the other two taking position in said he.

address. said. You let 'varted. who informed them that folks' pra'r-meetin'. an' no wite trash is 'lowed in. " Brethren and sisters. but when they reached the place they found the door guarded by a " Dis wus a cullud stalwart negro. One week afterward they repeated their visit. one of the three hit him in the neck and sent him backward and down into the midst of the congre gation. led to dat place in dat berry strikin' manna'. sound. " And really. I : . with me on a set me on a rock set rock. jumped up O Lawd. an' got sojers Sam Jones. exclaimed " Sam Jones. and bowing right and left. many edgewise. a venerable colored man arose and opened the exercises with fervent prayer. and other senses. stamped on the floor." As he said this. we have come to prayer-meeting let the ser vices proceed. as she looked out of the door. what fo' you stop dem wite sojers ? Dem wite are good sojers dey wus heah las' week. . at which there was a great uproar." ' ' But the feature other curious and quaint expressions. it sarved you jus' right. who also made a special plea " Fo' de 'varsion ob de tree Uncle Sam's boys in bloo. and numerous black heads came peering out the door. and shouted at the top of her voice. some of which were laughable in the extreme. At the conclusion the three soldiers shook hands with the entire congregation and returned to the fort. dem wite sojers right in and the white soldiers went in. After several minutes had passed in perfect silence. She swung her arms. As soon as he had recovered he rushed to the outside to give further battle. The last address was made by a very old colored woman of prodigious dimensions. who. "notwith standing the curious sensations of sight. in which he made a powerful exhortation " Whom de Lawd had for the souls of the three soldiers.' ." says McKeever. ' ." The soldiers sat there all through and listened to the ex ercises attentively. but was stopped by the old black woriian of huge dimen sions. and down." and the three took seats. McKeever rose." of the evening was the conclusion of this wherein she waxed enthusiastic and vociferous.80 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. in conclusion.

" The city of Washington during the war was little more than a huge military camp. The streets were full of soldiers." of considerable anxiety to certain members of the regiment. " benzine. It was considered quite a privilege among the soldiers to receive an " all day off" to the city. or with their six-mule teams and shouting drivers winding up the hill roads or entering the city. had in a few months been completely changed. less accurately speaking. Various immoralities existed which had probably never existed before. Soldiers were probably not entirely observers.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. and the environs of the city in every direction teemed with military life. yet the Fourth Heavies probably passed . and the class of crimes commonly known to cities were greatly ex tended. The char acter of the city. though it must be said that the good order of the city was not lessened by military discipline. Among them was the plan of pushing barrels over by swim ming and burying them in the sand until their contents could be drawn off and sold. Pies and Bibles were found Women were caught to be made of tin containing whiskey. Parks of artillery occupied the waste ground. was One source the persistency with which whiskey was smuggled over the river. All sorts of people could be found in Washington at that period. The outside of the keg was saturated with but the contents were. and though it occasionally happened that a man would return with his memory so beclouded with the sights of the day that he couldn't recollect the countersign. and possibly of interest to many more. many of the buildings were decorated with flags. as well as its appearance. and army wagons with their white coverings were to be found in park. regiments were constantly passing and repassing. and so completely exhausted that his steps were anything but regulation. Many of the methods employed were ingenious. 81 think we three soldiers derived considerable good from our attendance on these two sessions of a darkey prayer-meet ing. filled with the same with rubber hose wound about them fluid. kerosene. Colonel Allcock arrested one female seated on a keg in a wagon.

Jr. 1863.82 this period HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. also left the service October Company D. De Hussy became Colonel. Some minds quite naturally reverted to the former days of roast pork. In May. without seriously ill effects from their contiguity to the Capital. was succeeded by Lieutenant William Arthur. of Gardener L. Quartermaster Thorp had resigned in October previously. gingerbread. Smith Jones. little later. de This claring all the slaves in the Confederate States free. President Lincoln published his procla mation confirming the manifesto of September 22d. he was promoted to Brigadier-General. of Company Filley. but were con stantly looking for. Smith were advanced to the grade of First Lieutenant and Edward C. \V. In December Second Lieutenant Martin Van Buren Aiken was promoted to First Lieutenant George Bliss. D. Young. About the same time Surgeon Berky resigned and was succeeded by Surgeon George Bayles. Captain Gustavus A. Knower and John B. and Henry L. In November First Lieutenant George Frank C. March 9th a band part cavalry passed A . during the early of of rebel 1863. inal Captain of Company H. in occurred offensive especially character. and would not be satisfied with Uncle Sam's fare. Vanderviele were promoted to captaincies. Hall became Colonel. In the same month Second Lieutenants Edward C. 1863. upon the resignation of Colonel Doubleday. January 1st. William Van Name. . ant-Colonel Henry H. E. of the accession have the occasion of several contra been* may bands to the cooking departments of the regiment a source amusement rather than advantage. inasmuch as the Lieutenant actually won a wager on the eating powers of his man. As to eating. 25th. Lieutenant Burt could tell you of a certain colored "pusson" of exceptional capacity. or in receipt of boxes and barrels from home. K. 1862. of Several changes occurred in the officers of the regiment about this time. Knower. Morrison. was discharged. every one of which the darkey downed at a sitting. who had been nom . and Lieuten Several raids. but he lost a peck of apples. it was a matter not wholly tabooed or lost sight of by any one.. and new cider.

Art'y from Organization to A. Art'y from May 23 to Aug. '63. Of 4th S. Art'y from Mar. COLONEL Of 4th N. 7. Mar. '63. '63. 7 May HENRY H. DERTTSSY. to COLONEL 23. Of 4th N. Y. Y. HALL. Y. .GENERAL GUSTAVUS THOMAS D. COLONEL 6. DOUBLEDAY.

.

. ARTILLERY. The Forty-seventh Regiment New York State Militia was . the sounding of the long following roll. COLONEL Agreeably to instructions received this even ing from General De Russy. 85 through the Union lines. and captured General Stoughton and a few others. to-morrow. for his of the killed. went to the scene of the tragedy slain some four miles away. A telegraphic operator is here. sabres. About of White's Confederate cavalry made a dash hundred two onto a Government farm at Lewinsville guarded by our pickets. 1863. Bailey's Cross roads. Va. FORT ETHAN ALLEN. you will have your garrison : under arms at 3 o'clock to-morrow morning. and with military honors escorted by our regiment and band. is and midnight rallies in consequence. if possible. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. An equipments. who promises to send a larger regiment of infantry. They killed three of our men. wounded five. H. but as the regiment num bered only two hundred and fifty-four. ordered to report to me for duty. the order was coun termanded by the General.DEFENDING THE CAPITAL. with three companies. he was thrust through with a sabre. etc. Colonel Allcock.M.. There was considerable diversion all through the season from anticipated attacks. etc. 11 P. entered Fairfax. VA. a money or his Refusing to yield the former. guerilla raids. Sergeant. was asked. The were buried on the afternoon of July 8th by a detail from headquarters. event similar to this occurred early in July. revolvers. Lieutenant-Colonel TJiomas Allcock. in guerilla life. and subsequently destroyed some ten thou sand dollars' worth of property in the shape of horses. Falls Church. a specimen order received at Fort Marcy The : HEADQUARTERS FOURTH REGIMENT N. cap tured twenty. June 28. Commanding Fort Marcy. Signal Officer at Munson's Hill reports Swain's Cavalry (Scott's nine hundred) on duty as patrols between Fort Albany. Ball's Cross-roads. Munson's Hill. or until the sentinel can see the sur rounding country and distinguish the movement of anybody over its surface. One style. and remain so> until broad daylight. Y.

Some of the boys thought. and the artillerymen were grow ing desirous of emulating some of this glory. I sent a letter to Colonel Hall. H. . there were rumors that the Fourth had orders But this proved to be only a to move up the Potomac. commanding at Fort Ethan Allen. who sent about two hundred infantry and fifteen cavalry. Yours truly.86 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. The detachment assigned to our line (twenty) are well posted and connect with the detachment of same regiment below. and we shall now have to debouch to the rear and bring up that organization. . to Mrs. SOUTH OF THE POTOMAC. They remained out all night. Very respectfully. July 13. not even a horse track. A. All through the season of 1863 it seemed necessary to sleep with one eye open.USSY. Passing events were scanned General Burnside's command fought the battle of Fredericksburg. G. A sample expedition : is also indicated in the following report HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES. H.. 1863. duty from the regiment were very large. that solid fighting would be preferable to the anxiety incurred. Department of Washington : On receipt of your communication of the llth inst. Assistant Adjutant-General. Colonel Commanding. as many troops as he could spare. DEK. and reliable citizens in that neighborhood had no intelligence of any rebels being in the vicinity. however. and as a result General Hooker superseded him then the latter tried his fortune upon nearly the same ground to meet a similar fate. HALL. Early in the fall our numbers were augmented by the addition of the Third Battalion. after the Confederates had crossed the second time into Pennsylvania. but no traces of any enemy were found. Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor. closely. Brigadier-General Commanding. in view of a possible raid of the enemy's cavalry and the details for picket and outpost . rumor. Jones's farm. In July. Important victories were also heard of in the West.

Fourth New was detailed on recruiting home. service in connection with a furlough to visit his family. in the county of Monroe. to days from date. SPECIAL ORDERS. regiment of artillery is hereby authorized to be raised in this State. to be known as the Eleventh Regiment of Artillery. Barnes is appointed Colonel of this regiment. War Department. and on the way to his York C. Y. 126." Captain Barnes having such a limited time in which to raise a regiment. Following is the special order : GENERAL HEADQUARTERS STATE OF NEW YORK. ALBANY. By order of the Commander-in-Chief. who will establish his headquarters at Rochester. Sixty days will be allowed for the organization of this regiment. and having had some experience in recruit ing.CHAPTER BOUT B. he stopped at Albany and secured authority to raise a regiment. T. Captain William Barnes. to serve in the Army of the United States for three years. No. January 1st. 70. A JOHN This authority was extended. being of a some what ambitious turn. 1863.. series of 1862. No. " sixty 28th. For purposes of organization. 1863. ORGANIZATION OF THE THIRD BATTALION. N. Rochester. and proceed in its organization in conformity with the provisions of General Orders. ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE. VII. February 7. or during the war. SPRAGUE. as will appear. 1863. and if not completed in that time it will be con solidated. of Company Artillery. New York State Volunteers. for the rapid . hit upon a novel scheme. May Adjutant-General. Captain William B.

is light . Mr. till they all had agreed to enlist. These men were attached to Company K. and recruiting offices authority he had. Buck. in March.. however. Clarke. We are unable to find out now. expressly for the defense of New York Harbor." said another." Hon. H. P. E. A half dozen students from Canandaigua Academy sauntering down Main Street in that village one morning. enlistment of men. listed and been taken out by their friends. Rev. Stopped to read an attractive bill just posted in the Court House Park. T. and the other speakers were Professor N. " The company is designed to garrison the forts in New York Harbor. such of his purposes were presented city to various persons desirous of raising companies for the military service as seemed necessary. It happened that all of these six boys had thought about Some of them had even en entering the military service. he was doubtless more He claimed to have authority for patriotic than scrupulous. Hon. . having raised the first sixty-five men. A. Andrew J. It will be found on the following page. was mustered as adjutant of the prospective regiment by Mustering Officer Captain James Moony. Captain Barnes's plan seemed to work. But here was a proposition that " their friends might even assent to. Howells was chairman of this meeting. Faurot." This was the taking clause in Captain Barnes's scheme. just what On establishing his headquarters in the of Rochester. Hatck. where duty and danger afar off. Esq. J. on the ground of not being old enough. "A WAR MEETING " This evening (Wednesday) at the Town House. like many another enrolling officer of that period. were quickly opened in that city and adjoining towns.88 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. A short time after (May 6th) a war meeting was advertised. Captain Barnes was a man of culture and not evilly disposed toward any one but. and other speakers are expected to address the meeting. for the of purpose enlisting men in Captain Brown's Company of Heavy Artillery." said one. " I will go. his plan. " So will I. G. if the rest will.

B. r.ORGANIZATION OF THE THIRD BATTALION.BROWW. CLARK . AH OArnurl ff -*^TB BMlffTlKfl iBBTf* TT r^TJMT fjhaMti' Hiir JJM Jl IfcMfcrtaJjtol^ HaltMsO*clil^ ^^ L*4Kl| tavi^^"Bc4lM^ Capt. T.C.1T mm4 wi.A.~c K. D* s*n I-THM t. M4 U(ki <uir ! Krikn. TW (().CMirr>>>M>BMnckiHM> FORTS IN NEW YORK HARBOR. b *M *r iW n. >)<.TEyr promTT. BARNES. nm TM MR MM ITHI tu. 1st BeomliB enrolled ^* Lieut E.!. .u H t.i mkcnwmk>To^>lMm. U M k COL.f ITIKM y n frra. . 89 1 1 RSI (1\ SSR ECRl IK A GOOD CHANGE AW TEE DRAFT! The last chance in Heavy Artillery! I. W..C. >.4 4ri^l.

There is no doubt that Colonel E. and as the Colonel was enrolling recruits at the rate of one hundred and fifty per week." And. certain it is that many of the officers of the Eleventh New York Heavy Artillery regarded Colonel Marshall as their evil genius. saying that the men must . and some. however much of truth there may be in the statement. so Barnes replied he could move with about eight hundred. So rapid were the enlistments. A large were obtained. C. Sprague then ordered him to consolidate his command. Lapham." an obstacle was encountered. Backus. November 3d. Says Captain A. X. But. the better the soldier if soldiers be not corrupt. manding the Fourth) and applied to Marshall for muster. they ought to be made so. and Sprague tele graphed to Barnes to know how many men he could move with. " The worse the gallant soldier. recruits Brown. Now. Marshall. : cured. and. A similar success number of was met with at other recruiting stations. he en couraged General Sprague to send us off. and Captain A. that on June 15th over eleven hundred men had been se camp established called Camp Spragne on the Fair Grounds. a United States Mustering and Disbursing Officer.. as often happens with " the best laid plans of mice and men. the maximum of eighteen hundred men would soon be reached. Brown in a letter written to his father. of course. Rochester. man. 1863 11 About June 1st Colonel Marshall came to Rochester as . as United States Mustering Officer we had consider It now appears able business to transact through him. Being Albany about the time of the Pennsylvania raid. LIGHT.90 HEAVY GUNS AND C. we had furloughed most of our men. and proceed at once to HarBarnes then consolidated to six companies (I com risburg. and to raise a regiment for the same arm of the service. leaving about seven hundred and fifty in camp. Y. was a brave and But Napoleon has said. as we had not expected to move for two months. and a large number were then absent on furlough. apply to Marshall to muster it. formerly of the Thirteenth New York Volunteers. had de serted. G. when he sent up one Dr. that he soon conceived the idea of smashing the Eleventh in and building up his own regiment upon its ruins. to be sure.

all 91 be examined by the doctor." . and many more who were away on fur lough were subsequently enrolled in said officer's new regi ment. and you will have some idea of the patriotic hearts with which we went through the Pennsylvania . that the Government had done nothing it had promised. many of the men. could not but give color to the sus .ORGANIZATION OF THE THIRD BATTALION. distasteful of their officers were thrown out and the strange men. and when Marshall passed along the line he threw out about sixty more. and the men had to do every thing which they had been assured they would not be called upon to do. a tiling never heard of before." Probably the urgency of the situation in Pennsylvania had much to do with this consolidation. and that is why Clarke and Page were as all the thrown to out. every one of whom was entirely able to do duty. bounties had been paid four months' pay due them. . leaving me only seventy-eight men. two hundred men. and their families actually and on top of all this that we were needed the money armed with rifles and ordered into the rifle-pits instead of manning heavy guns in short. and he replied that it must be done if Marshall Backus threw out about insisted. The consolidation was. men had already been examined by our Surgeon had been in service before and ought to know who Avery. Barnes telegraphed to Sprague. but this was not so well understood at the time and the fact that many of the men thrown out of the Eleventh by the Mustering Officer and his surgeon. But another phase . and men had to be taken from my company (the Fourth) to fill the others. men placed under Add to the fact . and so we had to submit. * ' strange officers and among that none of the promised that some of the men had three or campaign. the Fourteenth. We then consolidated to four companies. about this time of Colonel Barnes's plan developed he called the officers together one evening and stated that he expected " a telegram to move the regi ment to Fort Ethan Allen in the defenses of Washington. and that is the way I came to be First Lieutenant in stead of Captain. whether a man was all right or not. as many of course. picions referred to.

A. Richmond.. F. It was fired by one of the guards from another regiment. Cowles. however. and await orders. and W. and contained some veterans who had served in the Third. R. H. One rejected volunteer named James Stevens was mortally wounded by a shot in the abdomen. THE COMPANIES. Officer ing rejected men in the ranks. COMPANY was recruited in Rochester and other towns of Western New York. . : . W. Twenty-third. night. E. Eighteenth. Wells. H. did receive a telegram. did not leave much excuse for obstinacy when the work was done. H. J. Smith. occurred the next day. filled with the expectancy of handling heavy guns." to cool off. however. Thirty-second. or.92 HEAVY GUNS AND He LIGHT. Tenth. Pa. Twenty-first. quite a number exhibited such fiery dispositions that some were put in the guard-house and others in the city " Blue jail. some of them The ease and readiness with which the Muster objected." It was said to have been a very stormy session in Major Barnes's quarters after the officers assembled came to under stand the situation a session which continued nearly all The muster of the regiment. more accurately. and One Hundred and Fifth New York State Volunteers. the battalion. Z. Goodwin. Owing to this dissatisfaction considerable excitement prevailed during the afternoon and evening following. Still. Fourteenth. It may not surprise the reader to learn that when the enlisted men. but not as anticipated* The message was from the Adjutant-General at Albany. The enrolling officers were chiefly H. were informed by their officers that they were to be immediately mustered and sent to the front as infantry. commonly called the Eagle. and " Colonel Barnes will have his read as follows regiment mustered at once will proceed immediately to Harrisbnrg. Cummings.

Oswego. Lillie. M. current series. The company contained many Dexter. Gould. Meldrum. COMPANY was composed of recruits from Canandaigua. Some were also York. Leroy. C. Merrill. Many of them were quite young. S. Morris. COMPANY was recruited in Rochester. and New York. Kelly. No. and E. L. though the com pany also contained numerous veterans. and other towns of Ontario County. W. H. 1863 SPECIAL ORDERS. Brown. N. P. H. C. Mt. H. Curtis. veterans. Prevost. authorizing the Eleventh Regiment of Artillery. . Some days after the battalion : had moved into the field the following order was received GENERAL HEADQUARTERS STATE OF NEW YORK. enrolled at Oswego. ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE. New York State \olunteers. N. 93 COMPANY was made up of men from the cities of Rochester. 70. R. Evans were the chief enrolling offi cers. Williams. Syracuse. Rodney E. is hereby revoked. largely Buffalo. A. also from Rochester and other cities. 361. Dickenson. J. W. B. No. July 1. and New The enlistments were secured largely by H.ORGANIZATION OF THE THIRD BATTALION. Syracuse. S. good many of those A enrolled had also seen service. J. Geneva. F. Clarke were the most prominent enrolling officers. and other west ern towns of the State. A. Special Orders. Avon. Page. and W. ALBANY. and J.

utant. Adjutant Hatch. 21st. will be known as the " Battalion of the Eleventh Regiment of Artillery. and Adjutant will be mus tered out of service. Smith. age twenty-six. The officers named below were mustered June : into the military service of the United States Marshall. Connor as Quartermaster Sergeant. Goodrich as Commissary Sergeant. which has been recruited under the order. will turn over to Colonel E. New York State Volunteers. The battalion of the Eleventh Regiment of Artillery. Lawrence as Assistant Surgeon. LINE OFFICERS.. commanded by JOHN T. Marshall. age twenty-four. New York State Volunteers. William B. Egan as First Lieutenant and Quartermaster. Second Lieut. Quartermaster. the clothing and other public property which may be in his charge. G. J. age twenty-eight. of the Eleventh Regiment of Artillery. Richmond.Chief. afterward I of the 4th. P. Samuel Beswick as Sergeant-Major. New York State Volunteers. George W. Richard P. J. G.. Andrew J. age thirty-six." The Surgeon. Clinton P. \ T. commanding Fourteenth Regiment of Artillery. Hatch as First Lieutenant and Adjutant. ) A of the llth. First Lieut. Barnes. Foote Henry as Hospital Steward. Barnes as Major. Newell H. Avery as Surgeon.94 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. (Signed) Major William B. . NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. Captain. Co. FIELD AND STAFF. age twenty-one. Henry Alva E. j Ad SPRAGUE. 1863. now in the field.General. William Church. Captain Sixth United States Infantry by E. By order of the Commander-in.

4th.ORGANIZATION OF THE THIRD BATTALION.. 95 Howard Rodney L. Captain. Captain. Second Lieut. Augustus C. 4th. Co. Co. Kelly. First Lieut. . afterward L of the Birdseye N. Lillie. Seward F. afterward of the D M 4th. First Lieut. Merrill... of the llth. Herman M. of the llth. Curtis. Henry P.. C of the llth.. afterward of the B K Dexter. Brown. Gould. Co. Second Lieut. First Lieut.

and a few succeeded in making a great many others miserable by Says Colonel Gould giving vent to this disposition. No very memorable incident occurred on the trip that night. A large majority of them had no objection whatever to entering upon active service the nature of a soldier tofigJit. the battalion left Camp Hillhouse. and rejoined the battalion afterward. 1863. it is But an " old soldier" : back to with any pleasant thoughts. would have been quite satisfied with the change. and engineer were instructed that the train had the right of way to Harrisburg. ordered to follow the 7 P. when the train moved out. had they once ex perienced something of the monotony incident to garrison duty. and had taken in too much ballast probably to steady him." On the evening of June 24th. " This ride from Rochester to Harrisburg was one thing I would not like to repeat.CHAPTER IT* VIII. across Clarissa Street bridge and halted at the Erie Depot. and which very few will look at once. ex " and to be careful to be on time. except that a man who was full of the idea that it was better to ride on the top of a car than on the inside. The train was a special. of the battalion FHOSE who felt themselves so aggrieved by being thus suddenly con verted into infantry. If he had not been so full of his ." The conductor press. rolled off in the darkness when the train was going at full speed. marched down West Main Street.M. PENNSYLVANIA. It was 9 o'clock before the Eleventh Heavy Artillery were all aboard. Strange to say he was unharmed. better known as Camp Sprague.

All the inhabitants seemed to Pa. with his entire army. by every Ample rations were dealt out to the soldiers in the shape of bread and ham and with a comfortable night's rest the of the 26th found the battalion in much better morning the humor." his The next day tumble would undoubtedly have killed him. Great excitement existed in the city and throughout the General Lee. marching on Harrisburg by way of Citizens were going North Carlisle. Cumberland Valley. The town of Sunbury. This was the only square meal partaken of on the trip.IN PENNSYLVANIA. responded most nobly. have turned out to greet the command as the battalion ar rived and the meal which had been prepared and was served by the ladies was regarded as a most excellent evidence of patriotism as well as skill in the culinary art. 97 " idea. HAERISBURG. was very close at hand. The battalion reached Harrisburg about 11 o'clock P. it was reported.. it was discovered that the rations provided were both deficient in quantity and quality.M. and Colonel Barnes telegraphed ahead to several stations asking if food could be provided for the battalion. Arms . train. though day was rainy and unpleasant. . .

and Private Fox distinguished himself by shooting at a stump. The was discussed of having our battalion guard these unruly militiamen. are here inserted " An attack from the enemy being momentarily antici pated.General John Ewen. continued the detachments in clearing away the woods in front and completing the rifle-pits. N.. were given the men at Camp Curtin. Colonel Barnes. moved the Twenty-second and Thirty-seventh Regiments behind the Received into my command the Eleventh Artil rifle pits. as given in his report. where intrenchments had been begun. They were willing to defend Harrisburg. which he mistook for a prowling rebel. those of the Thirty-seventh being engaged at the latter during the whole night of the 29th.. S." Twenty-second and Thirty-seventh regiments in completing the works of the pits. The movements of General E wen's command from the 28th inst. G. F. New York Volunteers. where a more effectual stand could be made. but unwilling to cross the bridge. An incident of the day was the refusal of a militia regiment to cross the river. That night a detail from the battalion was put on picket. The Twenty-second Regiment being held in reserve. Desiring to avoid such a contingency. a section of light battery. lery. June 29th. Smith. and men on picket duty. retire to the front. and became a part of the Fourth Brigade commanded by Brigadier. On the 28th inst. posting it on the turnpike. and detachments of the project : " It was designed by the commanding general that my command should check the advance of the enemy by the York Road. the battalion was assigned to the command of General W. doing duty as infantry. First Division N. I solicited and obtained from him.98 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Y. supported on each side by the Eleventh and Thirty-seventh regiments in the trenches. This shot deprived nearly the entire command of sleep for the re mainder of the night. broke up camp pursuant to orders. but we escaped this unpleasant task. Employed a detachment of this regiment in felling the woods in front. . and the command crossed the Susquehanna and marched to a point on the York Road opposite the city.. and if hard pressed.

It was sub sequently taken to Pottsville.. 99 At this time a number of men were detailed from the bat Quite a number went in the Twenty-fifth New York Independent. and assisted in quelling a riot. . This battery was in the neighborhood of Carlisle till after Gettysburg. so that the talion to go into light batteries. Greencastle. and a rapidity of twenty shots per minute was claimed for it. The guns were breech-loading rifled pieces and the invention of Goodwin. and rejoined the battalion at Fort Hamilton in Sep tember Large details from the battalion were kept at work on Fort Washington.IN PENNSYLVANIA. gun was kept comparatively cool. and those who were especially desirous GETTYSBURG AND VICINITY. known as Good win's Battery. In its operation the breech was lifted up by a lever and a chamber containing the car tridge to be fired was inserted. Pa. and Hagerstown. and then followed up the rear of Lee's retreating army through Chambersburg. At each firing an empty chamber was taken out and a loaded one put in.

he adopted quite a different course. with field -pieces. 1863. This fire was returned with muskets and light fieldIt pieces. and some had to be put A statement of their grievances was made. however. to the general in command and it may be truth . to a place called Sportsman's Hill. there would probably have been no trouble. tinder guard. be company in this command roll-call being absent from a company roll-call of each every two hours. Y. they grew obstreperous. that there would be no consideration of what they thought to be their rights. IN FIELD NEAR HAKRISBURG. rode up and informed the General of the enemy's The brigade moved several miles in the direction location. HEAVY ARTILLERY. When they found. under General Fitz-Hugh Lee. But. The brigade was moved about in the vicinity of Harrisburg and Carlisle for several days meanwhile the discontent existing in the ranks of our battalion was not entirely . GENERAL ORDERS.100 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and was stopped by a volley of both musketry and cannon. July 3. and was returning when some Union horsemen who 'had been driven in. Hereafter there will 1. sympa On the morning of the 30th General E wen's brigade moved but about three miles for the purpose of intercepting a body of cavalry. unfortunately. in Major Barnes had evinced as much skill and diplomacy managing his men in the field as he had in enlisting them. He found no trace of the enemy. however. fully said that the commanding officers generally thized with the members of the battalion. of realizing some measure of the terms of their enlistment looked forward to putting in cannon and handling them as artillerymen should. indicated. was learned afterward that the enemy's force consisted of thirty-five hundred cavalry. No. This If is illustrated in the following curious order : HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH N. allayed. and after a few rounds the enemy' s fire ceased. and any one will "be fined six and one half .

Of the days following. 101 ($6.50) dollars for each and every offence. At Paperstown I directed Colonel Roome to report with his regiment to General W. By that time we had inst. Reached Laurel Forge in the mountains of Pennsylvania on the evening of July 5th. Smith for special duty in guarding roads in that vicinity. command consisting of the Eleventh. not even the participants. probably. rights and equal liberty to its subjects. has rarely. were these sounds audible. to be deducted from his next monthly pay. Acting Adjutant. the 3d following. and for the momentous character of the results dependent upon it." " Though no copy of it can be found. SMITH. Twentysecond. another order was given to Colonel Barnes to proceed with the Eleventh Bat talion to New York City and report to the Commander of that Department. commanding imme By Command of Colonel WILLIAM B. J. appreciated its real greatness at that time. marched with the division from Carlisle.IN PENNSYLVANIA. forming the rear guard. we quote from General Ewen's : report July 4th. and Thirty-seventh regiments of New York. for the grandeur of the spectacle presented.. A. as Major Barnes construed it. This was repeated at various intervals during the day and also on the two days Particularly on the afternoon of Friday. About 9 o' clock on the first day of July the dull boom of cannon was heard afar to the southwest. F. a request. been surpassed in turning-point deciding the question of national existence. but no one. learned that a great battle was being fought at Gettysburg. if a battle which was doubtless the ever. We were listening to the sounds of a battle which. " While at Captain Brown says Harrisburg we received an order. the maintenance of a government designed to secure just . or. Company commanders will report every offender to the Colonel diately. for severity of fighting. BARNES. to go : .

to our great delight. and the men declined doing it as a matter of choice. It seems that General Couch. con cluded. not at all surprised. though they never refused to obey it as an order. This was too much. to Carlisle and thence to the front as infantry." .102 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. to send us to New York.

The larger the ci4y the greater the range of its re semblance to nature. A trouble more affecting public interests was the fact that within the city of New York a monster lay sleeping whose awakening should be attended with all the parox ysms of brute ferocity. or the ferocity of an aroused and maddened tiger. Enrolment for the draft under the call for troops had been in operation for several days in the city of New York. if not the hopes of the nation. that the mode of enforcing the draft by provost-marshals was an encroachment on municipal rights. 1863. The Third Battalion of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery reached New York City from Harrisburg on July 10th. Company M at Fort Hamilton. CCORDING to its moods a large city the attractiveness of an active presents organism. and some of them persons of emi nence and authority. and was distrib uted in the fortifications there as follows Company I at Fort Hamilton. It was believed by many. RIOTS OF 1863.CHAPTER NEW YORK THE DRAFT IX. both of public and private interest. Company K at Fort Richmond. : Company L at Sandy Hook. As to their nature it is not necessary to speak now. . and whose struggles should threaten the destruction of the city. The battalion found various troubles awaiting attention. and the more com pletely will it manifest the varying emo tions of animal life. Private griefs were shared more extensively by the officers than by the men. the indifference of a slum bering ruminant.

and. The draft began on Saturday. The workman refused to v give it. in conjunction with the invasion of Pennsylvania by Gen eral Lee. if not al ways polite.104 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Some of the enrolling officers had been assailed a few days before with abusive language when taking the names. had been a source of alarm among thoughtful and especially among residents of that city. some serted of whom were as to be emissaries ATTACK ON PROVOST MARSHAL. From . This feeling had been fed by leaders of ability. seizing . in the per formance of this preliminary duty. threatening rumors of re sistance to the draft. In enrolling the names of the laborers on a building at the corner of Liberty Street and Broadway. and in language most vehement. in the Ninth and Eleventh police precincts." had been formed to resist the draft but subsequently this report was regarded as a citizens everywhere. came near losing his life. Provost-Marshal Erhardt. July 13th. private sources Governor Seymour was in formed on June 29th that a secret organization. from the South. It ex tended through the worst and lowest quarters of the For some weeks city. the officer stepped on a plank laid from the sidewalk and asked a man at w^ork on a ladder for his name. by no means unimpor tant. hoax. Very fortunately the police were not in sympathy with those opposing or likely to oppose the draft. made up of eighteen hundred deserters from the army and a large number of " Copperheads. that lost no opportunity of asserting. that the draft was an encroachment on their individual rights to which they would never submit. And there was a turbulent element. and after some altercation leaped down.

" possibly it was in keeping with this cognomen that they were among the foremost in the of these telegrams to the effect that there One was plot to seize the Arsenal to anticipate to be occupied . 105 advanced to strike the but a pistol stopped him. rookery. not unusually noisy. and out-of-the-way place seemed to have occupants. Such was the excitement produced that the police were effect of this incident is of the riot. Covered with dirt he regained the street and sent for a force of They did not come. Telegrams poured into the Central Police Office from every quarter of the city. The quiet-sleeping beast was being goaded into wakefulness. were among the names published. was offered. but seemingly engaged in earnest conversation. Their engine was known as the " Black Joke. kept very busy during the evening. The foreman was arrested the next day. . outbreak. The two fell from the plank into the cellar. showing that mischief was brewing of an ominous character. and then had to desist. drawn out of fifteen hundred called for in the Twenty-second Ward. Erhardt on top. and many ugly rumors were in circulation. Several members of Fire Engine Company No. regarded as one of the active causes Another immediate cause was the fact that the draft began on Saturday. The Marshal went on enrolling names.NEW YORK THE DRAFT an iron bar. all that Sunday night. but the moral soldiers. in fact. and these in a meeting bound themselves to resist the draft to the uttermost. though promised if resistance The officer stood for several hours facing the excited workman with his pistol. RIOTS OF 1863. located near Fifty-eighth Street and Broadway. and. so they were seen and discussed by laborers and others not having anything better to do on that day. officer . Twelve hundred and thirtysix names. Every saloon. was a which Superintend ent Kennedy ordered it by fifty policemen. Suddenly the man made a rush and clinched the officer. 32." and they were sometimes " Black called the Jokers . That night gangs of men were seen along the wharves on both sides of the city. were all published in the Sunday morning papers.

stones. It resisted every effort. they moved down Fifth and Sixth avenues until and Forty-sixth streets were reached. books. gave way and the yelling crew poured into the apartment. was invaded and the men compelled to stop work and Augmented in this way. they In Forty-sixth Street at the corner of Third A * i* Avenue was the ProilTi vost Marshal's office. occupied by workmen. The doors. its for prey. these motley join their ranks. ragged women with dishevelled hair.106 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Every factory or other place which they came to. which he poured over the floor. moved north until they came to a vacant lot in Central Park. The tiger is aroused and swept ing. yelling and curs in a wild tumult. clubs. which were hastily barred. Early Monday morning. looking Suddenly the officers stationed at the drafting bureau were astonished by an angry roar outside the building. fill ing them full from curb filling the THE MOB. men without coats. all in a northerly direction. Quickly they smashed the furniture. and many with firearms. . and then turned What was their purpose directly east. crowds began to assemble in different parts of the city and to move along the various avenues. Here a consultation was held. and papers into fragments. Down both streets. A safe con taining important documents was attacked with clubs and and hatless. and dividing into two separate bodies. crowds. as if by a preconcerted plan. Then a wild-looking man produced a can of spirits of tur He rolled up a pentine. and tore indiscriminately the lists. stone to curbstone. in II* Forty-fifth I ^ ! '* fl which names remaining the quota for the Twenty-second Ward were being drawn. and as suddenly a paving-stone came crashing through a win dow. including the wheel in which were the names yet to be drawn. armed with sticks.

John Egan. he shouted to a man standing Kennedy was not kill ed outright. Chief of Police. Foolish men Their guns were wrested away from them. and the mob outside. the flames burst out. RIOTS OF 1863. his : they yelled. fired a harmless volley over their heads. carrying a light cane. hurled down upon a ledge of rocks. some one cried out Kennedy. MOB CHASING NEGROES." he lighted a match. " Save me. 107 " Get out o' here. tiger begins to explain this. Then some invalid soldiers from the Park barracks came. and they were doubly efficient from that very time. as he waved the shouted. who were terror-stricken at the prospect. The smoke began to ascend. He was knocked down The and nar show its As a man in citizens' dress. rowly escaped being killed. made " There's way through the crowd. and his corpse hidden by the stones ! . burning paper crowd poured out of the doors. stamped him into the mud. but his treatment maddened the police. two left for dead on the pavement.' on the bank." They set upon him.NEW YORK THE DRAFT newspaper. get into a pond of water out of their reach. The Su perintendent's life was saved as only by a mir acle. now filling the He Then they streets in all directions. a third pursued to the river. knocked him down. He struggled to " " Drown him. teeth. The upper floors were occupied by families. began to throw stones against the upper windows of the burning building. The to and fro. and thinking to intimidate the mob. A provost-marshal tried to instantly. set up a loud cheer.

on fire. and the remainder only saved from was drawn to the arrival of a police force under Sergeant McCredie. The surging mass of not less than fifty thousand persons Now One attacks the Armory in and Twenty Street. nearly every policeman engaged is badly in . yelling. " Down with the nig gers. They brandish their clubs and muskets and rush down upon that intrepid band of policemen. Then the ex hausted policemen find themselves hemmed in by another crowd in the rear. ployed across the street rushed forward." engage in chasing and hanging every colored man they meet.108 cast HEAVY GUNS AND down upon it. but are forced back. only for in number. And . though several are killed in the the arms and burn the building. and though all finally escape. With their clubs raised the forty-four HANGING NEGROES. and then set them divides into several sections. The mob does not wait for the police to begin the attack. the huge savage beast is thoroughly aroused jured. Heads and arms were broken as the clubs fell. The tiger has tasted blood. attempt they capture Others sack jewelry and dry-goods stores. and it will need a pretty good posimilar treatment because the attention of the rioters lice force it now to bring into subjection. it has tasted blood and gained a victory. For several blocks they are driven. They break and flee. -first a great crowd. LIGHT. One colored man caught in Clarkson Street was horribly mutilated and thrown into a barrel of burning whiskey. The undisciplined horde fight savagely. ty-four " Charge !" shouts Mc de-r Credie.

thwack. they move up town. double-quick. maddened with liquor At and in a body. red-faced and red-armed. and clubs. first by one avenue and then another. "By the right !" The flank. They hesitated. a leader cried out d d rag. Broadway strewn with bloody human forms. and the house would have been consumed had not some one suggested the propriety of first burning the ProvostMarshal's office on Broadway." Shortly Something must be done at once. ** : A Headquarters A despatch received at Police Fifth Avenue to afterward it was ascertained that the real purpose of the mob was to attack Police Headquarters in Mulberry Street." were not a block away. and it is burned to the ground. Judge Thirty-fifth " Haul down that Street. bearing a banner with the words. charge thud. armed with iron bars. thud. thwack of the clubs falling with precision on human skulls were too much for even that crowd. when the tumultuous horde. surged down Fifth Avenue. This they proceeded to do. fire-arms. : of this terrible It is crowd ? rumored they are going to murder the black waiters is in the hotels down town." No one obeying.NEW 1ORK THE DRAFT RIOTS OF 1863. stones were flung at the win dows. Halting. to strike the mob in flank. Forty-sixth Street. the American They perceived on White's near flag displayed residence. With the hundred he into at Bleecker remaining Broadway swung Street. What is the destination success. and as the fifties way was in a similar manner struck them in flank they gave panic-stricken and fled in every direction. The tiger was cowed . and then the march was continued. and Twentyfourth Street are sacked and burned. was despatched by Commissioner Acton to intercept them. pitchforks. "No Draft. 109 Burning and sacking dwellings as the caprice seizes them. About the middle of the afternoon. Forty-third Street they set fire to the Colored Orphan Asylum. Inspector Daniel Car two hundred policemen. with very large crowd is now going down attack the Tribune building. Carpenter detached two squads of fifty each up the side streets right and left. five more than thousand rioters. Various dwellings in Lexington Avenue. with their shirt-sleeves rolled up. penter.

and Fort Richmond should be got in readiness to move at a moment's notice. S. This detail was not ordered to the city till the second day of the riot also a section of battery two brass six-pounders " of Bragg' s Battery. Eleventh Battalion. was all commanded by Lieutenant Henry E. About 2 o'clock P. Twelfth United States Infantry. enth. It consisted of about one hundred and fifty and was under the command of Lieutenant McElrath. and a company under Lieutenant Wood (fifty-four men) from Fort These were commanded by Captain W. from Fort Richmond. Franklin. While the Ad jutant was making out the detail. for the time being. Company H.110 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. For the remainder of the afternoon the mob revenged themselves by chasing down negroes and hanging them. men. Lafayette. who had seen service in the One Hundred and Fortieth New York.M. to send eighty men to New York. Acting Adjutant at Fort Hamilton. Another but afterward turned over to another officer. General Brown. and the purpose was freely avowed among them to burn the Tribune building that night." The first detail of troops sent. was got in readiness and limbers filled with canister. and immediately directed that " all troops at Fort Hamilton. under Lieutenant Rodney Dexter. conforming to General Wool's order. The next detail was made up from the Permanent Guard at Fort Hamilton and the Eleventh Battalion all w ho had seen service were called for. Quartermaster of the Elev T . commanded this section. and . . arrived at Fort Hamilton in person. coming on. but not subdued. Richmond. consisted of a platoon of the Twelfth United States Infantry. from General Wool. He was astonished that General Wool should order so small a number. Fort Lafayette. Lieutenant Richard P. Night was when wild beasts prowl in comparative safety. comman dant of the military post of the city and harbor of New York." made famous in the Mexican War. who had seen service. an order was received by Lieutenant McElrath. Egan. -together with a small detachment from Fort Hamilton. detail from Fort Richmond of sixty men of Company A. A party of them tried to find the editor of the New York Tribune .

NEW YORK THE DRAFT RIOTS OF 1863. were found to be entering the building." he says Approaching Major Christensen. a tumultuous rabble. the mob sought revenge in burning the Police Station and Post- under Police . Up town. McElrath. : : * ' ! ! Officers Warlow. Soon an accession to the crowd. were nearly all of the Fort Hamilton Permanent Guard. that no one could give a very definite idea of what was oc curring except in his own immediate vicinity. about 2 A. Ill one of the pieces was in charge of Drum-Major George S. this is the one spot in New York where the least is known of what is taking place As the darkness came on in the city the rioters had filled Printing House Square. with a few members of the Eleventh Battalion.M. This is sup ported by Lieutenant McElrath's experience when reporting for duty. Tear.Sergeant H. frantically So effective was the work of the police that the lower part of the city was found to be almost deserted. when three hundred and fifty bluecoats. came pouring down Chatham Street. But for some reason they seemed to hesitate about beginning the attack. Thus augmented they became bolder . the other one being in charge of Commissary. or seemed to be very soon. of the Permanent Guard. It is impossible to give more than a synopsis of the move ments of these various details. I inquired what had been going on in the city that day. Nicholas Hotel veterans. Browning. all This battery reached the St. it down Burn it!" they yelled. The men. having cleared the square. Then the cowards rushed for the doors. of the Fifth Artillery. Hetherington. S. that night. of Brooklyn. Major Christensen' s reply was characteristic Good God. in Eighty-sixth Street. stones were thrown into the windows. Carpenter. So diverse were the actions of the mob and the consequent movements of their pursuers. between thirty and forty in number. In his report of " The Draft Riots in New " York. for as yet I was ignorant of the details. and had begun a general destruction of the contents. Devoursney. and were evidently meditating the " destruction of the Tribune building. and Folk. Then they burst into the lower offices. Gen eral Wool's Adjutant-General.

with a detachment of marines and a howitzer. was mur dered in a most brutal manner soon afterward.M. The police patrolling the East Side were assaulted in Second Avenue near Third Street. Inspector Dilkes had a desperate fight at a wire factory near Thirteenth Street. opened their There did not seem to be much of a places of business. crowd in the lower part of the city but as early as 5 A. where several thousand carbines were stored. This was the closing act of the then the wild beast sank into a surly slum first day . Lieutenant Wood. and received a half dozen shots from. was found to wear underneath his dirty clothing fine cassimere pants. . a handsome. fired by Lieutenant Egan. the nominal commander. in command of the detachment from Fort Hamilton. with a volley of A Colonel musketry. master Wakeman's house. .D. Midshipman Stephen. O' Brien.Bragg' s Battery. The Times building was defended with Gatling guns. ber. but the morning dawned smilingly. had command of a strong guard and a battery at the Sub-Treasury. Adams. and the mob was again routed by Inspector Carpenter. though dressed as a laborer. and killed and wounded some thirty of the mob. It rained heavily during the night. threw them into consternation. was soon charged upon in Pitt Street. to send troops. Tuesday. were raised down town that all stores and alarming reports factories were closed. The same mob charged on the military. who had made himself conspicuous on horseback. rich . which. and was thought to be responsible for the firing. and many workmen were thus let into the ranks of the rioters.112 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and many. One of the leaders who was killed here. supposing the work of the authorities had been effective. Active demon strations were soon resumed in all parts of the city by the mob. The guards at the armories and public buildings had been greatly strengthened. and asking General SanSoon such ford. late of the Fourth New York Artillery. was stationed at the Tribune building Colonel George Bliss. July \4t7i. near Broome. a despatch had been sent stating that the mob were burning buildings in Eighty-sixth Street.

Captain S. the shouts of the mob. There were but few specta: . yet the number of rioters was such that new mobs would soon spring up in the neighborhood. Putnam. Captain Wilkins captured and destroyed four bar ricades erected in Ninth Avenue near Thirty-fifth Street. which were kept constantly ringing. murder. Captain Putnam. in repelling an attack at Forty-sixth street and Fifth Avenue. RIOTS OF 1863. Several hundred citizens. and many others were looted. Though the mob was put to rout so frequently. the vast city Hashed golden rays of light. neighborhood attacking the rear of Cap command. Gibbon's house. " All over the in an account of this trip. Negroes were murdered when caught. Harlem Bridge would certainly have been burned had not the rains of the previous night rendered the timbers too wet to ignite. but upon rapine. including General Wetmore and William E. about forty rioters. Dodge. forts. P. says bay.NEW YORK THE DRAFT vest. he suddenly faced his men about and ordered them to fire. He was thought to be a South ern emissary. one of the party. the volleys of musketry and cannon all combined to make the city seem a veritable pandemonium. The crouching tiger resist ing discipline had given place to a hydra-headed monster. Serious disturbance had occurred during the day in Yorkville. Brooks Brothers' store. Trains leav ing the city were filled with frightened citizens. Mayor Opdyke's house. as the sunset gun was being fired. whose snaky visage seemed everywhere now intent not merely on resistance. 113 and a fine linen shirt. The saloon of a German was robbed and burned because he was known to have some negro customers. The streets were strewn with dead and dying. Mr. killed. The fire-bells. enrolled themselves in volunteer com panies to act with the militia. Lieutenant McElrath dispersed a mob which attacked his in this The mob tain Franklin's battery at Thirty-sixth Street. Colonel Nugent' s house. We landed at Castle Garden. the the islands. until flight was prevented by the tracks being torn up. The additional detachments from our battalion left the wharf at Fort Hamilton about 8 o'clock. and revenge.

E. quarters in Mulberry Street. and from him received orders to proceed at once to Yorkville to pre serve good order. in most cases flight. 4. Contrary to the hopes and ex pectations of many. corner of Eighty-sixth Street and Fourth T Avenue. In an the houses. and many attempts made elsewhere. the property of Postmaster W akeman. officer and a men search dozen occur. We were in arms until early morning." Wednesday. prevent rioting and to protect property generally and the lives of the citizens. It was a sort of brigand warfare. and bands . and were detailed to patrol the eastern section of the city. night. and in the Twenty-first Precinct. r some instances there w as resistance. On the morning of the loth I was called into the presence of General Brown. The disorderly crowds after one volley would slink away We into the darkness. A bare synopsis ' only of the events is possible. avenues. and the terrible scenes of the former days were even surpassed on this third day of the riot. As we filed along squads gathering at the corners of the streets broke and disappeared. detail : " Says Major H. the dangers unknown. Broadway it . the spirit of the beast mob was not yet broken. July \5tJi.' We were quartered in Harwood Hall. Several different station-houses were attacked. cleaning out the rioters. East Broadway. and it was impossible to follow them. Buildings were burned in Second Avenue. tors of our rapidly-forming ranks. could simply keep the streets clear. where disturbance was brood Occasional sounds of tumult were heard and the dis ing. Richmond. Stones were hurled from dark recesses and shots fired from tall tenement buildings along which we were passing. charge of musketry. who had command of the " We were under marching orders nearly the entire various the streets. As we marched up was absolutely deserted the silence was omi We reported at Police Head nous. whose dwelling had been burned the day before. patrolling Our special attention was directed to the safety of the Times and Tribune buildings. for we seemed to be in the midst of the most lawless of the popu A halt would lation. Negroes were hung in Second and Seventh at Pier No.114 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT.

July IGlTi. such were the demonstrations on Thursday that the matron of an orphan asylum near by with several hundred inmates." In accordance with this appeal suit able provisions were made and all danger averted. During the day there were disturbances in Yorkville. The military charged through the various streets. then. and again the deadly shot ploughed through them. Scarcely had they retired when a mob gathered afresh and strung up the lifeless bodies of the negroes. Thursday." Nevertheless. and Cap tain Ho well. Trouble in that had been somewhat the Catholic priest. between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets. made a written appeal to Lieutenants Richmond and Dexter to guard their lives " against assaults which were threatened by the riotous mob. emboldened. suddenly. and perse. refusing to dis Soon. making many arrests. who had and in a public speech counselled them " to strictly observe the law and preserve good order. with a section of the Eighth New York Artil The crowd fell back when charged upon by lery. Another night of horror passed. Commissioner Acton and his force of police. The canister tore through that mass of human bodies with sickening effect. Again they came on. 115 of robbers were engaged in looting stores and dwellings all over the city.NEW YORK THE DRAFT RIOTS OF 1863. " Fire !" shouted Captain Ho well. were getting worn out yet the beast was still rampant and unsubdued. and then moved elsewhere. came up. Later in the day Captains Putnam and Shelley dispersed a desperate mob in Fifth Avenue. with a detachment of cavalry. they filled up the streets. . called his people together Wednesday afternoon. as well as the limited number of troops engaged. Several thousand rioters at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Thirty-second Street were engaged in sacking houses and hanging negroes. the infantry and cavalry and then halted. when General Dodge and Colonel Mott. The Seventh Regiment and other troops returned during the night from the seat of war in the South to a worse conflict at home. vicinity allayed by . sent a shower of stones at the cannoneers. Not until some six rounds were fired did the rioters disperse.

Captain H. There fight occurred. Placing his cannon in position he swept the streets repeat edly with canister. This was a desperate but final struggle. R. reached the place with several companies of Regulars. where they began to plunder stores. A squad of at First foundry Avenue and Twenty-eighth when a stubborn were but twenty-five soldiers against On the arrival of the Seventh Regi ment the crowd dispersed. to reassemble. and then charged vigorously upon all the houses where they were firing from the roofs and windows upon his troops. They attacked the cavalry soldiers sent to disperse them. For some time the mob commanded the situation. . thousands of the mob. however.M. Putnam some time after 9 P. and one Sergeant was brutally beaten to death and his body left in the street. in Twentyninth Street. soldiers were chased into Jackson's Street. A DESPERATE BUT FINAL STRUGGLE. Scarcely had the dead body of the Sergeant been placed in the wagon when the rioters began to harass the Captain's men.116 HEAVY GUNS AXD LIGHT.

117 Before it was concluded. was hushed in mournful slum ber. Though the lightning would occasionally reveal groups of prowlers and the gleam of bayonets. and truly symbolized by the clouds. Yet peace was bordered with sadness. . that night. and the sobbing waves along the shore. the beast of unreason was dead. as if re-enforcing the authorities. Heaven's artillery opened and a drenching thunder-storm Twelve hundred closed the last act in the mad drama. Its great inarticulate voice. so well defined in its daily toils and triumphs.NEW YORK THE DRAFT RIOTS OF 1863. the tear-dimmed streets. The city lay in peculiar gloom lives had been sacrificed.

physical disability. informing other officers of the battalion will be dishonorably mustered out of the service." Lieutenant A. in the shape of their late mustering officer. and of signing false accounts for rations. In this. Captain Clinton. with forfeiture of all pay and allowances. and the officers began to congratulate themselves that they should at least have fair treatment. CONSOLIDATED. . Brown was immediately sent by the officers to Albany to interview Governor Seymour. had been dili gently engaged in weaving a web for their destruction. however. for fraudulent conduct in connection with the recruitment of the force. the latter telegraphed to Washington. was an intimate friend of Captain Marshall.CHAPTER X. C. Various charges were furnished Colonel Barnes on which the original order of dismissal had been based. and an investigation ordered. of General Canby's staff. and on which the investigation would now be made. Major Barnes became the recipient of a somewhat startling order from the War Department. Among these was that of enlisting men physically incompetent of enlisting men solely to garrison forts in New York Harbor of enlisting men previously discharged from the service for . This was done. After hearing a statement of the mat ter. their anticipations were somewhat weakened when they learned that the officer him that he " and all appointed to make the investigation. At any rate. jS to the private griefs referred to in the last chapter it was asserted by some of our officers that their evil genius. requesting and recommending that this obnoxious order be suspended. .

as was admitted on the trial." As the result of this examination. and indeed did not think Barnes and Avery quite guilty. not satisfied with taking over sixty men which he and his doctor had rejected from our regi ment into his own. and remarked that he did not think Marshall was quite im partial.' After referring in his letter to the friendship between Cap tains Marshall and Clinton. On the trial I defended Barnes. not forgetting to enlarge well on the Harrisburg affair. upon the whole. would recommend that they be dismissed dishonorably and that the line officers go before an examining board. but. such as no court under Heaven could have passed by lightly. though the result was not known till some time afterward. and put in a written defense. 1863. when. which sought to deter mine an officer's fitness to command a company by means of hard questions in arithmetic and other branches a sort ' * of incipient civil service with a military annex nearly all the line officers regained their positions. Avery. charging Barnes and his officers with all sorts of irregularities and frauds. it appears that Marshall.CONSOLIDATED. I also assisted Dr. then. The result was an order dishonorably dismissing us all from the service. omit ting entirely the strong arguments they depended upon. and he was as strongly posted as Barnes. 119 Captain A. and entirely unable to defend ourselves.' and the thing was done. supported by numerous affidavits of the strongest character.* and as that was withdrawn. through A . none of us were touched by any one of them except that of enlisting men ' ' : ' previously discharged from service for physical disability . states the situation as follows " While we had been in the field totally unconscious of : enemies at home. had been diligently engaged in corre spondence with a friend in the War Department. Captain Brown says further i% \Ve were all to be mustered out on the charges pre sented. Brown. Of course General Canby approved ' the report. without pay or allowances. What was our surprise. few. no one could be tried but Barnes and Surgeon Avery. when Captain Clinton in his report stated only a few points of Barnes's and Avery' s defenses. C. in a letter written November 3d. to his father.

especially cerned. Those of the battalion who were not detailed in the city ' ' ' with the regulars during the riot were left in charge of Fort Hamilton and of Fort Richmond.tape and shoe polish prevailed." " salute with the hand most remote. of course. or school-boy accustomed to think himself as good as anybody. Parades." and in some instances were duly incarcerated in the Fort Hamilton guard-house. guard-mounts. Indifference or disgust not pressing their claims very hard. though not always pleasant in character." and to stand like a mummy for per haps a minute. it was a little irksome to be suddenly brought to a halt in the street. So many regiments were temporarily located here. until some of the leaders happened to get out and were fresh fish' they had duly pummelled by some of the robbed. This guard-house deserves mention. the raw recruits of the command. This gang managed to keep in the guard house for a time. On the night of July 18th an amusing incident occurred at the latter post. edged post. and did a thriving business. inspections in fact. The experience of " guarding the forts in New York Har bor" for the four months the battalion was located there. was in military regulations and discipline a sort of gilt- were dropped. This was en tirely proper. so far as the officers were con To the men. because another fellow with shoulder-straps happened to be passing. rifling the pockets of drunken men newly paid off and put in to sober up. to have to " face to the front. but to a young farmer. was interesting. clerk. Red. A gang of these fellows organized themselves for the purpose of relieving new-comers of their surplus cash. which had been evinced in connection with the workmen . has already been explained. The source of unpleasantness.120 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Even some of the old veterans " kicked. one difficulty was the Fort Hamilton. all exercises affecting the relations of officers and men in and about the post. rigidity of the discipline. There was a riotous element on the island. were conducted under the strictest military rules. the headquarters. that the guard-house frequently contained more than a hundred occupants. Staten Island.

FORTS IN NEW YORK HARBOR.FORT HAMILTON. .

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That night the sleeping inmates and the small relief of a half dozen . the men were ordered to pack up and fall in as soon as possible to go on board a transport in the harbor. fell in line about 3 P. as if the ditch.. a premature discharge blew off one of the inventor' s hands and partially blinded him. to visit the city and take in the museums. located above Fort Rich mond and the orders were strict as to challenging any one approaching the sally-port during the night. been left all night with the harness on their necks and a long chain dragging therefrom. to capture the fort. and considerable of a commotion It turned out that a yoke of oxen had at the rear entrance. There were suspicions at the time that the man himself had a hand in it. and on the heavy guns in the The company officers were assisted in this work by forts. about midnight they had sentinels were startled employed on Fort Wadsworth.M. quar tered at Fort Hamilton. and a few days after ward. returned from Pennsylvania. 123 " by a challenge.CONSOLIDATED. The companies were drilled daily while here in the manual of arms. then serving in the defenses of Washington. On October 8th the report was circulated that the bat talion was consolidated with the Fourth New York Heavy On Artillery.M. etc. manned by our boys. though he proved too good a soldier afterward to warrant the belief that it off A gun was intentional. Companies K and M. They were well-nigh successful at least. company movements. a yell. Opportunity was also given. for the sentinel was pretty badly frightened and knocked off the bridge into started pell-mell down the hill. blew was discharged one night at Fort Richmond and a man's finger. though sparingly. theatres. In September Goodwin' s rifled battery. sergeants detailed from the Seventh and Twelfth United States Infantry. A few members had already ft fallen in" the boozing places along . about 9 A. the 10th of the same month. while exhibiting it. Bathing was a chief recreation while here. Who goes there ?" followed by a shot. Possibly actuated by the spirit of discord so prevalent.

124 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. from the effects of having drunk ob stinate liquor. Washington. another tractable state of mind. which even quinine and whiskey would not allay. Fortress Monroe was reached. October llth. of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Warner and James McKeel. refused to go on board. Upon shot. except that a good many p. Anchored at Alexandria for the night. February IQth. probably. The battalion as such ceased to exist. a Lieutenant in the Sixth Regulars. the arrival of the four companies. Sunday. shore. locations for camping were assigned and tents furnished them until barracks could be constructed. man walked overboard. One man. and had to be hunted up by the sergeants who com manded the companies. the regimental battalions being organized anew. and finally a to the dock in barrows. after passing the drawbridge the men disembarked at the foot of G Street wharf. Vandeweile. A man in Company A was accidentally Another man in handling a gun. About midnight. the hammer caught . who was accompanied by Lieutenants George H. The sergeants com manding reported to Captain John B. man feet fell down the hatchway of the Constitution fourteen and broke a rib or two. and the companies fell in and marched through Georgetown to Fort Ethan Allen. and on Tuesday. he came his sword. but was finally fished out in a much more On reaching the transport. near drowning. and about twelve hours after ward the transport entered the Potomac. The other two companies were already stowed away in the vessel. The rolls were called by the respec tive orderlies. During the spring and summer of 1863 a number of events of a striking character had occurred at the fort. and in some instances wheeled down The tug which was to convey the companies on board the transport did not reach the dock till dark. knocked the man into the dock with the flat of Loaded down with his accoutrements. The transport Constitution weighed anchor about 10 The voyage was imeventf ul. The officer of the Post Guard. suffered from sea-sickness. and was duly rescued. M. under the direction of Captain Vandeweile.

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Artillery. commanding said post. sir. and that it is fully appreciated by the company this costly and beautiful sword. 127 blowing out the brains of the man Company H. ac An companied with the following remarks " Lieutenant Hayden. May of Sth. winiung the game by one run. is which the following account given : SWORD PRESENTATION AND SURPRISE. 1863. VA. FORT MARCY. and other articles fully prove. May '30th. " You may soon be called upon to use this sword in the defense of your country. your officers as well as myself can testify. his belt. the non-commissioned officers and A have requested me in their name of Company privates to present you with a small testimonial of their esteem for you as a man and a soldier. elegant sword was presented to Lieutenant Hay den of Company A. belt. and I feel confident that you will never let it be stained with dishonor. tion was made by Major Allcock. and it went in front of him. I have to express my grateful acknowledgments. has been strict in enforcing discipline. having been challenged by Company C to come over to Ethan Allen and play a game of base-ball. on the occasion of your merited promotion. off.CONSOLIDATED. sash. Y. on Friday of the above date. . An interesting affair occurred at Fort Marcy. but as an evi dence of the deep friendship and strong attachment they have for you and their satisfaction at your advancement. sir. and all in your power to promote the efficiency of your company. It is most gratifying to see good feeling exist ing between the officer and men. Fourth N. but it is not always the case : when the officer " That you." Lieutentant Hayden replied as follows To those members of Company A who contributed toward this magnificent present of which I am here the honored : 1 ' recipient. Y. came and played nine innings. not for their intrinsic value only. May 8.. Receive them. have always done your duty. by the members of The presenta his command. at Fort Marcy.

sir. trusting also that you would lead us to a successful issue. to testify to you both by word and deed that you have by gentlemanly and soldierly conduct endeared yourself to us. set of A The presentation was made by Cor revolver. etc. called upon you with us to sacrifice the society of friends. wives of spurs. I appreciate the kind motives which actuate you. that while many have been called upon to the sterner realities of war. " The fortunes of war has called us It has together.128 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. com mander of said post. and remaining with you until such time as Uncle Sam shall have no further use for one of the best companies in the United States service. it becomes my pleasing duty. worthy of this beautiful gift. you have not been called upon to lead us to the bloody fields of strife and carnage. but should you be thus called upon." THE SURPRISE. we trust and confide in your ability so to do. and try while mothers are now mourning the loss of sons. now garrison ing Fort Marcy. and our nation is clad in the mourner's sable garb. could not ask to be connected with a more noble com of men. sisters of brothers. and . and thank you from the bottom of my heart and it is my earnest wish that my conduct as a soldier may be . Companies and H. saddle. and also to bear with us the burdens of an unholy rebellion. with an elegant bridle. children of parents. It is in vain for me to attempt to express the emotions which I feel. and I hope and trust that I may have the pany of pleasure returning your love and respect. poral Company H. proceeded to present Major Allcock. I thank you. Yet. the comforts of domestic life. After the conclusion of the former ceremony. we have been spared. " It is true. Again. 11 To-day is a day of peril. : husbands. gentlemen. members of my company and " I in the estimation of both the my superior officers. and that you would return crowned with the laurel wreaths of a nation's gratitude. accompanied with the fol remarks viz. of Wheeler. of the previously-named regiment. sir. sir. lowing " Major Allcock.

and that we may in turn. and that you may ever be found worthy of the respect and esteem of those whom you have the honor to command. Although we are and have been thus favored. While practising with light artillery. every soldier has a duty to perform. and. spurred on by the consciousness of being backed by your valor. our mothers.CONSOLIDATED. a Union restored. our sisters.. which will ever be cherished by me as a memento of your kindly feelings. June 2^. hoping that the same friendly feeling may ever exist between us. ever cherish ing the fond hope that we may soon return to them richly laden with the blessings of peace. as the rebels were reported in the vicinity. I present you with these gifts. you have performed yours well and with an impartial hand. : You have stolen a march your many flattering remarks. in our opinion. I magnificent presents which you ask my am profoundly grateful. " Therefore. " I cannot find language to express you. a firm and Government. and shall esteem them the more as coming from the enlisted men of this post. our wives. A and H. and the costly and acceptance. bearing with us also the fruits of our labors namely. our children and friends. Details were sent out to barricade the roads. only mourn our absence. 129 friend of friend. in behalf of your command viz. by our gentlemanly conduct and free republican " soldierly bearing." May 31st. I trust it may be in this saddle. " For Reply of Major Allcock." " CORPORAL AND SOLDIERS and taken me by surprise. as a token of our regard for your welfare and respect for you as a commander. " I r my feeling toward accept your beautiful presents. and ever bear upon your forehead the impress of a true patriot. " I thank you once more for your splendid gift. ever prove ourselves worthy the respect and confidence of so noble a commander. w hom I have the honor to command. and if it shall ever be my lot to ride to fame. the shells .

to man the Details at the guns for several days. The men received new Springfield rifles in their old guns. Dr. chas etc. Owing to heavy showers. June H. Colonel Tidball. appeared for the first time on parade. July 28t7i. In fact. August and turned 31st. forty -nine to thirty-six. 26th. July 4th. June June June guns. an order was read on parade allowing every man a gill of whiskey per day. This was not regarded with favor by aU. A heavy hail-storm. Tidball. it was the aim of some of the officers to dedicate every new building with appropriate ceremonies. A young fellow of Company F while bathing was swept into the current of the Potomac and drowned. the work of building went on jointly with the daily and guard duty. who had won an excellent reputation as an artillery officer on the Peninsula. carpenters and other work detailed for all the companies needing barracks. 21 st. at Antietam. was especially careful of all means looking to the comfort as well as discipline of his command. Heavy cannonading heard Leesburg.130 set HEAVY GUNS AND some woods on 6th. 9th.M. with customary zeal. and more recently at Gettysburg. Men called up at 1 o'clock A. \St7i. Mudie fell from his horse and broke August Wth. Every new barracks was duly dedi cated with a ball. with stones as large as in the direction of black walnuts. The body was recovered on the 30th and buried with mili tary honors. August his leg. Company C won a game Score. had worked long to have erected. which Chaplain Can-. recently ap pointed Colonel. fell. Quite in contrast to former orders. The new chapel. the river was very high and rapid. spreading over a few hundred of ball played with acres. September 3d. ing a greased pig. LIGHT. When the new men were and drill battalion arrived. was ac- . wheelbarrow races. General John C. fire. There were athletic exercises wrestling.

but. . The following troops were encamped in the vicinity of Fort Ethan Allen while we garrisoned it. One Hundred and Forty-second New York. Twenty-third Maine. and sabre : composed of different regiments. Sixteenth Virginia. A number of chiefs of pieces who were most successful in handling their respective de tails and in hitting the target were recommended for com missions by the Colonel. though some did not receive these documents till a long time afterward. one in the middle of each side and one at each talion . made of boards battened. so as to be bomb-proof. 131 tually dedicated twice secularly. After the buildings were all completed. the jigs performed at . and would have remonstrated. of officers was held in the building on its com The point was first discussed that the house was pletion. the waltzes. Fortieth Massachusetts. who was then A meeting preparing his address for the dedicatory ceremonies. named in the order in which they arrived One Hundred and Twentyseventh Pennsylvania. To which the chaplain. alas it was too late. A non-commissioned school for instructing the chevroned officers in all kinds of including infantry. One Hun dred and Sixty-ninth New York. that reception. The latter were built of logs and covered with earth. duly It was then moved and seconded that it would assented. there were eight outside of the fort and two within. bayonet exercises. and on the Sabbath following as a house of Divine worship. he came into the new chapel on the evening appointed and saw the quadrilles. and varied with target firing. light and heavy artillery. was under the immediate command of Lieutenant Morrison and Captain Miller. how ever. ! Forenoons were devoted to drilling on field-pieces. When. not yet a chapel. Those outside were one hundred feet long by twenty wide and twenty high. be eminently proper to hold a reception in the building to which the reverend gentleman also assented. as a building.CONSOLIDATED. Perhaps it the good chaplain remembers with disgust to this day how came about that he consented to the former ceremonies. There were four doors. he waxed righteously wroth. and a bat drill. One Hundred and Eigh teenth New York.

he very graciously allowed them to search the house. and along the west side of the parade ground. but they found a man who was so positively and dangerously insane that they were glad to get away. A. Care a was the the shot fired to arouse house. Lieutenant Burt and Captain Brewster. H. Eddy was the first Assistant Pro vost Marshal. Much of the fatigue duty was done at this time by the who came in in large numbers during the winter. went out one night to capture a man who had deserted from the First Ohio Cavalry. suddenly who appeared to be seven feet high. The deserter was not there. Burt. came those of D. G was inside the fort. Lieutenant A. some humorous. attired in one gar ment. fully surrounding man when front and a the door occupants. a long red beard. E. Richmond was Adjutant. with head perfectly bald. Their man was : . stalked forth to the edge of the piazza. D. opened. did They very much more drilling. The barracks of K and B were at the south end. without in to desert. would go out in the country and forget tending pathetic. J. Each contained twelve windows. Strong suspicions were entertained that he was located in the house of a secesh farmer. who was succeeded by Lieutenant W. On the death of the latter. who was succeeded by Major Young. where they halted about midnight. too. and M. and gazed cautiously around until his eye " What do rested on the command. C. and I were at Fort Marcy. A good many incidents will be remembered as occurring about this time some exciting. E. Lieutenant U. than the remainder of the command. F. They were heated by cylindrical stoves six feet long. of Scott's Nine Hundred. numerous. as thin as a rail. H. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Expeditions after guerillas and deserters were The latter were usually men who. The first Provost Marshal was Major Ulysses Doubleday.132 end. in order. Hatch was appointed to this posi tion. with a candle in one hand. when he said you 'uns want?" On being informed. LT s barracks being at the north end. and some recruits. H. The officers' tents were located along the east side of the parade ground. to return. of which post Lieut.

Drilled in the forenoon on light field-pieces. Detailed as Sergeant of Picket Guard. But when the Lieutenant pro posed to fire up the chimney. With twelve men and two corporals. 1863. etc. During the twenty-four hours turned out the guard once for Officer of the Day and twice for Colonel Tidball. Drilled in light artillery. but if memory does not fail. October 30^. Just after dress parade one evening. opened oysters in Aiken's tent the incident of one officer awaking suddenly to find a lighted torch in his mouth false alarms of Moseby and Washingtonians in retreat the touching incident of Sur geon Lawrence's kitten which he encountered in the road. . Officer of the Day." Had . a carriage containing two ladies from Washington. Chain Bridge and took charge of two light pieces Purchased meals at the " Dominie's. our man came down very lively. the team dashing down the rocky hill to Chain Bridge. though the girls said there was no one about the house. Some . December \ktJi. and which proved to be not a kitten. went over to Maryland side of near bridge. and had charge of police squad in the after noon. One of the ladies was thrown out and injured . 133 found later on engaged in the revelry of a dance near Leesburg. in the afternoon did fatigue duty on barracks. the Captain himself was so wrought upon by the spectacle of the ball that he detained the com mand there until he could try his foot and figure. then sergeant in Company M. quite severely. from Washington. October 31st. Detailed as Sergeant of the G-uard. Some idea of the routine life among the enlisted men may be suggested by the following extracts from the writer's diary. November 5th. of the officers may recall the night when friends of Sutler King. Captain Brewster will excuse the reminiscence. Went grand rounds with Captain Jones. who had been visiting at the fort.CONSOLIDATED. On another occasion Lieutenant Burt found a deserter he was seeking up a chimney. went on dress parade. was run away with.

to keep comfortable. drills January Learning phonography. Detailed as Sergeant of Picket Guard. parade. inspection. who is sick in the hospital. January 4tk. Off guard. remaining days he was on drill. some very sick. gun. men put into the magazine for witnessing a dog-fight. .134 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. quarters in a small building containing a stove. Managed December 23d. Major Young's funeral train passed about 3 P. by the average soldier. under the leadership of Corporal " Old Put. A MarcJi %th. Corporal Canfield. then a private belong ing to Company C. Snowing all day. or parade. Wet all day until 3 P. During the year he managed to receive eighty-one letters and to write eighty-six probably more literary work than was performed . Eleven patients there. drew thus avoided cleaning it. on The twenty days fatigue. From the diary of Dr. Last night the coldest of the season. Weather warm. M. died this morning. the load in post my 7. we find that he was on guard during 1863 in and about the forts fifty-seven days on picket. No 2d. Sat up last night with Dan Keyes." went out in the Putnam.M. Bought two and one half pounds of butter at thirty-five cents. first relief on the par number of apet at the end of Company G's barracks. Some members of the escort straggled back. December 25t7i. forty-one days. Company D. March ItTi. January QtJi. Twenty-two of us from several different companies of the Fourth.M. etc. At 11 P. From his diary we extract January 1st. On guard. On guard over choppers at Lewinsville. when it Read and cyphered all cleared up and turned very cold. . went down to ar rest some men attempting an attack on the " Dominie's" quarters. 1864. Robinson. a descendant of country to the house of a farmer named Paine. . where we had a very excellent Christmas dinner. and February 20th. Turned out guard for Officer of the Day about 10 A..M. Drilled in dismounting and mounting heavy guns. day.

ON" FORT ETHAN ALLEN. It need not be said that then the enemy \vith . the main body of the regiment. in which he saw the Confederates advancing up the ravine over the abatis across the moat. 185 A third relief post 5. over prisoners Moseby's guerillas made a descent on Langly. line of skirmishers from the regiment hastily thrown out. while our boys. en deshabille. The attacking party seemed to have the advantage until the Colonel was seen. Marcli \tli. and about which there had been so many surprises but the only thing of the kind we have to record is a remarkable dream of one of the men. rushed to the defense. as if on dress parade. and a goodly number of them scal ing the parapet. THE ATTACK. of the regiment immense have occupied Fort Ethan Allen with an at tacking party in its front.CONSOLIDATED. They were Garrison life could not fail to become monotonous and irksome unless coupled with incidents of real warfare such as some of the veterans had experienced. with night caps and artillery hats hastily donned. in the fort. and the younger members of the regiment were hoping for. and with muskets in their hands. entering the fort. On guard. called in to-day. It would have afforded some satisfaction to .

D. F. H. Benjamin A. D. M. were gallantly repulsed. . and William Arthur were severally promoted to Major First Lieuten ants James H. Gleason. H. J. Young. Smith. H. C. Edmonston. F. Bailey. including the valley of Pimmitt Creek. Hamlink. Bemis. Sears. Lee became Second Lieutenants. and Lewis Trites resigned tenant William E. C. Lieutenants Horace E. The following changes. J. Jones. Sanford. J. Gray. M. Dickens. Brown were raised to the rank of Captain Second Lieuten ants D. McPherson. D. Young. D. F. But alas that this glory should have all been confined to the night and the imagination of one sleepy sentinel. ! : . N. W. Japhet Allston. Kopper. all at Fort Ethan Allen Major E. Three officers died. Clarke. . Kimball. George W. Captains George W. and Augustus C. Van Name was discharged. . Cole. A. and M. B. Waterbury. oc curred among the commissioned officers during the year Major Thomas Allcock was promoted to LieutenantColonel Captains T. Wood. Lieutenants Daniel Cole and William C. and G. Bemis were advanced to the rank of First Lieutenant and B. J.136 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Horn. E. were filled with the smoke of our heavy guns in parting salute as they retired. Assistant-Surgeon Ingalls. F. D. McNaughand Lieu ton. S. D. K. R. and the nigged ravines. J. A. Curtis. Sedgwick Pratt. W. . E. . F. W. D. not previously mentioned. T. Davis.

The news created considerable excitement at Fort Ethan Allen. according to custom. Some of the officers expressed misgivings that the regiment might be transferred to infantry. and Brown. our regiment received orders to join the Army of the Potomac. and as soon as the companies at Fort Marcy could join the main body at Fort Ethan Allen. and those at Fort Marcy by the Third Pennsylvania Artillery. But Captain McKeel produced the order duly transcribed in the order-book. This quarters. among both officers and men. assured of its genuineness.. at Fort Marcy. equal to many an infantry At brigade. quietly sleep ing in his new ranch. March 27th. the companies of Fort Ethan Allen were relieved by the Second Massachusetts Artillery. At 7 A.CHAPTER XI.M. in packing. GOOD-BYE.M. was unceremoniously awakened by Captain McKeel at 5 A. on Sunday. and some were a little put out by the fact that they had Captain Brown. 1864. just gone to the expense of building new was the case also with some of the officers The day was spent at daylight. bounced out of bed and made his toilet in a hurry. of Company H at that post. the orders being to move this time the regiment numbered about twenty-five hundred men. March 26th. sus pecting that it was a trick to procure some whiskey which he had laid in to " warm" his new quarters. declar ing that he was spoiling for a fight. Heavy . Captain Brown ex pressed some doubt as to the genuineness of the order. CANNON. McKeel was apparently in great glee at the prospect of a change. and told the news.

we had we cars took previously occupied. and going into camp south side of the Potomac. past many of the forts near the depot. Reaching Alexandria. however.. This was our first experience in shelter . MAP SHOWING MILITARY POSITION SOUTH OF THE POTOMAC. the march was begun to Alexandria. out on was considerably surprised on coming in to find the regiment gone and a new regiment in its place. for Brandy Station. They soon overtook the command. Company K. The route was on the picket.138 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT.M. arriving at 10 P.

and the boys looked homesick and dispir- . where M they had plenty of friends and were most hospitably re ceived. marched nearly over to a place called Stevensburg. The weather was very fine and everybody was in good spirits. and about all we could do was to repair the dam after and considerable ages done and put ourselves in better shape for coming unpleasantness of a similar character. We pitched our tents as best we could. and every one who had the slightest claim to acquaintanceship remained with his friends. On March 28th we moved about two miles from the depot. This con tinued all day. Our pleasure was short-lived. enjoying the change and consequent activity. from half-way Brandy Station. The morning of April 2d found the ground covered with four inches of snow. but many of the men who had acquaintances in other regiments went Members of D. On March 31st the regiment was called out on dress pa rade for the first time since leaving Fort Marcy. however. but the men were countermarching. making everything muddy and uncomfort The next morning it able. and striking tents. and continued the rest of the day. 'had cleared up a little. tents. 139 good-natured. marching in high boots. and accommodated themselves to circumstances with excellent Many of the men were exceedingly footsore from grace. It was rather a severe baptism. behaved well. for we awoke the following morning to find it storming furiously. Here we camped on a side hill. and arranged our camp. but everything was damp and dis agreeable. of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York. pitched tents finally. April 1st we received orders to report to the Artillery Brigade of the Second Corps. and a worse spot could not have been found It began to rain when we were about in the whole vicinity. each battalion by itself. and there was a general call for army shoes. much to their relief. Those who were supplied with extras gener ously divided with those who had none. The courtesy was heartily appreciated by the wet and weary men. H.GOOD-BYE. and went over to the camp visiting. CANNON. and nearly drowning us out. The men suffered greatly from cold and exposure.

Hartwell C. Battery A. New Hampshire First Light Artillery. Captain Edwin B. and things were much pleasanter on the 13th. Battery K. Colonel Tidball had been placed in command of the Artil lery Brigade. and Captain Theodore Miller as Acting Assist ant Inspector. Edgell. Dr. Battery F. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Fourth United States "W. Tompkins was announced as Surgeon-inhief of the brigade. if not with cold. Arnold. Lieutenant Roder. Eddy as Aide to Colonel Brown. All the next day the storm continued with un abated fury. Fifth United States Artillery. First Rhode Rhode Island Light Artillery. In many cases this was quite impossible. Captain R.General of the brigade. Captain Frederick M. . John commanding. Captain J. when we were able. we crept into such shelter as we happened to have and tried to be comfortable. paid off. Sixth Battery. The next morning showed a bit of blue sky. Battery B. Second Corps. Ulysses D. : Dow. when the paymaster arrived. and we were nearly drowned in our blankets. Captain Light Artillery. Tenth Battery. which beside our regiment con tained the following batteries Maine Light Artillery. Bruce Ricketts. and shivering with disgust. Frederick Artillery. First Pennsylvania Light Artillery. Henry Sleeper. The weather con tinued very disagreeable for a whole week. Massachusetts Light Artillery. but the sky brightened a little on the 12th.140 ited. made so from exposure. Battery G. Captain William A. Lieuten ant James Gilliss. First Battery. and everybody set to work to fix up and make things comfort but right in the midst of these improvements another storm struck us. the sutler looking positively happy. New York Nelson Ames. First T. and many were reported sick. as the tents leaked most bountifully. Batteries C and I. Captain Island Light Artillery.

.

PABKHTTBST. ADJ'T HKNRY J. . C. LT. L. M. E.BBV'T CAPT. T. BREVET BRIG. D. MAJOR T. SEABS. MORRISOX.-COLONEL FRANK WILLIAMS.-GEN'L THOMAS ALLCOCK. BRV'T CAPT. GOBDON. KOPPER. BBV'T MAJOB G.

C. with as little delay as practicable. 92. III. to Sixth Corps. (Extract. is assigned to each of the three infantry corps. April 9th. General Meade teries.} 23. Headquarters of the regiment. Major Thomas D. and Second Battalions will report to the commanders of artillery of the corps to which they have been respectively assigned. All enlisted men belonging to the First and Second Battalions on duty in the Quartermaster's Subsistence or Ordnance Departments of this brigade. will be at once re- . No. the battalions of the Fourth New York Artillery are assigned as follows First Battalion. : larger than seemed necessary to act and immediate support for these bat the following special order was issued by A battalion of the Fourth New York Fort Artillery. to be selected by Colonel J.GOOD-BYE. April 9. and Colonel of the regiment. Army In pursuance of Special Orders No. CANNON. 1864. 1864." Accordingly the following order was issued : " HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY BRIGADE. Second Corps. I. SECOND ARMY CORPS. The Chief Medical an assistant surgeon to each of the First and Second Bat talions. Sears commanding. Tidball. Major William Arthur commanding. to Second Corps. Major Frank Williams commanding. with as little delay as possible. Officer of this brigade will assign V. under Lieutenant-Colonel The First Allcock. Third Battalion. will remain with the Third Battalion. to Fifth Corps. Chief of Artillery. and make such other disposition in his department as he may deem necessary. and will report for duty accordingly. Headquarters of Potomac. : Second Battalion. SPECIAL ORDERS. 143 As our regiment was as supernumeraries April 9th.

Captain Artillery. pitching Brandy Station.Sergeant. Captain Will iam A. Theodore Price. Fourth Battery (D). McCartney. Lieutenant Melville C. New York Light Artillery. Battery E.144 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. left regimental head- S. Battery G. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. On . Louis J. Battery M. Captain Andrew Cowan. broke camp to the Sixth Corps Artillery Brigade. Battery C. The day after the First Battalion joined the Sixth Corps. the soil of which was quite sandy. and marched over tents near Companies C. Eddy. Sergeant. Commanding Brigade. First Fifth United States Artillery. Captain William H. K. commanded by Colonel Charles H. H. April 13th^ Major Sears made the following announcement Lieutenant Adelbert S. First Battery. Kimball. : McVicker. Third Battery. under Major Arthur. First Rhode Rhode Island Light Artillery. Captain William B. Quartermaster. Captain Richard Waterman. TIDBALL. First Battalion. Major Thomas D. made up of Companies D. Captain James McKnight. The camping ground was a : grassy plain. First Island Light Artillery. and M. and E. Rhode Island Light George W. L. By order of JOHN After being paid Sears. Sears. First Battery (A). George the 15th the Second Battalion. under Major off. This brigade included the following Maine Light Artillery. consisting of C. the First Battalion. Adjutant. Quartermaster. Ham. Rhodes. Farwell. Tompkins. Adams.Major. Massachusetts Light Artillery. New York Light Artillery. turned to their respective companies. and their places sup plied by details from the Third Battalion. D.

Battery C. April 23d the following order. Battery D. First New York Light Artillery. (Extract. Captain Augus : tus P. also by the Brigade Commissary. Winslow. Battery D. Second Battalion. Battery E. Lieutenant Fifth United States Artillery. Battery H. now serving Corps. Company E. Captain Charles A. Quartermaster. S. 145 quarters and reported to Colonel C. Lieu tenant George Breck. No. Fourth with trie Sixth Army York. Fourth United James Stewart. New Army Corps.} 118. Captain Rodney Dexter. ordnance train.Major. Mink. near Culpeper.GOOD-BYE. Captain George B. First New York Light Artillery. : was made HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF POTOMAC. Sergeant. Company L. States Artillery. On Quartermaster. First New York Light Artillery. Phillips. . Artillery. transferring companies. is transferred to the Second I. Captain Charles E. Battery B. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Rittenhouse. com manding Artillery Brigade Fifth Corps. Lieutenant B. First Pennsylvania Light Artillery. 23. Major William Arthur. Wainwright. and Company Fourth New York Artillery. Battery B. Massachusetts Light Artillery. April SPECIAL ORDERS. Captain James H. 1864. Cooper. F. Martin. The brigade included Massachusetts Light Artillery.Sergeant. The tents were pitched in an orchard near an old house occupied by an elderly lady and her daughter. CANNON. The battalion organization was announced as follows : Adjutant. Batteries E and L. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery.

A. First New York Light Artillery. S. First Island Artillery. good many incidents of interest occurred while the encamped with the three artil of the of lery brigades Army the Potomac. .146 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. from the time of this transfer all through the cam paign. and the suspicion was rife that our heavy guns would be carried on our shoulders during the coming three battalions were thus A campaign. Assistant Adjutant-General. Adams. Tenth Massachusetts.General MEADE. Lieutenant Ulysses D. First Lieutenant George H. Judge Advocate. Second Lieutenant William Butler Beck. Blakee. Company L continued doing guard duty with the am munition train of the Artillery Brigade. On Monday. Artillery. J. Eddy. Second Army Corps. First Lieutenant S. Second Battalion. the army was reviewed by Gen Grant and Meade. Battery A. erals April 18th. Knower. T. now serving with the Second Corps. and a very important service was satisfactorily per formed by them. WILLIAMS. First Lieutenant Joshua W. and will report without delay. made up of the following officers : Captain Edward C. A court-martial was held at the headquarters of the Sec ond Corps Artillery Brigade. Fourth New York Rhode Second Lieutenant J. Battery Fifth New York Artillery. Fourth President. is transferred to the Sixth Army Corps. McClellan. and I that of the Sixth for a considerable period also. Artillery. Fourth New York I. Considerable drilling was done by each of them in in fantry movements. Battery G. Company E guarded the ammunition train Fifth Corps. Warner. New York Artillery. By command of Major. Second Lieutenant Alvah Smith.

composed of the following officers Colonel James L. C. of the First Battalion at was Brandy Station. Quite a number from the regiment were commissioned in colored troops. we knew we should soon be on the road. on May 3d.. and we An Examining Board also was ap got there on time. daily at Culpeper. Bates. enlisted to examine men of the Fifth Corps desirous pointed the last days of April. we did not do any drilling. 147 was also held at Culpeper during composed chiefly of officers from The writer has yet a vivid recollec tion of a horseback ride from Brandy Station to Culpeper While at Stevensburg. drew six days' rations. We had about an hour's time to make the distance ten miles. were sent before General Casey's Board at Wash ington. and. On inquiry it was found that the other two battalions had received quite sim ilar treatment from the elements. Fourth New York Heavy Ar Candidates successfully passing the examination tillery. Major Sears. in accordance with orders received. hap to attend this court-martial. Massachusetts . CANNON. decidedly averse to these applications and would not approve them. presence required at Culpeper as a first notice of this was one day when a The witness. and if again successful were commissioned in colored Some twenty-five applicants were examined regiments. .GOOD-BYE. On May 2d. came for him. and when. Watkins. about 4 P. that played havoc with the shelter tents and washed away very much of the soil on which they had been erected. The road was muddy and the stirrups too short. Seventy-sixth New York Captain A. the camp at Brandy Station was struck by a storm of wind and rain. the Second Battalion. which led to some complica tions with the company officers. . mounted orderly. Brown. Twelfth : A general court-martial Captain C. after a brief attendance at the Military School. leading another horse. A. but the horse was equal to John Gilpin's famous roadster.M. of entering the Military School in Philadelphia. of this Board. The indications for a movement of the army grew more numerous. of to be the Guard when some offence was Sergeant pening was his committed.

ing Tuesday. in command. and M." Every man of that battalion retired to his tent that night impressed with a certain responsibility. and the army in the new and distinguished General (Grant) who was to lead Orders were them to battle. When the line was formed. actuated by a high sense of duty. Major Sears. and re minding us that there could be safety only to our homes and families by the peace that we should conquer. Memory touches him in his dreams. F. the completeness of their equipments. must and will attend our efforts. consisting of HE First Battalion. and the soldier sleeps. read a stirring order from General Meade. Retreat and taps are sounded. and on that swarthy brow there beams a smile as he beholds familiar faces and friends far distant. Warning us that the eyes of the whole country would regard our movements with the greatest anxiety. 1864. and the confidence reposed by the Government. fighting to preserve the Government and the institutions handed down to us by our forefathers. Com drill panies C. This one shudders and mutters . not unmixed with wonder as to what the future had in store for him. May received to draw eighty rounds of car tridges and six days' rations. under God's blessing. and the companies turned out on undress parade in the afternoon. the ap peal concluded with the injunction that. the people. victory. re minding the soldiers of their strength. "with clear con science and strong arms. did not do any 3d. THE FIRST BATTALION.CHAPTER IN THE WILDERNESS XII. if true to ourselves.

. We came in a little time to find that a comparatively moderate load would answer the purpose best. down into the valleys. Possibly those huge vultures soaring as tiny specks in the blue sky to the southward indicate disaster. but in good order. as it appeared to some of us. beat silent and still the Army of the Potomac is moving. while bluebird and song-sparro\v sing their sweetest notes as we pass along. blankets. and in most instances stationery. canteens and haver sacks filled. In four ranks right face march !" and " " No drums tramp. Soon sunlight dispels the darkness and gilds the polished equipments with its rays. and you have a weight. besides gun and equip ments. coats. . . and all sorts of military clothing. Xo wonder the roads traversed during the first days of the campaign were strewn with tents. eighty rounds of cartridges. Soon numerous forms gather in the darkness. It is a beautiful day. " Turn out !" What now Some one says : The First Sergeant is waking up the company. chiefly by the open road. and answer to their names " Pack !" up Tents are struck.IN THE WILDERNESS strangely fate? . overcoat. rations carry. and over the hills and bridges in a southerly direction. for six days. to which we belonged. Sixth Corps. photograph album. and everything got in readiness for moving. The wild flowers nod smilingly. books. surpassing the burden of Bunyan's pilgrim. is 149 can it be that he forewarned of a coming ? Half -past 2 o'clock. woollen and rubber blankets. the boys are marching. tramp. not to speak of accessories of a personal character. " Pall in. tramp. a knapsack contain ing a change of underclothing. with arms at will. We shall see. THE FIRST BATTALION. etc. The portents of nature seem to be with us. a canteen presumably full. tents. shelter tent. amid the rows of then follows breakfast. we were unob structed save by the enormous amount of luggage which each soldier inexperienced in field sendee attempted to Just think of it. knapsacks packed. Onward the column moves in route step. : Marching independently of the batteries of the Artillery Brigade.

The At the head spirits of some. Nixon. of Company M. Save the pressure on their backs and shoulders the men were in good spirits. dull. In Company C We are coming. A company could hardly be said to have its complement of men with out all these. tramp" would be getting oppressive. became a sub of Some thought we were conversation that morning. and others might have been heard as the of ' ' Father Abraham. Heilferty. when the monotony of the " tramp." or some other equally suggestive strain. its silent.150 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Sergeant Chamberlain. its butt. want of rest. or in musical Corporal Nash explaining " language that Whether asleep or waking girl I love. through tedious marches. but as their shadows shortened. and the heat increased. refrain Farwell." I'm thinking of tke While " Dixie' s Land " was being impelled from the tongues as well as toes of some of the Provost Guard bringing up the rear. and others would participate. in which Denio. and the ill effects of gunpowder. Sergeant Adams. they became less talkative. its dead-beat. In F it was probably Cronk. Every company probably had its jokers and wits. evinced on this first march of the campaign. They have grafted him into the army. Doc Deyo would break out with " O. getting on to the left Our probable . Three hundred thousand more. the burdens grew heavier. destination. Most of the men were animated. Jimmy has gone for to live in a tent . quite naturally. seemed never to flag. the blended voices of Phillips. were subse quently observed to develop the worst as well as the noblest Various personal characteristics were qualities of men. however. some even enthusiastic in the outset. and its professional liar. and we are not now prepared to deny that the meanest and dullest man in a company had not his mission. or thoughtful plodder. ' ' arose. ject to with a of view going Culpeper. food or Hardship and suffering.

watching Lee's army. and he had a first-class plan for bagging Lee's army. " You got whipped then." said one. 1863. in April. as we had when we went to Chancellorsville with Hooker." Then he relapsed into the morning. who had not uttered a word since " I wouldn't run. Thus the day wore on. " This is no such march. you see. first. too. while by a rapid march the other three should cross by the fords higher up and so have Lee in a hole. you were and I zee I know it. 151 flank of Lee's army." it to him. The ." Dutchman run petty lively. four corps of us. that was all. We were all lying at Falmouth. said a listener of a Teutonic cast of coun vas no more Dutchmens as you vas. I pet They ?" you runs " Give " there. the wily old fox. didn't you ?" ? No. Schaeffer !" said Jake Drum " . a little farther back in the ranks. just flanked. opposite Fredericksburg. " Dutchmens " tenance. The General's plan was to make a demonstration across the river at Fredericksburg with the Sixth Corps. " Whipped 4 'How was and everybody thought we had the Johnnies sure. having marched about eighteen miles from our place of encampment. when the order came to move. though. " Run ?" said a heavy-built man named Cross. dle !" We got across all right. General Hooker was a splendid officer. same profound silence.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIEST BATTALION. zeveral time in my five life. who had The rival representatives from the Rhine eyed each other contemptuously. but the old veterans who had been over the ground before said that we were headed for the fords of the Rapidan. an old French soldier.'* that?" " Well." said Jacob Bay. But Stonewall Jackson. and about 3 o' clock we came to the bank of the Rapidan at Germanna Ford. wounds on his person. crept around our right flank and came down on the Elev enth Corps like a thunderbolt just as the men were cooking You ought to have seen those Dutchmen skedad supper.

on an elevated piece of ground in the vicinity of Old Wilderness Tavern. . and General Burnside with the Ninth expected to cross at Germanna Ford to-night also that the Second Corps crossed lower down the river. This position afforded a very good view of the region west of us. Another. under General Warren. resting in the enemy's domain. we are looking over this. trains . mingled with the clear tones of as many fifes and the sounding of battery bugles. and rested near army headquarters. is on the lead in penetrating this labyrinth. and were astonished to find it morning. Of the scenery. long columns of troops belong ing to the Fifth Army Corps pass and go into the woods. and from it we could plainly discern the changing positions of the Federal lines that day. circling round again. especially those locating for the night. on the right. After a little delay it came our turn. We shifted about several times before Most of the men. who had not thrown away any luggage. with our corps next. at Ely's is . After breakfast our battalion moved with ! Hark now the that beat rattle of the Artillery Brigade down the Stevensburg plank-road about four miles. and two thousand drums. after swallowing a supper of hardtack and coffee. startles each sleeper from his rough couch and makes known to the Confederate columns moving from Mine Run into the Wilderness that there is fighting to be done very soon. the cavalry having crossed early in the morning.152 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. which. is the drummer's call. We learn from some source that the Fifth Corps. crosses our While lines and extends far off to the horizon on the left. It seemed hardly an instant after we dropped to the earth before we were awakened by the beating of a drum. one for the and one for infantry. In the immediate cen while beyond is tre are open fields partially cleared land the same dark forest. little time was lost in seeking the arms of Morpheus. heavy dark masses of forest extend as far as the eye can reach. and we were quickly across the floating bridge." said Sancho Panza a sentiment with which we were all in hearty accord that night. Engineer Corps had laid two pontoon bridges. were excessively tired so. " God bless the man who first invented sleep.

There you go. The rattle of in muskets succession a shout from twenty quick brings those staring artillerists. rises. we had heard no musketry. General Crawford. some time before our column.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIRST BATTALION. the Orange turnpike near us. to move by the turnpike in our front. and aide-de-camps seem to be inactive and numerous. General Warren had ordered the First Division of his corps. hill are just building their fires for dinner thick masses of fleecy clouds are moving lazily over. in pursuance of this order. remarks that Griffin's Division has pointed westwardly struck the enemy. which were said to be the butchers shooting live-stock for beef rations. was moving south around Lee's right flank. the Orange plank-road to some two miles farther south. In the midst of those dense woods a little wreath of smoke Each one starts up and looks in that direction. the other. It is now 12 o'clock. and we are all wondering where the rebels are. and by way of precaution against sur prise. dice. The artillerymen on the . . under General Griffin. was moving on the plank-road. Suddenly there is a commotion at headquarters a sound of firing is heard over to the left. the troops that opened the ball and determined the location of the battle. General officers with field-glasses are looking in various directions. and disconnected with As yet no it. and books are thrown aside and eager glances are cast toward the spot. That is on the left. It appears that two roads cross the Stevensburg plank which we had traversed that morning one of these. General Grant had ordered General Warren to follow our The Third Division. hack. General Ewell on the turnpike. It proved that a full corps of Confederate infantry was advancing on each of these roads General Hill on the These were plank-road. and except a few shots in the morning. . and almost simultaneously another and heavier volley is heard a little An officer whose field-glass is our right and front. under cavalry up this plank-road. Cards. On the plank-road Crawford was driven with the loss of nearly two regiments on the pike. hostile signs had been observed by us. 153 Ford.

Our comparative ignorance of the place was another draw back. scrub oaks. with the bushes so dense as to be utterly impenetrable in many places. traversed by gul lies and swamps covered with stunted pines and cedars. The battle-ground was an unfortunate location for the Federal cause. In advancing on the right. with a division of the space Sixth Corps. was ordered to hurry to the scene of conflict.154 Griffin HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. A broken. but so abounding with stumps and stones as to prevent the passage of artillery. crossed and recrossed here and there. almost annihilated. We observers knew little of these circumstances at the . retire in comparative safety. sterile region. he had won. Various roads. the Sixth Corps came upon ambush after ambush. sweet gum. where the concealed Confeder ates would pour in a withering fire and then. hazel bushes. General Getty. who was ten miles away to the left. Gen Hancock. little more than wood-paths. and the remaining divisions of the Six Corps were ordered to form on the right eral of Warren. was ordered to the support of Crawford. and dwarf chestnuts. arising from the bush. Johnson's Division of Ewell's to be repulsed in turn and driven back over all the Corps.

so that battle. THE FIRST BATTALION. 155 and the phenomena of the battle were sufficiently grand and imposing to completely occupy our atten left if About 3 o'clock the strength and volume of sound on the was suddenly increased tenfold. smoke of the battles while fifty thousand muskets are opposing as many more muskets. sweeps over a forest or a city. is now covered with a snowy vapor the The and right whole dis GENERAL ALEXANDER HAYS. Shortly after 4 o'clock the roar of the battle monster sud denly ceases in front. impelled by destroying hurricane. Getty is holding Pegram's forces in check and Sedgwick has come to the support of Griffin. a terrible roar swept over the centre and right. And now the incessant cracking of musketry and occasionally the deeper bass of heavy guns on the left echo back the tumultuous din of the right centre wing. tion. as balancing the wings of battle. more than five miles in extent. and in full volume sweeps to the left. As the element a with its fire. and all belching forth madness from out their dark throats in furious and rapid succession. crackling timber and awful roar of blended sounds. tance of that long line. the screaming shot and shell.IN THE WILDERNESS time. the roaring cannon. as if to gather strength. swept from right to left. now swelling into sub limity. . again sinking. the cracking of mus underneath ketry. and then with renewed stroke and redoubled fury broke into one awful deafening roar that poured forth its volume and belched its thunder for an hour. mingled with cheers and shrieks. And shortly after.

Longstreet's com not yet arrived. Hancock's troops are supporting Getty. however. watching the enemy. swept down the Orange plank with an impetus that Hill's soldiers were unable to resist." yet victory is still un certain. by a reveille of musketry in front of the Sixth Corps.M. indicating that the lines are entrenching. the treble of charging columns. Not till some hours after midnight did the noise and flash of the guns cease to be observable. Union cheers were frequent and vigor ous in that direction.M. most of us were asleep on the hill. which seemed to us then not unlike the death-knell of a South Sea savage. hurling them back in utter rout for more . and the divisions of the Second Corps under Birney. among whom we thought our other battalions might be. sat musket in hand all night. seemed to roll as a majestic wave of sound across the centre and along the entire left wing. while the peculiar cry of the Confed erates. mingled with yells and shrieks. It seemed that both General Lee and General Grant had ordered a charge at daybreak.156 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. with Getty of the Sixth. gested that this might be due to the fact that fresh troops were engaged on that side with lungs unimpaired from yes terday' s screeching. despite the bleeding thousands all around. The meeting of these attack ing forces had disturbed the slumbers of the artillerymen on the hill. The cooling shades of night descend. and by the time the writer was on his feet a deafening roar. would occasionally be heard more It was sug distinctly in that direction than elsewhere. The contest seemed to be especially fierce and bitter on the left. and the deep-toned cannon. General Alexander Hays and thousands of other brave men have trod the " paths of glory. of the 6th inst. The silence in front and on the right is broken by the stroke of axes and falling timbers. but the hot blood of the combatants. still urges on the struggle. We were awakened about 5 A. Then the full orchestra of war bursts forth anew. By 2 o'clock A. mand had As a fact. but the poor fellows over in the trenches. charging the Confederates under Pegram and Hays. Sounds of crashing trees mingle with the musket's diapason.

" We're in for it now. But the Union columns being greatly broken in the chase by reasons incident to the capture of Confederates and the nature of the ground." " Never mind. With our artillery in the shape of muskets on our shoulders. the tables came near being reversed." says an officer. Indeed. again. trades heavy artillery. lying in all sorts of positions. owing to the withdrawal of troops to the left and the flank attack of Longstreet later in the day. 157 This was the reason. . so that no proper advantage was taken of this victory. infantry. Jack. and Kershaw's Division of Longstreet' s Corps coming fresh into action. our knapsacks and other equipments hastily slung. in. only going to build a parapet for a battery. and now we next thing we'll be cavalry. " " we're No. of the we passed the time until about 11 A. and observing what we could conflict. light artillery. Fourth Artillery. as if merely asleep. forced our left back than a mile. lowed up the war might have been shortened a year." struck on our ears. enter ing the woods in rear of our corps." says an old veteran. Taking our coffee.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIRST BATTALION. " I' m going to desert to some other branch of the service we seem to be Jack of all in . using a very large adjective to make his remark emphatic. it is all for the country. when " Fall First Battalion." says a are engineers young fellow. we fall and pass down the hill in a northwesterly direction." says one. some indicating the agony of the final struggle by their stiffened contortions and others with peaceful look. Before the old fellow could free his mind more fully the : command came " Halt front load at will load !" Again we move forward by the flank. An instinctive feeling of awe creeps over us as we notice on every hand the rigid limbs and features of the dead." " Well. that the Union cheers seemed to increase as they grew more remote and the Confederate yells to die away until they ceased alto Had that success only been understood and fol gether. whose patriotism was less critically disposed. probably. .M. clad in gray and blue.

Says Dr. The line in front of us were engaged in putting up a breastwork. and go to work. W. Another squad of men were digging a trench in which to bury the dead. Jim. Some of the men were carrying logs for that purpose. fatal is the most comforting belief a soldier can entertain since if his time has not yet come he can brave any danger ism .158 HEAVY GUNS AND ! LIGHT. and others were throwing the earth up against them. but as they were not directed at us the casualties for the time we were at work were few. which were not more than two and one half feet high. you'll get hit !" ** Never you mind. " Whizz buzz !" out. if Bullets occasionally any. them to help carry several heavy logs and put on the works. came over. " replies Jim . A portion of us were soon It fell to me detailed to assist in all of the above duties. . Robinson. who was a member of Com " We were from one hundred and pany C fifty to two hun dred feet behind a line of battle. the work was aban doned. About 4 o'clock the bullets became more numerous and several of our boys were hit. a moderate skirmish fire in being kept up front. and still another detail were carrying the fallen ones and laying them in their last homes. wounded cept this fire proceeded. and at the extreme right of the Sixth Corps and the whole army. and the com mand being without intrenching tools. that's certain. We could not see even these ex as men came back and passed to the rear. matter about the truth or falsity of the theory. vicinity." " Look go several bullets in our I'm born to be hung No. because there were said to be two lines of our own in front of us. or for our own protection. with impunity. We move on a short distance to a point where the trees are larger and the woods more open." : The writer's recollection is that this work was designed for a battery. but there being no chance of a battery getting into the wood. The provoking feature of our was that could not see the source from which we position and we could not fire in the direction whence they came. D. " if I shan't be shot here.

and steadily holding its ground until the corps was almost destroyed. unless we fired at some of our own men. which was a continuation of the wood road we came Toward sunset. dark in the woods. " One man stopped . its right unprotected.IN THE WILDERNESS : THE FIRST BATTALION. of the second line were many of us trophe in the of indulging luxury hardtack. long enough to say." Steady. weary from fighting and : fasting. and that now was giving way. You fellows had . raw pork. boys don't fire till you get the order. stripped of three brigades of its veteran troops. or a dozen canteens. The front line had their arms stocked. in his " For thirty-six hours the Sixth Corps. and water. was that the in squads and many of them running. had been patiently waiting for the relief promised it long ago. We couldn't see anything to fire at if we had received the order. ran across the swamp." said the Major. so much so that neither army occupied it. to which one or two of our men were allowed to go at a time. and some of the men had taken off their belts and hung them on the stocks. Their lines of battle were on each side and at the edge of the swamp. fill them with water and return. we concluded there was none other. 159 " As we could see but one line of Says Dr. we gave up work and returned ting early to our respective places. A corduroy road. when one or two others would go.' Soon their fires were burn coffee boiling when the catas occurred." The number of wounded men retiring from the front ing. as it was get up. Each man would take eight. ten. Robinson The battle before us. " Thirty-four hours before General Sedgwick had sent . better dig out of this you'll get h 1 in a minute. They began at once like old veterans to cook their suppers. pork was frying and We seemed to be increasing very rapidly. land before this line was understood to be swampy. who were " now coming back The fact . " " Three Years in the Sixth Corps Says Stevens. lines in front had been stretched out very thin the front line had either been gobbled or fallen back to the second. Some distance in our rear and right was a spring.

and with it the rebels were seen crossing the breastwork we had put up. We caught a glimpse of a swarm of gray-coats sweeping onto us from the right rear and heard some officer cry. In our front." . dropping branches and splinters promiscuously. " Says Dr. and to the rear of us. burst the Ki-yi Ki-yi close to us. leaving the pork Some in the pan and the coffee on the fire and their arms. and begged that support might be sent. : of our boys raised up to run. followed by an unearthly screeching and yelling. Robinson Suddenly out of the dusk in front. One piece struck a man's hand near the writer and left a finger dangling. The men in front of us were so much surprised they immediately ran. The re mark of our friend was being verified we were getting h 1 sure enough. and our experience then and afterward. this use of the word seems fully justifiable and appropriate. was Gen eral Shaler's Fourth Brigade of the First Division. some bursting overhead and others crashing through the trees. word that the rebels were trying to turn our exposed flank. on the right. subjected to a fire in the rear and in danger of being captured. poured in from the right across our flank. but under command lay down again until the front line men ran in among us. Shell rhymes with and each one certainly sounded like h 1 that day. Just then a terrific volley. So that in view of the uncer tainty attached to the use of this term in the Revised Ver sion of the Scriptures. Sixth Corps to his left General Seymour's Second Brigade of the Third Division while General Neill's Third Brigade of the Second Division was still farther to the left. We had expected to attain and we were here glory running for our lives. " Men. fortunately aimed a little high. but no support had come.160 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. I know for no more appropriate use of the word than this. It was humiliating enough. . . when we joined them in the stampede. extending a little beyond our right. get back !" and the First Battalion was for the most part moving to the rear at an astonishing gait. " Shortly after six o'clock several shells in quick succession came screaming right among us.

161 : When we took position I hung my haversack and canteen on a dogwood sapling. " McVicker. and succeeded in capturing that battery. General Alexander Shaler. J. and they captured six hundred prisoners.IN THE WILDERNESS Says L. and Johnson's Brigade of Rode's Division. says " Seymour was captured on the line I was captured while rallying the troops a few yards to the left of Seymour's Gordon's attack in front. were moving around our flank. A large number of the men had seen service. the men was good. I set sail to the rear with all the speed I was department. and in position. and when the line of battle ran over us I started full tilt in rear of the line to get my commissary . many in two The morale of years' regiments and some in foreign wars. includ ing Generals Shaler and Seymour. we might have turned the tables. With a last fond at the destined to line some glance grub hungry Johnny's stomach. I had gone to the right of the line to watch a game of euchre between the Major and Adjutant. and resisted only by a line of skirmishers and a single line of battle without sup ports. we now know. was supported by Petery. Gordon. though there would undoubtedly have been fewer left to But Early says in his tell the story . THE FIRST BATTALION. his own." Memoirs that his own troops were in great confusion. ' Do I want anything to eat ? My eyes and ears were four to one against the answer of my stomach. rear was simultaneous. in a letter to the writer. As sixty feet in rear of ' ' ' capable of. on the flank. Sergeant. The first contained several days' rations of hardtack and salt pork the latter was filled with water and a handful of coffee and sugar. gram's whole Brigade which was advancing upon us." There was undoubtedly excuse enough for this course. but we were not raw troops and were five hundred strong. and a number regretted afterward that we had not been allowed and directed to charge that bat That battery.Major of the battalion the line was receding I found myself some my property when the charge occurred. : . and if we had charged. while two brigades under General John B.

For us might have been much worse. Surrender. during the balance of the campaign. mounted. who commanded Company " Our battalion did not fall back until after the whole : had passed us going to the rear. and this horse was with us.162 " HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Morrison. and the stampede centred : this. The effect was terri toward ble. our battalion front line ' surgeon. Lawrence. " We had no Says John H. said to have been fired by Sergeant Chamber lain. I drifted to this. opened on this road. a newer and better one. you etc. and that he found another. a short distance on." The writer remembers vividly striking the low branch of a beech-tree with his head the first movement he made. There was but one road of which we knew. " It might have been . ridden by Dr. All organization was lost. the poor fellow dropped to the earth. was directly behind our line when the first line of the rebels cleared the breastworks some twenty yards in front of us. Yankee s o b. They were led by an officer mounted on a black horse. with a levelled pistol.' This rebel officer was killed at once by a shot from one of our battalion. General Sedgwick. Maguire. It is but fair to say that some did not leave the breast works till they had sent a parting salute into the yelling crew approaching. It looked to me at the time as if that shell cleaned the . of Company C chance to form and were carried irresistibly back with the mixed mass. such as a man can only make whose life is suddenly snatched away from him. This officer. sung out to General Sedgwick. Of all sad words of tongue or pen The saddest are. The enemy had two pieces of artillery which had complete range of this road. M Says Captain G. who died afterward in a Confederate prison. killing several and blowing the arm off from a man who was between him and the missile. L." And yet. We had no artillery in As soon as the retreat commenced the enemy position. which threw his cap several yards rearward. With a heartrending shriek. and soon after reach ing it a shell came tearing through. it however sad the verse. As he picked this cap up a shell burst.

and no amount of coaxing or pounding could move him. The mule was covered with While the bullets camp-kettles. and. Tears stood in his eyes and his features : ' ' expressed the deepest emotion as he cried out : . command " Forward !" dash on again. and clothing. Several amusing incidents occurred. we got a strong volley from the north side." Many others left this road and plunged into the thicket. and got away then and thar from Phil Fitzsimmons. singularly enough. Just before entering this clearing we came upon a large pile of muskets. In a wood-path where officers of all ranks were mingled with the men. As we passed him the poor fellow looked the most perfect picture of despair I ever If he was not captured he must have left the mule saw. etc. Says Maguire "I noticed a soldier. evidently. had braced himself. greatly excited. least trouble in the world. which was about forty rods square and entirely surrounded by the thicket. trying to lead a mule. evidently a captain's cook. took command. I think. A horseman came flying out of the woods opposite us with sword in hand and. except what we had on. McPherson." " The broncho mule be Major James H.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIRST BATTALION. cooking outfit. Walker. had been used for a hospital. with all our grub. It was too hot for me. several hundreds seemingly. were singing their liveliest tunes the mule had concluded to stop. 163 road for twenty rods. and self. without his hat. Some distance back was a clearing in which stood a log building. his orders were obeyed." As we came out of the woods into the clearing. it was said. camp-chairs. lying in a parallel direction by themselves in the wood. As he would " Halt !" the column would stop. scattering the men in a mangled mass and left. I took to the and could get right over six-foot brush without the thicket. and then at the yell out. We concluded that they were the muskets of the dead and wounded which had been gathered by a patrol. which. tin pans. It was General Sedgwick. a corporal. to the right : and lost his position. Wood writes longed to officers' mess of Battery C.

" the General wheeled his horse and rode into the woods at a terrible pace. rally this !" in General way yourselves and your Seeing a soldier with a guidon in his " Halt hand. This was an unnecessary and hazardous proceeding. He was after re-enforcements. ! Don't disgrace For God's sake. the only colors in the General called to him. Some officer said it was inhuman to let those wounded boys in the log. proved to be with out occupants. man who stood there was independent to either run Every or fight as he chose. I think. moving form a his hand to officer to line along there. The line was thin and did not extend fully across the opening. and some commenced firing into the woods. It was now nearly dusk. of Company C. It was at Walker was killed.house be captured. wounding the color-bearer.164 HEAVY GUNS AND ! LIGHT. plunged into the . and noticing a low rail fence or rail piles opposite. which. Lieutenant James Walker. to the left of the rails. At any an rate. and " Form every man who heard the remark fell into line. and several other soldiers rushed up to align themselves. MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN SEDGWICK. kill ing a soldier near him. conclud ing it was folly to remain longer there. most of the men made for this cover. along here in the edge of the woods. I think. sight. Several officers of our battalion were in this line. striking the General' s horse. pointing to the edge of the " The and wood. when a wellaimed volley struck the colors. There was no organization. muttering something which sounded like d d d Is. Some who were together in the thicket. near the right. my boy advanced with the guidon some rods from the woods to the place designated by the General. as it immediately drew the enemy's fire this time that Lieutenant and probably did them no damage. boys." said the officer. Advancing to cover the log-house. and. " Come !" The man here.

a member of Company C. For God's sake. give them a volley run Just then the Johnnies fired. slackened I looked to the right and left along the ' ' fence to see how my sup ports were doing.IIS THE WILDERNESS till THE FIRST BATTALION. of Company C." " Reed LIEUTENANT JAMES WALKER. Brown. After the fire says that. Seizing the colors from a color-bearer he set them into the ground. with which those forests abound. one man. " He who fights and runs away Will live to fight another day. killing several of them. were fired on from the right and fell back to the road again. Boughton." Nevertheless. of Company M. 165 woods and did not stop road. and found to surprise that they were skipping out. But their mournful tones It struck our dejected feelings much like the import of the old adage. as if reproachfully. coming out from the We returned the fire." In passing out of the woods that night a good many of the boys were doubtless surprised to hear plaintive voices AVilliam H. We thicket. L. then advanced. Just my then spying a moving mass of gray legs advancing through the brush I skip ped too. and my sake. Meanwhile General Sedgwick had ordered Neill' s Brigade . George Sanders and myself were together when General Sedgwick came out of the woods. they reached the Stevensburg Maguire. says : ' ! ' ! in the trees calling out. saying. your coun They will try's sake. " Fight you will Fight you will !" ! was near the brooding season of the whip-poor-will. insisted that he heard an order from some one in a tree " Leap to the rear !" before he started.

Poor Asa was killed at the second charge at Ream's Station. G." About 10 o'clock there was hardly a sound to be heard along the line. General Sedgwick came up and ordered A. S. of a tired and hungry body of troops who. when the battery was ordered to move and we were relieved. anxiously hoping something would happen to pass. They kept us there until long after dark. speak. Says G. They could hardly have . or I'll put a hole through you. Farwell. when the enemy were discerned through the darkness approaching in force.166 to the right. Every man was aroused and on the alert. a lieutenant in charge of two brass pieces came and placed them in the middle of the road fronting both forks. and prove a Confederate. D n you. Halt there ? I dreaded to answer the challenge lest it should Click goes the lock of a gun. to take what men he could find (there were about a dozen of the battalion together) and form a guard in front of the artillery and not let any one : we were and all. I found it was a mixed mass of the direct my course. Clark. of us. with bayonets plank road. This force halted every man.' and was only too happy to get inside the line of breastworks. as many as twenty different regiments being represented at the point where I got in. Q. The Confederates were advancing cautious ly. and made fixed and the guns were loaded and lanyards in place. as if locating our whereabouts.' I stam mered Friend." " I wandered about in the darkness for Maguire says some time. Getty's division having returned from the and with the fugitives from the Third Division a line was formed through the woods and moved up to a This line was composed partially constructed breastwork. officers them fall in line in front We had bayonets : Who goes Suddenly I heard. lay as quiet as death awaiting the onslaught of the enemy.uartermasterSergeant of the battalion "At the intersection of the road that passed by the log house and the turnpike after the stampede. fixed. The Lieutenant compli mented Sergeant Clark for the service he had done. Occasionally some one of our own men approaching in front would be halted and come in tremblingly. ' ! ' ' ' 1 * Sixth Corps. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Sergeant of Company C. fearing Confederates.

which lay scattered through the woods in the rear. 167 we heard somewhere down been near enough to discern our slight breastworks. when with frightful yells they dashed forward. Asa man who would Some never not run. there was little of advantage to the Confederates. might have captured many prisoners. and the continued rattling of wagon trains only increased our fears as to the result of the previous day's These fears proved groundless. but the dead and wounded from the rebel ranks literally covered the ground. " " load Steady. most of the straying soldiers seeking their own Had commands.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIRST BATTALION." came the command. six hundred the prisoners captured. So the rebel wounded lay between the two armies. " Scarcely a man of the Union Says Surgeon Stevens force was injured by this charge. however. making the night hideous with their groans. as the night deep ened. your pieces !" Their advance was evidently a skirmish line for half an hour later they came on again silently. About 3 A. It proving chilly. gave them the coup de grace. Another and more terrible volley from our guns. till perhaps thirty rods from our position. and the soldiers needed rest.M. sav fighting." care of their a charge been ordered then. Parties came straggling Cross. the in all day. of the 7th. we started to find the battalion. There was no help for them. was . But Gen eral Sedgwick' s purpose was attained in checking the enemy. Found the remnants with the artillery. as. " Fire !" and simultaneously a terrible volley was poured into their advancing ranks that sent them flying back. : own wounded. Our men were unable even to take . men. crossing the Stevensburg road. In a thicket near this road two of us started a little fire and made some coffee. when the left the command. the night. after making coffee again. came back. and they returned no more. followed by a cheer all along the lines. wearied as they were. Before midnight the line was withdrawn to a position farther back. by flanking the Sixth ing Corps. we enlarged the fire and it attracted quite a number There was considerable musketry later in of stragglers. our soldiers.

The fighting on the 7th was of a defensive character on both sides. shouted.168 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and marched all night. It resembled more a gigantic piece of Indian light ing or bushwhacking of pioneer days than a battle. and missing. Several were slightly in night. of the The writer was made very wide awake. got a battery in position. He was either killed or wounded and burned up in the terrible fire which swept the wood. chiefly in a southeasterly direction. by with caissons teams. it was also one of the strangest contests ever fought. Every man was instantly asleep the side of It happened that some battery the road. and the drivers left far in the rear shouting after them. and where the existence of a human foe was chiefly determined by their M shrieks and cries. attached. jured. and lay behind it until dark. One of the bloodiest. speaking of this inci dent " That was our last scare I never knew a member of the Fourth Artillery running from any fright or scare after ward. Nearly every man was on his feet and moving. Some one in whose ears the Confederate yell was still ring " Rebels !" ing. Thus ended the battle of the Wilderness for us and the army. but men were actually asleep while moving on. threw up breastworks. had taken fright and empty came rattling down the road at a prodigious rate of speed. lost nine killed. wounded. never heard of afterward. and his left eye was closed for a week from the impression made by the boot-heel of some person unknown stepping into it. The w oods were on fire both sides of us the forepart of the r many This doubtless tended to prevent straggling." : . the caissons colliding occasionally with a stump or tree. without much regard to where he went. . where the messengers of death came from unseen sources. Our battalion felled three or four acres of wood. Then we were ordered to fall in. About midnight there was a brief halt to enable some batteries to overtake us. Xearly five thousand men were slain outright and five times as many more wounded in that jungle. and Company the other companies in about the same proportion. Says a member of the battalion.

Down in Dixie's land !" . marching southward to support some batteries in position. out of the wilderness. whose spirits seemed invincible. 169 Our sleepy ranks moved all night with the batteries. and Sunday morn ing. May 8th. And there might have been heard from the vocally disposed. the wilderness. the suggestive words : " Ain't I Out of glad to get out of the wilderness. for the most part forward. found us on the heights of Fredericksburg.IN THE WILDERNESS THE FIRST BATTALION. Ain't I glad to get out of the wilderness. but cautiously.

of Company H. which was crossed about 10 o'clock A. until 2 o clock Wednesday morning. T 10 o'clock on Tuesday. THE SECOND BATTALION. the line of march from Culpeper is . The rebels made no opposition. located at Culpeper and attached to the Artillery Brigade. The weather had grown warm and pleasant. literally covering the ground along the line of march from Culpeper with clothing and blankets. ma Stevensburg. shirt. though a long line of rifle-pits and some small earthworks were found on the heights commanding the ford. and the men with hat. and everything they could spare. till and musket. 1 and had already prepared their breakfasts. on pontoon bridges. fell in line and moved with the light batteries. the Second Battalion. and many are reduced to pants.CHAPTER IN THE WILDERNESS XIII. blankets. The order to move did not come. in his " Line Officer :" The day is warm and pleasant. and the men threw away their coats. however. and as rumors were freely circulated that the whole army was in motion.M. May 3d. " Diary of a Says Captain Brown. received orders to be ready to move in two It need not be said that the order created great excitement throughout the command. when the men who had been aroused hours. characteristic recklessness have thrown away one article after another. Fifth Army Corps. matters were exceedingly lively for a time. the battalion halting on the heights above. The mo mentous character of the movement about to be made was well understood by every private soldier. to Germanna Ford on the Rapidan River. com manded by General Warren.

' myself debated for some time I should part with my overcoat or blanket and final ly actually threw the blanket I which away. During the afternoon we were ordered to get our knapsacks from camp and be prepared to fall in as rear guard to the brigade when it marched. one could have marched from Stevensburg to the Rapidan on overcoats and blankets that were thrown away by the Excepting the suit I had on. ' ' afterward. for a long march is about as convincing an argument as I know " ' of that but that little little Man wants Nor wants here below. because of the heat and : 31AJOR-GENERAL GOUVER- NEUR K. 171 literally covered with coats. May 4th. We did so. was one of the most fatiguing the battalion ever made. a mistake I never committed including tired soldiers. long. WARREN." " That Says Warren Works march. of Company D detailed on guard. Of all the remarks." Notwithstanding the burdens. the loads the boys attempted to I believe it would be no exaggeration to say that carry. It was wonderful how the road was covered for miles with : blankets and clothing thrown away to lighten the loads. everything three days' rations. blankets." says Warren " and old had been Works." " May 3d I was Says Eugene Cooley. perhaps.IN THE WILDERNESS THE SECOND BATTALION. scrutinizing the floating Darby . Nor can I blame the poor fel lows under the circumstances. and knapsacks. none will be better remem bered by the boys of Company K than the appellation which Darby CT Shaunnessy applied to the pontoons. " We were about the middle of the river. a rich field for rebels or cavalry. I threw away a but rubber blanket and half of a pup tent. the men were animated and indulged in a good deal of humorous conversation.

" After crossing the ford the different batteries were as signed to march with the divisions for their better protec tion through the Wilderness. CROSSING THE RAPIDAN. " At about half Says Captain Brown -past 3 o'clock we reached our destination for the day. though they halted. in front of the old Wilderness Tavern near the Lacy House. after a march estimated at about twenty-three miles.172 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Bedad. and a foine instrument became a catchphrase with the company to characterize anything w here craft over ' ' ' r other appellations failed. where they found the first four in posi tion. it caused Breaking a roar of laughter. the pontoons is a foine instrument. which we were marching with much interest. The battalions marched the remaining distance without much regard to the batteries." We " quote at length from the Captain's Diary of a Line Officer :" . he broke out in his rich Irish brogue with the Suddenly remark. and camped in a field near the old Wilderness Tavern and some four miles from Mine : Run.' in as it did upon an interval of silence.

wounded. not the cheers of the vic tors.' and I am decidedly of the opinion that in time of action troops just out of range are in more danger of demoralization than those in the immediate front. boys with stories of the fearful slaughter. brigades. At 5 o'clock fell into line and joining the headquarter trains as a guard. They listen to tales of bloody and disastrous defeat. tents " which in the morning was light and desultory. . 173 Thursday. and assisted flock by comrades. not of the crowning victory. I to the sticking-point. begin to pass road. Sounds like these followed by sights like these are am bound to say. Meantime various divisions. not the living. with their stretchers dripping with the Crowds of soldiers. Turned out stiff and sore this morning and drenched to the skin with dew which falls so heavily here that in the morning the appearance of the and fields is very much like that after a severe storm. press to the front again for other slightly wounded. with their ghastly freight. Returning to the point whence we started. May btJi. blood of the last occupant. until it resembles the roll of heavy thunder. In short. and the dead. as our skirmishers met those of the Johnnies. Soon the stretcher-bearers. par ticularly on the right and in front of our (Fifth) corps. The picket deepens. we stacked arms in a meadow immediately in front of general headquarters and awaited developments. every sense is ab sorbed in the contemplation of the horrors rather than the glories of war. past. The former see only the wounded. gradually increased as the day advanced and seemed to draw nearer and extend to the right. many of whom. and regiments are pressed hastily forward to various points. as they stop to entertain our rest. After march ing about a mile we began to hear occasional shots from the picket line which preceded us. and as they are lost in the woods and come within range. calculated ' to screw up courage not. the dying. by us to the hospitals now established on the plankand returning. the sound of musketry firing.IN THE WILDERNESS THE SECOND BATTALION. we started for Orange Court-House. They hear the terrible sounds of the combat and the groans of the suffering. and soon we received orders to counter march and park the train.

where he had been informed that I had been very dangerously wounded. a little cannonading is heard. arm. as the case might re quire. vines. we were up cooking our when coffee. after I iously inquiring for my tent. of Company D " At gray of dawn. " About 1 o'clock P. Eugene Cooley. as the firing dies away I can not learn that either side has attained any decided success. or head.gayly by yesterday. and showing me the instruments he had brought for the purpose of taking off my leg. of our brigade. upon whom I had no sort of claim whatever. The movements would seem to indicate efforts on both sides . and the forests. now of the First Battalion attached to the Sixth Corps. anx field. lost two guns to-day on a narrow road in our front and was himself taken prisoner. away up in front a single musket shot was : . he remounted his horse and was soon lost in the darkness but I shall not soon forget an act of such dis interested kindness on the part of the doctor.174 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Just at night the headquarters' train moved back a short distance across the plank-road by which we came into the field and parked in an old corn while our battalion pitched our tents near by. and explained that he had ridden in great haste from the Sixth Corps headquarters some three miles away. but the surface of the country is so broken and irregular. and brambles. Being assured of my safety. looking in. Just had crawled into my shelter-tent I heard the familiar voice of Dr. that but little use can be made of artil Lieutenant Shelton. May 5th. I assured him that so far as I knew I was not yet very badly damaged. inquired breathlessly if I was much hurt. ing. Lawrence. to get control of commanding points preparatory to more bloody and decisive work. so dense. our former assistant-surgeon. and having found it he jumped from his horse and. with their undergrowth of saplings.'' For the same date we quote from the reminiscences of . whom I saw ridlery. such as that two whole rebel but brigades were completely annihilated this morning though the fighting has been very hot and the losses un doubtedly great on both sides.M. Various wild rumors are flying about. personal or professional. whereupon he expressed the greatest relief.

a line of batteries was stationed on some high ground in front of the Lacy House. passed up and by where established his headquarters perhaps half a mile When within about two hundred yards of the line of battle crossing the road. We could see little or none of the fighting.IN THE WILDERNESS THE SECOND BATTALION. H. or a solid noise without a break a terrible roar at other times it would slack up on some portion of the line. Fresh troops were oughly the rear. all to alive that was going on. The sun had gone down. we formed a line of battle on the left of the road. and everything . Once or twice a regiment or brigade would be forced back into the open and . At this particular time we heard the rebel yell in our front and a rapid rush in our direction. When we came up the charge was re pulsed and we remained on the line. and a charge which would be met by more volleys and solid roar. was moved over to support them. sticks. These batteries commanded all the open ground in rear of the line of battle in the woods. " The musket firing would roll around from right to left. which was usually followed by a cheer or a rebel yell. or the reserves would take their place. " We remained here a short time. our right resting on the road. consisting of Companies D. cheering as loud as we could as we ran. It afterward seemed to me that between sundown and dark and daylight and sunrise was a favorite time for a charge by the rebels. with occasional vol It was my first experience and I was thor leys and cheers. We immediately moved forward at a doublequick through the brush and timber. As the battle developed. when we moved back Grant had on this road. to the turnpike. would re-form and go in again. we lying down in front of the guns. A slight protection was or had been made by piling logs. We lay here until late in the afternoon. and when the bullets were singing viciously. and for long intervals of time would be continuous. It soon developed into very rapid firing. and K. and our bat talion. followed by rapid firing and cheers by the line of battle in our front. 175 heard followed by three or four in quick succession. and the wounded and stragglers hurrying up from soon began to fill the road on their way to the rear.

Arriving at General Warren's headquarters. Soon Company E. Before daylight the ball was opened by the skirmishers. in a commanding position upon a hill. passed us 1 . and we slept with our muskets in our hands.176 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and crossing the road." Captain Brown continues "Friday. We o'clock this morning by an officer. which order we instantly obeyed. were aroused at half -past 2 who brought us orders to leave the headquarters train and to report at corps head quarters at once. we were con vinced that a crisis was approaching. left in the de fenses of Washington when we were ordered out. or We : were not allowed to build fires make any noise. joined in the chorus. and the anxiety apparent on the faces of the officers about headquarters. from which a view could be had of the dense woods upon all sides in which the troops of his corps now lay in line of battle. two of this battery were captured in the morning farther down this road. and about half-past 4 the artillery. and from the strenuous efforts made to bring May QtTi. which were then at the Lacy House. I never listened to a sound more grand and awful than that of this morning's engagement. expecting every moment to be ordered into the line. and the pattering of the skirmishers was soon lost in the deep and terrible roll of the musketry of the main lines. As it got dark the firing gradually ceased. every available man to the front. such as could be efficiently used. As the day dawned the firing increased all along the lines. which had been ordered up from the ammunition train. pickets were thrown out in front. we halted on the southerly slope and stacking arms began to boil our coffee (the favorite occupation of the sol diers upon all occasions when a halt is ordered). The Sixth New York and other regiments of heavy artillery. were stationed several batteries as many as could be got in position. The loud est and longest peals of thunder were no more to be com pared to it in depth and volume than the rippling of a trout-brook to the roaring of Niagara. that could be gathered and throwing some dirt on them . joined us. Next to us were four brass twelve-pound Napoleon guns the other . on our right.

Here. and to repel which all the re serve artillery also has been in front of headquarters with the guns shotted and the cannoneers at their posts. pressing forward to fill a gap in the line through which the enemy are momentarily expected to pour their charging columns. and while we were still busy at our hardtack and coffee. just in rear of several batteries of artillery which.IN THE WILDERNESS THE SECOND BATTALION. without our consent. and show a gradual but certain weakening of the lines. Here. but the crowds wounded surging from the woods in every direction and hastening to the rear bear terrible witness to the desperate valor of the combatants. and soon a mounted staff officer dashed wildly down upon us. About seven o'clock. . Entering the low pines and underbrush through which roads had been cut for the transportation of artillery and ambulances. and upon pointing out my company of foot soldiers hearing the officer add apologetically. I am compelled to bear the mortification of being asked by a staff officer what bat tery I command. again. transferring us to another. we were ordered to the front. you are one of the heavies " I shall never cease to condemn in the strongest terms the action of the Government in enlisting us for one branch of the service and then. being in position. It cannot be sustained even as a military It is a wanton violation of good faith. and an imposition upon a patriotic soldier that would hardly be practised upon a senseless ' ' ! beast. shouting at the top of his voice that the their little fires. and with many speculations as to our destination we fell in line and marched across an open field into the woods. connected the extreme right of the Fifth Corps with the left of the Sixth.M. we moved noiselessly along until we emerged from the pines in a hollow and formed line of battle beside a little brook. For tunately the of weak spot is not discovered. Ah. " About 3 o'clock P. 177 this morning. built and improved the time boiling their coffee. stacking arms until the engineers should complete the breastworks on the left of the batteries. an out necessity. fair rage upon dealing. the firing opened very briskly to the right of us. the men unslung their knapsacks.

We learn . ' barely stationing a picket to guard our slumbers. and who by this time had no doubt reported at headquarters.' the firing gradually died away. who in a few minutes would be down upon us also and gobble us up. and with the assistance of the non-commissioned officers and a few cool-headed men. but I caught him just in time to save my property. Fortunately. Sixth Corps had broken and were retreating before the vic torious rebels. though he himself disappeared and did not return until the next day. the officers were in the rear of the line. instinct of self-preserva tion.' ' closing his remarks by ordering us forward into the unfinished rifle-pits. my forming the line moved into the rifle-pits. for many a man of the bat talion. must be the effect on green troops on the front line with arms stacked and belts laid As might have aside ? been supposed the result was nigh disastrous. would have body-guard. which I had taken off a few moments before the stampede commenced. however. and being assured by the engineers that there were two lines of battle in the woods in our front we lay down to pleasant dreams. distinguished himself on this occasion by gallantly retreating and carrying away my sword and revolver. WADSWORTH. Such information calmly and quietly conveyed to veterans far in the rear would hardly inspire them with martial ardor. seized his knapsack for the rear. and Joe. and started on a double-quick however.178 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. then. Not withstanding the terrible forebodings of the mounted officer referred to. they finally restored order. with the natural GENERAL JAMES S. What.

Corporal Cooley gives the following ac count " May 1th. May 1th. but his head fortunately escaped. and musket I started out in front. and taking an observation from the stump behind which I lay. arranged at down the and perhaps one hundred my way slight slope. when objects could not be seen but a few yards. I took half a dozen or more canteens : and an old leaving my picket and told tin coffee-pot belonging to Matt Decker. but his gray and ragged uniform could be made out. in all I judged probability we would have no chance that day. We both left at the same time. " At the first gray of dawn. of our Saturday. in . My coffee-pot was a great help to fill the canteens rapidly. While I was thus engaged a figure emerged out of the fog and darkness and cautiously approached the brook and began to fill his can teen. Walker 179 that General Wadsworth. I discovered that the pine-trees in our front and just beyond the slashing were full of rebel Barber was badly scared by a bullet which sharpshooters. I knew there was none in our rear. as the distance of only three or four yards separated us.IN THE WILDERNESS THE SECOND BATTALION. and Lieutenant Sixth Corps Battalion. and fifty yards found a small stream of water that at inter vals formed little pools that were several yards long and two or three wide. I could hear a continual buzz of men moving about and suppressed voices in front. and knew that if we did not both eat and drink before daylight. Neither of us spoke. but it is needless to say we eyed one another very closely. We had had nothing to eat since the previous morning. I found the him what I was after. and which stood about fifty feet in rear of the breastworks. probably aroused by the whizzing of a stray bullet now and then. When I got back to the lines. that from the lay of the land there was water in our front. My canteen had been empty all night and nearly all the boys were in the same fix. between the lines. I woke this morning just at day light." Of this early morning engagement and the events follow ing on the 7th. He had no arms. took his canteen and I carefully worked a signal when I came back. the boys. were killed to-day. ' ' " passed through his hat.

My cup of coffee was kicked a rod in the scramble. but most of them exploded Just at dark a line of just over us and a little to our rear. and made a night march on the road that passes through Chancellorsville. a wire bail) full of water covered with coffee. At this interesting moment. anticipation of my return. For a long time this day we were dodging shell thrown at us by a battery that had got our range some struck our breastworks. Shortly after a charge was made on us by the rebels. except to establish a skirmish line in our front. The batteries pounded the woods with shot and shell. we holding the line. the infantry line lying down taking our place. infantry was moved up to take our places. We were allowed . The horrors of that march The road was ankle-deep with dust. Morning dawned on us fast asleep in the road where we had halted an hour before. By sunrise we had ceased firing and I do not now remember that we fired another shot. the rear double-quick. " May 8tk. At this interesting stage we were ordered to . As soon as we were well clear of the front we made a left flank and right file into the road. out of the dim daylight in our front came such a yell as I never heard before. / was mad ! The batteries had been loaded with canister and the guns depressed to rake our front. whose cries and groans. the woods were on fire. They opened fire and so did we. wagon trains full of The road was jammed with troops and long wounded. caused by the jolting of the wagons. During the day we occupied the line until dark and were under a heavy fire from skirmishers and sharpshooters. I then and there resolved if ever wounded to never allow myself in an army wagon if possible to prevent it. which was soon boiling and removed to cool. had dug small holes deep in the bottom of our ditch and had small fires in the bottom I soon had a tin cup (to which I had attached of the holes. One charge at least was made from our side by infantry troops that were brought up to our line and charged from there. and a charge on us that brought every man to his feet with his musket in his hands. They lay down on the ground. No material gain was accomplished.180 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and the air was thick ! with smoke. were simply horrible.

M the corps moved out on the Brock Road under orders to proceed to Spottsylvania Court-House by way of Todd's Tavern. when we took our place in the line of battle which had then been broken by a charge of the enemy.IN THE WILDERNESS. "The batteries marched with the division. on account of the density of the woods. Says Colonel Gould. as such. although we advanced to the front line at bat talion front under a heavy fire. and which was in a great deal of confusion. The night was very dark. Toward night we were ordered over to the front to support batteries. A met us and directed our officers where to take position. to 181 make coffee and marched before sunrise. the fighting on the 7th being almost entirely defensive on both Wainwright : The remaining reports received from members of the battalion are in substantial agreement with those already sides. ended on the 6th. which was at the Lacy House. From that time until daylight the rear of the column did not make more than half a mile an hour. given." " Our battalion was ordered to re Says Warren Works port to General Warren's headquarters. we only saw the rebels once or twice." Of the movements of the batteries of the brigade General says. and took position at a point where the Zouaves had been frightfully slaughtered. was cut in two by a shell. in his report for May 7th " At 9 P. and arrived in the vicinity of staff officer had Spottsyl vania a little before sundown. and some of our : . where Stonewall Jackson died two years before. at which place we lay until the next night. a guidon." The Wilderness battle. listening to the roar of musketry in a state of excitement not exceeded probably : by those who were fighting. The next morning our fiagstaff. Though in the front the days following.THE SECOND BATTALION. and the infantry straggled across a few little wfet spots on the road to such an extent that it was 1 o'clock of May 8th before the last battery left the Lacy House. passing through Chancellorsville about noon. But after our line was formed we were not attacked. who commanded Company K "In the battle of the Wilderness we spent the first day (5th) near where the artillery was parked.

. We remained in the works until about 6 P. were May 6th. find out the fate of the Third. and were then ordered up to the front to support Captain Rey nolds' s Battery. Awoke morning Slept under arms. in a charge that the picket line made to clear our front of the rebel sharpshooters that had become Then came the night march to Freder- icksburg. also of : Company K. About 12 o'clock the engagement became general the wounded were carried off the field by hundreds. was almost suffocating. I was one of the Fifth Corps wagon train guards and the battalion did not participate in the battle. but after receiving three or four deadly volleys stiff.182 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. which had caught fire during the battle.M." Leaving the Second Battalion at this point. . hungry. We were compelled to march " all night. This day the battle was hottest. at daybreak quite A. We continued our march to within and when two miles of the front.'' Edward H. halting a couple of hours on the old Chancellorsville battle ground. Were compelled to cross a large stream and got thoroughly wet. wet. has the following record in his diary tl May 5t7i..M. leaving a heavy loss of killed and wounded on the field.. the rebels charged on our lines in front of the battery. Battle commenced with skirmishing at 10 A.M. and worn out with fatigue. our Spottsylvania. Irving. three companies were detached and sent forward with rations and ammunition. the smoke from the woods. " May 1th. retained at general headquarters as guard until 5 P. which made it almost impossible to breathe without choking.M. " We Fourth United in the States. At 7 broke and retreated. and lorsville. The day broke hot and sultry the dust and smoke rose in dense clouds. . to Spottsylvania. when we left them and marched. Reached the front about 10 P. and lying down on the ground to rest amid the skulls and bones of the poor fellows who lost their lives on that sanguinary field. via ChancelThe roads were very dusty.M. . men were wounded rather troublesome. we return to May Sih.

it now remains to trace the course of the Third Battalion. NDOUBTEDLY next to ^ the battle of the Wilderness. of the infantry column of General Hancock's Corps began to move from Stevensburg at 11 o'clock P. in pursuance of General Grant's plan. was lo cated in the centre. No other regiment. and of the Second Battalion. which for a time was located on the extreme left. The van . if beyond the right of the Confederate Army before joining battle. Gettysburg. which.M. and it was no doubt General Lee's shrewdness which induced him to avoid the open country beyond the Wilderness which. to get and yet he evidently hoped. the Second Corps had reached when the battle opened. General Grant has stated emphatically that his purpose in crossing the Rapidan was to fight. where the other three corps . The order directed the crossing of the Second Corps to be made at Ely Ford. had the same opportunity that ours had of viewing that battle and participating in it from three different stand points. which. or intended. Having followed the fortunes of the First Battalion. was for a time on the extreme right. as we have seen. with the Sixth Corps.CHAPTER IIST XIV. it is safe to say. He was not expect ing to gain any special advantage of General Lee by adroit manoeuvring possible. with the Fifth Corps. was the most im battle portant fought by the Army of the Potomac. The fact that the Second Corps was ordered so far to the left shows this. THE WILDERNESS THE THIRD BATTALION. crossed. some eight miles east of Germanna Ford.

the batteries were accordingly at dark on the evening of May 3d put in motion ma Madden' s House for Ely's Ford on the Rapidan. Mountain Run was crossed at Hamilton' s bridge. as follows crossed partly : Left Stevensburg at 9 P. Ya.M. Proceeded to Chancellors3d. with the engineers. General Bimey command ing. and the other two divisions. General Gib bon's Division the Second. " Having received preparatory orders for the bri says with the whole of the Second Corps. formed a part of the same column. General Tidball." The official report of the movement of the battalion for the two days is worded briefly. W. winter cantonments near Stevensburg. on the night of May 3d. and . Marched to Ely's Ford on the Rapidan. to break up gade. and with them the Third Battalion of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. The loca tion was near where the battle had been fought the previous Broken equipments and other indications of the year. " camping for the night at a house about a quarter of a mile to the north of the Chancellorsville House. and the Fourth under General Mott. which was crossed about midday. General Barlow's Division the First. were met at Madden' s House the entire column moving on the direct road through Richardsville to Ely's Ford. G." It was here that Lieutenant Price gave an account of the death of General A. S. in his report of HANCOCK. and I. on the following morning.184 llEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. the movements of the brigade. . " May 4t7i. May Reached Madden' s about midnight and bivouacked. which was reached at 9 A. Night very dark. Whipple.. The batteries were put in motion some two hours earlier. struggle were visible here and there. consisting of Companies A.M. the Third. our former division comville. B. : by fording and partly by pontoon bridge. MAJOR-GENERAL AV.

IN THE WILDERNESS

THE THIRD BATTALION.

185

mander, on whose staff he was serving the previous year, and who was killed at this very place. Through a mistake of the Commissary the battalion only drew three days' rations instead of six before leaving Srtevensburg, and what was quite as serious, drew no ration of salt whatever. This latter deprivation was felt the more keenly on account of the fresh beef which was issued, and led to experimenting with various things, as wood ashes and

gunpowder, to see if a substitute for salt could not be found, but without any very satisfactory result. By the time our Third Battalion were in bivouac the Second Corps had taken position covering the Fredericksburg turnpike, the plank-road, and U. S. Ford road (see map, page 138), pickets were thrown out and the troops
encamped.

The order of march directed that General Hancock should " Shady Grove Church," and at 5 A.M. the proceed to troops were on their way, with General Gibbon' s Division The route from Chancellorsville was by way in advance. of the Catharpin Furnaces to the Brock Road, and thence on the Brock Road to Todd's Tavern, which was reached The batteries reached the same point a little at 8.30 A.M. before noon, when a halt of an hour was made.
Suddenly the whole command was put in motion back upon the road it had just passed over. Shortly after 12 M. cannonading was heard in the direction of Old Wilderness Tavern. It was the signal of the meeting of Getty's Divi sion of the Sixth Corps with Hill on the Orange plankroad.

General Birney's Division in the advance joined the left of Getty's line on the Brock Road, about 2 P.M., in two lines of battle. Mott's Division followed, forming two lines of battle on Birney's left Gibbon formed to the left of Mott
;

and Barlow's Division formed the extreme left of the corps on high ground in an open space, where all of General Tidball's artillery was posted except three batteries.
In his report General Tidball says " Captain Ricketts's Battery, being near the head of the column, was directed, at the request of Brigadier-General Getty, to report to the
:

186

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

latter, whose division of the Sixth Corps was engaged at or near the junction of the Brock and plank-roads. Captain Dow's Battery and Captain Edgell's Battery, assigned tem porarily to Mott's Division, were placed in position in a thin part of the woods, about seventy-five yards in rear of Mott's line. It being impossible on account of the thick ness of the woods to use more artillery along the Brock Road, the remaining batteries were halted in the open ground on the extreme left of the line of battle and placed in commanding positions to guard that flank. Colonel Allcock' s Battalion of the Fourth New York Artillery for a time constituted the extreme left." Companies A and G were sent out on the skirmish line. The remainder of the battalion was set at work throwing up rifle-pits. Before the pits were finished, however, they were ordered farther to the right to support Roder's and Sleeper's batteries. Company G was relieved on the skir mish line by infantry when it constructed a strong line of rifle-pits between the batteries. Company A having been relieved from the skirmish line joined the battalion in the
rifle-pits.

" Ricketts quote from General Tidball's report having, as before stated, reported with his battery to General Getty, placed four guns, all that he could get, in position on the plank-road. Soon thereafter the enemy made a vigorous charge upon this point, drove the infantry from their posi tion, and one of Captain Ricketts' s guns fell temporarily into the hands of the enemy but a portion of Carroll' s Brigade of the Second Corps, under Captain Butterfield, coming up at this moment, retook the piece. Another of his pieces was disabled by the bursting of the muzzle. There being no further use for this battery at this point, it was subse quently withdrawn, having sustained a loss of one man killed and two wounded. With the exception of that taken
:

Of the further work of his command for May

5th,

we

;

by Ricketts, and a few shots fired by Dow, no other part was taken by the batteries in the first day's fight." The action of the artillery with which the fortunes of our battalion were merged was far more important on the next

IX
day.

THE WILDERNESS

THE THIRD BATTALION.

187

The events which led to this action were of a varied It will be remembered that both General Lee and General Grant had decided on an early attack for the morning of the 6th. The hour for Hancock's advance had been fixed at half- past 4. But at General Meade's re quest, a delay of half an hour was granted to perfect the
character.

preparations.

Promptly at 5 the divisions of Birney and Mott, with Getty's Division of the Sixth Corps, temporarily assigned to Hancock, and with Carroll's and Owen's Brigades from Gibbon's Division, all under the command of General Birney, rushed over their intrenchments and burst like a whirlwind upon the Confederate defenses. The force of their attack could not be resisted, though the contest was
gave way and fled in were carried, colors and prisoners captured, and the vanquished driven back more than a mile, overrunning General Lee's headquarters, so that the Commander-in-Chief, in his desperation, threw himself among the troops to rally them. But this pursuit had bred such disorder in the Union ranks the forest proving such an obstacle to the preserva tion of the lines of battle and General Wads worth's advance southward having attacked simultaneously, for the purpose of striking Hill's left flank, owing to the success of the en
close

and desperate.

Hill's soldiers

confusion.

Two

lines of intrenchments

movement, had brought the greater number of his troops upon the flank of Birney' s command, mingling the two. A halt was ordered, and General Birney directed the division commanders to rectify their lines. A second cause of delay was the fact that Longs treet's Corps about this time reached the scene of action, and
tire

entering vigorously into the fight, forced a part of the line back.

" The third, and even more important cause," says Gen " which now eral Walker, operated to check the course of Hancock's victory, and even to turn it to defeat and mourn ing, was a misunderstanding, never before explained, between himself and General Gibbon, as to the disposition to be made of the forces under the command of the latter officer.

188

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

Even while Hancock was forming his columns for attack, before break of day, he had been embarrassed by intelli gence from army headquarters that the advance of Lonu street' s Corps, instead of coming up in rear and in support of Hill, was bearing off southward, moving along the Catharpin road, as if to pass around our left flank and penetrate into our rear and he had been especially warned that in all his arrangements for the day he must provide fully for the exigencies which might arise in that quarter. Hancock had at his command no means of ascertaining the truth of the reports regarding Longstreet, and was bound
;

to proceed as

placed giving him all the General artillery massed there and the infantry of Barlow. whom no man than knew better artil the use of Gibbon, his of com the lery, disposed great battery forty pieces upon
left,

if they might be true. General Gibbon in charge of the

He accordingly

paratively high and clear ground which we spoke of in con nection with the first day's fight, and placed his infantry in position to support the guns. Had Longstreet indeed approached from that quarter there is no reason to doubt that he would have met a terrible repulse."

General Gibbon's troops and those making the charge under Birney were connected before the latter moved for ward, and owing to the misunderstanding referred to, a gap was made in the lines and the farther Birney advanced in the charge the wider this gap became. Kershaw's Division of Longstreet' s Corps had caused Birney considerable trouble already, and now there was a danger of the Confederates getting into this gap and flank ing the attacking column. It was expected that Burnside with the Ninth Corps would make an attack simultaneously with Birney, but Burnside' s reported movement proved to be unreal, and news was received that the left of Warren's Corps had been driven from its position. General Hancock was or dered to send relief to that part of the field, lest the enemy should penetrate between Warren and Hancock. General Hancock understood that Barlow, of General Gib bon's Division, was to be withdrawn from the Brock road
;

IN

THE WILDERNESS

THE THIRD BATTALION.
;

189

and sent forward to the left of the attacking column but General Gibbon did not so understand. Major Mitchell (aide to General Hancock), from whose

"At 10.10 A.M. diary we are permitted to quote, says General Gibbon sent word to General Hancock that there was no enemy on the Brock road, and also that Colonel Miles' s skirmishers were engaged on our left with the enemy' s dismounted cavalry while further out our cavalry
:

;

was supposed, with Longstreet's Corps, either at Todd's Tavern or on the Catharpin road." But it does not appear from any of General Gibbon's re ports that he actually knew General Hancock's purpose
was engaged,
it

with regard to the disposition of Barlow's Division. Unfortunately the enemy discovered the gap in our line, and where Barlow's Division was supposed to be by the corps commander, four Confederate brigades one of Field' s Division, commanded by General G. T. Anderson, one of General R. H. Anderson's Division, commanded by General Mahone, one of Kershaw' s Division, commanded by General Wofford, and one of General Heff's Division, commanded by General Davis all moving by the right flank, reached the
unfinished railroad, and there formed line of battle facing to the north. At about 11 o'clock they moved forward

vigorously into this opening in the Union

lines.

Colonel

Frank's Brigade was rolled up and thrown back in dis A part of Mott's Division gave way, comprising order. McAllister's Brigade and to add to the disaster, Kershaw's, Field's, and Anderson's Divisions in front made an im petuous charge directly upon our lines, forcing them back. Hancock saw the necessity of immediate and vigorous action. Mott's Division was falling away under the ter rible flank fire. Wadsworth had been killed at the head of
;

his troops,

and Birney's Division and the other brigades
fighting.

under him were being worn out by incessant

the plank-road the tide of fugitives poured. Af fairs were in a truly desperate condition. The victory of the morning would soon be changed into a humiliating de feat. The situation was such that no general's personal action could do much toward putting enthusiasm into his

Down

190

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

command,
officer

since from the density of the forest a general could be seen but a short distance, and from the in cessant roar of musketry and cannon his voice could not be

heard.

What
tion
?

will save the

Second Corps from rout and annihila

The trenches along the Brock road, which our troops had passed out of, forcing the Confederates back in the early morning, were now tilled with the same soldiers vic-

SECOND CORPS BATTERIES IN THE WILDERNESS.
torious for a brief time

disheartened and

many

of

them

suffering from wounds. Three events served to change the status of the battle, and if not to give the victory again to our soldiers, to at least save them from defeat. Among the wounded officers of the morning was Colonel S. S. Carroll, in command of the Third Brigade of Gibbon's Division. General Hancock meeting him with his arm bound up. asked him whom he wished to have take command of his brigade to which the Colonel replied with animation, " I have not yet left the field myself, sir ;" and very fortunately that he did not.
;

IN THE WILDERNESS

THE THIRD BATTALION.
fire,

191

The breastworks had taken

and the

soldiers within, in

places, were forced back away from the breastworks, largely from the fact that the wind blew the smoke directly There had in their faces, thus favoring the Confederates. been thus far no actual break in the line, but at this junc

ture some of Mott's troops began to waver, and as the Con Carroll saw federates charged, they suddenly gave way. this, and putting himself at the head of his brigade, dashed forward across the road and encountered the Confederates in the flush of victory, as they were planting their standard on the breastworks. They were hurled back over the intrenchments and driven in disorder down the road. Not

only
rific

so,

teries,

but at the same instant Dow's and Edgell's bat which had been placed in position, opened with ter

and played upon the retiring col General Walker says that frightful slaughter. Brook's Brigade also came up on the double-quick from the left, and would have performed the gallant action done by Carroll had he been a moment later. The batteries were perhaps the most important factor in repelling the charge,
volleys of canister

umns with

though the gallant action of Colonel Carroll cannot be over
estimated.

General Tidball says in his report " It is impossible to overestimate the brave service of these two batteries on this
:

occasion."

These two causes were supplemented by a third, unknown at the time on our side of the engagement. It appears that Long-

down the front of his own troops, through a mistake received a volley from the rear, severely wound ing him and killing General Jenkins. This accident was also a cause in reversing the condition of affairs at the time. It was the fortune of our battalion to lie in the rifle-pits
street, in riding

supporting the artillery the entire day, and located as they were on the left of the line, while their danger did not prove to be imminent, as General Walker has suggested, the position was one of great importance. " While lying under the guns of one of the batteries that " Colonel Paul Frank afternoon," says J. T. Lock wood, came riding along, and halting near us remarked,

192
'

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
'
!

" The rebels will feel mit you poys apont 4 o'clock " Sure at about the time designated by this enough, unique though gallant prophet, some artillery appeared on a ridge in front, perhaps a quarter of a mile distant, unlimbered, and proceeded to pepper away at us. Colonel Tidball and Captain Miller were upon a house-top to our left mak
ing observations. " As soon as they could get down they came rushing over to the battery behind us and gave the command to load. Each of the officers sighted a gun, and the second shot from Colonel Tidball' s piece upset the carriage, and we heard no more from that piece of artillery." As Lieutenant More, of Company B, recalls this incident, the officers were mounted and did not dismount, but simply gave the order, and the batterymen did the work of dis mounting the enemy's cannon. This illustrates how the memory of two persons, after the lapse of twenty-five years, good many may vary about the same circumstance. other illustrations could be given. This position was retained by the artillery the entire day of the 7th. General Tidball says " On the 7th, owing to the density of the woods in which the battle was fought, the fighting was confined almost exclusively to the infantry. Soon after daylight on the 8th the Second Corps took up the march, and about 12 M. arrived at Todd's Tavern, around which it strongly intrenched itself. In the afternoon a body of the enemy attacked Barlow's Division, stationed to guard the Catharpin Road. Roder's battery being in position at this point, was brought into action, and did good service in as sisting to repulse the enemy." The battalion moved as far as Todd's Tavern that day, put up a heavy breastwork to protect the rear, supported two batteries, and then worked all night in the intrenchments.

A

:

CHAPTER XV.
SPOTTSYLVANIA.

HE primary purpose for which this history
was written was to present the varied movements of the Regiment, its battal ions and companies, during its existence as an organization. Closely allied to that was the purpose of connecting these movements with the general movements of the army, and with the plans and pur poses of the several battles in which our boys were engaged. For the individual
soldier it

was often impossible to know the nature

of the

movement he was making, even when engaged

in a great

battle, and especially was this the case during the Wilder ness campaign. We left our battalions on the morning of the 8th pursuing their several ways in a south or southeasterly direction. During the next ten days there transpired a series of battles

and

labors, consisting of intrenching, marching, supporting

and countermarching by night as well as by day, that served to confuse every individual member of the com
batteries,

mand, until in many cases no effort was made to understand where we were going, or the purpose for which we went. We were simply so many elements in a machine, and our movements were so varied, and the surroundings so much in keeping with our movements, that at times it seemed doubtful to us whether even those in command understood what it was all about. And yet it appears now that all the marching and working was definitely planned and for a
definite purpose.

the First Battalion on the Chancellorsville road on the morning of the 8th. The Second Battalion was

We left

194
located

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

down the Brock road with the artillery of the Fifth and the Third Battalion at Todd's Tavern. Corps, The general purpose of the movement was to seize Spottsylvania in advance of the Confederates.

In the order of
;

movement the Fifth Corps was to take the lead the Sixth Corps was to follow, coming up by a road to the left of the Brock road, and the Ninth Corps was to come up to the left of the Sixth, Hancock being located at Todd's Tavern to hold the Catharpin road, and thus to keep the Confeder ates from attacking the moving columns. The base of sup plies for the army was accordingly changed, the Orange and Alexandria Railroad abandoned, and Fredericksburg made
the base of operations.

GENERAL MEADE'S ORDER.
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May
The following movements are ordered
night
:

7,

3 P.M.

for to-day

and

to

First. The trains company the troops
Chancellorsville,

and

of the Sixth Corps authorized to ac will be moved, at 4 o'clock P.M., to park on the left of the road, and held

ready to follow the Sixth Corps during the night march. Second. The trains of the Fifth Corps authorized to ac company the troops will be moved, at 5 o'clock P.M., to Chancellorsville, following the Sixth Corps, and parking with them, and held ready to follow those trains in the

movement
Ttdrd.

to-night. trains of the Second Corps authorized to ac company the troops will be moved, at 6 o'clock P.M., to Chancellorsville, and park on the right of the road, and held ready to move at the same hour with the other trains, by way of Furnace's, to Todd's Tavern, keeping clear of the Brock road, which will be used by the troops. Fourth. Corps commanders will send escorts with these

The

trains.

Fifth. The reserve artillery will move at 7 o' clock, by of Chancellorsville, Aldrich's, and Piney Branch church, to the intersection of the road from Piney Branch church to Spottsylvania Court House, and the road from

way

SPOTTSYLVANIA.

195

Alsop's to Block House, and park to the rear of the lastroad, so as to give room for the Sixth Corps. Sixth. At half -past 8 P.M., Major-General Warren, com manding Fifth Corps, will move to Spottsylvania CourtHouse, by way of Brock road and Todd' s Tavern. Seventh. At half -past 8 o'clock P.M., Major-General Sedgwick, commanding Sixth Corps, will move, by the pike and plank-road, to Chancellorsville, when he will be joined by the authorized trains of his own corps and those of the Fifth Corps thence, by way of Aldrich's and Piney Branch church, to Spottsylvania Court-House, and the road from Alsop's to Block House. The trains of Fifth Corps will then join the corps at Spottsylvania Court- House. Eighth. Major-General Hancock, commanding the Sec ond Corps, will move to Todd's Tavern, by the Brock road, following Fifth Corps closely. Ninth. Headquarters during the movement will be along the route of the Fifth and Sixth corps, and at the close of the movement, near the Sixth. Tenth. The pickets of the Fifth and Sixth corps will be withdrawn at 1 o'clock A.M., and those of the Second at 2 A.M., and will follow the routes of their respective corps. Eleventh. The cavalry, now under the command of Col onel Hammond, will be left by General Sedgwick at the old Wilderness Tavern, and upon being informed by General Hancock of the withdrawal of this corps and pickets, will follow that corps. Twelfth. Corps commanders will see that the movements are made with punctuality and promptitude. Thirteenth. Major- General Sheridan, commanding Cav alry Corps, will have a sufficient force, on the approaches from the right, to keep the corps commanders advised in time of the appearance of the enemy. Fourteenth. It is understood that General Burnside's command will follow the Sixth Corps. By command of Major-General MEADE.

named

;

Warren did not reach Spottsylvania as he was directed, because he was anticipated by the Confederates, and in the attempt to capture the position, a series of battles resulted, fought principally on the 8th, 10th, 12th, and 13th, in which both armies were engaged, and one of which was not surpassed for the frightful character of the carnage by any battle of the Civil War, if by any in history. Giving a synopsis of these general engagements, we will

196

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

endeavor to locate the movements of the three battalions, with regard to each. General Anderson, who succeeded Longstreet in the com mand of that corps, had been ordered by General Lee to pro
ceed to Fredericksburg on the morning of the 8th, and being influenced by the fact that the woods were on fire in front of his corps, he determined to set out on the evening of the 7th and make a night march to his destination, as the dis tance was some fifteen miles. And so it came about that when General Warren, pro ceeding on the Brock road to Spottsylvania, arrived within

about three miles of the town, he encountered Anderson's

The and Robinson on the advance, supposing that there was only a small force in front, went vigorously forward, but were repulsed with heavy loss, General Robin
troops

moving

in the direction of Fredericksburg.

division of Griffin

son being wounded severely. General Warren with his staff arrived on the scene at the critical moment when Bartlett's Brigade of Griffin's Division had been repelled in disorder, one regiment the First Michigan having lost more than one third of its numbers in fifteen minutes, and when Robinson's Division on the
left

was giving way

in disorder.

SPOTTSYLVANIA.

197

General Warren was not of an ardent temperament. He was an excellent engineer, and on most occasions cool and deliberate in his movements but, fired at the disorder he galloped forward, seized a apparent among his troops, division flag, collected his soldiers about it, and held the position until the remainder of the corps could come up. The battle had begun by an engagement with the enemy's cavalry, and the infantry had moved forward until it came Here to a clearing on what was known as Allsop's farm. the artillery of the Confederates was posted to contest the passage of the Ny, a small stream having a wooded slope of rising ground on the opposite side. The artillery brigade to which our Second Battalion be longed was posted on the right, where it could command the artillery of the enemy. A vigorous fire from the bat teries and a charge by the infantry two fresh divisions, Crawford's and Getty's of the Sixth Corps, having arrived carried the first two lines of works, the third line being
;

protected with such strong intrenchments that it could not be carried. This occurred on Sunday afternoon, May 8th, while our Second Battalion was moving as support to the
batteries.

Sunday Morning,
marching
cutting
all

May

night on a

8th. The First Battalion, after wood road east of the Brock road,

obstacles so that the could arrived at Chancellorsville a artillery get through, little after daylight, and then proceeded on the road to We passed a large body of prisoners on the Spottsylvania.

away brush and removing

being escorted to Fredericksburg. Went into position about 3 P.M. to support batteries. The weather was very warm, and many of the battalion who had not already thrown their blankets and heavy clothing away did so on this march. Slept on our arms. Company F was sent on the skirmish line. The battalion expected to march before morning. In this, however, we were happily disappointed, as the morning broke and found us fast asleep on the

way

ground.

May

9th proved very
fire

warm and

oppressive also.

The woods were on
with the smoke.

in our vicinity, and the air was filled Men came in with the sad intelligence

Its ces- . surveying the field from a com manding eminence. A brave soldier. Cowen's. some of his men seemed to be very timid in regard to bullets which came over. with their staffs. and began the disposition of his troops on General Warren's left. ordered that a general assault on the enemy's works should take place at 5 o'clock.198 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and when . !" " Pooh " said he. and Rhode's batteries opened fire over our heads. The command of his corps devolved upon General Wright. who had crossed the Po River. At about 4 o'clock the Confederates came out and forced Barlow. but the next morning General Sedgwick arrived. and some picked troops of General Xeal's command. All the batteries opened in a terrible continuous storm upon the rebel position for some three hours previous to the movement. The 9th was chiefly occupied in the arrangement of troops. with the Vermont Brigade of the Second Division. Sixth Corps. drawing himself up to his fullest could not hit an elephant at that distance. a skilful general. that our corps commander was killed this morning the circumstances were as follows On the night of the 8th from the picket firing it became evident that Lee was concentrating his army. for the advance. they At that instant a rifle-ball struck him fairly in the fore head and he fell dead. and about half -past 6 o'clock Generals Meade and Grant." height. Colonel Upton. General Sedgwick superintended the posting of his artillery in person. moved for ward with irresistible energy. While engaged in placing a battery. : morning dawned the evidences were complete. McCartney's. moving down from Chancellorsville to the support of General Warren. which was kept up until the moment arrived for the charge. In front of our First Battalion. In the afternoon of the 10th General Grant. was only in part engaged in the action on Sunday afternoon. ordered the signal The signal was twelve cannon shots. The Sixth Corps. to recross it and join the main body. This delayed somewhat the attack. having fin ished the disposition of his army. a noble man was lost to the army and the nation.

and not having been ordered to make an attack. and the men were fortunate enough to gain another night's rest. and It to deploy it and take was our pleasure did not evince a very gener spirit. On the morning of the same day our Second Battalion was lying with the trains on the plank-road' near Chancellorsville. to laugh at the poor Johnnies as they filed into our works in a state of more or less trepidation . of the enemy. but the attack was a failure. The attacking column rushed forward in the face of a terrific shower of bullets. was but it Division. who seemed This was the greatly depressed by their fallen fortunes. and finding Hancock intrenched. perhaps. and at 6. had only came in. which included twelve cannon. with the same purpose of going to Fredericksburg. They moved about two and one-half miles and every preparation was made. This capture. So it is not to be wondered at that they were greeted with considerable banter. The struggle was continued along the lines far into the The rising night. however. without firing a poured over the crest of the Confederate intrenchments. first compensation for our loss on May 6th another came a few days later. and the gallant fellows. another of General Lee's corps had been ordered on the 8th to move to Todd's Tavern. the only success of any importance achieved that day. sation 199 was the signal for the infantry to advance. As to the movements of the Third Battalion.SPOTTSYLVANIA. until darkness put an end to the conflict. . . and were among those who had flanked us in the Wilder ness. as an attack was anticipated on the right to capture the trains. Our battalion possession of them as they to guard them that night.30 they were notified to be in readiness to move at a moment's notice. The writer conversed with sev eral during the night men of intelligence. stampeded and drove over the breastworks and into our front about a thousand shot. ous happened that these men were chiefly from Gordon's many of them belonging to the Fourth Georgia. Early reached the vicinity of Todd's Tavern. This was the command of General Early. moon shone down on a vast number of dead and dying. and rushing along their rear.

Meanwhile other batteries were placed in position farther down the river. batteries. in which General Miles was successful in beating back the enemy. Brown's and Arnold's batteries had the evening before accompanied Barlow's Division about two miles on the Spottsylvania road. having to pass through " . moving in the direction of Spottsylvania. With Hancock's Corps. Brown's. Sleeper's. In the skirmish Lieutenant Hunt was successful in driving from its position a battery of the enemy. and seriously annoyed the march of the enemy. : made no them in favorable positions for covering the withdrawal of the infantry. to place Captain Arnold. This I did by placing Edgell's. Roder's. crossed the Po and drove a body of the enemy from a position on the south bank. on the 10th the corps was ordered to recross. the enemy's trains and troops being visible.200 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. to ad vance. if necessary. Captain Edgell placed his bat tery in a favorable position. The Second Corps stayed in arms all the afternoon. and Gillis's batteries on a crest about five hundred yards distant from the river. as we have seen. About 12 M. and distant from Spottsylvania Court-House about three miles. and I was directed. One brigade that of General Miles' s Second Corps however. in withdrawing from his advanced position with Barlow's Division. and the anticipated attack was not made. await ing the advance of the entire force in their front. with the right resting on the Po River. accompanied by a section of Arnold's Battery under Lieutenant Hunt. after removing the . our Third Bat talion lay with the artillery brigade. and it was fully expected that a great battle would be fought then and there but the sun went down. effort to break through. and by daylight on the morning of the 10th all the artillery were on the south side ready. General Tidball says " The next day the 9th about noon the corps moved forward about four miles and took up a position. During the afternoon Barlow's Divi sion. and there remained in position during the night. had an encounter with Mahone's Division near Corbin's Bridge. and by their fire cleared the way for the crossing of the remainder of the corps.

of our troops. who was located in the thick foliage of a large tree on the edge of the woods. He immediately sent for a rifleman. As soon as the ground on the other side was cleared opened fire." " There was an Says E.SPOTTSYLVANIA. kept one of the guns clear for ov^er an hour. B. Miller. but followed closely by the enemy. and but being so much lower than the opposite Gillis crest. Roder's Battery and a section of Gillis's was moved forward a few hundred yards. Under the circumstances no blame whatever could be attached to either Captain Arnold. were in readiness to open a destructive fire as soon as the opposite ground should be cleared of our troops. To correct as much as possible this error. Every man who stepped to the breach of the gun was hit by a bullet. or men. considerably diminished the development of fire from the other batteries. by changing the position of range. Brown's Battery. and the enemy coming upon him. " General Tidball. became so entangled with one of his pieces that before he could extricate it by cutting out a road the infantry had retired beyond supporting distance. who came with a globe-sight rifle. as before mentioned. about three quarters of a mile distant. the withdrawal of the infantry was successive by brigades and in good order. Brown. which served to delay the operation of Roder's Battery. but that the body : . 201 thick woods. and taking his position at an adjoining embrasure. which occasioned the loss of this gun. inquired why it was silent. and which is not in cluded in General Tidball' s report. but to a low and less favorable position. said he could locate the man. A. The batteries posted on the ridge. A sharpshooter. although by great energy and daring he succeeded in bringing off his limber. and the enemy come within easy General Birney. his With the exception of the derangement officers. could not see the plane beyond upon which the enemy were advancing. he was forced to leave it. of Company A other cause which operated for a time. The loss of this piece was more to be regretted from the fact that it was the first gun ever lost by the vet eran Second Corps. riding along in the ravine in the rear of the battery. and was told the reason. Roder.

where they were engaged and did good service. moval of the pontoons. and B on the left. "in this posi tion were also uncovered to a very annoying fire from a battery of the battery I enemy upon their left flank. was very important. I withdrew Brown's. though the risk was incurred of being over powered by a superior force in the operation. with Colonel Allcock's Battalion of the Fourth New York Artillery. was effected. which. Roder's. where. Ames' s Battery." says General Tidball. his attention of the tree covered him. which. where. stretching from the Po to near the Ny River. was moved back in the direction to check this movement." "These batteries. Captains Dow and Ricketts had accompanied Mott's Division to the extreme left near the Ny River. To silence this moved Edgell's to the left a few hundred yards. the enemy in force and moved around threatened to cross the river light above and endanger our rear. during this and the succeeding day they effectually guarded the right flank of our army. " In the afternoon of this day. and Gillis's to the crest before mentioned. checking as it did the movement of the enemy to the rear of the army. and at the same time the Confederate marksman ceased firing forever. a coat mounted on a pole with a hat on top was thrust up near the breach of the gun. Accordingly. uniting their fire with the other batteries. they moved through an open field and engaged the enemy's skirmishers. joining its force with that of Rittenhouse's Battery of the Fifth Corps. after a slight skirmish. with Major Frank Will A iams in command. Company G on the right. the two soon drove off the rebel bat After the recrossing of all the infantry and the re tery. In two seconds a bullet passed through the hat." This action of our Third Battalion. was hotly engaged with the enemy. and came down out of the tree ready for burial. driving them back into a . Company had not yet returned from picket duty when the order came.202 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Deployed as skirmishers. May 10th. While these opera tions were going on with the batteries mentioned. I in the centre. and it would be necessary to attract and draw his fire.

contributed rifle-pits in front of . 203 piece of woods.tack and expecting to turn in and have a rest. Some of the boys thought we must have taken the wrong road. when an order came for us to move to the front. At first this rain was hailed as a relief from the dust and heat. More. moving to and from Fredericksburg. which was the heaviest of the campaign up to that time. Lieutenant S. after instructing the men in a whisper what to do. and were then withdrawn by the personal order of General Han cock. Daybreak of the llth was ushered in by sharp picket firing along the lines of Warren. They held their ground sufficiently long for the purpose in view. contemplated capturing who was on the right of Company B. but the day passed without severe fighting. The cannonading which followed. our delight was somewhat modified. attacks in the rear. and when we halted were nibbling the hard. where our boys took position. he gave the orders in a loud voice " Fix bay But instead of onets forward double-quick charge !" going further into the woods. and marched back over the same road we had come. about-faced. a strong column of the enemy was seen moving out of the timber cations that the enemy. When back nearly across the lield. the first rain since we crossed the Rapidan. and Birney. there were indi who were in force in the woods. as toward morning we halted. In the afternoon it began to rain very hard. I. Then. the line. Quite naturally.SPOTTSYLVANIA. our First Battalion received orders to march. gave the order to rally on the right. and especially upon the trains . and which was continued all day. probably for a similar reason. but after we were thoroughly soaked and the shower changed to a drizzle. We had drawn two days' rations at some point on our march. On the afternoon of the llth. which continued all night. were to be expected and it was probably for this reason that the Second Battalion had been kept so far to the rear. and started in the direction of Fredericksburg. they went exactly in the op posite direction. from previous experiences. : around where our right had been posted. We did so. going into several batteries. Gibbon. When the order came to fall back.

tended to make an assault with the Second Corps to-morrow morning at daybreak. under the supposition that we had marched into the enemy. which carried us to the position of the Ninth Corps instead of to the point we were aiming at between the Sixth and Ninth Corps. where it was in 1864. aide-de-camp. arid Nelson. The men. . During the afternoon Colonel Mor Colonel Comstock of General Grant's staff. and it was nearly dark when we returned to the proper point for examination. Captain gan. When the troops arrived at the Brown House they were quietly marched in front of our intrenchments near to the enemy's picket line.204 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. so as to be ready for the intended . knowing that we were near the enemy and that we were engaged in a perilous undertaking. . where we had examined the ground in the evening. too. and was most happily favored by an exceedingly dark night. Before daylight the troops were formed for assault as follows Birney's Division on the " May \2th. between the Sixth and Ninth Corps of our army. when spme pack-mules. Corps moved (save Mott's Division. Colonel Comstock unfortunately missing the way. where we made as careful a survey as possible before night set in close to the enemy's pickets. laden with in trenching tools. kept remarkably quiet during the whole movement. etc. " 10 P. to very important results. Night exceedingly dark and roads very rough men tired and worn no out. but kept well closed up and moved along briskly accidents save one. myself were directed to proceed to the left and examine the ground in front of Spottsylvania as close to the enemy's lines as practicable. We quote an interesting account of the events from Major Mitchell's journal : "May \\th. : . and fixed the position of the ground for the formation of the troops in our minds then returned and reported to General Han cock the result of our examination as to roads.M. assault in the morning. ran away and made some confusion. This was accomplished without noise or confusion. 1864. which was with Sixth Corps) toward Brown's house near Ny River. Accordingly we started in a heavy rain and rode rapidly for several hours to the left.

. but a few paces separated Bar low' s Division in column of regiments doubled on the cen tre Gibbon's and Mott's Divisions (the latter having joined .8POTTSYLVANIA. and a few men was sent to and our column disperse them. Their fire killed Colonel a Strieker. who were so astounded at our appearance marching on them out of the fog that they never fired a shot nor did we. regiment kept on to capture the works. . but moved The first fire we received was from the right over them. and the troops dashed over it in fine style. The . Edward Johnson. and we all stood shivering with cold and wet until 4. Stewart. driving the enemy out pell-mell with clubbed muskets and . A dense fog fell be fore daylight. which we found to be about one half mile from our point of formation. and tearing the abatis away with their hands.M. The whole corps stepped off at the same moment. bayonets. and the com mand was given to advance. General Stewart surrendered. commanding brigade. each division with but very short intervals. and in about three hundred yards marched over the enemy's pickets. The ground was open and rolling from the Landrum House to the works. this making almost a solid rectangular mass of nearly twenty thousand men to hurl upon the enemy's works as soon as it should be sufficiently light for our purpose. who rushed up to the works. not meeting a heavy fire until when within about three hundred yards the Irish Brigade then gave a wild cheer.nd immediately the enemy opened a tremendous fire of musketry on us over the parapets with some artillery but nothing could now stop our men. to Colonel Beaver. 205 right in two lines of battle. I believe.30 A. . when the fog lifted somewhat. and BrigadierGeneral George H. us) in the rear of Barlow and Birney in two lines of battle. Second Delaware Volunteers. poured in like a great wave. picket reserve stationed at the Landrum House. capturing twenty pieces of 'artillery and nearly four thousand prisoners nearly the whole of the cele brated Stonewall Brigade also capturing Major-General ' ' . about half way between the point at which we formed for the as sault and the enemy's works. commanding a division. a. . One Hun dred and Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

when we came to a second line of intrenchments. who had come to the support of Ewell. .' ' And under any other circumstances I should not have offered it. saying. held out his The latter replied. Stewart ? * Under the circumstances I decline to take your hand. The Fifth Corps. and thereby lost to us about twenty additional pieces of artillery we had captured between their first and second line we. like tigers at bay. The Sixth Corps. the latter. Just think of it for fourteen hours almost continuously charge and countercharge followed each other in hand-to-hand conflicts the infantry. got twenty pieces off the field. prisoners got mixed up among our own men in the works. were repeatedly engaged. The con test settled down to a desperate struggle for the crest of the salient lying between the angles east and west. which opened so auspiciously for us. became general along the whole line. they compelled our troops to retire to the first line we had carried. on Hancock's right. midst of this confusion and crowd a soldier attracted my Major Mitchell. when the enemy ' ' broken lines. became hotly engaged.' said General Hancock. however. and being heavily re-enforced. and held them.M. moved forward as an offset to a division from Hill and Longstreet.." This fierce battle. and I directed a captain of attention to me. also on the right. as well as the Ninth Corps on the left. who knew him before the war. . .' gave me his name and rank. The carnage was most fright ful. How are you. Often the wounded lay in hideous heaps buried under rallied their . here is a I at once rode up to General Stewart.30 A. eral. while from dawn till the darkness came on the ground was swept by a tempest of cannon-shot and shell which shrieked through the ranks as if impelled by some awful demon of destruction. who were firing upon us as they fell back. and were dodging in all directions from the bullets of their In the friends. hand. " When we had earned the first line of works we con tinued to drive the enemy until about 5. who rebel general.206 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. by shouting out ' the Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers to conduct him When Stewart was taken to the Gen to General Hancock.

LIEUT. 8. WM. V. V. B. U. LITTLEFIELD. B. KNOWER. EDDY. CAPT. Brevet Brig. F. S. U. S. JOHN B. VANDEWIELE. Brevet Major. Brevet Major. FLINT. WM. MAJ. LIEUT. ULYSSES DOUBLEDAY. KXOWER. WM. M. ULYSSES D.LIEUT. Brevet Captain and Major. U. LIEUT. A. U. LIEUT. V. CAPT. EDWARD C. WATERBURY. CAPT. S.-Gen. V.. . TiiRoooitE PKICE.

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com manding the battalion. not having slept in forty-eight Some of the officers it proved were not asleep. and still the light went on. Slept till daylight. . was holding the trenches against the foe. and bullets to whizz through. Eleven o'clock. Even bullets. All day a procession of blue coats. back near a grove. and still Hancock. had lighted lamps or candles for about 11 o'clock shell began to explode among our tents. noticed an object which appeared to be a 11 Kin asleep under a tree. Ten o'clock.SPOTTSYLVANIA. raised up his blanket and crawled in. Our own experience that day seems tame beside that of the men whose fortunes have been described. and though thoroughly wet. and still the rage of rebel and Yank seemed unassuaged. spotted here and there with gore or with blood-covered faces. 209 and still the missiles came. and found the other party was Major Sears. The . went pouring to the rear. orders were at last obeyed. Prisoners were made by grappling and pulling them over the logs. but thousands were resting whom the bugle-call of Gabriel can only wake again. and the after nightfall men would ground was red with rise from one side of the intrenchments and thrust their bayonets or iire directly into the faces of their antagonists on the other side. tearing the defenses into fragments. The rain was Tired nature's still falling upon that field incarnadine. and quickly had put up our sheltertents. moving along in the battalion got separated. the dead . were soon under their meagre shelter and asleep. rain half asleep. but hours. Nine o'clock came. We of the First Battalion were lying under the cannon in the muddy A little after dark we were relieved and moved trenches. putting his own rubber blanket over both. Our Second Battalion started from their position on the Chancellorsville road on the afternoon of the llth. Brigades with half their numbers gone were relieved by others to share a similar fate. The forest trees were mangled and even cut in twain by human blood. and again and again ploughing through the corpses of the fallen. The writer. We moved out without orders very lively. with his men four ranks deep. Not till after midnight was the bloody day's work done.

May 12th. of Company C in rear of found us the Second at early dawn. on a slightly higher ground in an open field. Some four thousand prisoners were : Judgment. that of marching by a hospital and some ampu tating tents. which was not more than eight or ten inches below the surface. bayonets. and a telegraph wire was run up to it. containing the rebel Generals Johnson and Stewart. When the was made across the River. We were in plain sight of the desperate fight going on. I think four or five feet high. Says Warren Works making about one foot of mud of that mortar-like consis : tency which Virginia mud is famous for. and a little to the rear they were left in front of the Landrum House. When we got up near the rebel line we met an ambulance under guard of three or four of Hancock's mounted orderlies. and any thing at hand that moved dirt. One incident I remember. rifle-pit way The rebs had used logs where they were to be had. Corps Ny charge we were started for the front at a double-quick. We took position near. We crossed the river at a ford in rear of the Landrum House. in to face the other fact. Our men dug and threw up from the opposite side with cups. it faced both ways.210 HEAVY GUNS AND all-night's LIGHT. where we saw a couple of piles of legs and arms. Soon troops from the Sixth Corps came up. and we were moved off to the right and a little in rear of where the Fifth Corps joined the Sec General ond. to the and made an front. march through the mud " The rain came down in torrents." being got in line. One comrade of a philosophic turn said there would be likely to be confusion when each man came to claim his own limb on the Day of " The morning of Says Corporal Cooley. and then dug down to the hard pan. the rebels trying Our men had turned the to recover the works captured. Warren established his headquarters a few rods in our rear. and perhaps eighteen or twenty pieces of artillery were being run over the rebel breastwork. Both sides of this rifle-pit . and thrown the dirt over in front to get dirt enough they had dug back on top of hard pan about four feet. water about knee-deep.

I thought. was carried in from the right in haversacks and rubber blankets. some sleep. fell over logs. or rather that of Warren's headquarters. lying down. for a week. the Ninth Corps. 211 was occupied by men trying. who were taking ground to the left in order to turn Lee's right flank. General Warren had to move. with all the power they had. Lieutenant Doubleday. Our two ranks soon reduced itself to one. and the struggle over the captured little. bruised ourselves without complaint but soon out of the darkness ahead came suppressed ejaculations and exclama tions that bordered very close on to the profane slowly it travelled down the line. I. . and like every other man. . The night was dark and wet in the timber it was almost black. and then they let up on us a It began to rain. We started in two ranks off to our left through the woods. a slightbuilt young man. hitting me on the shoulder. as we learned the next day. . and possible. the men stooping and crawling under cover of the breastwork. We hugged the ground very closely. was very nearly knocked out that is. just missing my face. The air was full of splinters and limbs. or rather we travelled toward it. works was kept up late into the night. The first explanation I received was a terrible slap from a young and tough sapling that had sprung up from between the legs of the man in front of me. divined the source of the profanity instantly. until dark. and threw. who was following me. expecting to get It seemed to me as if I had not slept a wink In a few minutes we were ordered to pack up and fall in and not to make any noise to speak only in a suppressed voice. I think. wounded men were very A battery got our range. We occupied this position. After dark we moved back into the timber and lay down. tons of railroad iron I presume they were long just a few feet over our heads. and the worst racket I ever heard. who was behind him. as I saw it. got a terrible whack in the face. plenty. Ammunition. . each man as close to his file-leader as We stumbled against trees.SPOTTSYLVANIA. Dead and to take the life of those on the other side. would of them rifle shot go end over end. and scream many like the very devil when they struck the timber in our rear. following. . and Fred Cooley.

known as Hancock's salient.M. they were ordered by General Hancock personally. who surveyed the position. The other three com panies were deployed as skirmishers. Ames's. to retire. Having no sup port. capturing a large number of prisoners. and marched by a road still farther to the rear. Brown's. to the bank of the Ny River. and accordingly with drew under a sharp fire from the enemy's skirmishers. Our Third The battalion movements ments. about a quarter of a mile from it. with twentyone pieces of artillery. and were bringing up heavy Some forces for the recovery of the works just captured. and held so as to cover any disaster or follow up suc cess. The Confederates were reported to be advancing to cross the stream. which they suc ceeded in doing under severe fire." Battalion. At daylight we found not many rods distant from the place -where we started. who were becoming hotly pressed by the enemy. nine caissons. and a large number of artillery horses. Com pany A was sent out to destroy the bridge. Dow's. for the purpose of assaulting the enemy's works near the Ny River. under my direction.212 I HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. The batteries. At dawn of day on the 12th a charge was made upon a salient of the enemy's works and proved eminently suc cessful. where they had bivouacked the previous night about 9 A. under Lieutenant. Without orders we dropped on the ground and fell asleep. on the 10th moved from the place on Hart's farm. I immediately brought up Arnold's. three extra limbers. and before daylight had reached the prescribed posi tion. who had now rallied. for the days following are re ferred to in General Tidball's account of the brigade move He During the night of the llth the Second Corps moved round in rear of the Fifth and Sixth Corps.. the . were assembled. judge so from the language that followed. in the only available position for as sisting our troops. About 4 P.Colonel Allcock. the right resting on the river.M. Before morn ing the impression prevailed that no one knew where we were or what our destination was. and Rickett's batteries and placed them in position on either side of " says : Landrum House.

Colonel Upton. I advanced Arnold's Battery. requested of me a I accordingly sent him Gillis. under Lieutenant Brown. From this position the batteries kept up a constant flight of solid projectiles over our line. r it being impossible to post the batteries nearer in conse quence of intermediate low ground. After occupying this position for some time. pressing back our line of infantry. The enemy. and then with shot and shell. and Miller. under Lieutenant McClellan. Too much praise cannot be awarded to the officers and men w ho. carrying with them lanyards and friction Captain primers.SPOTTSYLVANIA. but. and another of Ames' s Battery. near the Landrum House. being without its artillery. forced the latter to occupy the reverse side of the works. immediately set about collecting and hauling off the captured guns. farther to the right in the abatis. The enemy.the Sixth Corps came up to take position on the right of the Second. A section of Brown' s Bat tery. latter became exhausted. but. in a favorable position a few hundred yards to the right of where I had the other batteries. for the better service of these pieces. my limbers. sections just mentioned. I called for and immediately received volunteers from Ames's Battery. caissons. at a distance of about one thousand yards from the infantry line of battle. commanding the artillery of that corps. being hotly en- . for a considerable portion of the day. was placed immediately at the apex. soon worked the guns with telling effect. The position of things having somewhat changed during the day. having his line of battle not over three hundred yards from the battery and " poured into them heavy volleys of which were replied to with canister. 213 of the captured pieces were turned by our infantry upon the enemy. and placed it in position near the apex of the salient. Colonel Tompkins. worked these guns unprotected and uncovered under this terrible fire. who. these pieces were withdrawn to an artillery line formed in front of the Landrum House. so as to reach masses of the enemy beyond. inspector of artillery. 11 Soon after the capture of the works in the morning. commanding a brigade of the Sixth Corps. until the musketry. who placed himself battery.

but before this could be done nine of his horses were shot down. Lieutenant Gillis being himself slightly though painfully wounded. who succeeded in dragging his guns a few yards to the rear. Most of his men were disabled. Edgell. ing it. The enemy at the same time mounted their parapet to make a charge. left the right of the Second Corps exposed. In consequence of the mud caused by the rain. and sent Colonel Allcock's Battalion of the Fourth New York Artil From this position Roder lery to intrench and support it. which commenced with the successful charge of the Second Corps at dawn of day. He therefore ordered up his limbers to remove his pieces. was not at tacked the next day May 13th. however. having changed from its position on the right of the Second Corps. who were pro tected by strong works thrown up by Colonel Allcock's Battalion. which. ended only at nightfall. During the night the enemy retired a few hundred yards and intrenched a new line. His limbers he did not recover until the next morning. in rear across the N"y. where they remained until evening. it within three hundred yards of the enemy. and opened lire. Gillis.214 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. He then obtained infantry. " Meanwhile the remainder of the army. and his battery well-nigh exhausted. and it was impossible for him to work his guns from the miry nature of the ground. During the night of the 13th and morning of the 1 4th the entire corps with- . which he did. and Sleeper. To provide against this. requested Lieutenant Gillis to send him a section of Lieutenant Metcalf command his battery. and in an open field upon this line I posted Roder. Lieutenant Metcalf poured into them double charges of canister. the right was drawn back and strongly intrenched. softened as it was by the falling rain. I replaced it by Roder' s. it was exceed ingly difficult to move and serve artillery. placed posted at this point behind his breastworks. which was falling nearly all day. This day's bat tle. " did good service in frustrating the enemy's attempts to bring up his batteries. It was also impossible to furnish cannoneers to serve guns in such a vortex of fire. gaged at the point so severely fought for throughout the day. which remained as a support.

I sent Edgell. Pitched tents and slept . and early in the morning of the 18th recrossed the Ny near the Landrum House. In the morning Captain Chase. and dur ing the day had spirited contests with batteries of the right. toward morning. with Gibbon's Division. Assistant. and began to move about 9 o'clock P. and Sleeper returned. com manding the artillery of that corps. During the night of the 17th the Second and Sixth Corps returned. and coffee. The morning of the 14th found us out of rations. and the Artillery Brigade. From our camp we had a good view of an artillery duel. and had enemy. if its condition could be estimated by that of the writer. Men were sent back to bring up the wagon. marching about five miles.' from whence. marched all night through the mud. went into camp near Anderson's Mills. must have arisen " cold. which disabled him for service in the field. to the right near the Deserted House.M. and Brown were placed in posi tion around the breastworks captured on the 12th. wet. Edgell. 215 drew.M. Ames. when a wagon got stuck near a bridge. received a wound in the hand from a fragment of shell. despite of the rain. dis tant from Spottsylvania about two miles. Men came straggling in all day. salt pork. Roder. The batteries of the Sixth Corps not having yet come up. placing his battery on a commanding hill on the extreme l was successful in dislodging an enfilading battery of the enemy. and reoccupied the positions taken from the enemy on the 12th. hungry. It came about 4 P. We had orders. after a little unimportant firing. During the night the troops were withdrawn to the north side of the Ny. they returned to the Fredericksburg road. at the request of Colonel Tompkins. and returned with out it.AdjutantGeneral on my staff." for that is the record of his state that morning after his night's rest with the Major a condition not allayed till we had. marched about four miles and encamped on the Fredericksburg and Spottsylvania road. the only delay being . " On the 17th Roder. consumed an indefinitely large amount of hard-tack.SPOTTSYLVANIA. who. and crossing the Ny." On the morning of the 13th our First Battalion. a huge fire started of rails and logs. and mad .

216 HKAVT GUNS AND well. very On the 15th we constructed a road and built At about 4 P. threw out a picket line and slept till morning. LIGHT. A whiskey was dealt out at night. and though a gallant action.M. when we found ourselves lost. Also marched the night of the 17th. and marched to the left. and our battalion was moving into the front when halted by an aide and sent back. This battle was an assault by the Second Corps on the works in its front. fell in line in the midst several bridges. when we retraced our course. ration of a of heavy shower. was unsuccessful. A battle was in progress. .

whence the Confederates had There was been driven out by General Tidball' s batteries. 12th. though still belonging to Colonel Wainwright's Artillery Brigade of the Fifth Army Corps. as it leaves Spottsylvania Court- . It remains to consider the battle of the 19th. The command had been so shifted about for several days that there had not been opportunity to kill the ox assigned On the morning of the 19th inst. been temporarily attached to Colonel Kitching's Brigade of the Artillery Reserve. 10th. Accustomed to being ordered every where and anywhere. D. ready been referred to. O the student of military history the name Spottsylvania will always be a synonym for fierce and bloody fighting. H. they had on the 18th inst. This abated about 7 o'clock. Of the those on battles principal fought there. as it gave them the desired opportunity of secur for beef rations. which was considered fortunate. having marched some five miles. considerable cannonading and musketry going on at that time. MAT 19TH BATTERIES AND K. and to the performance of all manner of work.CHAPTER XVI. when the bat talion returned to the camping ground of the previous night. but the men were kept in position until some time in the afternoon. in which the batteries above named played a very important part. the three companies were detailed for picket. The Fredericksburg road. On the morning of that day the battalion broke camp at daylight and moved to the front of the house. al and have 18th May 8th. then lying in the rear of the army on the Fredericksburg road. ing fresh beef.

except the Fifth Corps. and about half Company of Company skirmish on the line." Their compunctions of sympathy for the ox being duly satisfied by the excellent beef allotted each man. which just been attached to the Second Corps. " Get tin' tender-hearted. was lying farthest away. cooked. as was sup posed. and Battery D was the right of the line. and were south of the Ny. should be borne in mind that the whole army had now intrenchments before Spottsylvania. Fully a mile farther. eh?" said the butcher. There were no troops on our right. A wagon train was moving on this road as the boys ad vanced to the picket posts. formed the right. General Warren's Corps. and the re deployed D K mainder of Company K. with Company H. found the batteries about half a mile from the Corduroy Bridge on the west side of the Fredericksburg road.218 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. "I shouldn't wonder if you fellers would be a-killin' men afore night. and the Second Corps. chiefly on the east side of the road. The ox had been driven around so many days that he had become quite a pet with the boys. and about this point on the west side of the road our picket line was located at a distance of perhaps three quarters of a mile from the road. east of the Fredericksburg road. which was lying farther south near An It left their had derson's mill. lay across this road about one mile from the Court-House. which was divided. were held as reserve. and the right of our line of battle. to the Ny River. and some one remarked thai it seemed a pity to slaughter the old fellow. runs northeast. On our left was a regiment supposed to be the Fifteenth New York Heavy Artillery. The early dawn of the 19th inst. But this seems to be in doubt. House. . many of the supply trains were parked as well as artillery. and had an intrenched line a little above where the Fredericksburg road crosses the Ny. which. and eaten the greater part between day light and sunrise they moved up toward Fredericksburg a little ways and took position. as already stated. Tyler's Division of Heavy Artillery. reaching.

and commencing at the spring. Company K. emptying their pistols as they wheeled. a rebel scout. The centre of the line was in front of two log houses one " the old of them was called house. of squad.MAY 19TH BATTERIES D. A little On The field next to this house was planted with corn. and between this house and our line was a fine spring of water. when a squad of rebel cavalry came suddenly dashing out of the woods. stretching across the heel of the horseshoe. probably sixty rods wide. with the reserve at the spring. the line facing west. which was used for picket headquarters. and also a little valley between that and the log-house in the rear. H. There were several premonitions of danger to the com mand during " We Says Warren Works. On the top of a little ridge commencing at the spring was a small growth of timber. and on the slope toward the creek pine bushes had grown up so as partly to cover the ground. : the day. with timber on three sides. We were as much surprised as they were. forming a line across the clearing. on the left. We all fired at the same time. Eugene Cooley. and the post next to the one I was on and some of our own post were just comfort ably seated for a little game of cards. : . which was filled thick with cat' s-tails and flags. a member of Company K had scarcely got our line formed. 219 ." " Tow Says Corporal A. was a slight ridge. the higher ground beyond was a log-house with a door facing our way. which was up so that the rows and hills could be plainly seen. A lane led back to one of these. which was much in the shape of a horseshoe. Parallel with the creek. AND K. Beyond us was an open meadow." and owned by Miss Susan Alsop. Jack Michaels. farther on a small stream ran through a swale. Our line was on the west side of this creek. after which they halted. when they about-faced and galloped away. then timber. and almost rode over us. There were two old tumble-down buildings near. of Company D ard noon we captured. with men on a post. was hit in the hand by one of my their shots. as we supposed. crossed a low miry swamp. The posts were formed five at intervals of five or six rods.

wood across the command at the house." Colonel Hamlink. and was released. we were startled by the sudden firing of our videttes. who was advanc ing at a trail arms.220 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. While loading my rifle outside I noticed : ' ' ! . coming out of heavy the timber. who came in in great haste. who com manded Company K at that time. standing near. The balls came through as if the building were paper. I was just taking aim at a tall Confederate. he was in favor of holding him as a prisoner. when they poured in a volley. we saw the rebels coming from the woods in column." " I had Says Works gone into one of the deserted houses and was cooking my supper when I heard one of the I looked out of the win boys say. and the men were lying few of down. was shot through the heart. and several men were struck. and going to the upper windows for a better place to fire from. I watched him a moment as he gasped his last breath." says Colonel Gould. John Burns. " Several of the posts had now come into the house. A the enemy had been seen on the edge I found the officers in my statement. Captain Jones sent me with this man to headquarters to re port the circumstance. but Major Arthur offered to set him at liberty if he would take the oath of allegiance. and began firing out of the chinks and windows upstairs. reports that. which he Colonel Hamlink asserts that he did. and a few minutes later a line of battle with colors flying. and still another line a few rods in the rear of the first. recognized the same man among the dead of EwelFs Corps the next morning. of the made "About three o'clock. who was adjutant of the battalion at this time and had command of the reserve picket. protecting themselves as best they could. ' ' Rallying what few men were near the houses. open space. and then I descended. As we passed down the skirmish line a few bullets were coming over. There they come I saw a line of skirmishers when dow. and a minute after they came into line and fired a volley at the house. It seemed to me that it tore away the whole side of the building. after examining this man. and was ordered back to my company.

Works. to where we now were. but the Confederate line had not yet shown itself on the right.MAY 19TH BATTERIES D. though pretty well concealed by the sedge. Just then a bullet and I beat a retreat. I aimed at a K . At this place we found a washout or The house zigzag ditch. formed line off the line their Company D had just taken Says Corporal Cooley muskets from the stacks after drawing rations.' but the way he dusted to the rear manifested the liveliness of that particu ' lar corpse beyond all shadow of doubt." " for the same purpose. " He said to me. : we behind an old rail fence back of the swamp. The rebels came on in quick time. and same time Edward Irving was struck with a bullet in the chest. Throwing away my blanket and also a large fry tore a heel off one of my boots ing-pan. and with some result. some of our men had occupied was swarming with rebelsWe opened fire witli our inside. and the enemy's skirmishers had reached the log-houses formerly in our vidette line. nor could we see anything of their In company with Fred Cooley and several skirmishers." " Says Colonel Gould Retiring from the houses. Cap tain Jones ordered us forward double-quick by the right flank for some rods and then by the left. and behind. As it proved afterward. and when they were in easy range we set up such a hurrah and gave them such a At this time Company D was fire that their line staggered. AND K. I'm killed . on the top. this did not penetrate the bone. others we went down to where the bushes ceased and the swale commenced. over a little ridge and down among some pine bushes. The flags and cat' s-tails were cut about my head in a way that was anything but pleasant. half-a-dozen muskets. I gained the other side pretty well blown. though it must have jarred him considerably. when pecting to relieve Company the firing at the front became very loud and rapid. but was unfortunate enough to get mired in the slough. ex : getting rations. where we could see Our line had fallen back clearly across the open ground. Our orders were to commence firing as soon as we could see any thing to fire at. 221 at the Frank Bidwell down on one knee deliberately firing. H. which made a very good rifle-pit.

an old soldier of ranged twenty-seven battles. They got " The all we could possibly give them. At this interesting stage we heard cheering in our rear. The line of battle came on. fire our line now poured into the skirmishers ad was so steady and severe that they were broken up vancing and ran for cover. We were ordered back to the company line. We had not gone five yards before we received a volley. and as we rate. barely glanc ing to the right and left as he brought down his gun to . Two of us. and knew that help was coming. We got a shower of lead in return that would have annihilated us if it had been correctly aimed.222 HEAVY GUNS AND in a door LIGHT. and kept on sending the bullets into the Confederate line still The enemy's fire was simply terrible the advancing. My gun got so hot in the rapid firing that I had to hold it by the strap in loading. : . Loading and firing with the greatest rapidity. with a carpet of green leaves and was soon covered line. near private Stephen De Russey. possibly some one else did the same/ At saw him any drop. I took my place on the right. and yelling as if they expected to scare us away. made apparently by two or three balls passing through him. named Krappt. got a shot in the leg that tumbled him back. pany. however. and as brave a man as ever lived. Neither of us was hurt. I ob served the wadding in front of his dress coat sticking out in shreds." foliage. We. Fred and I. We answered the cheers. supposing him dead. I did not see Fred again until the close of the war. but poor Krappt was struck several times he went as limp in our hands as a wet rag. limbs cut from the of the young pine-trees. As Fred fired a man rolled off from the roof. "I found our line near the edge of Warren Works Says A good many of the boys were a straggling belt of pines. I man jumped out of the ditch one of the party. steadily and rapidly. loading and firing as they advanced. dropped him and run to the right and rear. and moved forward as rapidly as circumstances would allow. Passing to the rear of the company. pulled him out. which was brown and bare when we formed the ground. straightened him up on one leg. passing in at the left of the com .

and could hardly refrain from firing into some captives we took later in the day. 223 he would yell out to the boys. and yet. He was a young to fear. My tentmate. cutting the boughs. tail was gone. and whenever a ball whizzed by him he would jump and snap as if trying to catch it." As one incident of this period. should the latter' s attack prove successful. of Company D. Give it to 'em. the battle opened in our front. and. See me pick off that and the before he could fellow. but poor Steve fell. front. let us enumerate. according to the official records. General Early says that he was with his entire ready. a day or two afterward.' and aim It used to be his boast that the bullet was take again. and the boys stood their ground for a considerable time until re-enforced. a bull-dog belonging to Lobdell. The heavy firing troops who participated in the victory of that day. shot man wholly insensible through the heart. the commands engaged. when the bullets were ' passing over in greatest number. flags. It is also true that the Confederate line had and ours lapped therefore. never moulded that could kill him. This was the situation when General R. that Ewell. I was so incensed over his death that I took especial pains to make my shots count. It is true more than by our one have been entirely withstood battalion little of skirmishers. showing unmistak able signs of rage. with six thousand men. and men promiscuously. that the tip of that dog's at this point had not failed to attract the attention of the general officers and their commands lying off to the south and. as it hap pened. as he raised his rifle. corps. D. ' AND K. Albert Dresser. O. was in our that. was seen running back and forth in rear of the line. It will not be supposed. to support Ewell. saying. shot dead in one of the battles before Petersburg. It wr as remarked as a very suspicious circumstance. stepped out from cover to take a bet ter aim. that this force could captured some wagons of a train passing on the Fredericksburg road. and my best friend. Ty- . H. there having been conflicting claims made by various chroniclers and historians as to the .MAY 19TH BATTERIES load.' pull trigger he fell.

and he de spatched the Maryland Brigade. sound at double-quick. in command. but it does not appear to have had anything to do with E well's movement at Pine Grove. and Eighth New York Heavy Artillery regiments. There was a command under General Ferrero some five miles north on the Orange plank-road that had an encounter the same afternoon with some Confederate troops. was also by General Meade to send troops. About half -past 5 o'clock. The Confederates had checked the advance of our support. Help was never more welcome. with General Tidball's batteries from the Second Corps and some guns of Major Fitzhugh. a glorious sound. near Spottsylvania Court-House. of the Fifth. was killed almost before they got under fire still the men went on and did their part toward stopping the advance of the enemy. General Hancock. were the forces engaged. an attack was made by Ewell's Corps on Tyler's Division of balls "What made : Foot Artillery.224 ler's HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. "those as they went but slightly above our heads into the Confederate ranks !" " On the after Says General Hunt." says Colonel Gould. The action of the artillery was of no slight importance. It also happened that the First Maryland veterans were marching from Fredericksburg to rejoin the army just as the Confederate column struck the road and had captured some of the ammunition wagons. First Maine. and saw a battalion of the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery coming to our assistance. " Shortly before six o'clock. Seventh. Second. in his official report noon of May 19th. and were forcing our lines back when the batteries opened. Major Brown. General Warren. being nearest directed These. " By direction of Major-General Meade I ordered the bat- . " . "we heard cheers. when the fire from the first line of battle was heard." says Colonel Gould. riding forward. consisting of the First Massachusetts. Division arrived. ordered Birney's Division to move in the direction of the to our location.

This not only checked their ad vance. H. twelve of the and wounded. reports that he at tacked until his flanks were turned. Joseph Housel. They were all decently buried. Benedict Privates William Burroughs. General Ramseur. John Burns. who had command of the Confederates in our immediate front.MAY 19TH teries." Tidball . and those of the Second under Colonel after a sharp action.. . when he was compelled to fall back. Mead. Lieutenant Michael J. he was about to retire He Army when attacked. AND K. to the point of attack. 225 each of the Second and Sixth Corps. Ewell. Jr. the next day. hundred and fifty killed : . in which the batteries rendered good service. BATTERIES D. the LIEUT." reports a total loss of nine hundred. also states that. Smith Artificer Gould R. and a great cheer went up as the artil lery opened A and we saw Confederates hurled back in disorder. Albert Dresser. William Derbyshire. having accomplished his purpose of ascertaining whether the of the Potomac was moving. LEE. however. The total loss of our forces was about twelve eighty-two. Lee. Jones. The battalion lost number being killed outright. the batteries of the Fifth Corps being under the direction of Major Fitzhugh. Henry A. and took the direction of the artillery in person. with head-boards and in Their pockets had been rifled scriptions. in " his Memoirs. . Following is a list of the dead Sergeants Peter Gordon and Judson A. but was the begin ning of a rout in which we captured over four hun dred prisoners. and William R. MICHAEL J. One officer. was mortally wounded. Robert Knapp. the enemy was repulsed. was poured volley of musketry in along our whole line.

. A bullet struck my right forearm. while the ground was held by the Confederates before we regained possession. but they were summarily mustered The out. in which condition it remained several months. my gun with my right arm. as I hopped to the rear on one leg. resting my gun in the left hand for a dead shot. " Coming to the field of corn I paused an instant. passing between the bones. victory won. my my left. and tried to fire but found I could do nothing it. In its trip through the cap-box the bullet had picked up and securely wound around itself the steel priming wire. but it was The rebels several minutes before I could get on my feet. which was bleeding. tearing through the muscle and lodg ing in the flesh on the opposite side. the foe in rout. and many of the individual experiences were of a highly exciting character. their A soldier's goal own flag overhead. Their work is done they're mustered out Few of marks the officers and men of the battalion had not some " I had Says Corporal Cooley dropped on my right with elbow on knee. None of the killed had yet served more than half their terms of enlistment. had crossed the field and were near the far side of the swale it seemed to me that we could not stay there much I picked up longer. pressing out a bunch as large as a hen's egg. and after two more attempts got on my feet. I soon recovered sufficiently to sit up. uncer tain whether to attempt to cross it.226 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. to support my weight on both feet occasionally by aged way of resting. . glanced off the buckle and struck my left thigh above the bone. The slope of the corn field was higher ground than the ridge where we formed : of the fray about them. paralyzing my right arm. ! Grudge not the glory of those heroes dead. I then tied with my teeth and left arm a handkerchief around my right arm. tore the capbox in pieces. attained. The shock knocked me over. In some way my cap-box and buckle had worked around under my right arm. owing to the flank fire from the right. but found I With the most exquisite torture I man could not walk.

" Our line fell back at this time to within. I never saw Company D or the Fourth Heavy Artillery after that. Michael the Lieutenant severely right J. Lieutenant Ward of our son first Stephen Colonel. 227 and most of the enemy's shot that passed over us struck on this slope. He said he was in an awful hurry. but finally stopped. but I could prevail on none of them to help me farther back. got on their horses and left. failed to include a severe injury received by himself. A little farther was a pine grove extending to the road. perhaps. was Doubleday. with the company guidon. I was bleeding freely. The men retired skirmishing to this line. one shoe was full of blood. and partly carrying. cut my belt straps. in which was a field A young surgeon bandaged my arm. where I found several of the boys. one of them mortally. and had hospital. Lee. I hopped the house. D. partly dragging me. I hopped on a few yards alone. These dust spots seemed thicker than the hills of corn. advising us to be careful or we would be captured. this engagement. cut to my pants from the bottom to examine the begun other wound. soon got out of the line of fire. H. from which he subsequently died. including my operator. all the surgeons. when a member of my own company rushed by at full speed. when the noise of the conflict coming much nearer. One of them took a silk hand kerchief off from his neck and tied it around my leg. established the right. where Corporal Burghardt. . and to hesitate was to through the field and to the rear of be lost. wounded in foot. but I managed to work my way back to the road just as a division of the Second Corps came pouring across. Warren Works carried him to the rear. a hundred yards of the Fredericksburg road. Every wounded man started for the road.MAY 19TH BATTERIES line of battle. AND K. who sent a report of losses at the time to the papers. of Battery K." There were three of our commissioned officers wounded in Lieutenant Kelly. I called to him. I could hardly crawl. The spot wherever a bullet struck was marked for a few seconds by a little cloud of dust which rose above it. was shot in the shoulder.

as already stated. the Harris House being located some forty rods north of the log house belonging to Miss Susan Alsop. of Company K. where Sedgwick was killed. nor with the Alsop House near the Brock road. Says the historian of the Seventeenth Maine. and asked Captain Gould if he might be allowed to go with the reserve. and instead of lying down. they had taken their position on the crest of the hill. 1864. was continued as long as the waning light would permit pursuit. which was granted. This fight was called the battle of Pine Grove or Harris Farm. but having formed a junction with the heavy artillery regiments on the left. which degenerated into a Confederate flight. striking that road north of the Harris House. and the fight.228 HEAVY GUNS AND line LIGHT. They were driven back at first. that he felt impressed with the belief that something serious was going to happen him that day. May 19th. which regi ment was in Birney's Brigade " The ground was literally covered with the dead and wounded of the heavy artillery : Not having experience in fighting. Colonel Dushane having formed line of battle on his own responsi bility. where they stood erect and furnished most admirable targets for the enemy. to Thursday. The timely arrival of the First Maryland Infantry repelled the attack at this point. they kept their end of the line well up. said before there were any signs of an enemy in our vicinity. was an average summer day. who fought as usual in the woods and behind regiments. . and Sergeant Gordon was the first man killed. fences. or taking advantage of the ground. When the fight opened Lieutenant Lee got the reserve instantly on to the line. they had the neglected precautions' that veterans take. This regiment lost six men killed and some twenty-five wounded. and capturing some ammunition wagons. The Confederate line had advanced at an angle with the Fredericksburg road. which was located in the rear of our line. on the second charge driving the Confederates through one piece of woods to the edge of a second piece beyond. This should not be con founded with the Alsop House on the east side of the road. When the picket was formed in the morning Sergeant Peter Gordon.

FTER THE MAY 19. . BATTLE SEEK not to know the hue they wore. Enough that it was blue or gray. . 1864. In dust they wait the judgment day. They died as brave men ask no more.

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It appeared that the Confederates had lapped our right somewhat. as just at dusk bullets were ob served coming into the rear of our right. who proved to be Confederate soldiers. May ORDERS. . and found no troops to our left both the right and left of our line were in air. and that some of their com mand had gone too far. H. The Major-General commanding desires to express his good conduct of Tyler's Division and Kitching's Brigade of Heavy Artillery in the affair of Thursday evening. thinking they were among their own They were undeceived later on. satisfaction with the 20. Many of the captured Confederates were caught while straggling in the woods. and received various commendatory notices from General Warren and other officers for its part in this engagement. L. 231 of the of the Federal line. find : { ' among them the following : HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF POTOMAC. Howard Kitching's) Regi ment was located. in which the picket line to a great extent mingled with the artillery troops. 1864. and shortly after a number of men were seen running in a northwest direc When cap tion. fell them in the twilight. when a halt was ordered. AND K. H. if it took part in the engagement. ing. but I am unable to picket Heavy K where the Sixth (Colonel J. tured they admitted having fired the shots from the rear. continued until about 8 o' clock in the evening. of Kitching's Brigade consisted of the Sixth and Fifteenth Artillery regiments. The Fifteenth was supposed to be the regiment on to the left of our line that day. and the three batteries D. and seemed completely worn out with the fatigue of their long march. Kelly Alsop's house by the Major in command of picket line to take com mand of the left of our line. though likely their want of success was one cause of their dejection. and also early in the morn into our ranks. Some men.' Our battalion was soon returned to the Fifth Army Corps. " I was sent from Says Lieutenant H.MAY 19TH The advance day was BATTERIES D. and of the Fourth New York Artillery temporarily at tached.

severe Frank W. 1864. arm George Bowman. Charles Cole. Kenyon. hand Nathaniel Moore.232 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Sergeant C. both hips . hand Christopher Turner. Egburt . arm and leg B. . Lee. roughs. Prisoners. Collins. By command of Major-General MEADE. severe John Wilson. severe Eugene D. both legs John Cole. IN ACTION . BATTERY D. ankle David Campfield. . justifies the commanding General in this special commendation of troops who henceforward will be relied upon. . hand James Douglass. slight William V. LIST OF CASUALTIES IN SECOND BATTALION FOURTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. . right severe. Privates John Barnes. A. Killed. Sergeant Peter Gordon. Cooley. hip knee. Robert Knapp. right side. May 20th. . Killed. shoulder John Crouse. Privates Melvin Alderman. Privates William Bur Albert Dresser. D. . Assistant Adjutant-General. Lent. Jones. E. . . foot James Downey. WILLIAMS. left arm Valentine Washburn. William Derbyshire. Corporals A. Harkness. Lyman W. . Second Lieutenant Michael J. . . right thigh. The gallant manner S. E. Herrick. . . right eye Thomas Murphy.THURSDAY. . in which these commands (the greater the first for time under fire) met and checked portion being the persistent attacks of a corps of the enemy led by one of the ablest generals. shoulder Andrew Wounded. . MAY 19TH. right thigh and breast. . Wilbur. Wounded. B. MANNING. 1864. . . arm. First Lieutenant S. . . Timothy Van Cleack. back. Privates Lawrence Marks and Parkhurst. shoulder and leg. Offi cial Headquarters Fifth Army Corps. . BATTERY K. Assistant Adjutant-General. leg. mortally. Milo Warner. leg Edward Wheeler. Morgan. back George Lent. foot. as were the tried veterans of the Second and Fifth Corps at the same time engaged. S. Ward Doubleday. severe Samuel Mulford. head Gustave Lange. right leg. Private Henry A.

D. foot J. . Artificer Gould R. E. H. hand . Sanfords. Abbey. foot J. Privates T. . Charles M. arm Samuel C. hand A. foot Charles F. George H. severe. Harned. side. ankle. Rooney. Loyd. Benedict. . W. B. C. Wounded. . Sergeant David B. Jr. Sergeant Judson A. Privates Joseph Housel. hand. Bullock. thigh . BATTERY H. Lyke. foot Levi Brockelbank. AND K. B. Corporal Samuel L. Mason. slight. James Chase. Mead. A. W. William R. . .. Andrus. 233 . both legs. . Smith. arm Charles M. bowels Silas Johnson. Hunt. . Miller.MAY 19TH BATTERIES Fry. Chase. Leroy. Charles Herrick. . arm . Smith. S. severe Albert E. hip . arm. foot Frederick A. hand Samuel Johnson. . leg Minting. Jones. McW. Woodruff. W. Privates Asa Smith. L. face Erastus D. Adams. Greenslit. ankle . . . foot and leg R. face. F. Greenman. . Butler. thigh Frederick Knapp. P. Smith. . Missing. . leg F. Privates Charles E. . . slight Allen R. D. severe . Elvviiine. Killed. Cole. Struble. Phelps. Slover.

was the most immediate of these.CHAPTER XVII. preceded by Torbert's cavalry.M. policy of getting as many battles as possible out of the Confederates deter mined General Grant upon another flank movement that he might force General Lee out of his intrenchments and bring on another engagement in the field. named very conveniently from its four branches. -a stream purpose. received orders to move from Spottsylvania at 2 A. but with disastrous results. which was to lead the column of ad vance southward. formed by the union of the North and South Anna. and still farther the Chickahominy. but on account of Ewell's attack on our right. all constituted impor tant natural defenses. the movement was postponed until 11 P. One more trial of the enemy' s fortified strength was made on the morning of the 18th by the Second Corps.M. of the 20th. Added to this was the chance of getting between the Confederate army and Rich mond. AT THE NORTH ANNA. and the four tributaries unite Farther south the Pamunkey south of Bowling Green. Hancock. River. Spottsylvania lies between the Po and Ny. some six hundred and fifty of the attack ing divisions being killed and wounded. The Second Corps. then turning south reached . The natural features of the country presented many obstacles to the latter The Mat-Ta-Po-Ny. considered in the last chapter. took his corps east to Massaponax Church.

AT THE NORTH ANNA. . 235 MAP SHOWING STREAMS CROSSED IN CAMPAIGN OF 1864.

To guard against a flank attack Hancock took a round about course. thereby giving Longstreet the advantage in the matter of distance. although every effort was made by our troops to cross the river first. Warren four miles farther up. That night Wright followed the rest of the army.236 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. they came in sight only to moved find the enemy already in position. where a heavy skirmish line of the army met him. at Jericho Mills. Swell's Corps moved off in the direction Longstreet had taken. following the same road. leaving Wright in command of Sedgwick's old corps in front of Hill at Spottsylvania. Warren left the main army soon after Hancock started. The North Anna is sixty. Re- enforcements were hurried to this point by the Confeder ates. Hill. The two armies started for the North Anna almost simul taneously. Bowling Green at 10 o'clock of the next day. Hancock struck the river near the Fredericksburg and Richmond Railroad. and while the distance had been overcome the more formidable obstacles between Grant and Richmond remained. the rest of the corps following rapidly. Griffin hurried to a piece of woods less than a mile distant. At Milford's Station Torbert found a guard posted north of the Mattapony and captured sixty prisoners. but got such a warm reception that he fell back ingloriously. Griffin's soldiers were ahead. and at 5 o'clock a vigorous attack was made on Griffin. immediately set about frustrating it. The fact was that Lee conceiving Grant' s design to be the capture of Richmond. Hill off and Spottsylvania was deserted.five miles from the Rapidan and twenty-five from Richmond. and. anxious to know what force was actually left behind. came out and attacked him. and by 1 o'clock the night of the 20th Longstreet's Corps was marching toward the North Anna. but he held his position and gave them such a warm greet- . Burnside followed Han cock and Warren. and plunging into the stream shore to their waists struggled to the opposite There were no troops as high up as this to oppose up their landing.

Thirty of the enemy were captured in the ditch. the left of which joined Gibbon's Division. he was forced to give way before the sudden attack. Griffin seeing the critical character of the situation or dered up three regiments of Bartlett' s Brigade and restored the line. The Confederates swept both sides from previously erected works. on his right Pierce' s Brigade. While this conflict was raging on the south side of the river Hancock was fighting desperately on the north side. suddenly encountered the enemy while marching to the scene. its left to the right of the redan. Hancock saw there must be no dallying the redan on the north must be taken by assault and that quickly and Birney's Division was sent to perform the task. The Seventy-first and Seventysecond New York reached the redan first. under Colonel Blaisdell. Birney's command moved across the open space at doublequick under a heavy fire. holding it during the night. while one of his men grabbed the Confederate leader by his coatcollar and dragged him unceremoniously into our lines. over which Hancock immediately passed with his corps. came up partly in the rear. The Fourth Brigade. Just before sunset on the 23d the assault was begun. . Quickly and skilfully moving the forward companies into line. securing us the coveted bridge.AT THE NORTH ANNA. he poured in a sudden volley. This was commanded by Cuyler. under Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy. Our loss was not over one hun- . and not yet being in position. 237 ing that they abandoned the attack at this point and made a detour. The Eighty. The Confederate brigade broke and fled. of the Eleventh Massachusetts. On the left was Colonel Egan.third Pennsylvania. On the left of Birney's Division was Barlow's Division. while Tyler's Heavy Artillery Division was held in reserve. and still to his right General Mott's Brigade. In less time than it takes to tell it they had planted their flag on the enemy's stronghold. and the garrison were driven pell-mell over the bridge and the latter seized. falling onto his right Hank.

M. At pits. He had every ad of river swollen lie Should the become vantage position. The Second and Ninth Corps were moving by us southward in the afternoon. lieved for a time to get breakfast and then returned to the work. our before re-enforce either flank of army might overcome ments could be brought up. with the apex on the river opposite Bumside and between Hancock and Warren.M we formed columns in four ranks and . 3 o'clock we took our guns and moved into the rifleand about 5 P. On the night of the 20th we of the First Battalion about 9.238 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. now lay south of the North General Lee's army lay in the form of a wedge having a very obtuse angle. were marched out without arms and worked At 5 A. Before tracing these general events further let us consider in order the movements of our three battalions. getting little opportunity to sleep during the day.M.30 P. Army Anna except of the Potomac Burnside's Corps. dred men. we were re steadily all night building rifle-pits. All the "Wright's Corps crossed at Jericho's Ford and fell in in rear of Warren.

Barnes. M. Geo. Doubleday. Clarke. II. Capt. C. E. Smith. N. Bailey. Chas. Lieut. W. First S'g't Aug. Lieut. Wm. S. B. Edgar W. Young. Dennis. Nolan. a. vet-Major. R. Dexter. Lieut. G. P. Bemis. Ball. W. T. Lieut. . Lieut. 6. Mcars. Lieut. S. Furrey. l. Hulse. N. W. Morrison. Master . Ingalls. Edward H. II. First Serg't J. C. Capt. A. Barnes. Henrv L. Thorp. S. Capt. T. Maj. II. Bartholo- may. Ltent. Lieut. W. J. C. Bre Lieut. Lieut. First Serg't Oscar Knapp. Lieut. Geo. Q. Wilder. D. I. Wood. T.Maj. Major. Wallace. l.ii'iit. W. First Serg't Smith. McNuughton. Soeley. Lieut. G. Ilonice E. Lieut. Brevet- Lieut. W. Harris.i'Mit. Frank Ahner W. BrevetMajor. Hayden. S. Capt.1. Lieut. Kimball. T. C. Filley. Mnrcotte. Capt. Wm. Wm. Lieut. Capt.

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Some of the scenery was very fine. A woman. May marched through Guinea' s Station. encamped for the night. forces tore M . We crossed the North Anna River and encamped. Sixth Corps. uttering the most frightful oaths and curses against the whole Yankee army. at which place we drew In a house along the line of march found five days' rations. Third We marched nearly to Guinea'sDivision. and corn. probably " War is a species of cruelty at best. we were out of A single hardtack sold readily for twenty-five rations. not far from this. he drew his sword and we fright 23d. In the yard of a house along the roadside. Marched all night of the 23d and halted only a few minutes on the morning of Tuesday the 24th. with di shevelled hair and clenched fists. Besides being very tired and sleepy." and it is difficult to mitigate We passed through numerous fields of growing grainwheat. Took up our line of march about 7 A. and we were ordered back some distance and took the road for Bowling Green. Lieutenant Chichester happening in just then. We were temporarily attached to the First Brigade. 241 moved by the left flank on the direct road from Fredericksburg to Richmond until morning.M. came to more than one observant soldier. rye. it. his wife evidently.M of the 22d we ran into a Confederate battery and were stopped by a shell that woke us out of our march ing slumbers. About 6 A. Station and ened the fellows out. as we passed. cents. One ginia Company was rails and ties springing back when uplifted and injured by falling upon his leg. was standing near him.. lay the dead body of a rebel soldier recently killed. and even higher prices were quoted. The thought. some soldiers tantalizing a white-haired. if not the words of General Sherman. Poor thing. they turned upon him.AT THE NORTH ANNA.. trembling old man. The writer having suggested that it was not the proper thing to do. she was doubtless insane. On Wednesday our and miles of the Vir about twelve up destroyed Central Railroad man of track.

30 on the left. At 6 A.M.. on the 23d they joined the wagon train and marched to Mt. They the Fifth Corps batteries. At 7 A. The Second Corps passed to the left and the Fifth to the In a few moments right and crossed North Anna River." says Captain Brown. and had some coffee. The Third Battalion left their camp at S potts ylvania at 11 P. of the 20th. passing through Bowling Green at 11 A. a soldier of Company B had been on a lit foraging excursion. In the rear of the house by the roadside. on May 25th. " The men. Carmel Church.30.M. Near tle this place. They marched all night and all the next day.M. The next morning all was quiet in front. he had captured a rooster. The battalion had marched about ten miles. The cavalry re turned from the raid. and reached Milford Station at 3 P. which managed to set up quite a loud squawking as he came around the building with it under his arm. our Second Battalion moved to to be near Hanover Junction. having had noth ing to eat on the long march of twenty-five miles. crossed the passed through at and halted near a house in Downer's Mattapony Bridge. supposed The boys improved the lull to get a good bath in the North Anna River. An old lady came out of the house. Hill's Corps opposed. a cornfield. but there was some heavy cannonading in the direction of the Second Corps. and the Sixth Corps was reported to have torn up the railroad from Hanover Junction to Gordonsville. and felt re freshed and better fitted for the approaching conflict. on the 22d they were ordered back and halted H until 4 P. when they marched to Bowling Green and camped near Harrison's store. the right and Kitchen's Brigade to the left.M. Company Guinea's Station on the 21st. Skirmishing began briskly in front and heavy cannonading at 3.242 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT.. arriving at 11. .M." At 1 A. " were thor oughly tired out and as hungry as bears. a distance of six miles. Our Second Battalion marched all night of the 20th with on the lead. commenced and the battle opened vigorously skirmishing at 5 o'clock and lasted two hours. but there was very little fighting.M.M.

and meeting some other soldiers with the sheep on their backs. you cowardly Yanks. This they did until the sheep were : . clay. arrayed in gray clothing. Captain Watts. by reason of the skirmishers suddenly firing briskly and it was said among the soldiers at the time. Wright says that some officer ordered him to kiss: . He fell over backward. cackling and squawking as only a rooster can. ordered them to stand under arms. and she berated them with her tongue." Dr. " Some of our men were Major Knower says foraging against orders. which was secured by Jack. regarding them with a portentous frown. Lieutenant S. had fired over their heads. It This caused the young lady to retire hastily. who. and as he turned around for the purpose of guying her. that the picket. You will meet old Bob Lee pretty soon. had caused the noise by their desire to secure fresh mut ton. I. Mike. and then you will laugh the other side of your mouths. the rooster flew out of his arm. to their great amuse ment. and brought before General Hancock. and so frightened them that they left their booty. They were reported. she rushed toward the soldier. and members of the battalion. soft four or five inches through. 243 She picked evidently in a very indignant state of mind. however. she hit him square in the forehead with the mud." Emboldened by the words and actions of the mother." had gone out foraging. of Company investigation of this. Moore says " She was the most beautiful woman I ever saw. having encountered a flock of sheep. and their followers. Some other soldiers had been more successful. she did not hesitate to say " Laugh. states that he made an found that two rather notorious known as " Black Jack" and " Irish Mike. several of the command describe as being very beautiful in fact. to a halt. : her. and brought in a sheep between them. F. The daughter. was near Milford Station that the Second Corps came .AT THE NORTH ANNA. perhaps up a chunk of and after insisting on the return of her property to no pur pose. and the boys set up a great shout at his dis comfiture.

occupying strong works on both sides of the river. Edgell.' The Third Battalion crossed the Mattapony at 3. the line.244 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT.M.. Preparations were at once made for the assault and capture General Birney's Division of the works on the north side. but because of the impatience that was shown by those not aware of the facts. and eaten by those around them. we quote from the General's report " During the night of May 20th the Second Corps marched through Bowling Green to Milford Station. on the 21st. and took position with Brown's Battery on the left of ' digging rifle-pits all night and the noon. They worked till next day Of General Tidball's batteries. The enemy were found to be in heavy force. At daylight on the 23d the corps again took up the line of march. On the 23d began marching at 7 A. These batteries at once opened fire upon the enemy intrenched on the opposite side . was designated for this service. cooked.M.15. and crossing the Matta/pony. not on account of its own importance. and General Hancock directed me to place all of my artillery in position to crush the batteries of the enemy and cover the assaulting force. and Sleeper in a field opposite a ford (Oxford) about a mile above the bridge. which performed such ex cellent service at the engagement at the North Anna. The range was easy and they were not long road. Roder. killed.of the river. Owing to the fact that the Fifth Corps had cut in upon the road along which the Second had to pass. Finally I got the batteries up and posted them. strong ly intrenched itself on the south bank. crossed Polecat Creek at 9 and halted at 3 P. near the North Anna River. the artillery was several miles in rear and some considerable delay occurred be This circumstance is mentioned fore it could be brought up. Let this ' teach you a lesson another time to obey orders. Anna River at the A few hundred yards above the . where it arrived about 12 M. when they were relieved and dismissed with the warning. They crossed the North Anna on the 25th. and at noon reached the North : point crossed by the Fredericksburg Rail railroad bridge was a wooden bridge. the artillery being placed in position. where they rested that night.

The work was completed and 24th. Finding an excel lent position for short range by the side of the railroad. Ricketts. with his usual promptness and gallantry.AT THE NORTH ANNA. they had a command ing fire upon the works of the enemy. and about sundown the charge was made and the works on the north side of the river captured. This position of Arnold's prevented Ames and Gillis from being thrown for ward as intended. I Brown. and soon after daylight the Second Corps com menced crossing. immediately occupied it with his battery and poured in a telling fire. at about twelve hundred yards' A dense woods extending down the slope of the distance. It is fair to assume that the fire from the artillery contributed to a considerable extent to the success. although the range was long. Working parties were at once set to work. Me Knight. 245 in silencing the guns of the enemy. to fire the woods could General Birney through posted by do little more than have a damaging effect in exploding percussion shells over our own lines. still holding a position on the river about fifteen hundred yards above the wooden bridge. Roder was brought up and placed about midway between the bridge and the enemy' a . who. As soon as the batteries got in position indicated it to as described. Burton. to prepare the re doubt just captured for the reception of his guns. and Clark were posted on a commanding hill upon the extreme left. where. The enemy. Dow was placed directly in front of the work to be charged. '" his guns in it by dawn on the During the night the enemy. Later in the day these batteries were relieved from this position by batteries of the Ninth Corps. hill in this part of the line prevented me from establishing other batteries along there. Ames and Gillis were held in readiness to move forward and take position in front of the woods as soon as the open ground there should be suffi Arnold being ciently cleared of the enemy's skirmishers. under direction of Captain Ames. they opened fire upon the enemy's batteries. withdrew from the immediate vicinity of the bridges. kept from that point a constant fire upon our col umns as they passed over. by swinging back his right wing.

and. Three men of our Battalion who were on picket." There was little or no fighting on May 25th. Chief of Artillery. making an attempt to force this flank. Rain began to fall in the morning and continued to do so day. but so narrow there was danger of the men being run over by the wagons. which had once been white. During the day all of the bat teries except Dow's. re ceived an effective fire from that battery. At dark our First Battalion fell and marched all night through mud so deep and liquid. in an open field. and the diffi cult operation of withdrawing across the river began on the 26th. were left behind. and uniting his fire with that of Ames endeavored keep down the fire of the enemy. and later in the day the enemy. The writer followed a in ! pair of corduroy trousers. On the extreme left. but the guns of the latter were so well protected by breastworks that it was im possible to dislodge them. and Roder's were crossed over and occupied positions along a line of intrenchments thrown up nearly parallel with the river. and no wonder dark as Erebus. which he had with the ammunition train. so far as the writer is aware. worn by Lieutenant Chichester. and the enemy sought new ways of covering himself from this strange fire. not being relieved or notified of the with all drawal. which could faintly be seen . Taking advantage of the darkness I placed them in position about six hundred yards from the enemy's works. These he promptly sent me. Ames'. can be better imagined than described. Other batteries to during the day as occasion required. I requested of General Hunt. never heard of afterward. Army of the Potomac. The effect was magical. even the fire of the sharp fired shooters was stopped. and soon after daylight opened fire with them. The en The night was as tire division straggled. " For the purpose of silencing the enemy's battery above the bridge. was posted Clark's Battery. the use of six Coehorn mortars. that the course was rather a stream than a road. The condition of the roads. softened by the water and cut up by the wagon trains and artillery. the road in places was not only of the con sistency described.246 batteries. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT.

but started again. when we started at 9 o'clock and marched till 12 the following midnight.M." The Third Battalion recrossed the river at 11 A. while the cavalry was sent out again. The men were beginning to get dry and were mak ing themselves as comfortable as possible under the circum stances. by order.30 P. when rumors of a change of base and a long march : were brought in. and marched with the light batteries on the 27th and 28th. The men built breastworks on picket. of the 26th. to cross Pamunkey. It was utterly impossible to keep the men in line. passing many interesting places. " Two. We had made twenty-five miles in the rain and mud. which we did at about 5 at the old ferry. crossing the Pamunkey at 3. finding the mud knee-deep. " We started again at 9 the next morning and marched all day.M. among them the plantation of John Carroll. We remained here until the following morning. least 247 all night.AT THE NORTH ANNA. . so He followed these at two of the battalion were together the next morning. Reached the church about 1 A. through the darkness. We left the Infantry Division and rejoined the Artillery Brigade the morning of the 27th. The brigade crossed the North Anna River toward Mt. First was the fact that they recrossed the river by daylight. with sixteen men. Fires were built and rations issued. Says Captain Brown of the movements of the Second Bat " talion The morning of the 26th was rainy and disagree able enough. Marched steadily all that day and the next some fifty miles. and one by one the rest came in a sorry-looking crowd. on Saturday the 28th.M. deployed as skir mishers with the batteries crossing the Pamunkey on the The only advantage the other battalions had of the 28th.thirds of the men fell out from sheer exhaustion. At 4 we halted to make coffee. however. Carmel Church. covered with mud and wet to the skin. and they straggled along as best they could. The batteries of the Second Corps as well as the in intrenched that day in a position between the river fantry steadily and Hawes' shop.

General Grant. while the army was set in motion. and after rains likely to be impassable. AT THE TOTOPOTOMOY. General Sheridan. a branch of the Pamunkey. without much slope to the banks. There are three places known as Hanover. passing through A : . This creek has very much the same physical characteristics as the other streams in Eastern Virginia. with heavy timber in many places. Stewart. URING the time we had been engaged at Spottsylvania General Sheridan had been making with his cavalry a very success ful raid in the direction of the Confeder ate Capital. during which the brilliant cavalry general. called the Totopotomoy. de cided to move again around the enemy' s right. for the purpose of misleading the enemy. with two cavalry divisions and Rus sell's Division of the Sixth Corps. strong force of cavalry was ordered to make a demonstration on the Confederate left. which should not be confounded Hanover Junction. From the town of Han over a main road runs to Richmond. across the Pamunkey. as we . finding himself at that river so much at the mercy of General Lee. was killed in the action at Yellow Tavern. only fifteen miles from Richmond. and the town between which and Richmond flows a creek. owing to the superiority of the latter' s position. Sheridan returned while our forces were at the North Anna.have seen. led the advance. and by noon of the 27th he had seized the river and thrown a pon toon bridge across at the town of Hanover. Hanover CourtHouse.CHAPTER XVIII.

marched all day. On the 29th our army was entirely across the Pamunkey. received orders to join the Third Battalion in the Second Corps. the Confederate horsemen were routed. had a smart contest with the enemy's cavalry near Hawes' Shop. and crossed the Pamunkey and camped on the south bank. of the 28th on Saturday acting as flankers to the Sixth Corps batteries. Major Arthur. There was such a continuous firing of musketry and artillery. his right extending beyond Shady Grove and Mechanicsville. as we have seen. as usual. Pohlgreen Church. Huntley's Corners. commanding. and they marched . The plan of movement was for the Fifth and Ninth Corps to cross at Hanover. that we found it quite dangerous getting into the works. while the Second and Sixth Corps were to cross at Humphrey's Ford above. and. and his left stretch ing out in the direction of Hanover Court-House. On the 31st our battalion was ordered to rejoin the regiment. 249 Hawes' Shop. The Con GENERAL PHILIP H. federate line of battle lay in a concave. and Shady Grove Church. and another division of cavalry under Wilson covered our right and rear. arranged to meet them. and General Grant having discovered the posi tion of the enemy.M.AT THE TOTOPOTOMOY. we of the First Bat talion took up our line of march at 7 A. Of the movements of the Second Battalion on the 29th. was composed of cav alry. SHERIDAN. after crossing the stream. Sheridan. The advance. and we found them lying in the sec ond line of breastworks near the Totopotomoy. Of the movements of our regiment. his centre a little beyond Atlas Station on the railroad.

at Totopotomoy. were resting under a little bower house. *' : Says Major Mitchell. As often happens on such occasions. and burning the eyes out of several others. which. Knower. Aide to General Hancock The . who had found the other portions of the house un One of the batteries had removed a gun limber. The enemy were very busy in oar front. In this we were not disappointed. C. passing between the two soles of his boot. eral Tidball. as reported. Kopper jumped up with a very forcible expression. while Tidball. and several of the line. occupied by a number of ladies or rather the cellar of which was occupied by a number of ladies. J. Kopper." At 4 o'clock in the early morning of the 30th the Second Corps batteries and our battalions. Lieutenant W. explading the ammunition. now all united. B. She was probably delirious from fright. and while in conversation were astonished at a bullet coming through and striking Kopper on the foot. and Lieutenant W. tenable. men were hit. she emptied into the limber. to get out of the sun. During the night and the early morning we built our works for batteries within about five hundred yards of the enemy's This was a dangerous operation. in a southerly direction for about eight miles and re ported. On May 29th. Adjutant H. when an old negro woman (while shot and shell were flying in all directions through and about the house) came out of the door with a fire-shovel full of live coals. ad vanced half a mile and stacked arms. said any more come in that kind : of way. Knower.250 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. killing two men outright. The same day a very curious circumstance occurred. looking around in a leisurely " There cannot manner. the principal in the affair was unhurt. B. Gen Captain E. The batteries were located in the vicinity of what was known as the Shelton House. partly in the road and partly in a cornfield of about fifty acres. Burt. it was said at the time that she had been prompted though to the act by the ladies in the house. which was being filled with ammunition. and there seemed to be every pros pect of a very warm time.

as he had learned. and re a somewhat amusing correspondence on that subject. Miller. and that if they valued their lives they would retire. B. questing that the Second Corps would take some other route. after deciding to attempt the passage of the creek. who. brings up the fact that the house was occupied by its calls customary inhabitants during this cannonade.AT THE TOTOPOTOMOY. and in some way caused the ammunition in the box It exploded so soon afterward that the im to take fire. and nearly scared to death by what she had done. pression prevailed and the story got afloat that she had thrown the ashes and fire into the limber itself. of course greatly excited. I not only sent the ambulance a second . and re . reply later. very and teous appeal from the ladies not to make their house the scene of conflict stating that one of the members of the household was sick and could not well be moved. but on the ground under or near the limber. it was necessary to reply that the Second Corps could not well change its line of march. ran into the house again as if the devil was after her. to the letter was an hour a cour received. amid the confusion of battle. 251 negress. I arrived on the ground just as the men whose eyes had been burned out were being taken off the field. This was offering them transportation to the rear. and that the old black woman came out of the house with a shovel full of coals. General Hancock. and an was In to save time ambulance sent done. in his History of the Second " Corps :" Speaking of the negro woman coming out of the kitchen. of Company A. who was unhurt. She was so crazy that none believed she knew what she had done. " Says General Walker. but that she did not throw the coals into the limber. had instructed me to write to the ladies of the house immediately at the crossing. says he was present when this explosion occurred." E. It was not supposed that the negress had any intention of doing such mischief. were there unprotected. informing them that their estate was likely to be the scene of a severe conflict the next day. A. It being not altogether convenient to alter the plans of the Army of the Potomac at so short a notice. along. and on some cartridges which ex ploded.

but speedily came back. at this point in the was assigned to a campaign tha't one of our com Coehorn mortar battery. and let loose a cloud of geese. and immediately after he arrived their batteries opened upon the house. was panies." When the limber was exploded by the colored woman. to visit them and see that the sick member of the household suffered no harm. Dougherty went. the Confederate cannoneers were particu The house was repeatedly struck. stayed in the house. and other poultry. time. until an officer on a white horse was seen to ride up to the front of their lines. none of which were saved. hens. having moved down in the cellar. sick and well.252 . Sergeant Donnelly. with indignation not of the speechless variety. manned for the greater part of the campaign . of Company G. D. but larly attentive to it. which continued to be by our men. their blood would rest upon my soul forevermore. none of the family in the cellar were hurt. As our signal officers used the roof for purposes of observation. President. Several of the men of our regiment. He had pro nounced the sick lady to be in a condition to move without the slightest danger but his opinion had been received . it was difficult to apprehend the The upshot was that the ladies. Dr. A hatchet and a caseknife were also blown through the air and buried in a log. say that the house itself was not fired upon by the enemy's cannon. and Army of the United States were set forth with the utmost distinct The epistle closed with informing me if any of the ness. in which the opinions of the household concerning the Congress. Inasmuch as the only possible chance of their being injured was by shots from cannon manned by Confederates. but all were finally accounted for. people. I myself received a letter. and several shell passed through It it. the side of a barn was blown out. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. logic of this denunciation. family were killed on the morrow. took the hatchet and carried it along with him as a memento. Dougherty. but requested the able and humane medical director of the corps. who were in the vicinity of the Shelton House. Dr.

(\rr. V. V. MAJOR HENRY T. HOWARD L.-Col. Li i IT.. DUNCAN D. LIEUT. LIEUT. LIEUT. C. MAJOR DERRICK F. 8. U. KELLY.I. WM. Brevet-Major. PARSHALL. RICHARD KENNEDY. U. GEORGE W. WOOD. EDMONSTON. CAPT. JAMES H. 8. LEE. HAMLINK. Brevet-Lieut. C.i i IT. YOUNG. N. MCPHERSON. .

.

Arnold. four batteries were got into position upon this Ricketts and Clark line. Undoubtedly the work of the artillery 255 was the most im " Soon after dark upon the 26th the difficult operation of North Anna River commenced. I was directed by General Hancock to move forward batteries and to put a my guns in position in front of the Shelton House.' During the night of the 29th I accordingly moved up the batteries. I sup posed that some change of plan. moved forward the two battalions of the Fourth New York Artillery and set them to work throwing up protections for the guns. I immediately set about correcting the error as far as the artillery was con ing. his cerned. but was surprised to find them about half a mile in rear. . The battalions of the Fourth New York Artillery intrenched themselves between.General command large of number ' disappointment at not finding the infantry as well as the artillery in the position specified. The march was soon thereafter taken up for the Pamunkey River. and kept up a constant shower of bullets. expecting to find our infantry divisions intrenching themselves upon this line. and obtaining intrenching tools. were on the right of the road. the line of the Totopoto "The enemy having taken up moy as his defensive position. Owing to the proximity of the enemy. who were securely in trenched upon the opposite side of the creek. which they returned with . During the afternoon the enemy opened a most terrific artil lery fire upon these batteries. General Tidball's account of the various movements at this place is herewith given as set forth in his report : and Hawes' Shop. and the Coehorn mortars were on the left. had been made. and across the withdrawing was successfully accomplished by daylight on the 27th. and by 12 M. and it was not until after daylight that I learned from the Major. this operation was exceedingly hazardous nevertheless. which was reached and crossed the next day. and Roder. which was that of our skirmishers. it was successfully accomplished. and the corps and batteries intrenched in a position between the river portant feature of the contest at the Totopotomoy. of which I had not been informed.AT THE TOTOPOTOMOY.

and did good work. Chief of Artillery of the Army of the Potomac. In the afternoon Sleeper boldly placed his battery on the skirmish line of Gibbon's Division. S. that during the night the enemy withdrew and intrenched a new line some distance in rear of the first. .' Opposite the enemy had considerable artillery. New York of them. being composed entirely of were unable to speak or understand English. Birney advancing his division across the creek took these works. Roder being sent across to relieve him. which it returned with spirit and skill. Up to this time made the mortars had been served by a company of the Fifteenth Artillery. of this. such them. which. The Coehorns were moved across and preparation for other batteries to go into position during the night. and maintained a vigorous fire. Brown." Artillery. where it drew upon itself a heavy fire. ' skirmishers. Jones. with such success on our side. I placed Captain D. but soon after dark all the troops were returned across the creek to their former position. K. of the consequence New York Fourth with his company. with which these batteries kept up a spirited contest.256 HEAVY GUNS AND effect as to finally silence LIGHT. During this and the suc ceeding day he occupied the same position. in which latter was left a heavy line of day. and opened upon a battery which had an enfilad ing fire upon the other divisions. May 30th. and Edgell's batteries were moved up and placed behind the infantry breastworks upon the left of the Shelton House. up and extended the intrenchments On the afternoon of the succeeding Ames. In Germans. This con centration of fire caused the enemy to withdraw during the night and intrench a new line about a thousand yards in rear of his first. Gillis was placed in an advanced position on the extreme right. and McKnight's Battery was sent across and placed in position. in charge This change was subsequently confirmed by Gen eral Hunt. Meanwhile the In fantry Division moved to the right and left. Having ex pended his ammunition and lost several of his men and horses he was withdrawn.

COLD HARBOR. to be commanded by Colonel Tidball but this did not prove to be the case. the day our First Bat talion rejoined the regiment. who were equally anxious to get the position. it was re new movement ported that the regiment was going into a siege train.CHAPTER XIX. The regiment moved into rifle-pits in the evening to support batteries. again a movement around the enemy's right flank was determined upon. The Sixth Corps made an Richmond converged . For a considerable period we were practically more devoted to the musket than ever. On the 31st. . he gained the point and held on tena ciously until the arrival of the Sixth Corps. a very im portant point. that had been ordered around from Butler's Army. of Cavalry. VERY far of our army thus us nearer the Confederate brought at but each new position we were Capita]. The Confederates could be seen very plainly when they dared show themselves. It being apparent to General Grant that he could not ad vance directly upon Richmond. On that night twenty-five men from each company of the Third Battalion of our regiment had been sent out to dig and put up breastworks. for the reason that all the roads leading into at that place. confronted with the same stubborn ob stacle the Confederate Army. which was soon followed by the Eighteenth Corps. having been within four hundred yards of the rebel lines. He moved forward rapidly with Torbert's Division. Sheridan was accordingly pushed forward to Cold Harbor. They returned about midnight. and though hard pressed by the enemy.

suffocating.258 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and conse reached the quently we were in the rear of the corps. was despatched to General Meade of the necessity of the rest of the army moving to the support of the Accordingly General order : two corps. This fact becoming apparent. much confusion arose on the line of march. and Field's. There were four divisions of the Confederate Army op posed to these two corps at this time Hoke's. about the time of the close of the fighting referred to. and the result was that our regiment. from the fact that the artillery were so delayed. and the dust was almost Our regiment got the benefit of all of this. It need not be said that General Hancock made every effort to obey the commands of his superior. " The weather was very warm. made a mistake in the route. and some of the guns were caught between trees. which it is desired to extend to the Chickahominy. with the balance of the command. The road was found to be narrow. As it was. and were unable to move forward on that road. with Ricketts' Division on the right. the right of the Sixth. had to march all night. now wholly of the Second Corps. word Pickett's. We . forcing the enemy back and then took position on the road to Games' Mill. upon its arrival. with General Martindale's Division on the right. Gen eral Smith." This was received on June 1st. the corps made a charge through the open space and a small piece of woods. who undertook to conduct the col umn by a short cut. General Meade' s instructions would have been executed more promptly undoubtedly had not an officer of engineers. Every confi dence is felt that your gallant corps of veterans will move with vigor and endure the necessary fatigue. and though they had had a tedious march from White House Landing. Hancock received the following You must make every exertion to move promptly and reach Cold Harbor as soon as possible. commanding the Eighteenth Corps. Kershaw's. and succeeded in capturing some five hundred prisoners. formed on attack immediately to their second line. At that point you will take position and re-enforce Wright on his left.

though the musketry firing. right underneath Sergeant. whichi continued at intervals until morning. A good many missiles of After receiving orders. and Ninth did not reach the ground until late. and not put into execution until half -past 4 o'clock the next morning. was as follows Hancock on the : . holding the lines from Cold Harbor along the road running south to near Parker' s Mill. . as no explosion ity. though he had been ordered to form in the rear in support of Warren. the road. and in time to hear the very heavy firing in front. very fortunately in. rank with the famous charges of history. which had been the early morning. This gradually extended along the whole line. but thought he would rest easier in some other local The missile was probably a solid shot. but from the fact that the three corps the Second. and in . a shell struck a caisson on the right and another missile of some of the road and blew it up to be a shell struck on the left of description supposed in the dust . We were awakened about half-past 4 by the sounds of the battle in the shape of cannonading on our left. 259 vicinity of the prospective battle-ground about 7 o'clock of June 2d. This charge on the early morning of June 3d deserves. we moved on up to the this character passed over our heads. over which the long lines of glistening it A drizzling rain . this order was suspended. and for a time Burnside was on the extreme right.Major Huysman. front. was reclining followed. to which the writer was attached. Fifth. half an hour was perfectly terrific.COLD HARBOR. one respect. who at that place. The formation of our line in this closely contested battle terrific in left. uneven ground. as it cooled the air and allayed the dust yet in places it rendered the ground. On the night of the 2d considerable rain had fallen. As Company M. under General " Baldy" Smith Warren came next. On his right was General Wright' s Corps then the Eighteenth. was falling and a mist hung above the low. still more unstable. An attack had been ordered at daybreak that morningJune 2d by the entire army. halted and sand. had now practically ceased. He did not wait for it to ex plode. marshy at best.

On with a cheer went the brigades of Miles and Brookes.260 steel HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. the sec ond line of battle . The first lines came upon a sunken road filled with Con This they carried with a rush. were seen to move. followed closely by those of Byrnes and McDougall. many of whom were captured. went Owen and McKeen's troops. quick firing of the almost pickets instantly indicated the nearness of the foe. Birney's Division was the rear of Hancock's command. supporting the other two.O \>%$& V^ -VSSVi* r their right. xs^*^<i*tfKiffli^/Tirt'" On to&p / ^ ' --J. with Tyler's and Smith's Brigades in advance as skirmishers. the graycoats federates. .C-FIEI. flying in all directions. The sharp. while the roll of musketry between the intervals of artillery firing indicated the advance of the other corps on the right.

The gallant leaders. on the left and left centre. Considerable clatter was made no doubt by the in- . forced them back. The position had been inspected dur the an officer. Colonel O. but the enemy coming up en masse. and we had reached what was supposed to be the ground for the fort. and the lack of sufficient support. Along the centre the Sixth and Eighteenth Corps carried the front line in splendid style.. H. who supposed that he would ing daytime by in a line of We lay down farther to the front be able to guide the party directly to the spot at night.COLD HARBOR. fell dead in their midst. Alas the victors of a moment only Brooke and Byrnes. caused the line to retreat. successor. and no very important advantage was gained by the enemy. having discovered our abandoned line at Totopotomoy. Morris. the latter mortally. all were killed outright. works until 3 P. to build a redoubt. On the right the principal fighting was done by Burnside. his Colonel Haskell. swept their colors while death was staring them in and planted the face. 261 either side. and Colonel McMahon. The night was intensely dark. capturing some prisoners. and at dark we were ordered to move to the left to a point which had been designated during the day. had come up with the Ninth Corps while they were retiring. forward with a shout heroic three the lines. but not their guns. an enfilading fire of artillery. but as a fact we passed beyond and really moved out some twenty rods in advance of the lines. and had also struck the flank of the Sixth Corps. on the enemy's breastworks. The Confederate General Doles was killed in this engage ment. as we supposed. the former General Tyler. It was a gallant ! ! Then skirting a swamp on charge. Colonel Mcseverely. Keen.M. when we moved and assisted in constructing a line of rifle-pits. It appears that the Confederates. We moved along in the darkness to a position held by a certain Michigan regiment. right on to the enemy' s works. of the Sixty-sixth New York. but a heavy advance of Confederates under Hill. were both wounded. bringing the greater part of their prisoners. with his colors in his hand.

redoubt without delay. on their part. in speaking of this day at Cold Harbor furious fire a broke out the two came on along evening that in no lines. Going with me to the front Do you see that big tree up of the hill. who. The Confederate reports. : ' there " ' ' ? Yes. how down laid flat on the We found the ever. there one of the most terrific fires of artillery ever ex happened " all hell perienced by the command. and the greater part made for the rear at a faster gait than even double-quick time. for instructions.262 trenching HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. At it was found that this position was wholly wrong. and a number stopped Firing became quite general all along the line on Word was sent to General Tidball. tools. regiment whose line we expected to reach. speak of being attacked at this time from which it is fair to con* elude that at least the greater part of the firing was done from the breastworks on either side.' I replied." Colonel Gould. Some. sent word that the de tail should return immediately to the spot and build that there. directly in our front. and the position abandoned. Says General "As Walfffcr. Inspector. This was supposed to indicate an attempt by an unseen enemy to carry our lines in the dark with a rush. sup posing we had reached the place he had intended and desig nated by his inspector for a battery. though very quietly and cautiously. about 3 A. " Got bedabbed from head to fut. gives the following account of the affair "I was ordered to re port to Captain Miller. This was done. Miller said.General of General Tid ball' s staff. . and as he expressed it in his broad Scotch. both sides. now so near together many cases pickets could be thrown out.M. for suddenly. who had command of this detail. It sounded as if was let loose. ground." We were ordered to lie down and then to get back to the lines. : . It was during this escapade that Lieutenant Watts fell into a pit not of his own digging." This misadventure of our regiment was really the basis of a supposed attack on both sides of the line. and some very vigorous language was indulged in by the General.

COLD HARBOR.
"
'

263

Well, let the left of your redoubt rest there, build for three guns, and put a curtain on the right.' " I and see the Let us
'

"

said,

go up
'

place.'

'

No,' said Miller,

you have

all

the instructions neces

sary.'

" At night we moved out, advanced beyond the lines, and were driven back by a terrific shower of shot and shell. We, however, returned, as directed, and found the place

designated by Captain Miller. About 3 o'clock in the morning out came the Third New York Battery to occupy these works. Of all the hard words I ever heard used dur ing the war, the words called down upon this piece of work were the hardest. According to the map which the Captain of the battery had with him, the fort was faced the wrong way. The guns were moved back under cover of the hill, and we went to work to correct our error. "As soon as it began to be light and we were dis covered by the rebels, they opened a very brisk fire upon us. We were compelled to hug the ground, and finally to dig out a trench next the works, throwing the Lieutenant Hamlink was wounded dirt over our heads.
at this place.

" In the early morning General Barlow came down to the works with Colonel L. O. Morris, of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery, on an inspection tour. Colonel Morris was shot and killed about one hundred feet from our works. General Barlow came on, and into the hole,' as he called
'

it,

and down into our inside

ditch.

He came along hugging

the ground just as we were doing. After expressing his mind very freely in regard to the position, he asked how a man was going to get out of it. He was told that the only way out was over the brow of the hill in the rear, and that the only possible chance to get away with one's life was by running. General Barlow was opposed to this sort of
himself. He had on high top-boots, one of which he removed, and held this boot up out of the ditch with his head bent over. He kept this position for several minutes. I offered to go over the hill with him, but he declined and ordered me to stay where I was. Finally he

movement

264

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
the slowest

made a break from the ditch, and he was not man who made that run.

" General Tidball put in an appearance soon afterward and gave orders that the redoubt must be constructed in a differ ent position, as at first intended. Orders were given to go back to the woods and cut logs, and not to stop work under any circumtances. " We had about ten logs cut when the Johnnies dis covered what we wore doing, and opened fire with all the guns they could bring to bear. The shells came so thick and fast that it would have been murder to stay there, and every one was ordered out, an order that was very quickly

Captain Brown, of Company H, got ahead of me and took shelter in a washout. I got be hind him, using Brown as a sort of breastwork, and he actually had the audacity to ask me to exchange places with him. After twenty minutes the firing ceased, and we immediately started up the hill with the logs that had been cut. We constructed the fort, though a good many of the detail were wounded in the operation. Fred Coldmorning is the only one whom I now remember of my own company that was killed, but my impression is that there were others. For the benefit of those who were not at Cold Har
obeyed.
to the
hill- side

bor, I will explain that, after the first night spent there, observation went, every man, every officer, and, so far as

my

had a hole
with
all

This was universal in. the line of works." The original detail for the construction of works had in cluded the entire regiment, but after we had formed line one on the 3d inst. we were divided into two reliefs of them was occupied as already described, and the other slept in the intrenchments all night, thinking themselves very fortunate. The writer was among this latter num
in the

ground to sleep

who occupied

;

ber.

With Sergeants E. O. Gates and N. C. Parshall, seated against the breastworks, we discussed the war, the military situation, and other topics far into the night over our pipes. But what was our disappointment, about 4 o'clock of the
4th,

when we were

aroused, ordered to get breakfast imme-

COLD HARBOR.
diately,

265

and were then sent out and relieved the detail who had been engaged during the night. We had to work all day in the open daylight, in the face of the enemy's fire. This was especially annoying because of the sharpshooters,

who were in carefully lo cated positions, and af ter they had the range, seemed almost sure in
their

aim.

The works

were on a hill in plain view of the rebel lines. While we were going into them a number of bullets

came over. The writer was slightly in advance One of Sergeant Gates. of these missiles came directly by and struck Gates in the right arm
I near the shoulder. missed him when we reached the breastworks,

and looking back, saw him walking to the rear,

LIEUTENANT EDWIN

0.

GATES.

the blood streaming down his coat. The wound proved fatal, and one of the noblest, most self-sacrificing young men one who went forth to the war purely through patri

was lost to his friends and country. His commission, awarded on account of excellence in artillery practice while at Fort Ethan Allen, came to the regiment the very day he was shot.
otic

motives

Ah

!

never a sound was heard or penned

all human bearing As the bullet's crash that strikes a friend From your side and leaves you staring.

So past

I

remember one such

hellish sound,

When

a gallant

life

was sundered

;

And have

often thought of that ghastly Whether fate or heaven blundered.

wound,

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

'Twas a score of years and more ago
I heard that deadly singing Across Cold Harbor's morning glow,

And
It

still

the sound

is

ringing.

must be true that the reaper Death Delights in the richest reaping, Else many a soldier now had breath
That
in the

ground

lies sleeping.

So, boys, a cup to the braver dead, Though the old-time tears o'ercome us, But hate to the sound of the crashing lead

That took our loved ones from

us.

So accurate was the aim of the sharpshooters that day, that it was only necessary to step in front of one of the embrasures, and then instantly step aside, to have a ball

come directly through the opening. The writer tried this experiment and others did also, and one man an officer had the straps of his right shoulder cut by getting in front of the opening at the wrong time. Nevertheless, a number of the boys worked on the crest of breastworks in fact, it was necessary for some one to do so most of the time during the

John W. Sweetman, afterward promoted to Captain, was one of these, and he had a very narrow escape from the bullets. Several of the detail were killed and a good wounded. many Practical joking was not entirely neglected during our "At Cold Har stay at Cold Harbor. Says Major Knower
day.
:

bor, one of the assistant surgeons, in order to secure himself from flying shell and shot, dug a hole about six feet deep

near the top of a small hill, in a comparatively safe local Three of us placed our ity, and ensconced himself therein. selves on the hill out of range of his vision, and whenever a shell burst in the vicinity, we would pick up handfuls of In the gravel and throw it down on the hidden surgeon. him a number of we heard narrow escapes evening, relating that had befallen him during the day. " Another time, some officers had erected a tent for shel in ter, proximity to a tree, the tent being connected with both tree and ground. Several of us held back a limb of

COLD HARBOR.

267

the tree and bided our time. As a shell exploded over head, we let the limb spring back, and as it struck the tent, the officers, thinking a shell had struck them, emerged from the bottom of the tent on their hands and knees, and scat
tered in all directions, to the amusement of the spectators." Though the charge of the previous morning was the only
battle fought at Cold Harbor, yet the skirmishing stant nearly the whole of the time we lay there
;

was con and that

battle itself, if we except Spottsylvania, was perh- xs the bloodiest of the campaign, our loss being in the aggregate

about thirteen thousand. General Grant has stated that he always regretted ordering that charge at Cold Harbor. The artillery, and particularly that of the Second Corps, was a very important element in the work performed. General Tidball's report, covering the period from the time we left Totopotomoy to June 12th, will be read with
interest.

important change took place on June 1st until after all the batteries were with the infantry with dark, drawn and the whole inarched for Cold Harbor, which was reached in the forenoon of the next day. Nothing of im portance transpired on June 2d. On the morning of the 3d an assault was made upon the enemy' s works at daylight by the divisions of Gibbon and Barlow. The success was but partial. Each of the division commanders had two bat teries at his disposal, but only one Dow's was used. It was my desire to have had more in action, although, from the nature of the ravines and woods, it was difficult at that time to find suitable positions for artillery. The result of the movement was the establishment of our lines of rifle-

"

No

when

enemy. At some The conse were not over points they fifty yards apart. quence was a constant fusillade and an unintermitted sharpAs soon as possible Sleeper \vas put in position shooting. on a commanding knoll a few hundred yards in rear of Gib bon's right, Gibbon's Division occupying the right, with Barlow on his left. Dow and Clark were posted on a ridge a short distance in rear of Gibbon's left. Still farther to the left and in rear of Barlow's Division, Roder, Brown,
pits in close proximity to those of the

268

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

Burton, and Edgell were put in position. The enemy were not long in discovering these dispositions and opened heavy fire upon these batteries, which was vigorously returned, and at intervals during the day the cannonading recurred. Furious attacks were made by the enemy in the fore part of the night, but they were repulsed. The batteries, con were in the on alert, prompt stantly opening fire. At the officer of the the of commanding request Eighteenth Corps, McKnight was ordered to report to him, and being placed in a hot position was engaged until evening, when, having

expended his ammunition, he was relieved by Ricketts, who remained in position with the Eighteenth Corps until

TIDBALL'S BATTERIES AT COLD HARBOR,

the 8th, using his battery with good effect in the frequent attacks made by the enemy during that time. The Fourth

New York Heavy Artillery was moved up and formed part of Gibbon's second line of battle. Two of the Coehorn
mortars under Captain Jones were brought into requisition at very short range. Having during the day selected more advanced positions for batteries, soon after dark strong parties from the Fourth New York Artillery were set to

work in constructing works, and, although interrupted by attacks from the enemy, succeeded in constructing secure places for Sleeper and Edgell on the right, Dow and Clark in the centre, and Arnold on the left. These batteries were placed in position before dawn on the 4th. " It was found that, owing to a slight mistake of posi the works for Arnold's Battery had been placed about tion,
twenty-five yards too far to the front, and that it was diffi cult, if not impossible, owing to the fire of the enemy, for

COLD HARBOR.

269

Ms men

work the guns, and it was still more difficult to get in or out of his battery. To overcome this difficulty I had a new work thrown up at the proper distance in rear,
to

.and running a sap to the first one succeeded in

drawing back the guns. This new position proved eminently suc cessful, and Captain Arnold was highly commended for the The Coehorns efficiency of his battery while occupying it. had likewise been placed in the salient which approached near to the enemy's works at the McG'ee House.' It is scarcely necessary to remark that at such short range, and
'

than

being so skilfully managed, they could not be anything else The batteries remained in the position just effective. described until the night of the 12th. Scarcely an hour or this either time that some of day night, during passed, have occasion to fire. On the 5th a new work them did not was built on the left of Arnold and occupied by Burton Ames at the same time relieved Arnold, who was with
;

drawn
"

for rest.

On

the 8th,

Gillis,

moving around with Birney's Divi

sion on the extreme left, engaged a rifle battery, with which during that and the succeeding days he had considerable
practice."

FIGURE FROM CURTAIN' IN THE SHELTON HOUSE.

CHAPTER XX.
CROSSING THE JAMES.
lay in the trenches at Cold Harbor until Sunday, June 12th. During this time no very memorable in cidents occurred, though, saving the short period on the 5th, when a truce was made
for the purpose of

burying the dead,

Mitchell,

picket-firing was kept up. Concerning this truce, we give the words of Major who was one of the actors in bringing it about
;

he says
cock, I

:

By direction of General Han a of truce with Colonel Lyman, of accompanied flag General Meade's staff. The point selected to put out the flag was on the Mechanicsville road, where our pickets are very close to the enemy's. Found considerable difficulty in getting the flag out, as the pickets were firing at each
5t7i,

"June

1864, 5 P.M.

and were close together (about two hundred paces), sheltered behind trees, but after considerable delay suc ceeded in getting the flag out by calling to the enemy.
other,

Major Wooten, Eighteenth North Carolina Infantry, met Colonel Lyman and myself a truce was arranged by us to continue for one-half mile on right and left of us during the time we were out with the flag. Meantime the firing con tinued on other portions of the lines. General Lee being absent from headquarters of his army, we were obliged to remain between the lines until nearly 10 o'clock at night Had a long talk with Major before we received a reply. is a who Wooten, good fellow, and other rebel officers. All as extremely desirous that the war themselves expressed should terminate. I think the hard knocks we have given them this campaign has a little sickened them of the
;

CROSSING THE JAMES.
1

271

Yanks.' While I was out with the flag (about 7 o'clock), heard a furious cannonade and musketry about a mile to our right on the Second Corps line, and upon my return to headquarters found that a round shot had struck Captain McCune, Assistant Provost Marshal, Second Corps, who was standing at the door of General Hancock's tent at the time, and mortally wounded him. The shot and shell raked the headquarters fearfully and scattered all servants, team
I
sters, etc."

the 6th various details were made from our regiment On the 7th all the men who had been de tached with the Sixth Corps artillery trains were returned to duty with the regiment. We drew rations on the 8th. General Grant having changed his base of supplies from
for fatigue duty.

On

Fredericksburg to White House Landing, some delay had been made in consequence in the matter of issuing rations, and on the march from the North Anna many of the boys had gone forty-eight hours without food. On the 8th our rations included several extras, issued by the Sanitary Commission. Dried apples, pickled cabbage, and potatoes were found a very agreeable addition to the hard -tack and salt pork. We lived high for the rest of the time we lay at Cold Harbor. On the 10th everything was very quiet, and but few shots were fired along the line. Those in need drew clothing, and rations were again issued on that day. On the llth part of the Second Corps were relieved and moved back to the rear. We also drew two days' rations, and there were rumors of a move. About 2 P.M. of the 12th we packed up, fell in line and marched to the eastward some two miles, where we joined the batteries there we No one seemed halted, cooked supper and awaited orders. to know the direction in which we were going.
;

About 9 o'clock, " Fall in, boys !" was heard, and we fell in and marched all night, saving such interruptions as were incident to travelling with the artillery. We marched with very little enthusiasm, only cheered by the fact that we were going still in a southerly direction it was a dreary We crossed the Richmond and York River night's march. Railroad and the Chickahominy at Lowbridge. It was

272

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

about 10 o'clock when we halted for the night of the 13th, in a large clover field, about half a mile from the James
River.

one day's rations on the night of the our wagon train before crossing meet llth, the river. In this we were disappointed, and consequently were very hungry, as well as tired. The clover field formed an excellent resting-place, and the morning of the 14th found us in excellent spirits, saving that every man was inquiring of his neighbor if he had not extra rations to loan or sell. Another fact may be noticed at this point. As usual on a forced march, a good many men straggled from their companies, and some of these never came up. They

We had drawn only
and expected
to

were reported as having been captured or killed by guerillas who hung upon our rear. One man named Martin, of Com pany M, was said to have been found with his throat cut. When the rear of our regiment, which at the time really constituted the rear guard of the corps, crossed the Chickahominy the pontoons were loosened on the north side as Company A left that bank of the stream, and as the south side was reached and the pontoons swung into the current, horsemen appeared on the shore and fired at us. About 10 o'clock of the 14th we moved toward the river about two miles, where we stacked arms, took off our accoutrements, and set about cutting the road through woods some three
miles in length. It was after sunset when we got through, and we were told to make our coffee quick, as we were
liable to

ever,

move at any moment. The difficulty was, how we had no coffee to make, and as a result a good many

of the boys set out on foraging expeditions about the coun try to see what they could capture by way of provender, with various results. The next morning found us with ap

unappeased and no sign of the provision wagon. to Wilcox's Landing and encamped. The four members of the mess to which the writer be longed made a solemn compact to procure provisions that day or die in the attempt. One member of the mess Soles was detailed as guard at headquarters. He was very assiduous in preventing any thieving on the part of the
petites

We moved

CROSSING THE JAMES.

273

other soldiers, but he himself procured a chicken, hiding Another member Cook succeeded in his haversack. in digging a peck of young potatoes before crossing the river. Several of the companies of the regiment were de tailed to load and unload the artillery on the transports. The writer had charge of a squad in unloading artillery on the opposite bank. despatch boat came to the temporary wharf, and going on board strenuous effort was made to find some bread, but without avail. Finally the old black cook offered to bake a loaf of bread for a dollar. About that time the boat started, it was said for Port Monroe, but after going down the river for three miles it returned, for tunately, about the time the hot bread was done. The fourth member of the mess had procured some fresh- water clams, but they proved to be a failure. " Some of us Says Dr. Robinson, of Company C dug up and ate fresh-water clams, and some of Charles' tentmates stole a ham from the transports which carried us over. I received a slice of it, which was very acceptable." We worked all night of the 15th and until about 10 o'clock of the next day unloading cannon. The transfer of an army so large as that commanded by General Grant, with all its equipments, in the face of a sagacious enemy familiar with the territory, was by no means a slight under taking. The pontoon bridges on which the larger portion of the troops crossed were two thousand feet long, and were quite a triumph in that kind of bridge building. The boats in the deepest part of the river were anchored in some fifteen fathoms. General Grant had hoped, in the outset of the movement, that Lee would come out of his intrenchments, but this did not prove the case yet, as was antici pated, as soon as the movement of our army became known, a corresponding movement was begun by the Confederates to harass our columns. The total loss did not exceed four
it

A

:

;

hundred, however, including all casualties. In the order of march, the Fifth Corps, preceded by Wil son's Cavalry, led the advance across the Chickahominy, and then went into position, masking the movements of the
other corps.

Our

corps,

which followed, marched

directly,

274
as

HEAVY GUNS AND
seen, to the

LIGHT.
it

we have

James River, striking

at a point

below where the battle of Malvern Hill was fought. The Sixth and Ninth Corps moved by a longer route, cross
a
little

ing the Chickahominy at Jones' Bridge, some six or seven miles below Long Bridge. The trains made a very wide detour, going south some twelve miles below, where they crossed at a ferry. The Eighteenth Corps returned by the same route they had come to the White House, whence they took transports and sailed down the James River to be
joined

by General Butler. General Lee, discovering the position of General Warren' s Corps, concluded that the movement was to be in that direc

Richmond, and accordingly abandoned his position and fell back across the Chickahominy in the vicinity of the city. During the afternoon of that day Lee sent an infantry force of Confederates down the Newmarket road, who made an assault on General Warren's line. The movements of the artillery, with which our interests
tion toward

were connected, are thus
report
:

set forth

by General Tidball

in his

On June 12th preparations were made for the march to the James River, and immediately after dark the whole army withdrew. The Second Corps, crossing the Chicka hominy at Long Bridge, arrived late in the afternoon of the 13th at Wilcox's Landing on the James, and on the suc ceeding day the crossing by steamers was commenced, and at 7 A.M. of the 15th all the infantry of the corps, with McKnight's, Clark's, Roder's, Benton's, Gillis', and

"

D wight's

(late

Arnold's) batteries, had completed crossing
line of

and took up the

march

for Petersburg.
I

By

direc

tion of the Major-General

commanding,

remained back to

superintend crossing the remainder of the batteries, am munition, and other trains. This work was completed and everything in motion on the road by 10 A.M. on the 16th.
train

The labor of embarking and disembarking this immense was performed under the most disadvantageous cir cumstances by the Fourth New York Artillery, who worked with a will and constancy creditable to both officers and men."

CHAPTER

XXI.

THE HALT AT PETERSBURG.

HE continuous labor

to

subjected for forty-eight hours

which we had been had ren

dered the regiment entirely willing tomarch. The detail from Company D, with Coehorn mortar batteries, had gone for ward the previous day, but the rest of us were kept loading and unloading artillery and getting the horses over the river.

sounded to fall in. about 10 o'clock A.M. of the 16th inst.,
so
call

And

when the

every man was in his place, the only loiter ers being those who had gone some dis tance from the regiment on foraging ex
peditions.

The day was

bright,

and the road, though sandy

in

many

places, afforded pretty firm footing the greater portion of the route. But if the heavens had been painted with the
softest and most agreeable tints, and the road had possessed the firmness of cut granite, we could not have enjoyed that march. We were not in a state of mind to enjoy anything of an immaterial or jesthetical character, owing to the state of our stomachs. The sky, the foliage, and the landscape generally, enlivened as it was by the moving columns of

may have

few miles, with vistas of the river, been very interesting the notes of the birds the have been way may very musical but neither along sounds were nor of sights any special interest to us, for we were hungry.
soldiers, and, for the first
; ;

One of the boys, by way of emphasizing the intensity of " raw his feelings, said he believed he could eat a dog with the hair on." And one man in Company F who had caught

hoops were all off. except that it was a town south of Richmond. a place of which no one seemed to know very much. and besides she hadn't any. that is already captured. it is true. Provision had been made for supplying the necessities of Hancock's soldiers in this respect. yet. in fact. the transport which the Colonel had as cogent as those given seen unloading not being freighted with rations. you are mistaken Petersburg hasn't been captured .276 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and were being issued . It was said that we were on the way to Petersburg. a garter snake held it up by the tail in triumph as he moved along. taking up a position where the City Point Railroad crosses Harrison' s Creek." " that Colonel Morgan had reported to General Hancock the rations had come. : 1 ' you. There were plenty of provisions. " Why. The reason why these rations did not arrive were aboutby Mrs. didn't we have an official despatch read ?" to us near Spottsylvania to the effect that Generals Butler and Gilmore had captured Petersburg . and if all is quiet at that time the ferriage of the rest can be continued and they can join ." when. assuring the envious beholders that he was pretty well fixed for one meal at least. where we now have a work. Jones for not loaning her " Because the tub. no rations had arrived. you will rations. General Hancock had re " General Butler has ceived the following despatch been ordered to send to you at Windmill Point sixty thousand So soon as these are received and issued. After Bar low has crossed you will advance as much of your artillery and ammunition train as possible up to the moment you are ready to move. she had just loaned it to a neighbor. about twenty -five miles. before our corps had crossed the James. move your corps by the most direct route to Petersburg. It appears that about 10 o' clock on the 14th inst. with several railroads leading into it from the south. but in this case there was a wide distinction between the provisions and the rations. but no rations. " No." 11 Why." said one.

. forming the advance. Unfortunately. At any rate. 277 Army be. General Birney's Division. I'm in favor of that. The rumble of distant battle had been heard at intervals during the last twenty-four hours. it appears.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG." capture " Well. if they have anything to eat there I never was so frightfully hungry since I was born. did not begin until after daylight of the 15th. on the 14th inst. to the works captured by the . this success was not followed up.. the sounds could be heard for a long distance. had decided to capture Petersburg. under Gen eral Smith." " " That's it. at sunset. General Grant. The advance of our corps. from Cold Harbor. from Broadway Landing. It . kept growing hotter and hotter. General Smith thinking it wiser to hold what he had than. The skirmishers advanced under a sharp infantry fire. and doubtless put the enemy on their guard. This was June 16th. under whose direction we were moving. " Yes . capturing four guns and six hundred prisoners. on June 12th. as the movement of the cavalry under General Kautz. came up." said another they are waiting for us to the city. and similar sounds were distinguished with greater distinct ness as we advanced. The pontoon bridge not being muffled where they crossed the Appomattox at Broadway. they found the Confederates in their intrenchments some two miles outside the city limits prepared for their recep tion. carrying the works. without having gained the Petersburg railroad. by attempting to reach the bridges. and received orders to move on Petersburg at daylight. it appears." Another of our discomforts that day was the heat. though not precisely to the let ter. by way of White House Land The corps reached Bermuda Hundred ing. of the but haven't you seen the papers since ? The James were not as successful as they hoped to ' and they are now bottled up ' at Bermuda Hundred. to lose what he had gained. . There were several sunstrokes that day. and for this purpose had despatched the Eighteenth Corps. The order was executed. until shortly after noon it could not have been less than one hundred degrees Fahren heit in the shade.

some not even awaking about sunset to the sound of heavy firing in our front. except two ears of hard corn found in a corn-crib." appears that General Meade had ordered an attack at 6 P. came the order " Fall in. this. under General Potter. had in a most brilliant charge carried the lines to the left of those captured yesterday. Eighteenth Corps in the trenches. supported on the right by two brigades of the Eighteenth. at the disposal of General Smith. We had heard no musketry. securing four guns and some six hun dred prisoners.M. But the writer remembers eating only some of the bones of that chicken referred to in the previous chapter. It was too late and too dark by the time this relief was completed 11 o' clock p. so that the Second Corps did not move upon Petersburg until this morning." and we moved It when the Second . M . We learned afterward that a di vision of the Ninth Corps. most of us fell asleep. immediately placed No advance was ordered. and Ser geant-Major McVicker writes that he positively went three days and four nights and a portion of the fourth day with out food. but the troops were simply used to relieve the . After partaking of such sumptuous fare. Corps. We marched southwest some twelve miles on the Prince George Court-House Road and bivouacked. There is an apocryphal story that somewhere on this road we drew a quantity of hard-tack and coffee from a Government wagon. however. for Hancock' s troops to advance.M. We were awakened the next morning before light.278 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. indicating " That battle was on once more. for the reason that the works had been carried solely by the bayonet. when General Eagan's Brigade captured a redoubt. About 5 A. These were the sounds heard by those of us sufficiently free from fatigue to keep awake that evening.M. and on the left by two brigades of the Ninth. of the 15th with General Gibbon's was Division. and while cook ing coffee heard the boom of a single cannon directly in our front followed by cheers. capturing three redoubts and driving the enemy back along the whole line. made a very brilliant assault. and Eighteenth Corps about 6 o'clock P.

I am going to give them a shell " As he uttered the words a bullet struck him in the left temple and came out by his right ear. when a brigade. K. and by works captured from the enemy. by the Court-House. dropping the shell with great accuracy into CAPTAIN D. made a charge just to our left. SMITH JONES. P. I think of the Ninth Corps. " Sergeant. Their sharpshooters were conse quently on the alert. hastily said. In going to the ammunition box for a fuse I found the cap tain dead. very close to the enemy's lines. and all was over. of Company D. says " One other man and myself worked the right gun of the section that day. the The Coehorn Battery had been located near the Hare House. and around to the right of our lines. perhaps.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG." : ' ' ! : . shifting over to our front. Mead. quiv ered a minute. one of the best officers of our regiment. and had done splendid execu tion." John H. we learned of the en of the gagement of Company D with the Coehorn mortars on the previous day and death of Captain Jones. the Confederate works. Burnell charge of the am munition for the mortars. Captain Jones and I were sit ting on the ammunition box conversing. hand me a fifteen and a half second fuse. " I had Says Sergeant H. Captain Jones arising. iorward some 279 some five or six miles. He dropped. " They were repulsed and driven back on to our battery. Here we halted about half -past and rested until eight While lying here night. and Captain Jones had given positive orders that not one of the men should show his head above the breastworks.

After one such to see the effect of the and nearly every more of the captain. as it thus took him longer than it otherwise would have done to make an observation.. They saw no : Says Lieutenant S. who said that May 17th. a fact which may have contributed to his death. section of the command the captain's head was seen. when Coehorn mortars opened at Petersburg. Colonel Ransom ordered ten marksmen to fire at the cap tain. He was slightly short-sighted. man of the detail fired. who was observed to occasionally raise his head after SIEGE or PETERSBURG the fire. I. N. where he was buried in a garden. 1864. More "I commanded the centre Coehorn Battery. Corporal Silvester Simpson states that he helped carry him to the rear. which was commanded by Colonel Ransom. at Wilmington. command. Colonel Allcock. C. a few years ago met a member of the Twenty-first North Carolina." .280 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. which could be heard. and was with Captain Jones when he was killed. Lieuten ant Bradt subsequently had the remains taken up and car ried to his former home at Saratoga.

marched about through the woods. with . until by daylight we had a very respectable rifle-pit. dry at the time. when we clambered out. but so straight that a. until we reached the ravine into which opened a deep trench or run. was about midnight an order was received directing us to hold it when built. fell in and marched to the a short distance. Brown. were detailed as a working party to build a line of rifle-pits to the rebel outer line. we shouldered our mus left : kets. offering complete protection on either side. and had worked all night like beavers. and extending to the right and left in single file. until we reached a place some two hundred yards from the enemy's line. as his outline was seen against the sky. under command of Major Williams. at a point not far from the City Point Railroad. Up this narrow defile. gradually growing more and more shallow. but the limited number of shots convinced us that the force in our immedi ate front 11 small. G. B. and at 3 o'clock in the morning this order was followed by another assigning us to a position in the front line in a charge to be made from our rifle-pit at 4 o' clock. Although originally sent out merely to build the line.way. began each man for himself to sink holes and gradually connect them. as subsequent events proved it to be. which came directly down from the rebel lines and formed a sort of covered way. a few feet apart. F. C.THE HALT AT PETERSBUKG. indicated that our presence was known. but about dark a detail of five companies. it really seemed as though we should have another night' s rest. 281 and the Some time in the afternoon we had orders to put up tents. under command of Major Williams. An occasional but harmless shot at an officer. we crept as noiselessly as we could. As soon as it became sufficiently dark to partially conceal our movements. and commenced The movement is to dig a trench extending to the right. To men who had marched under a broiling sun all the day before. and H. who had command after Major Williams was wounded " Scarcely had we laid out our camp when Companies A. then numbering about five hundred men. and then up a ravine. thus described by Captain A. and. solid shot traversing it length wise would probably have killed every man in it.

and after a brisk but brief fusillade. if executed. excavated from side to side to the depth of three or four feet. but it was manned only by a picket line and but few shots greeted us.' and Captain Me Keel and the other company commander on my right followed suit. double-quick. was the crest of a knoll and protected by a dense fringe over just of abatis. and the The three companies crossed the first rebel line at an angle. Nevertheless. march. in addition to their fatigue and hunger. " The enemy's front line. and entitled them to artillery instead of spades and muskets." . and which ran parallel to the line already taken. would have sent us running along parallel with the ab atis. and facing to the front we swept down on the second line of rifle-pits.' which. By the left flank. nothing to eat and little to drink. and we all expected at least a respectable salute when our troops came in sight. this last order was not particularly welcome. which from that day until the close of the siege of Petersburg defied every attack upon it. which was nothing more or less than one of ' those public highways so common in Virginia. for some inscrutable reason. exposed us to a flank fire and delayed our silencing what little fire there was. the order Left oblique. a halt was ordered. we remember the ever-exasperating fact that their contract with the Govern ment exempted them from such service.' as steady a went over that earthwork as ever marched across the parade ground at old Fort Ethan Allen. as it ap peared to us then. " I gave my own Company H. which was in the centre. movement of the two companies on the left directly to the left caused a break in the battalion. And yet this fact did not justify the order which just then came from the ' left. when the order came line ' Forward. its occupants took a hasty departure. and there we lay in that road for several hours. while a line of earthworks grew up to completion before us. but it was soon closed.282 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. This line was also feebly defended. " Crossing this road we were just jumping a fence upon the other side when. at the point we struck it. nor was this at all surprising when.

and our l : was considerable. who as Lieutenant had command of Company G after his brother. and we expected to move at once forward. saw. when McKeel turned and said coolly Boys. C. his face lighted up with excitement. Thomas. when an order was given to halt and re-form in the road. but from some unknown cause did not until afternoon. that he. the Johnnies would have found a solution for the difficulty. Francis Mul len. E. and filed back into the road. The battalion was re-formed in the road. About twenty men of the companies on the right had passed this opening. was wounded " The Lieutenant had gone into the charge with but one : which was. James Weller. as he went over the first line of rebel works. get back into the road. must be the first man of it to mount the Johnnies' works. loss . Pat Colgan. ' ' ." Says Major William Knower. John W. * ' along the irregular line by his side ran a Corporal. This determination. Acker was killed Marcus Richtmeyer. of Company B the road was bordered by an impenetrable hedge-row. being commander of the com pany. and throwing it down. the mouth firmly set. Of my company. with here and there a place to pass through.' We snatched a Johnny reb out of the bushes. Alexander Van Loan had the stock of his musket splintered in his hands. he deliberately picked up another and went on as if nothing unusual had happened. by a bullet. . doubtless. who was secreted therein. that unconsciously arose from his knowledge of what officers always did in books was unclogged by any thought of what was to be done after reaching his goal but. a ball striking him in the forehead. his hand firmly closed upon the musket on his shoulder. S. and the . and First Sergeant James were wounded. : 283 " The west side of Says A. Knower. he cast a glance idea. Captain Jim McKeel was the only officer through the hedge A braver man I never at this time in our part of the line. Passing by the Hank of the company. We had faced a steady but not heavy fire from the time we scaled our works.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. had he succeeded. John Kearns. One of his men was instantly killed by his side. the eyes turned with an angry glare toward the enemy.

and in answer to the signal the battalion. and shouting. a crimson spot broke out upon the Corporal's fore head. as we subsequently discovered.284 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. to his astonishment. As the officer looked. said The Major is wounded I am in com mand the battalion is alone in this charge it can do noth ing without support I am going to lie here and wait for orders if none arrive. where. was the difference in distance and in the condi tions of the ground in front of the attacking forces. of the at the to the left rear. a heap of lifeless clay. edge Captain. as the curtain of vapor was torn apart by the discharges of a battery. his face turning to a sickly white. and watched the smoke. Wondering that such a happy idea had not suggested itself. While . a line of troops were lying with their colors planted along the front a background of foliage showing in strong relief the gay hues of the flags as their silken folds streamed out in the sunshine and seeing no signs of advance. the Then the canister from which whirred over their heads. Bewildered by this change of programme." The real cause of this halt and delay. motioned him to lie down. to be heard above the tumult. sprang to his feet. the Lieutenant obeyed. the bat talion seemed to have disappeared. that. The Captain. broke for the road. . The next instant he found himself in the advance. shooting out in continual jets. who watched him with anxious eyes. whole form of the man alive with energy. Turning to the men. Possessed by his ruling thought. . for it had taken cover. he motioned to the rear. the Lieutenant could exercise no pity at this sight. he stood irreso amid the flying missiles. a brave. lying at his side. the dead hand still grasping the musket.' For ' : . when. looking field. seemed to boil as it hung over the enemy' s intrenchments a low damp-looking em bankment of reft earth. who lute. . and. about eighty yards to the front and some time the two officers lay catching occasional glimpses of his battle-flag. I'll take the responsibility and get the men out of this as soon as God will let them go. utterly unconscious of them or of the deafening noise. . cool-headed officer. until he was joined by the Cap tain of the left company. rising as one man. and turned to cheer on the company. he fell head long to the earth.

any minute. In a few minutes more another saucy zip picked the comrade on Parkhurst' s left. while the Fifth Corps to the left of the Ninth had a still greater distance to go. 285 our corps was not above three hundred yards from the enemy's front lines. Why don't you get out of that ? said one. of my own company. After the orders had been given for an advance in the morning so many delays occurred on the left that General Meade fixed the hour for a simultaneous attack along the whole line at 12 o'clock. the men spread their shelter tents upon temporary supports and dropped to sleep from sheer exhaustion." " While the Fourth Says a member of Company H lay thus in battle line. . we had met with compara tively few casualties. resting on its arms.' boys. ready for the spring to the work. We may be ordered * ' ' ' ' ' to charge Zip. and carried two lines of works. both of whom were severely wounded.' down about as flat as a man can spread himself. turned a little and pressed C. Parkhurst. crash.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. and the third bullet with ugly hum rubbed T.' it does seem to be clipping close. I Well. too. " " Up to this time. was : kindly removed for treatment. C.' was the reply. such as Captain Edward Knower. and he. or endeavoring to secure rations for their commands. careless of the occasional stray mis siles which zipped about their ears and cut down their tentofficers poles. and so we had the pleasure of seeing the breastworks built and guns ar ranged for the murderous execution of our boys to follow. were taking observations. though we had charged nearly half a mile from our original position. This had the effect of stopping our advance. and First Sergeant Theban. but among our losses some of our best men. a bullet with spiteful zip came from the left and made its unwelcomed introduction to the leg of a com rade lying to the right of T. guess lay low. and here is my place. " The was and while some of the morning intensely hot. and who was borne to the rear. that means said one of the that fellow will fetch a bead you." says Captain Brown. on you next. the Ninth Corps to our left had to ad vance nearly a mile. I'll and T. Parkhurst. of Company Gr.

Parkhurst is pleas antly enjoying labor and life home at Canandaigua. dead man. In the instant of the commotion at the bushes Blodgett sprang to his feet. in a spontaneous Old Ship Zion..' and our friend turned himself.286 C. and a sensation as though some one had violently kicked the knapsack was felt by Parkhurst. when the charge was renewed. ' No. when whang went the gun of Blodgett and a sudden commotion behind that clump of bushes. come here be ordered forward at once. that Johnny is hid there. ped down to the ground. No. used to sing. ' ! ' : ' ' ' through I'm going to try my shooting-iron.15 P. in a red cedar. we may earnestly called. and when he pokes that gun ' ' ' ! ' . for I've been watching for him. The bullet had pene trated the knapsack and bored half through a package of writing-paper and then deflected and fell harmless. dropping his head behind the knapsack and close to the cedar. was as follows A hedge and rail fence skirted the west side of the road and was located on the bank several ' !' : . At this instant Blodgett. it won't do to break the line. I'll show you a thing I have got the range of that fellow who is after you. yielded." The situation in our front at 12. all being quiet but this one sharp gun ner.' Come here. to the left and rear of our line ? Yes. and in a little while he'll poke his gun through that hole in the board and draw another bead.' sprang itself from the lips of the soldiers. or you are a splinters fly. C. Park. bringing his knap sack toward the sharpshooter. that fellow has got the range on you. Hallelujah and drop way.M. get out of that. I can't. come insisted friend Blodgett. who was lying a little to the rear. and no more intrusive bullets came that way. when the friend said Do you see that little clump of bushes with a little board in front off there. Blodgett was after ward taken prisoner and died of starvation in Andersonville. whirled round and broke out in the chorus of an old song he frequently. C. when the fourth zip broke the stillness.'s HEAVY GUNS AND head and buried ' LIGHT. while T. and T. and the boys had a little free con gratulation that that annoying sharpshooter had been si lenced. making the Parkhurst.' In a few moments the ominous nozzle of that grayback's gun appeared. and all was still.' Well.

as it was fully three feet high and uniformly covered the ground. Though the general order for an advance that day seems to have been fixed for 12 o'clock noon. feet 287 above the roadbed in which most of the field of grain beyond the fence sloped gradually asleep. Sergeant A. when they carried Grady back he died almost immediately afterward. to prevent the enemy from getting between the river and our right. Adams. A murderous fire greeted the advance. This was a defensive movement.M. in fine which earthwork they were busy getting cannon in position. yet Birney's Divi sion actually renewed their movement before that time. Henry McBride and James Lyon were and most of the others wounded. Grady. . which the farmer boys of the command pronounced a very . however. J. In Company F eight men only had volunteered. and a request was made in each company for ten volunteers to act as an advance skir mish line. P. This field ascended to within a few rods of the Confederate works on the brow of the hill. Each of the remaining three gained a tree. and finally . the men fell in. when he received a shot through the body the other two. One of them. but managed to get off the field. killed instantly. Not far from 8 A. P. and shortly after the skirmishers at the command " Forward !" passed the hedge and scaled the fence with a cheer. was dry. growth. recovered. Lockwood had gone about fifty feet from the fence when he was struck by a ball between the second and third ribs on the right side. Van de Wiele was assigned to the command of this line. Five of these were killed outright before they reached the timber. but the men who remained unhurt never faltered. which. kept firing till the line of battle came up. of Company F. Cronk.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. for the most part. Captain John B. the missile passing entirely through the In Company A . In this belt of timber A men were lying a heavy line of Confederate pickets was located not above fifteen rods from us and beyond this was a field of corn. to a narrow strip of woods bordering the bed of a stream. was shot through both thighs. loaded and step ped out to shoot a Confederate in the corn. T. Stone and C.

Scott Hay. Earl S. and dropped forward on his face. after leaving the road. : day. He did this twice. Only . Our skirmishers de ployed and drove the Confederates out of their ambush. June 18th. In our front.M. Homer De Silva. he would fire at the Confederate skirmishers. Erickson. and kept that position until the opening itself was reached when. S. This was about 10 A. and I called to him that he would get hit if he did not move from in front of that opening but paying no attention. Our main line advanced about 4 P. I was one of the ten volunteer skirmishers called for to advance before the battalion moved out of the The others of B Company were Wallace Bullis.M. and while in the act of putting down a cartridge. . who was next to me in this charge.. in advance an evergreen hedge and some trees in which the rebel skirmish line was located. turn around with his back toward them. Peloubet was one of this detail from Company A who retained his posi tion unharmed all " Our Says A. A. Michael Murphy. about it is. of Company B company was on the extreme right of the line. The next two men Masterson and Erickson and my self carried him to the rear. that to all appearance he entirely recovered and has been an active business man since. about-face. was killed Morehouse. back was carried by two comrades. instead of taking advantage of the hedge on either side. he was struck in the back under the left shoulder. through one place in which all our company skirmishers There was also another hedge ten or twelve rods passed. in John conjunction with the Fourteenth Massachusetts. John Sheridan and John Morehouse. was a hedge. and then called on his men to rally around the colors. Thomas. and a singular thinu. and near the Appomattox. J. . and fire again. on turning around to reload as before. He was directly in front of the opening in the second hedge. a little in advance of the second hedge. Tip road. reload his piece.288 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. He right lung and coming out below the shoulder-blade. " The Colonel commanding the Massachusetts regiment ordered his color-bearer to move out in front of the hedge. Hay. The third man to my right was John Sheridan. Mat Masterson.

Knower. I do not remember any second line of battle upon our part of the field during the earlier part of the charge. Thuringer. The sound of the whizzing bullets : . Kirkwood. of Company Gr. the enemy commencing to fire the moment we rose. Philip Briody." Corporal and Angle. the Fourth Heavy. privates Foley. Just as we struck the timber Major Williams received a rifle ball in the shoulder. Wellsey and Wixon. Dougherty.' always ac customed to obey orders. and the ball opened. were killed. and falling near me ordered me to assume command of the battalion. and our battalion very nearly covered the rebel front be tween these guns. and the following wounded Captain E. Stone. The firing was terrific. Sergeants Smith. Wright and Wood. in this advance Morehouse. Kirkpatrick. and a number of others of our com pany were struck. it seemed perfectly evident that the charge would now prove a disastrous fail ure. had seen some of the guns moved into position and the troops deployed behind the breastworks. but when the order was given. but the main line pushed on and out into the open corn-field. though we felt we were marching to certain death. Jones. Murtaugh. I did so. James W. our five companies form ing part of the front. Reaching the belt of timber we found the picket line halted and firing from behind the trees. Miller. Delanoy and Thurston privates Branigan. To those of us who had anxiously watched all the morning the preparations for our reception. and I certainly was not informed of any in advance. and we were glad enough to be ordered back to the road again. scaled the fence with a cheer. turning my own company over to Lieutenant Edmonston.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. C. and. Mapes. Porter. Pyle. Alfred Wright. Hibbard. Corwin. and a part of our battalion. " The advance from this Says Captain Brown point was to be made in two lines of battle. perhaps in what appeared to be angles of their new works. " The enemy had posted two pieces of artillery. more. 289 a few of the regiment which the brave officer commanded moved forward to the color line. Weed. Conley. : ' . I shall never for get the hurricane of shot and shell which struck us as we emerged from the trees.

for just as I ordered the men down he ordered a retreat. When we left the road the colonel of some regiment on our left joined us with his color-guard and gallantly accom panied us as far as we went. but it was not so understood by the former.290 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and exploding shells blending in awful volume. My order was intended to embrace officers as well as men. I at once gave the order to lie down. Then for the first time I understood the fierceness of the fire to which we were being subjected. ' ' . to which we were entitled. and every frightful and sicken ing incident. He must have discovered the futility of a further advance about the time I did. conspired to paint a scene which no one who survived that day will care again to witness. calmly facing him and awaiting further orders. I remember perfectly well my thrill of admiration for those brave men as I glanced for an instant up and down the line. if we had been supported. and as the Hanks of the battalion came out in full view and we were within about one hundred and fifty yards of the rebel line. and under the combined orders the men at once disappeared in the corn. but a cross fire from troops and artillery on the right and left of our front. saw that we were receiving not only the fire from our front. and looking back I discovered that these five companies were the only troops of all the charging lines that had obeyed the order and left the sunken road. and followed that with an order that each man should get off the field as best he might. Accordingly. which would have been directed toward other parts of the charging lines. torn and bleeding. Men. still a target for the enemy. and after the men were out of sight there stood the line of officers. mingled with the shouts of defiance which greeted us as we neared the rebel works. with the ends projected toward the enemy. and realized that with this little handful of men it was worse than useless to continue the attack. fell headlong from the ranks as the murderous The shrieks of the wounded hail swept through the line. and there planted his flag in the soft earth. seemed like the terrific hissing of some gigantic furnace. I was astounded to see that there were no troops on either side of us. " The belt of trees formed something like an arc.

HARTWELL C.D.. TOMPKINS. M. . SURGEON FOURTH NEW YORK ARTILLERY.

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as giving some idea of the severity of the fire we faced. and a few days later being at General Hancock's headquarters I was intro duced to that distinguished officer by Colonel Tidball. killed in this charge. The rebs seemed to have a special grudge against that tree for be fore night you could not place your finger on the body for eight feet that was not pierced by a bullet. ' ' that afternoon. . I counted twenty-four shot and shell marks on the side toward the enemy on a little pine-tree not more than eight inches to the through at the butt. that on returning to our lines. and that the battalion lost." A. we wr ere unattached to any brigade. had to provide for nearly one hundred wounded. and lying down by the side of a wounded comrade. Thomas: "I was particularly favored with S. from which I kept up a constant fire. one hundred and fifteen men. General Birney being temporarily in command of the corps . acter of our loss may be inferred from the fact that Surgeon Tompkins. it being a cedar tree at least twelve inches through. and the general told me that he had witnessed the charge through his glass and recognized the men who made it. according company reports. " Thus ended the charge of June 18th. as they went out under fire at close range with fly tents. but I The char speak only for O' Connor (deceased) and Cuyler. By their action several were saved." " Lieutenant Says Adjutant Parkhurst Cuyler Edmonston and John O'Connor (Company H) were entitled to special credit for getting off the wounded after the charge was made on the main line of rebel works. and performed nine capital operations . Says cover that day. Your humble servant also bore his part with them in such service. : and wounded. During this charge we were under the command of Gen eral Gibbon. and he spoke in the most complimentary terms of the steadiness and gal lantry of the battalion. they would roll him on to the cloth and then jump up and run with him back into the woods.THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. 298 but it was no time for a dress parade. " I may add. and I immediately ordered them down. with one assistant.

a blot in the annals of war fare. The charge of the afternoon." "with three thousand gunners. while the fianks became covered by the retreating fragments of regiments whose organization had been lost in the fiame and smoke. after remaining a short time inactive. which we especially remembered from the bayonets on their can non and from the timely assistance they rendered our bat talion at Spottsylvania. full force of concentrated fire. but their relative loss stands as a pall in a lurid sky. will defend ays Napoleon. deserving to be ranked with the bloody blunder of Balaklava and the Grecian loss at Thermopylae. Five minutes of this work was enough.a fortified capital against an army of three hundred thou sand men. because it is fre . and abandoning its at tempt. fixed nine hundred and fifty-five members of that regiment moved steadily forward. quently impolitic to give them prominence. Second Army Corps. and were seemingly without advantage to our cause. Fourth Division. we were charg " ing fortified works. Fifty thousand national guards. which was continued in por tions of the line till darkness set in. the column. Says Major Knower "As the head of the heavy column : With bayonets met the disappearance resembled the thrusting of a solid mass into a blaze that continually consumed its substance. That afternoon. the First Maine Heavy Artillery. But such acts are not always lauded in history. Some of the regiment who did not participate in the charge witnessed it along other portions of the line. without firing a shot for five minutes."" The exalted bravery which in obedience to 'duty leads men to face certain destruction at the cannon's mouth has no parallel it is beyond comparison. formed the front line of an assault ing column of the Third Brigade. . The results were not less bloody." They did not accomplish more. their ranks were no braver and their fallen no more to be cherished than ours. probably not as much as our battalion. was the last of the three .294 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and retired with six hundred and thirty -eight officer sand men dead and wounded on the field. As at Cold Harbor. its retreated into cover.

including those of the Eighteenth Corps. fifty killed .THE HALT AT PETERSBURG. days' assaults so continuous and desperate on the intrenchments at Petersburg. at eight thousand one hundred and the author of .'' estimates our losses for the three days. in his Campaign of the Army of the Potomac. " Were they without result ?" says ' ' and wounded. All true. but the sacrifice was heavy. 295 " Grant and his " To the unCampaigns. to remain sountil the end of the war we confronted the enemy closely and kept him in his lines and we threatened his right. That night our regiment was relieved and lay in the sec ond line of rifle-pits resting and recuperating for the next two days. . re quiring him to make a greater extension in that direction. City Point was secured as an important base and depot. but this is an erroneous estimate." military eye it would seem that we had gained nothing . probably. We had taken some firm steps and accomplished some important results. General " Humphrey.

[OR the purpose of illustrating the variety of our work. on July 28th Company K. was also ordered to the lines of the Fifth Corps. and some of the men of a facetious turn indulged their humor mildly by inquiring. details meanwhile filling up such light batteries as were depleted from any we were brigaded the latter part of June with the regular engineers. and on July 14th ten companies (ten hundred and cause. Details from the other com panies were sent to various points along the line. Company H.CHAPTER XXII. Abbott com manding. " Whether the best artillery practice could be secured by handling spades and picks ?' However. THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. Lieutenant McPherson com manding. Company to the right facing the crater. with six Coehorn mortars. known among the soldiers as Fort Hell. Company C. and occupied Fort Morton a little ' On the 29th. and occupied Fort Sedgwick. was ordered to the lines of the Eighteenth Corps. some of the officers became suspicious that our change of service was nominal rather than real. Captain Brown commanding. As the work on the fortifications was kept up by details from the regiment for nearly a week thereafter. . it may be stated that after acting as infantry till the halt at Peters burg. was ordered to the lines of the Fifth Corps. Colonel Henry L. Captain Gould com manding. sevent y-two men). with six four and one-halfinch rifled guns. with six Coehorn mortars. Then for a brief period we laid aside our muskets to man the artillery. were assigned to the siege train. with Lieutenant-Colonel Allcock in command.

occupying Fort Spring Hill. it is true. Colonel Abbott. was ordered to siege train depot. and its whereabouts were only made known to the artillery men shortly before the explosion that morning. but in other parts of their line. on the morning of the explosion. The orders received from General Hunt through the Bri gade Commander. to keep down the fire of the enemy upon the flanks of our columns of attack. were as follows " Upon the explosion of the mine. Captain Morrison commanding. " While we were Says Charles Marsh. of Company occupying Fort Hell just before daylight. issued by General Meade. The general orders relating to our part of the work. near where Company A and the remaining companies had been pre viously sent. were substantially to watch the movements of our troops. covers the ground over which our columns being taken to avoid impeding the Special instruction respecting the progress of our troops. and for the most part filled with an eager expectancy as to the outcome of the profound and horrible mystery so soon to be unearthed. On the evening of the 29th mine. the artillery of all kinds in battery will open upon those points of the enemy's : works whose must move.THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. had either become aware of the movement or had strong suspicions of the fact. of inst. and while lying on the ground I could distinctly hear the sound . was to be sprung at daybreak the next morning. I with others had dropped down. it became known that the which we had heard rumors for some weeks. 297 F occupied Fort Tilton with two thirty-two-pound Parrotts. and by 3 o' clock on the morning of the 30th the men were in position awaiting orders. for they had attempted to countermine not only where the ex plosion occurred. Company M. The Con federates in some way. direction of fire will be issued through the Chief of Artil fire care " lery. and to keep back his re-enforcements. The mine had been constructed with the utmost secrecy. after being at work all night. There was but little sleep that night for the various artil lery commands. we were H : allowed a brief rest.

. Thinking it might be some work about the fort giving a delusive sound. fifteen or twenty rebels were seen skedaddling out of one particular place without arms or accoutrements. and a fuse extending through the main gallery. of picks. save the whispered commands along our own lines. being composed of practical miners. awaiting the signal This is the for assault. thus turned their knowledge to advantage in a military way. . Colonel Pleasants executed the work in the face of grave difficulties. and not a sound of military significance. It is a fact that after our guns opened on Fort Damnation." It is known to most readers of history now that the mine was designed and executed by Colonel Henry Pleasants. and so by that time the guns were all loaded. It was whispered about that the explosion would be ex pected shortly after 3 o'clock.15). seemingly right under us. near which the explosion was expected to occur. five hundred and eleven feet which terminated directly under the Confederate long. and other combustibles. These charges as well as the fuse were packed very securely. I arose and investigated. the gunners in position. was to have been 3. chlorate of potash. it appears. but could find nothing. and the eyes of every man who had sufficient energy left were turned in the direction of Elliott's salient in the Confederate lines. each charged with eight thousand pounds of powder. are now mostly on the ground.20. but half -past 3 came and passed. whose regiment. The actual time. of the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. and I then reported it to Lieu ' tenant Edmonston. Many of the men were now lying down. The fuse was composed of phosphorus. had been located. so that we formed the opinion that they were trying to undermine our fort. Four o'clock came all quiet.298 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. earthworks in two lateral galleries aggregating forty-five In the latter eight magazines. All quiet yet columns of men who had been standing for more than an hour back of our intrenchments to the left of Fort Morton. I called the atten tion of failed to some comrades to the matter who were so tired they become interested. A main gallery was excavated feet in length.' opposite. some asleep (4.

to whom the dice of fortune assigned the advance in the charge. Lieu tenant Douty and Sergeant Reese.THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. military equipments. and the flame went hissing on its terrible mission into the earth. under Colonel Fleming. and yet no sound. Hark A dull. rush back in wild confusion. heavy thud. which at the first sound had begun to file over the parapet and to make their way through the abatis. and the outline of the Confederate earthworks opposite was growing very distinct. and human bodies hangs so like a huge mon ster over our heads that the gunners start back. Ten minutes had now anxiously passed. get in posi The men shake off their drowsiness and take their places. About tion. No sound or sign was discernible along the Confederate works at twenty minutes before 5. 299 lias division of the hapless Ledlie." half -past 4 comes the caution. and Ledlie' s troops. " Ready fire !" and at the command more than two hundred cannon of all varieties of calibre add their thunders ! to the horror of the situation. and the whole mass of earth. a huge black mass suddenly shoots up two hundred feet in the air from the left of Elliott' s salient. and there were a few clouds in the sky. We now know that the fuse had been fired precisely at 3. and it had stopped burn ing at the splice. We also know that two brave men. were evidently in unconscious sleep. and then. occupying the doomed I section of the works. though the east was slightly redden ing. " Boys. The air was a little chilly that morning. and a quiver passes over our lines which shakes the cannon on the parapet. It was fully ten minutes before the dust and smoke of the . is heard. while the earth rocks with a sway ing motion like that which precedes the earthquake. flashes of light rise above it on the sky. not loud but deep. volunteered to go in and relight the fuse. broken timbers. The South Carolina regiments. What was the matter Colonel Pleasants had been obliged to use a spliced fuse.20. Seams of fire were glisten ing from its dark sides. which they successfully accomplished at a point about one hundred feet inside the gallery.

there appeared to be a good many of the graycoats left in their intrenchments. The troops did not seem to move with that enthusiasm presaging success. for reasons heretofore explained. from previous experiences at Vicksburg. and it was some time column of assault moved forward. and they were not long in recovering from the stupor caused by that violent upheaval. where he had caused two mines to be exploded with some measure of success. had hoped for important results in this movement. General Grant. yet none questioned his personal bravery or the courage of his command. an immense . they order. and that the men and officers had kept awake in a feverish expectancy the whole night. Our men picked their way through the abatis and chevaux defrise to the brow of the crater. F. and that the troops knew there had been a serious disagreement in regard to the matter between their corps commander and the generals commanding the army. He had sought to render the project more effec by previously ordering Generals Hancock and Sheridan James River. making an attack there. and the advance was supported by a brave and gallant officer commanding the Second Bri Still the troops did not gade. vision had only been selected for this work the night before. and this may have been due not more to their physical condition than to the fact that their assign state of ment to this important duty was unexpectedly made the night before. who. And owing to the obstructions both in without endangering our after this before the first our own front as well moved without much as in front of the Confederates. explosion had sufficiently cleared away to enable our gun ners in the vicinity to see where to fire the second volley own troops. in advance. There may have been excuse It appears that the di for this apparent lack of feeling. who among had no liking for Colonel Marshall. Bartlett.300 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. drew many of the Confederates from Peters tive to the north side of the burg. There were those our officers. but rather with a dis trust of the situation. who led the First Bri gade and his own regiment. move as if they expected to succeed. Nevertheless. the Fourteenth Heavy Artillery. General W.

We doubled our amounts of powder and lengthened the fuse to reach them. so that when our troops charged they met with so hot a reception they were quickly repulsed. Major William H. move forward!" When they jumped and tumbled into the hole en masse. and jagged blocks of clay. Tiole 301 nearly forty feet deep." The firing of the artillery during the day was not as rapid as in many field engagements. it's no business of ours. Oh. and what promised to be so great a success. and it may be sufficient for us to attend strictly to our own line of duty and keep back their re-enforcements. And they did pause. arms. huddled around the brink of the crater in groups peering into its dark recesses. and ninety-seven feet across. we're not acting as in fantry to-day. they soon began forming just out of range of the shells. and the division commander is not there per sonally to make a change. a hundred and thirty-five feet long. until the Second Brigade was nearly " up. out of the sides and brink of which projected not only fragments of carriages." Special in structions had been given. Why do they not move to the left and right and sweep the Confederate works ? It appears there is some misunderstanding about this. in the face of threatening death. Men. " fire !" " The rebels abandoned Says Colonel Gould everything and fled on the instant of the explosion. not only by General Hunt and the the commander of the siege train to make the work of the .THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. because so much pains was taken in aiming and making the shots " tell. The situation is different from what the original orders anticipated. truly a sight. we're heavy artillery. For there were two hundred and fiftysix Confederate soldiers buried in that gigantic grave. and bodies of men. for want of prompt action proved a failure. but also the legs. Powell. well. He is in a bomb-proof on this side. still we could see : Ready enemy constantly increasing in numbers. to make our men They pause with astonishment. and has to be communicated with by means of his aide. Finding that no troops were coming. and Colonel Marshall yelled. timbers.

and Colonel Wainwright. I had no difficulty in dropping my heavy shells just where the General desired. gave me the whole plan of attack for the following morning. . but also the part that each corps was to take. at the moment of my arrival with Colonel Locke. Chief of Artillery. As it was. mingling with whistling bullets and hand and . was experimenting with some new kind of shells which the enemy had fired at his head quarters he was exploding them in a hole in the ground.302 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. some of Ferrero's command of colored troops did reach a point two hundred yards from the crater in a charge. canister. Indeed. the crater became the target for every species of missile they could send there. He at once took me into the house. And shrapnel. and at General Potter's order the onlv division commander Coehorn shell. Many deeds of noble daring were performed and many cowardly acts no doubt. including not only the part which my battery was to take. that although I could see but a small part of the enemy's line the next morning." We knew but little of the wild dance of death transpiring in that worse than " bottomless pit" opposite our lines. it is probable that we should not have had over sixteen hundred more wounded and some two thousand captured a total loss of over four thousand. Had the crater been bottomless it could not have been worse for the four hundred Union soldiers who wretchedly perished there and if its sides had not seemed to afford temporary safety. and avoiding our own charging columns at and near the crater. surprise. after the Confederates had recovered from their.exploded amid those devoted groups of mangled and dying meri. but to certain batteries of the Fifth Corps. fell grenades. so full and accurate were his descriptions of distance and direction. The General. and producing maps show ing the position of the various works on both sides in front of his corps and to the right as far as the mine. C. : . Brown noon of July 29th I reported in person to General Warren for instructions. artillery as effective as possible. " At 3 o'clock in the after Says Captain A. True. General Warren gave such instructions. his Chief of Staff.

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were suffering such loss that it was determined to retire all but six pieces. they being for them kept the most part captured. comparatively safe from our artil . and hot until forced to abandon them. to call for volunteereto man these. . All of the Confederate reports refer to our artillery fire that day as being very destructive. the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery Captain A. owing to their superior weight of metal. as the situation seemed rather hopeless. D. Captain S.M. and. .THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. But it was then too late the enemy had fully recovered from their surprise.. of Pegram's " The fire of the enemy's artillery was very Artillery. Brown's com mand fired 300 times. more than seventy. lery. from the signal at daybreak till 2 P.five tons of shot and shell by the guns of the siege train alone were hurled A had seized into the Confederate works. : not in siege train proper is wanting. and dismounted or silenced every gun bearing : : . Gould's command fired 267 times. and the guns on the plank-road (opposite Fort Sedgwick). . 447 discharges of In detail the firing was as follows 19 847 of Parrott 4r|-inch guns 30-pound guns discharges 360 discharges of 10-inch discharges of 13-inch mortars mortars 1103 discharges of 8-inch mortars 1037 discharges of Coehorn mortars. Lieutenant D. The data for the fire of Company F and other companies : . present 305 his troops did obtain possession of some three hun dred yards of the enemy' s line. . when the firing ceased. Of our own work." " We knocked down and practi Captain Brown says cally levelled many yards of the enemy's breastworks in our front. says severe. their troops were massed on all sides and were under cover of huge earthworks. few brave fellows of the Fourteenth Heavy Artillery some of the enemy's cannon near the crater. F. C." and Captain McCabe. Pollard speaks of it as "a chorus of death. exposed in addition to the fire of sharpshooters. McPherson's com mand fired 315 times. Of the batteries belonging to our regiment.

As to whether other troops would have been more success in the assault has been the historian of the Seventeenth frequently discussed. there is an interesting piece of testimony from a member of our regiment never before presented." The mine itself and the part performed by the artillery in the bombardment were both eminently successful. except one whose extremely heavy traverse defied all our efforts. investigated the affair quite fully. but will merely re peat what was the common remark. as I understood it.306 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. " In the Says Captain Brown morning after the mine Warren came into Fort Hell. the great end and purpose of all. the office returned and reported that General Meade de: : ful than those who actually engaged ' . not only of the men of our own corps. had the affair been entrusted to Hancock. he called one of his staff officers and sent him to General Meade with the request. Says " Maine The writer will not discuss. upon our part of the line. the result would have been vastly different. though they differed somewhat in their conclusions The former attributed the re as to the causes of failure. was a lamentable failure. that he be per mitted to attack with his corps by swinging it to the right as upon a pivot. and so crossing the enemy's line of works After a while at the point where I had made the breach. a military Court of Inquiry and a Congressional committee. but of the entire Army of the Potomac. inquired whether I had seen any large body of troops in those breast works or their vicinity. As re gards this. while the latter attributed the failure prima rily to the refusal of the commanding generals to allow the corps commander to carry out his original plan. with his veteran corps. and upon my telling him that there seemed to be nothing but a heavy picket line in our front. Two authorized bodies. yet the design of seizing Petersburg. that. sult largely to injudicious formation and manoeuvring of the troops and the lack of a competent head at the scene of the assault.' and seeing General exploded the breastworks levelled for such a distance." It has also been urged that simultaneous movements should have been made at other points on the line.

CAPTAIN FOURTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY. .

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for I had been up all night and took no note of time after the mine went up. BROADWAY LANDING. I may not have given the re ported language accurately. 309 clined to grant General Warren's request. Petersburg would have been taken and the war then ended. but I know that at the time the requests were made the attack as planned had utterly failed. " I have always felt that had the request of General War ren been granted on that morning. that Warren be per mitted to make the move which he had himself suggested earlier in the day. and I remember that Gen Hancock indulged in some terse and vigorous English. but I know the message was somewhat brusque and emphatic. and it was not until some hours afterward that the enemy's troops. and that when he desired their corps to move he would give the necessary orders.THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. 1864. and that Hancock's Corps should occupy the lines vacated by Warren's Corps. This united request was also refused. and if I remember cor rectly the staff officer reported that General Meade had said that those two officers knew the plan of operations for the day. while if Warren was unsuccessful he could fall back on Hancock. and the firing had practically ceased on both sides. cannot give you the hour of the day when either of the requests above mentioned were sent to General Meade. Some time after ward General Hancock came into the fort with General Warren. as I understood it. I have the .. August 4. which had been sent off to their left the day before to meet the Second Corps. COLONEL : By direction of Colonel Abbott. and after some conversation the two officers sent a united request. and were the recipients of the fol lowing communications from the Colonel commanding and the Chief of Artillery of the Army eral I ' ' : HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN. VA." After the bombardment our regiment left the siege train for other special service. so that if Warren was successful Hancock could follow him up. came filing back into such of their works in our front as still remained and afforded them shelter. the movement would have been a success.

A. H of that regiment.310 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. A sent Company K. it has maintained that reputation well earned by its previous services during the campaign. Captain S. In preparing the siege battery. Companies K and C. honor to transmit herewith Special Orders No. was as signed to my command for the siege. Captain Brown. Captain McKeel. with six Coehorns. on duty at Broadway Landing. HENRY L. On the loth ordered Company of that regiment. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. re The lieving your regiment from duty with siege train. J. and Company C. Colonel Commanding HENRY : HUNT. P. On July 29th ordered Company M. C. the depot of the train. of that regiment. 100. In taking leave of the regiment the Colonel commanding desires to thank you for its cordial co-operation during the report to last four weeks. aggregating ten hun dred and seventy-two men. August 3d. to the lines of the Fifth Corps. F.. General. Chief Artillery Siege of Army of the Potomac HEADQUARTERS SIEG^ TRAIN. D. Artil lery Headquarters Army of Potomac. Lieutenant McPherson. Fourth New York Heavy Captain Gould. at the Headquarters are ordered to Companies A and M you at once. with six four-and-one-half-inch guns. Colonel. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. it has taken and in serving its guns six four-andone-half-inch guns Company H. Captain Morrison. Commanding Extract Report of Colonel First Connecticut Artillery. McPherson commanding. ABBOTT. with ten com panies of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. and twelve Coehorn mortars. LEARNED. Gould and Lieutenant D. On July 30th the mine on General Burnside's front was . Train. Lieutenant-Colonel THOMAS ALLCOCK. to lines of Eighteenth Corps. siege train depot. I am. VA. BROADWAY LANDING. August 1864. to report for duty at On July 28th ******** and sent Company Artillery. Brown commanding. B. a prominent part. to Brigadier-General Artillery. with six Coehorns. 4. Captain A. A. Lieutenant A. On July 14th Lieutenant-Colonel Allcock. very respectfully your obedient servant. 1864.

The following table ex hibits the amount of fire of the different batteries under my command 41 during this battle ( : B. was successfully executed. The part assigned to the artillery to keep down the fire of the enemy upon the flank of our column of attack.. 9th Corps front.A. 311 sprung at 4. the assault by the infantry having failed and the attack being discontinued.M... and a heavy cannonade was instantly opened and continued until about 10. 5th Corps front .THE BOMBARDMENT AT THE MINE EXPLOSION. and to keep back his re-enforce ments." 1st L.30 A.M. when it grad ually ceased.45 A.

In relieving this regiment. in the prepara tion of material. the construction of the works. In obedience to Special Orders No. HENRY L. the Brigadier.General directing the operations returns his thanks to Colonel Allcock. Head quarters Army of the Potomac. his officers and men. 4.. General. 100. Commanding Siege Train. I have not been informed of any casualties in the Fourth New York Artillery. ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS A. and thirty-four men wounded. and in the service of the artillery in the battle of July 30th.312 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1864. par. P. the Fourth New York Foot Artillery is relieved from duty with the siege train. respectfully your obedient servant. 1. CRAIG. ABBOTT. for the efficiency. JOHN N. By command of General HUNT. 3. . 206. in the labor and operations in which they have taken part. August SPECIAL ORDERS No. I am. skill. and gallantry they have displayed while under his orders. Colonel First Connecticut Artillery. Assistant Adjutant-General. and will report to the General second commanding corps for orders.

throwing follows : General Tidball speaks of this capture as . the movement of the Sixth. the work of our regiment was of a very varied character. ordered General Birney to advance. the Confederates discov ered that they were close upon the flank of his division. in which four guns of McKnight's Twelfth New York Battery were captured by the enemy. ENTRENCHED. where we remained until the 21st.CHAPTER XXIII.. Before going into the siege train we had some experience as infantry in the The day after the charge of trenches. and General Birney' s troops being so much in advance. thrown out in front of the Sixth Corps line. when. and rested until 5 P. our five companies. was so delayed that General Meade. The next morning we marched eight miles. at about 4 o'clock in the afternoon. having a much longer distance to travel on the left of the Second. This was the day on which the Second Corps experienced a most humiliating disaster. Fifth. as already shown. without regard to the Sixth Corps. we moved back to the field near the Second Corps headquarters. we lay in a second line of rifle-pits. The Confederate skirmishers were. on the edge of a piece of woods. SHARPSHOOTING AND SHELLING. becoming impatient. in considerable force. and Sixth Corps. at that time. crossing the Jerusalem Plank Road.M. and accordingly attacked his left into confusion. FTER reaching Petersburg. This loss was due primarily to the fact that in a forward movement made by the Second. considered in Chapter XXI.

About 3 P. There were some infantry regiments lying be hind the breastworks on each side of the battery and as : . he en gaged a battery of the enemy at a distance of less than three hundred yards. While this battery was vigorously tiring at the enemy in front the latter came pouring in upon the left. Roder's Battery and the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery were sent through the woods to an opening on the left. were anxious to open on the enemy. the enemy made a sudden and heavy ad vance upon the extreme left of the Second Corps line. we also went to work with a will. as we after ward discovered. Gillis. and there formed a new line for Barlow's Division. With the pieces McKnight lost three limbers. and such a reply as we got it was awful. Robinson. D. To check the advance of the enemy. Coming into battery in an opening. and went behind the breastworks to watch the fire of our battery-men. W. and threw the dirt all over us. and soon caused it to leave. gives the following account of the affair " I was sent with a squad of about thirty to the front of of breastworks to help finish a redoubt for a bat the line We found the battery -men hard at work. We were on the brow of a hill. who was one of the party. Solid shot and shell struck the works. and as they tery. by whom they were during the night carried off. which was hotly pressed by the enemy. joined Mott's Division. planted. which partly screened us from the enemy. he sustained no loss in this respect. and were throwing shells into the woods behind us. They had three batteries. and had just fin ished their work when % the charge was made.M. and there being no possible way of extricating the pieces. . The break extended beyond the point where McKnight's battery was posted. they fell into the hands of the enemy. Dr. behind a few rods of land covered with oak shrubs. They did not appear to know that we were there. caus ing it to give way. though the firing was not rapid. We finished the work at last. . in like manner. as his caissons and horses were in rear. The battery opened." Quite a large detail from our regiment had been made to prepare the works for this very battery.314 *' HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and what we were doing. but.

The infantry-men grumbled because we were there without muskets or any thing to defend ourselves with but as it was safer there than a few rods farther back. man got safely back to the regiment that one Saulsbury v .40 gait for the woods. The next day we moved to a breast work on the right. We moved at as fast a gait as practi cable.. with others. and were ten rods behind the skirmish ers. and did so about 4 P. except the pickets. The men were noti fied. but found them all gone. running part of the way through them.M. and several of our men were killed. a member of Company. as it was un tenable. had already gone.M. and begged that I would lead him to the rear. SHARPSHOOTING AND SHELLING. The bullets came over very frequently and dangerously We were ordered close. and all set off at a double-quick pace to the rear. The rebels immedi All but one ately turned the guns and shelled the woods. we waited until a charge was made on the right. 315 the shells aimed at the battery fell thick and fast. as it appeared. a man named with moon blindness Reardon. and the men in the pits rose up and . to abandon the line. battery where we had been at work. leave just then.. I think was taken prisoner. as the Johnnies were quite that the regiment likely to flank us having moved off to the left and rear. and at about 5 P. and started at a 2. ran to the right and lay down as close to the works as pos sible without getting into the pit. not having any guns. as he did not want to fall into thehands of the rebs. since for the time being he could not see anything. assisted in recap turing the battery. fired. ." That night our regiment. a man came from the regiment informing us that we must get back with all possible speed. and reached the line that our regiment had held. the greater number of the working squad. He was attacked Mickey a very strange disorder.ENTKENCHED. except one. It was the fortune of the writer to be in charge of the right of our vidette line that night. We had not been there more than ten seconds when " We thought it was time to we back discovered the infantry whom we had just left running the rebels had driven them out and captured the .. who had halted there M .

of the Third Division. dodging. was at tached to the ammunition train as guard. do ing picket duty. and a few bottles of liquid prov firing The sutler ender of a stimulating nature we thought it the part of pa triotism not to allow the Confederate skirmishers to get it.' I replied. so far as possible. dried fish. Some of the was heard in our front. being very deaf. could not hear the tumult The up. until July 12th. I ' ' . he re I heard that one. He came up and found us hugging the ground I stood closely. was meanwhile performing duty with the mortar batteries most excellent service and Company L. About this time tion lest his stores should be captured. Wood commanding. to be in great trepida he could secure on account of a who seemed boys suggested that if he would give us the stock we would carry it. Major bullets. respectively. cheese. Captain James H. lob sters. Company D. what we could not carry on our shoulders we deposited.' said he.. when Major Arthur was officer of the picket. and we moved west of the Jerusalem Plank Hoad. broke for the rear and we broke for the sutler's As stores. Major. in a safer receptacle. Second Army Corps. By The ten companies remained on the skirmish line. Our regiment at this time was attached to General Gib"bon's command. and the Third Battalion to the Artil lery Brigade of the Second Corps. placing his hand casually on the body of a tree close by. f What are your men dodging so for. Captain Church commanding. in front. Gtrurg ATTD LIGHT. and some bullets came over. and remained there until June 30th. which were to a great extent carried safely off. where we erected a line of pits. Knower ' \ said he. " On June 23d I had command of Says Major Knower : my company on picket. when our battalions were separated again and reassigned the First and Second Battalions to the First and Second Brigades.' marked forcibly. ' don't hear them. before starting. and as he doubled himself down. when we were ordered to ' " Bullets. but he did not take kindly to the proposition.316 HEAVY sutler. the stock consisted largely of eatables canned fruits. the bullets flying thickly over our heads. and. Just then a bullet spattered the tree. as no wagons to remove them. .

" A command was given by the bugler. language. : man. H. and took the chances. I The stable sergeant came around. First Rhode Island Light We found it in park in the rear of Fort SteadArtillery. and performed the service stated in the preceding chapter. McGuire. 317 report to General Hunt. I breathed more freely. The team did not know or had not heard the call. . to act as cannoneers for light batteries.' said he ? . gives the following interest- Ing experience " I was assigned to Battery B.ENTRENCHED. packing everything in wagons and on limber chests. That afternoon we were called out to drill. We came in collision with a caisson of number 2. J.' All right. but in desperation I put spurs to the team and gave them a slack line. 11 l Certainly. 'I respond ' ed. and went to work curry ing that team for two hours. and was placed as number two on the gun. But the next time I was not so lucky. Here I had better luck. The captain used some very pointed stop. I was paralyzed. and hurried to see my horses. They knew the call. and came in all right. hunting for driv jumped at the chance that would beat walking. I soon foiuid out that it was better to be a cannoneer than driver. while the rest of the boys stood by making comments and giving advice. got our horses. I venture the as sertion that it was the best dressing that team got while Uncle Sam owned them. Having al a fondness for horses. with horses and by bugle call. I understood artillery drill. but only when in position field drilling. We soon received orders to march and struck tents. and I was ordered to dismount. was new to me. when shown my team I had ways a procured curry-comb and brush. SHARPSHOOTING AND SHELLING. and if I when he asked me ' understood artillery drill. and would not have traded back on any account. was happy. One of these. and then came the trouble. had to That settled it. you take the lead team of piece number " I l. moved on to the ground. On the 13th forty men from the regiment were detailed to the artillery brigade of the Second Corps. and not being able to jump over it. and no more trouble. . ers. As stated before. hitched up.

and harmonious manner. marching. to Deep Bottom and Ream's Station during this time. General Tidball. From of Captain Clark's Battery. and every man to his special duties. Eddy. our regiment was assigned to the First Brigade. of the First Rhode Island Artillery. considered separately. Captain Miller. and work. says " It will be seen from this outline that all the batteries and the Fourth New York Artillery did within two months an extraordinary amount of hard fighting. performed. One mom- . Hazzard. and a number of the officers made a call on General Tidball. also of the same regiment. by special order 206 A. Even in camp such incidents were numerous. and it was agreed that the regiment should be again united. was Inspector of Artillery for the Brigade. efficient. First Division of the Second Corps. Every officer proved himself equal to his position. Major J. G. We moved to the right and rear of Grant's military railroad. Lieutenant L D. was my Assistant Aide-de-camp. and followed the for tunes of the army during the rest of the campaign. his duties in the most zealous. performed Gordon. After Captain Chase T was wounded." It was not very agreeable to many of our command to be thus divided up and distributed for the purpose of doing infantry duty. when we were assigned to the Fourth Brigade Aside from our movements of the same division and corps. This was different from what I was used to in the regiment. and presented their views to him. in concluding his report of this com mand. Shortly after this Gen Tidball was assigned to duty as commandant of cadets at the Military Academy at West Point. and Lieutenant New York Artillery.318 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. of P. on May 18th. He consulted General Hancock." After the mine fiasco. where we had to carry everything. command the duties of Acting Assist ant Adj utant-General. Each of these officers May 17th Lieutenant Fairchilds. to which we were attached until De cember 3d. of the same regiment. Ordnance Officer. so many other incidents of inter est occurred that volumes could be filled with them alone. Fourth : . assuming eral of the Second Corps Artillery..

in the breast works or on the skirmish line. and climbed was a reckless It while the bullets were back. which relieved D with the " The first Coehorns. when*a doctor an ambulance drove up. They started. etc. Numerous were the de vices among the pickets for drawing the enemy's fire and for getting sight of the marksman numerous the practical jokes played upon the fears of the unwary. secured the . afforded much amusement. After night the scene was grand. across the Appomattox. is especially interesting. when attired with that hat. This was my first view of mortar firing. and upon his return found that he had been relieved of two skylights and a quantity of plug tobacco. we were ordered to load and fire by battery.ENTRENCHED. Were awakened by picket firing in front." A gentleman as to have his on an electioneering trip was so unfortunate works in new stovepipe hat knocked over the breast The firing was brisk. handled. canned fruit. Thomas when all was : away by the shot. everything being quiet.." says Maguire. Knapp of that company ering. which occasionally would send one in of its howling. ing 319 we were camped near a piece of woods. All who were there will remember the Whitworth gun in Fort Clifton. screeching messengers of death. he abandoned his head. had his breakfast set out before him. the surgeon turned a double somer sault backward. directly through a sut ler' s tent. S. night after " I rejoined the company. hat. and the breakfast was upset. however. Sensations were most numerous. rather than risk instant death. SHARPSHOOTING AND SHELLING. The sutler went for one of the Gophers. one of those unwelcome visitors came ricochetting down the ravine.cov As soon as he had gone. we went to bed about 10 o'clock. quiet and not a sound was heard in front. and turning the horses facing the front. and com menced eating. which but the airs assumed Knapp subsequent proceeding. jumped over the breastworks. ly. The experience of Company C. enfilading bright sunny day. carried our line of defenses. " One and Says A. It being pretty heavy. whistling. A shell came and exploded just over the horses. On our left was a siege mortar battery of four guns. and front of Company M.

It was fun for them and perfectly harmless. Johnnie is a There thirty-day furlough. First Maine Heavy Artillery. There is a pass for Rich As their shells would come. After. an hour of this. When it reached our front it would get very heavy. and soon learned from our pickets what they were. I have sat for hours and watched these fireworks after night. we began to slack firing. but always made a failure.320 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. I saw every shell from reb and Yank (twenty-one in all) in the air at one It was a grand Fourth of July display. the pickets (who were but twenty feet apart at this point) stopped firing. once seen time. pass up and down the line. and that a rebel. the Yank would halloo. As our shells would pass over. as we called their fort in our front (Fort Mahone). I remember the first night we saw them they startled us there were so many of them we thought the rebs had got all their mortars in position in Fort Damnation. ing Our battery ceased. while the rebs answered. This sort of thing was repeated on an average twice a week during our stay here in fact. I believe. . perhaps. by Company M. and began to exchange compliments. Yank yell. the rebs not answering the last shot. Our pickets tried it in several ways. the rebs would mond. whenever the pickets on either side wanted to get the morcars at work they would have an understanding with each other. . As soon as the mortars began. bursting over the picket line during the siege in our front. The rebel pickets in some way got so they could imitate a mortar shell with fuse burning in the night by shooting something out of their muskets something I have never heard explained satisfactorily. There was a rebel fort to our left. firing would commence some distance to the right or left. we ceased altogether and went to sleep in our Gopher holes. But as we did not hear them explode we soon felt easy. never forgotten. except a shot every fifteen minutes. If we were slow about opening the rebs would raise a yell that would get us at work immediately. The rebs had eleven in front on this night. I do not remember of but one shell. The fuse burning showed the position of each shell. " After the artillery on both sides found there was noth but the pickets in the muss. ' ' ! ' ' ! .

' His first shot went into the port-hole. and opened on our battery. The rebs were putting in their best licks shells and pieces of shells were flying thick.ENTRENCHED. The rebs ran a couple of pieces of rifle cannon into position in this fort one day in an angle of their works. fort. . They were about to knock us out of time when Battery E. With two on the rebel battery. but could not reach them. he had to cross an open field for about twenty rods to our works. and cheered him every jump. in position in Fort Sedgwick. After leaving the sap road where he left his horse. They had no use for bomb-proofs left. to our left. and were making things hot when we opened on them. and appar ently burst somewhat in rear of the rebel gun his second passed through the same place. He did not call again had seen enough. scattering men in all directions. . A squad of infantry got into an old bomb-proof at our The rebs dropped a fortyinto shell and it. and helped them when we got a chance. killing eight-pound wounding some six or more of their number. the next for exe cution. . He got to our works all right. after that. getting a cross-fire on us. guns they opened ' : " The sergeant in charge of the guns sighted the gun near est to us. One day the rebs were shelling us with mortars and drop killed ping their shells pretty close. A major one day came up to see our officers the battery was in action things were pretty warm around us. . and all drank to the Major' s health. The way that major dodged and ran the We gave him all the advice we could gauntlet was amusing. They called them traps. and burst square over the gun. The boys found he had a canteen of com missary with him. Fifth United States Light Artillery. The rebs told us afterward that one of their guns were dismounted. The rebs limbered up and got out of there. which they got hold of. and wounded. We appreciated the work done by the regular battery. and they had several men . and said This shot for range. think of. . came to the rescue. The second gun on our side did equally good work. our extreme range being but twelve hundred yards. An infantry-man could not be induced to go into one in our vicinity afterward. which was known as the deserted there being no artillery in it. SJIAltPSIIOOTING AND SHELLING.

Getting more bold. Then would be the time for the cir cus to commence. scattering and destroying what had cost him two or three dollars and a walk of some six miles. I guess. would con verse together for an hour or more. giving advice. Frequently some officer shell.322 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. We were in action when he returned. and began to play picket. crowd into one of these holes under ground would be hav ing a real good time. himself and comrades sitting out It was wonderful the side. He got out before the shell exploded. They would get down always. then cover up the chimney. We were down there visiting them. Look out. yet they would throw shell right into our bedrooms. We had played zip. ' ' would come along and order the men to go to firing. It worked all right for several shots. those rebs did not have a particle of respect for company. sticking our heads up over the pits and yelling. amount of Scripture the boys inside could quote on such occasions. meanwhile. No. we raised our breast over the pits and sent them our compliments. It was a Shrapnel picked up thirty odd ounce cast-iron balls in our was a shame the way it mussed up our beds quarters. " Frank McPhillips and myself went out on the picket line one evening. this the tery. We It . giving each other warning before . The rebs drop ped a shell down the chimney. zip. every time we shot. came the little fellows around our ears. My brother one day had been to the sutler' s and procured a lot of extras. As our guns flashed. Johnnie. We found the boys playing cards. He went into the bomb-proof to cook and give us a treat when we should get time to eat. our back to the bat and soon found picket long enough. Some rascal having located the crowd would get a rope and tie the door from the outside. It is needless to say the one who tied the door never was caught. he was not mad just felt a little cross. I believe whatever that is. point pickets and climbing on top of their pits on both sides. visit When not in action in the evening we would each other Sometimes as many as could possibly in our bomb-proofs. way At would often declare a truce. We had no trouble in procuring guns. having a game they called poker. Johnnie was not quite ready had been locating us.

Sharpshooters on the rebel side had never bothered us here. Sharpshooter. Rubbing his eye. and threatened to drop a shell About into our picket line if they disturbed us that night. stopped and said. We were in action. though it made us very tired. Captain Wood was watching the effect of our shots through his field-glass. however. I think. We turned in that night without firing the last shot. awakened we were the heaviest by picket firing midnight we had heard up to this time. It was common with us to look over our works to see the effect of our shots. to have some fun with the rebs. Boys.. In a few minutes our Pennsylvania Corporal came along with three men.and got the mortars at work.again. They seemed to be out of humor. Turning out.' We told him we would not. SHAHPSHOOTING AND SHELLING. and we got brave . When the news of the fall of Atlanta reached us. 323 they began to fire. He received peremptory orders to leave. Before we had fired the third round not a shot could be heard on the picket line. we found GUI' works were being filled by infantry from the camps in our A charge by the rebs was expected by all. This compelled us to keep our heads down for some days. but they soon gave up watching us. this time to get the last shot something Captain Wood declared he always would have. and wanted to borrow one of our mortars to take out on the picket line (four men could carry them). you have got to get out to night. when zip came a bullet. a the line opened at given signal. throw ing dirt all over his face. had our guns talking. They had accomplished their object. I never knew one of those truces being broken without first giving warning by either side. and we were not on the lookout for them. he turned around to Mr. some time near morning of the third night. We got it. as the relief pickets were going out. and coaxed him to go away. On the evening following. One day a sharpshooter strayed into our battery and posted himself. We soon rear. and kept us firing three days and nights.ENTRENCHED. This fellow soon drew the fire of the rebel sharp shooters. We were shelling the rebs one night when it was raining and ' . a corporal of the Fifty-third Pennsylvania. we were ordered All the artillery on to fire a shotted salute at the enemy. and he moved.

In his excitement. An amusing incident happened one day with our Tom. and actually wrote a letter home. The shell struck the bed of No. and jumping on his feet. Dailey and I were working No. he come to. Why. Something was wrong.' Tom no needed second invitation. Looking up over our works. The shell struck within a foot or two of where the other had exploded. started to For God's sake. by lighted fuse. I It was too late half the men had not yelled Gopher time to get into the holes. He was cooking his rations of beans a short distance from the works when the rebs opened with a mortar we had given the name of Camp Kettle. To our right. We private was slightly wounded. ' ! him out and dazed him for a few seconds. where it danced for a ' ' ! . he looked over chat. Some one went to the post and found it deserted. Coming out of our holes.324 so dark HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Yelling All got in this to the boys. had loaded. coming right but broke for the hole at once. My brother was sitting by Tom. over the works. coming directly into our battery. giving details of the affair. tearing the corporal's foot so badly that amputa I believe he died in hospital. Looking straightened up our gun and loaded it again. struck his head against a log with such force that run. having a social When hearing the report of the gun. and I had inserted the friction primer. and the shell we had just loaded it with rolled out on the ground. 1. I again saw a shell coming for us. We had not heard from him. and exploded. inquiry was made for our lookout. when my brother said. ing it it we could barely see our mortars. Gopher The kettle for us. The tion was necessary. time. rolled along to where a corporal and private had taken refuge. 1. turned the Coehorn up on its end.' Poor Tom believed it. the works hurriedly. the kettle struck you square on the head and laid you out. some it straightened When * . moment. and stood at a ready. tipped over. we again made for our holes. he missed the hole. we saw a rebel its shell. The rebel shell after strik ing our mortar bounded back against our works. but stayed on duty. The shell passed to our right and rear. They were mak warm for us. Tom asked what had happened. saying to is Tom. my brother was making a big fuss over him.

This was a son. soldier obeys orders and asks no questions. but in most cases they had taken the goods .ENTRENCHED. Some heads of departments. just to sample the goods. We a mortar for them. which had been abandoned by artillery for some rea One evening about dark everything was quiet along the line not even a picket shot was heard. We soon heard the clatter of a cavalcade of horses going down the sap road toward the rear. had sent orders through Artillery Brigade make some fireworks for the com Our pickets had caught on. when we were ordered to turn out. As soon as the delegation moved out they ceased firing. They did not call again. but after giving us a couple of rounds they turned their mortars on deserted Fort Rice. and sent word through . with goodies from friends at home. to make glad the poor soldiers with a Christmas dinner. pointed we loaded the battery and sent them the whole list at once. The rebs soon answered us. We ! but a private soon had everything ready. we found a num ber of guests had arrived at City Point from Washington. Upon inquiry. we found others had been there before. with their ladies. find to the had rebs surprised got a new mortar in position. and at the command. while the pickets on both sides began to cheer. and fire by battery. SHARPSHOOTINO AND SHELLING. We . . On opening them. could see no cause for it surprise to us. and General Grant had invited them to the front on this evening to see the mortar firing Headquarters to have us pany. on one side. Our lookout told us we dismounted their gun. the rebel pickets to the rebel mortar battery hence their turning from us and sending their compliments to Grant and company. . The fireworks for company was a failure that One day we were somewhat night. Again the order to load and fire by battery was given. A plunge staff and a man went up in the air in plain sight. load. 325 forty rods or more. After a few shots to get range. . Fire away they went. The effect was better than we expected. They were popping shells from this new gun around us pretty lively. no doubt. a little to the left of Fort Mahone. there was a large fort called Rice. They did not trouble us any more from this point that was their last attempt in changing At Christmas a lot of boxes came packed position on us.

He left us wearing the major's leaf. I guess they never were unloaded until they reached Wash We were used as train and artillery brigade ington. we got enough out of the lot for the company. . but advised our a treat quite Soon after the holidays Captain friends not to try it again. and were placed as guards on wagon trains. ward. The sight was sickening. take position the fort. We were ordered to in it. away to the left. Saw five sent to eternity at one time from one scaffold. Tearing up everything. unless compelled to do so by orders. kept posted doings of the regiment whose record we were interested in. . until but after the grand review at Washington guards we the of although being detached. near Grant's observatory. account of expiration of term of was on Wood discharged. While in camp here I went to see some poor fellow executed for desertion. Our mortars in the wagons we had loaded them in when we left they followed Lee clear to Farmville in those same wagons. but for some reason were halted outside and camped for some days finally got orders to build huts. we moved to .326 HEAVY GUNS AND left LIGHT." . to make A new fort. had been built. However.and we never received a report which caused us to blush or wish we belonged to some other regiment on the contrary. best wishes of every man of the company. and with the service. and the sample. we al ways felt proud we belonged to the Fourth. named Fort Fisher. I never visited an execution after .

and there drew rations. secrecy for the purpose of misleading the This attempt at enemy was some- . for daylight in the morning found us not in the Chesapeake. smoking and con jecturing as to our probable destination. The fact was. We camped about a mile from City Point. remained on deck. and took three boats to carry us. which read. when we Washington. We were the last regiment. there must have been a change in the direction of our course. that after going down the stream a few we moved down miles (our boats passing the other boats) we had dropped anchor. and it was cur rently reported that we were going to This seemed to be confirmed by the fact that the river. where we remained in line until the evening of the 10th. " Steam up to Deep Bottom. and shortly after this very important piece of business. while most of the men were asleep. it went on board transports. and many of the boys who were awake. We fell and marched to City Point. DEEP BOTTOM HANCOCK'S CAVALRY. The movements of our Second Corps so far conformed to this principle during the 1864. we received orders to campaign of sobriquet of pack up and get ready to move. and noticed this change. but some ten miles from City Point up the river toward Richmond." It was a beau tiful night." On August 12th our regiment was paid off. During the night.CHAPTER XXIY. is CTIV1TY said to be a chief element of success in any undertaking. that we received the " Hancock's Cavalry. and between 10 and 11 o'clock there came an order.

wharves. many of the boats had to wait in the stream . and had to unload across the others and the largest boat. C. so LIGHT. Companies B. grounded in the stream.M. an order detailing the whole command for the skirmish line. At daylight we were disembarked at the landing at Deep Bottom. and went into position on the Then there came right of the Second Corps line of battle. however. when the regiment was relieved and joined the division on the Newmarket Road. there being but three tedious process of unloading . and bivouacked for a short time in a field near the river. E. where we only remained. and stuck there for several hours. there was a constant showing of lights and blowing of whistles on the river. The rest of the regiment about 9 A. moved to the front. in order to prevent The foremost boat reached the collisions in the stream.328 HEAVY GUNS AND fact that. . until about 12 o'clock noon. The weather was very warm. about a mile off. place designated for disembarking about half -past 2 o'clock Much delay was occasioned by the in the morning. and F were immediately sent out on picket. what thwarted by the many boats being required for transportation. containing a whole brigade. A good ninny . being placed to the left of the First Brigade on the line of battle. some also drew so much water that they could not reach the wharves at all. and we marched very fast.

few feet in front of our guns. bounded over the heads of tain in our rear. where we crossed. H.DEEP BOTTOM HANCOCK'S CAVALRY. July 27th. Captain Brown ordered us to load and shell the woods in front. Here were stationed a few companies of one-hundred-days' men. who told us there were rebels in front. composed of At daylight on the logs and dirt thrown against them. as follows " Crossing the Appomattox at or near Point of Rocks. just then a solid shot from the enemy struck the ground a. General Hancock and staff. he asked to see the captain. sharpshooters began to play on the battery. we being relieved by a brigade. Being an swered. Second Corps. loth the First Division was relieved by the Second. and rolled over the river bank The order to change position was immediately countermanded. the general telling him to give the enemy something I do not believe we had with us. General Hancock and staff rode up. which cooled the air r though it gave us a very thorough drenching. captured four guns. not an enemy in sight. . The general objected to our position . During the night the regiment built a line of breastworks. The fortunes of our boys detailed with the batteries who were on this trip. This position was in the neighborhood of the place where Colonel Lynch. and here I first saw that ani mal called the Monitor lying at anchor in the river. and inquired whose battery it was. with breastworks in the shape of a horseshoe on the bank. Maguire. As soon as it was light. noon a heavy thunder-storm came up. 329 In the after of the men suffered sunstroke on this march. the officers were eating breakfast be tween the limbers and guns. While thus engaged. and our regiment fell back to a piece of pine woods in the rear. and about daylight crossed the James River on a muffled pon toon bridge at Deep Bottom. We camped on the Newmar ket Road. By this time the cap : We was on his feet. Company F was sent on picket in the evening. we continued in rear of the army in the line of works. as well as a graphic account of the battle. In a short time Miles' s Brigade of Barlow's First Division. went into position within two hundred yards of the river bank. are recounted by J. and Captain Brown had permission to stay where he was.

. threw off coat and vest. which was filled with our infantry. Poor fellow Here. The chase was exciting that battery discharged two guns at the charging column when their horses were going at ing. the whole corps being spectators. . filed across our front. came in from the right of our position. so that no accident might happen to our own men from the premature discharge of a shell. our cavalry after them. and with drawn sabre was leading the charge. which soon limbered up and got away. we saw they were holding their lines well gaps were closed up quickly Barlow. and gave them the best we had in the box. and formed for the charge. . his suspenders over hips. and soon a column of cavalry from the right of the timber hove in sight. dis mounted. which always has a very demoralizing effect on troops charg Looking at the column. soon as the column started we changed our ammunition from shells to solid shot. About the same time infantry advanced out of the timber directly in front of the rebel guns. many prisoners and four pieces of artil A telegram was handed lery being the fruits of the charge. to General Barlow about the time the charge ended telling him his wife. they went in fine style across an open As field at this point. We ceased firing. and found a* terrible one.330 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Other batteries nearer to them replied to their fire. We caught the inspiration and gave them a cheer. He did not get back to his command until near the end of the war. and was for some time in the hospital at New York. In a few seconds the round. his wife dead when he reached home. At the command away. It was a grand sight the men were perfectly cool. . " The enemy ran out a battery some distance to their left and opened on a piece of timber on our right. the blow was He obtained leave of absence. ! . and worked the guns to their utmost the column passed into the woods out of sight. full cheer of the Union boys told* us they had been successful. All was anxiety. . and formed line as if on dress parade. It was reported that he became insane. was not expected to live. at New York City. perhaps one quarter of a mile wide. in the height of victory. They were too far off we could not reach them. We pointed our guns for them.

in rear and left of Fort Steadman. our . he allowed me it. and we returned to our old camp at night. Some forty or fifty rods in front of the picket was a house and a fine-looking orchard . in rear of have. and buckling my belt tight. As soon as it became dark on July 29th we withdrew across the river and started back for Petersburg. and apples I must apples. but did not care for any more apples that day. Our boys came on the double-quick to meet me. Some of the prisoners told which the enemy were when he charged me afterward that our battery saved Barlow's column. we remained horses. but no heavy fighting. The mine was exploded. when our boys opened on them and checked them. I had gone but a few rods from the house when my attention was attracted by our pickets motioning to me to come on. drilling and recruiting men and . where . in them. where we to pass out. Skirmishing con tinued all day. I obtained permission to go to the front to view the ground over which Barlow charged. the Ninth Corps were charging these troops were to be used as supports. go the apples. until I had about all I could navigate with. I now put them down to their best gait. I reached the place. We did not have long to find wait to the cause for these troops being here. I was soon on the picket line. Passing over the works. all artillery-men know is a feat not After a race of about one-half mile. filled the inside of my blouse. cavalry took them in and brought them back this practi cally ended the fighting on this flank. I could hear the rebel bullets singing around my ears." for some time. and started back to the lines. everything being quiet in our front. 331 which easily performed. . They were not called into action. I looked around I immediately let to see a squad of rebel cavalry after me. HANCOCK'S CAVALRY. We held position here for a day or two. had eaten all I wanted. Hearing a noise behind. I wanted apples. My legs had always stayed with me. After getting into the woods I found a strong line of works. Promising to bring the picket some.DEEP BOTTOM their best gait. In the afternoon. I got in all right. pulled up before daylight the next morning troops were being massed near the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad.

The detail was not relieved till the morning of the 19th. Companies C. . recrossed the James River. The relief had three men wounded during the twenty-four hours. and a good many exchanges were made of coffee for tobacco and newspapers. M. There was heavy fighting during the day on our right in front of the Tenth Corps. There were no troops behind us. contrast to the animation with which we started on the right of our line was attacked we re-entered our quarters again feeling. trip. but were repulsed with some loss. The pickets on the advanced posts became quite friendly during the early morning of the 19th. H. and marched to our old camp near Army Head Quite in quarters. the army mule.332 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. We were on the extreme right of the Second Corps and located on the brow of a hill. Com Companies A and G on the line latter had the lost two men killed and one picket officer wounded while on their tour of duty. I. That night the by the enemy' s skirmishers. H. Deep Bottom. through sheer weariness. while at panies E. That night our regiment broke camp. On the night of August 16th. and . all the stubborn docility of that most slandered of beasts. and were themselves relieved by E and G on the morning of the 20th. and a part of B relieved C. in the pine woods near Petersburg. K relieved Showers fell on the afternoon of the 18th. from which the Confederate works could be seen. About 8 o'clock that morning Companies A and F relieved the others on picket. and K on the evening of the 17th.

but were afterward ordered to retire by Colonel Spear. and M) left camp to build a corduroy road to the headquarters of the Fifth Corps at the " Yellow House. who may chronicle thus far with any degree of in terest in the fortunes of our regiment. BEAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. commanding a cavalry brigade. and with the First and Second Divisions of the Corps moved off to the left. road. Their loss was three enlisted men killed. was one of the most owing to nevertheless. The night march from Deep Bottom. and proceeded with the balance of the regiment to the Weldon Railroad to tear up and destroy it. which had succeeded in gaining position upon the Weldon Rail . On the morning of the 23d we marched down the railroad to a point within three miles of Ream's Station and again went to work on the road. During the morning Companies A and H. be now prepared to extend to that organiza tion. and took position in rear of the Fifth Corps. under command of Captain McKeel.. and. to the entire command of the gallant Hancock. four wounded. two miss- . have followed this ET the reader. They charged with the cavalry a mile through a clear space and piece of woods and held their ground. fatiguing ever experienced by the regiment the men were in camp hardly long enough to prepare breakfast when they were ordered to fall in. I. his profoundest sympathy. F. the condition of the roads. On the morning of the 22d the First Battalion of the regiment (Companies C. in fact. were ordered to report to Colonel Spear.CHAPTER XXV. for duty." from which duty they were relieved at 12 M.

with myself in command as First Lieutenant. to say the least. Vaughn Road relieved . finding them strongly posted in a cornfield and that the cavalry which were ordered enemy's line. he halted and was afterward ordered to re tire by Colonel Spear and deploy as skirmishers and charge This charge was to be supported by the their position. He to support him had halted at least five hundred yards in his rear. The cavalry com mander. and Company G was formed in platoon on M . he halted behind a rail fence and held his posi tion until ordered to fall back by Colonel Spear. was ordered to march by a flank up a road leading into the ing fired into to deploy and charge proceeded as ordered. who with a bri gade of cavalry was covering our right flank and engaged in sharp skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry. and Company G. cavalry within fifty yards of the enemy's line. bination of circumstances they would undoubtedly have carried out the Petersburg part of the plan that night. bringing with them several wounded was men. In the afternoon they three also suffered sunstroke. Company detailed to cover a position at a cross-road some half a mile to the right. who at times was. who were Spear on the returning from a sharp skirmish. and but for a fortunate com night. Major William B. Knower gives the following account of this affair : Company M. These companies were held in reserve to the cavalry picket. We were to relieve two companies of our regiment that had been under Colonel Spear's orders since morning. We found Colonel Company A. LIGHT. but in very " disagreeable society. but as the enemy showed a disposition to allow him to march into their line without firing.334 HEAVY GUNS AND . Captain Morrison. under command of Captain Morrison. mildly enthusi astic. and when their position. He did as ordered. were relieved by Companies G and M. but after arriving dismounted. intimating that with such help he could go into Petersburg before He got two companies. with forty men. commanded by Captain Morrison. most of them got there on the 25th. However. were detailed to report to Colonel Spear. had applied for a regiment of infantry. and received the Colonel's orders.

though the Johnnies might. or. had they charged us. was to send Company Gr. should it be repulsed. and so took cover behind one side of the fence and commenced popping away. in line of battle. as Mrs. somewhere from the interior of the State. were formed behind another fence on the opposite side of the clearing. to cover its retreat. and there were not three rounds of The next step pistol ammunition in the entire brigade. we marched forward with a very poor opinion of cavalry tactics. I believe. Johnnies' bullets whistling through the stalks at a great and in the most discouraging manner. caught a full sight of the enemy. as the carbine ammunition had been exhausted. We reached a rail fence on the crest. and excited shouting on the part of the commander. either side of the road to support a mounted cavalry charge. 335 " The charge was merely a feint a good deal of display. As the road passed through a defile whose steep banks would interfere with such a manoauvre. marching by the flank straight toward the enemy. and charge in that formation Spear would support us with his entire brigade dismounted. which. the tall corn having obscured the view. there wasn't no sich person. deploy as skir he adding that mishers. just as the enemy's videttes had opened on the column an aide galloped up with orders for us to retreat. and also quietly advising us not to be too ambitious. we concluded the contract was a little heavy for one company to handle. Harris says. He had. who. and We after nothing serious done in the way of fight. regiments in position.BEAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. with supports. In the retreat down the hill I lost fire and strength of showed two full ' . with orders not to deploy until fired upon. fiowever. one of the best and bravest soldiers in the company. under command of Captain Morri son.' We soon got orders to retreat and did so in good style. His name was Tuttle. the ' ' . down the road. As their colors rate. as the brigade had no ammunition. lot. ward learned that it was a bluff. awaiting the arrival of our cavalry brigade to support us. have gobbled the entire At the fence I lost one man. no relative save a sister. and there for the first time. A charge up a hill through a field of tall corn made a very lively experience. rather.

M. and throw rails and ties over on the opposite side. many of the men never get ting another opportunity to draw their rations. and our natural regret at losing the company of Lieutenant Cox was tem pered by the knowledge that we had his share to divide. He found out. and on the 24th rested until noon. We bivouacked that night I consider very remarkable. we were marched into the breastworks at Ream's before Station. burning the ties. which. considering the heavy fire we were under for some fifteen minutes. as seemed to be the usual custom in the army. some three miles below the station. company. These three were all the casualties. however.336 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. all lift at once. with the cavalry. and on the morning of the 24th its com mander told Captain Morrison that he could report to the regiment. We found the regi ment on the Weldon Railroad. with a possibility of being gobbled we arrived. and then rode off with his brigade at a trot. had a glorious feast of suc cotash made from material gathered during the skirmish and on the road by foraging from the field. curiosity. the companies that were not on hand got left. and otherwise making things unpleasant for the stock That night Lieutenants Price and Flint of my holders. who had joined the company but two days before." During the 23d the balance of the regiment tore up the track as far as Ream's Station. leav ing our two companies some three miles outside of our lines to foot it back to safety. In the afternoon the regiment again went on the road and destroyed it to a point two miles below the station. along the track. We made good time. together with myself. one of the detail Brigade after Divisions of the Second of the First and Second brigade would form a each line Corps pass other. At 9 P. and. Cavalry : . a new recruit. engaged in tearing up the track. and suc ceeded in reporting without other loss. During our absence the rations had been served. take hold of the uncovered ends of the ties. another man. " Says Dr. Robinson. and who had been most anxious to see what a fight was like. being shot through the face and made temporarily unable to express further Lieutenant Cox was wounded in the heel.

The writer was one of the detail from Company C for picket. and if it had extended a few feet farther it would have crossed it. and and boards. The next day (24th) we continued our work the same as the day before. nor were they driven in. it suddenly turned toward the railroad. of pine woods. we would place the ties alternately in had preceded a heap until we had twenty or twenty-four piled up. We rested from our labors below the station that night. We laid the rails on top of all. but the spikes which held the rails to the ties. and the noise they made indicated business. and we were beginning to settle for the night when we were ordered into the breastworks and remained there all night. At night we were two or three miles farther down the road. 337 us. which was new. and set the whole pieces on fire. and roasted it in the fire. and enjoyed it as much. Our quarters were in a farmer's front yard. and the only one in In front of it and across the track was a large piece sight. After pulled throwing them over. While the fire was heating the rails we went into the cornfields on each side of us. and they would bend of their own weight until the ends touched the ground. The heat would make the centre of the rails red hot. This breastwork extended below the station some distance. which was in its prime. The building at the station was a small one. which must have been a tie." . and was in the squad which was held in reserve. until. as our men did not advance. firing. We had plenty of salt and pepper and used it freely. with our faces still southward. While we were in the vicinity of the station a severe skirmish between our cavalry and the rebs took place.REAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. and roasting. The cavalry were armed with the Henry rifle. This refreshment gave a zest to our work. Then we took the fence-rails. We waited to learn the result. We continued doing this all day tearing up. and pulled armfuls of green corn. running nearly parallel with the track. posts. on the edge of which was a breastwork about three feet high. at the extreme left. and not only acted as skirmishers. Night found us a little below the station. split and broke them into small and thrust them between the ties.

are going to see Johnnies out there any anyway. We were placed well out to the extreme southern edge of the thick undergrowth. but were afterward returned to our former position in the breastworks on the right of the Companies I and K. and Company F. and the most watchful care and attention enjoined upon us. commanded by Lieutenant Watts. and thirty-six enlisted men. The company lost two officers First Lieu tenant Watts. was sent out on picket to the left. gives the following account " Fourth New York : Company F. but responded with their usual promptness/ It was a dark night. commanded by sent out to picket the right of the were Captain Church. Second Division. as their skirmish line advanced to feel their way and to de termine our position. and the air became freighted with leaden hail. Just about this time a brigade of the Second Divi sion passed us. Lieutenant Watts commanding. of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New York. telling us by Soon voice and manner that the rebels were advancing. of this detail. the enemy broke the picket line to the right of Company F and captured all in it except one officer and fifteen men. who had just been relieved by Colonel Smith in charge of the picket line. saying.' It shortly ' We if there are evi- became . who was in charge of the line. During the night our cavalry passed to and fro through our line and reported large bodies of rebel cavalry and infantry hovering near. and reported to Colonel Crandall. Early in the afternoon division. and with many forebodings of the coming day the vigils of the night were kept. of the capture Colonel Corliss. Our men were tired and hungry. and across the road-bed of the destroyed railroad. Second Lieutenant Corliss. Our picket line was strengthened during the night.338 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Scarcely had the first streaks of dawn illumined the eastern sky when our cavalry out posts dashed through our line to our rear. Heavy Artillery. At daylight on the 25th we marched to a point a short distance above the station. Quickly finding us we exchanged compliments. the cautious tread and officers' commands were heard. and our passage through the woods was slow. was detailed for picket duty.

The writer informed him that our am- "About General Gibbon's munition was about gone.iyonet. The rebel skirmish line charged Affairs now became lively. which af The Confederates must have dis forded some protection. but our losses were slight. so hunger asserted its demand to be satisfied without avail. Other portions of the line by this time had become discon nected and contracted. We us. rode up and gave orders the that to effect our position must be held. From a prisoner captured we ascertained that the force in our immediate front upon the skirmish line was General Wade Hampton's cavalry dismounted and fighting as in They tried several times to drive us from our posi fantry.' He * replied. covered this fact and placed two cannon just under the crest of a hill on some elevated ground. our right resting upon the old road-bed. and those who ran that they might light another day straggled back beyond our line. We still held the The firing angle. l>. for upon their firing the solid shot scattered our breastworks like kindling wood. and the rations had been consumed. and the rattle of musketry an unending roll of vast. with no probability of receiving more. To our left. but Our suspense regarding the re tion. The line was now straight ened out by an advance from the right.REAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. contimious sound. of staff (I think). if it cost every life there to do it. but we of the Fourth spread out and covered the ground. 339 dent that they found some. the cannonading was terrific. as the rattle of musketry be came loud and incessant. and from which their buildings sharpshooters kept annoying us. then. sult of the fight to our left against the main line was increased. and it seemed to us our rear. About this time several Hold it with the ambulances came . was incessant. that was now seriously threatened. as we had hur riedly constructed a rude breastwork about us. countercharged and drove them beyond some upon that stood to our right. 4 o'clock in the afternoon Captain Porter. Very soon the brigade returned through our ranks and joined the main line. unsuccessfully. and cut off the trees about us as if they were pipe-stems. now that we discovered our ammunition was be coming exhausted.

I think. At the same time the rebel cavalry charged and captured all of the second post. Says E. the relief came. though the movement of troops. geant company on the posts to our right. firing with great rapidity. which had been hastily constructed by the Sixth Corps and Wilson's Cavalry in July. To the In front the ground was com right was a wooded tract. the railroad. On sufficient to conceal places the south the timber extended nearly to these intrenchments. " Fourteen of us were on post with one ser in the of balance the command. It sacrifice any more lives. It seemed this time as if our little band was surrounded by a circle of fire. We were re lieved and started for the main line. so we gave in and left were soon hustled to their rear. and old Hancock and ' .' line to our right and was useless to Our ammunition was now gone. seemingly in larger numbers than before. died in prison. prisoners. A number of our men fell. " Ream's Station is located twelve miles south of Peters burg. The had already been gathered in. the front extending north for some seven hun dred yards. The drivers reported that onr forces were getting worsted in the battle. The Weldon Railroad at this point runs west of the Halifax wagon-road and parallel to it. as he never came back to us. Shortly the rebels be gan to shout and advanced. wounded. the angles crossing these roads and extending eastward. not unlike a horseshoe in shape. They were almost upon us. but with a cheer and It was but a little while later rally we kept them at bay. and. west of southeast. He was taken prisoner. bushes and brush in many with paratively clear." Thirteen of the pickets of Company F escaped. Johnny Daily said he was going back to see what had be come of the company. his corps. was an old line of intrenchments.340 for our HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Cronk : . when another attack was made. The rebels' well-known yell ^as interspersed with cries of Surrender. About 5 P. after the station is passed. both curving to the In the open.M. Yank no use hold ing out. but with little ac curacy. On the morning of the 25th it was General Hancock's ap parent purpose to return with his corps to the Petersburg B. We uns has won the fight.

The work was a trench. Major Knower says " In the morning we marched north through and beyond the station. which space was in the form of a tri angle. etc. with rails. the height not exceeding three feet. it must have been counter manded. stakes. halting a short distance out.BEAM'S STATION lines. was the result of an order. fell in line and started in that direction. enclosed by the railroad embankment running due : . added in places to raise the embank- 5*e- *vaHP JK ?s. and in some places there was no protection whatever. as the line soon halted and countermarched to the old intrenchments mentioned..r BATTLE OF BEAM'S STATION /P GOf*S4/V fi #er&/ ment. after drawing If this rations. and then were countermarched to the open space immediately around and behind the church. In giving his account of the battle. 341 as all the troops about the station. AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE.

however. the persistent popping of small arms being occasionally punctuated by the sound of a heavy gun but as all this firing was very distant there seemed to be no About possibility of our having to take a hand in the fun. Dur ing our march.342 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. accompanied by an increasing the advanced rattle of musketry. over the stagnant water that had collected in the shallow into line ' Johnny skirmishers came . but as soon as it was apparent that the fun had commenced for us there was a general rush for the colors. and. smoke. 12 o'clock. One section of a battery dashed down from the direction of the church and went into posi tion nearly at the apex of the triangle. in order to clear our front. many being in front of the works looking for blackberries. the field was covered by a long line in blue undor arms' awaiting orders. When the fire first broke out the muskets of the regiment were stacked in a long line across the open space. and the edge of the wood commenced to shoot out quick. while the men were scattered loosely in every direction. crouched behind the low breastworks. in fact. during all the night. sharp jets of ' ' . hot August sun. The sides of the low earth work had been pretty well washed down by the rains. We waited in silence under the burning. General Hancock now rode down the line and ordered our colors out of sight a wise precaution. we had heard the constant firing of skirmish lines on our front and both flanks. line began to fall back upon their support. and. for as the wind blew toward us the smoke of our pieces was blown back and the enemy could not get the proper range for their artillery on the front line. taking up position on its left as support. a sharp skirmish fire broke out in the wood immediately on our front. The extent of ground to be covered was so great that in our battalion (the Third) we were compelled to form in one rank to properly man the intrenchments. north and south for a base line. as and opened on our position. as if by magic. and we could see the dismounted cavalry pouring out of the woods making for their horses and scurrying for the The infantry skirmish flank. and the regiment moved forward to the works. while our mess were trying to make a dinner on borrowed hard-tack and charity pork.

of Company C. and finally disappeared over the works without doing any harm. But I reckon each man afterward kept one ear to the left. only one trial was made. 343 ditch behind. and was getting something when the report reached us. with a sound and a rapidity not to be At last it came and struck and bent his musket. Nearer and nearer came the shot. Then a long wait. Clark. commenced to put in their fine work on the horses attached to the limbers of the guns we were sup One after another the poor beasts fell. and once by the arrival of a solid shot sent from somewhere down on the left. It was a magnifi cent line shot. named S." " A . with the same result. the right leg of the triangle and we could only ob tain an oblique fire on the enemy as they first moved for ward. says " One of our men. We breathed again and rejoiced at his narrow put his hand inside of it. talion. gaining a position behind the chimney of a small house in our front. that went ricochetting just in rear of our line. Then came the second charge. went through his haversack and into the ground beside his knee. a slender six-footer. and kneeling before it. Meanwhile the sharp shooters. Robinson. Just before the cannon was fired he went to the haversack. broken only by the constant fire of the skir mishers in front of the works (seldom replied to. the fourth and last charge not a single horse was standing. they would have caught the range and cleared out the entire bat : Speaking of this shot. had haversack his on a stake which held up the breastworks. for some twenty minutes before the first charge on the position was made. described. I know I did. hung and had placed his musket beside it. This took place on our rightthat is. until before porting." says Major Knower. The charge was repulsed. escape." Had the practice been continued. Then came an interval of waiting. while having both eyes to the front. Taking his hand out and setting back on his heels. he listened with the rest of us. " Fortunately. with his body ten or twelve inches from the works. as we had orders to reserve our fire). Dr. third time the Johnnies charged and were repulsed from the right flank.BEAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE.

. While looking in that direction I saw (no pun) the saw bend nearly double and then spring out in position with a clear. front of our companies was kept alive with shot and shell from the direct fire of the batteries across the open field. and nothing but a knowledge of a soldier's duty to obey orders prevented the Fourth from : Let me . The horse-holders and many killed or 11 of the battery-men were either pause here to relate an incident of the singular wounding my men. He was sitting with his back to the breastworks. and being repelled dering." " The Says Captain Parkhurst sharpshooters of the enemy. had posted them selves in the thick woods in front of the Seventh New York. . while near the left of the Fourth was placed the Rhode Island Battery. but this scarcely diverted our attention from the struggle on the right. or if thrown out to make stubborn resistance. going clear through his shoe into the ground. from our failure to throw out skirmishers. turning their guns farther to the right as the enemy advanced until the fire was almost All this time the parallel with the works of the Seventh. and made short work of picking off the horses of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery. which was placed about the right of the Fourth New York and left of Seventh New York. scribed a curve to the rear and descended on the foot of the man. of one of LIGHT. musical A minie bullet had struck it.344 HEAVY GUNS AND wounded. which they did with a will and when about 3 o'clock the lines of gray emerged from the woods and made a headlong rush upon the Seventh New York. taking a portion of his toes with it an illustration of fire from the rear. whose guns were turned to the right and shelled the woods. against which was leaning a handsaw. this Rhode Island Battery cut great swaths of them down by firing over the heads of the Fourth New York and directly over the low earthworks. supporting the soldier's pet theory that when your time comes to be hit you're bound to get it. and in turn received such a share of the sharpshooters' attention as to render it necessary for the men of our regiment to supply the places of those killed and wounded in the battery. Some fifteen yards to the rear was a bower house.

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tucked it inside his blouse. Then arose the cry. . who tore it from its staff. firing to the right as much as possible. whence it was rescued by Knower. Lieutenant William B. each time with increased numbers. outnumbering us at least five to one. and were as often hurled back into the woods by the single line of blue. the doubling up of our right was a matter to be expected and of easy accomplishment. blood-red battle flag of the enemy planted where before had been the banner of the Seventh New York. I halted about a dozen men in a little thicket behind the Weldon Road and ordered them to fire to the front.REAM'S STATION rising en AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. In go ing back. the triangular. thus supplementing the lines of the Seventh and presenting an impassable barrier to the charging columns of the enemy but as no general officer was present to order such a move . and standing up in the works. hoping to become the nucleus on which right left. Knower. as a rallying point for our regiment. until at last. as we saw. had started a column of them . from out the drifting clouds of smoke.toward the woods as prisoners. they swept like a wave over the Seventh New York. and a cheer rose from the left of the Fourth as we hailed this new victory of our comrades on the right. we were ' ! ' ! and left. and with others broke and ran to escape the enfolding columns of the enemy from both ment. if they broke. But we were quickly undeceived. The flag the Color Sergeant Lynes had been ordered by Major flag Williams to take the flag back and plant it on the railroad embankment. and before the smoke cleared away so that we could comprehend the situation. with a quick rush of five lines deep. and whenever the enemy charged cheering the Seventh and beg ging them to stand firm. which we at first took to be the rebel column again defeated. and beheld the right of the Fourth crumbled and doubled up by the force of the enemy. Several times the enemy charged. he was wounded and dropped the flag on the ground. obliged to content ourselves with assisting in the working battery as men were disabled. As they had also broken through on our and it was a question of flight or immediate envelop ment to the Fourth New York. 347 masse and moving a regiment's length to the right. well knowing.

M. In front of the church the Johnnies broke through and came pour: . the Confederate General Heth had opened a terrific fire with two batteries at short range. composed of the Seventh New York In fantry and four other small regiments. I at once shouted to the men.348 HEAVY GUNS AND . get out quick !" and suited the action to the command by setting such an example of racing and hurdle. McRae. and. This was kept up about half an hour. The ground to the rear and the railroad embankment fairly seemed to boil as the pieces of shell kicked up the dirt. however. the elevation being too high. and three regiments of McGowan' s made the assault. This time they were successful. but not a scratch except those made by brush and brier. The rebel yell arose again. most disastrous to the Second Division that were behind the railroad in support. our men might form but we no sooner halted than from right and left doubled around the lines of gray. and at the cessation of this the brigades of Cooke. It was. and from both ends came orders to surrender. and their reports seemed to mingle with the sound of bursting shell over us. completely cleaning them out. which lay to the After right of the Seventh New York Heavy Artillery. Major Knower. Lane. as they got the benefit of every missile that flew over us. in his further account of the fight. these fired at the rate of three times a minute. Anderson." The enemy had broken through the lines of Colonel Hugg's Brigade. but had no effect upon the front line. says *' At length the musketry fire was interrupted by the open ing crash of the enemy's batteries. three charges without result. producing a din resembling a constant roll of thunder. The shelling ceased. I escaped with six bullet-holes through my clothing. The men wisely deemed discretion the better part of valor. LIGHT. and once more they charged us. started for that goal of their ambition Petersburg. strik ing the Seventh Infantry posted to our right rear.jumping as would have secured an engagement in a Wild West show. Scales. accompanied by rows " Fire and of levelled guns. The time was about 6 P. in company with their newly found escorts. As they commenced to shell us from sixteen guns in position.

commanding Company A.REAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HOHSESHOF.. misun derstood. receiving it. a color-bearer. On the right Colonel Allcock had just risen to give an order. Anticipating what would probably be the Colonel's orders. He. that was next on our right. who were pushing a column down the road in our rear while deploying into line to meet and return the fire from our front line. my two lieutenants. and the right command devolved upon Major Arthur. Price and Flint. seen dimly through the thick smoke. was in stantly killed. had also changed front and opened fire. he marched straight on. going with it. afterward Lieutenant Lynes. To reach his point without running into the advancing enemy. ordered his battalion to the rear to form behind the This movement took with it the most of my left railroad. with colors flying over it. Lynes was com When near the pelled to make a wider detour to the left. Captain McKeel. Sergeant. received this order. platoon that was separated from the remainder of my com pany by a traverse and in contact with the right of the First Battalion. seeing that everything had gone out from our left. seeing no supports and knowing we would be cut off. I know not. . 349 ing into the triangle at the intersection of the right leg. though his comrades fell fast around him. so that we got an oblique fire upon the advancing enemy. I noticed par ticularly for his firm bearing and cool courage for. but threw his three companies to the rear in column echelon and along the line of the work. and recognizing the fact that without support we were bound to go to Petersburg. Whether Major Williams. The Johnnies came down in first-class style. I faced my com pany by the rear rank. One man. The Seventh New York Heavy Artillery. in spite of the fact that he was the target for nearly every musket in company. to carry the colors to the left rear and plant them on the rail " road embankment for a rallying-point. Their line. my Major Williams. . now ordered the bat talion color-bearer. waving his colors. but he did not follow the movement. when he was severely wounded in the neck. or. and consequently some distance to our rear. in command of the Third Battalion. in order to be prepared for a change of front to the rear. made a very effective battle picture.

was headed Jby the Sixty-first New York. Hav ing the shorter distance to go. Major . and as I stooped to pick up the flag the Johnny fired and sent a bullet through my hat. he fixed his bayonet and charged me. foot of the slope I saw him drop the colors. At the same time an advanced skirmisher from the Johnnies started for the flag. CAPTAIN JAMES M. but that I was cut off from it by a skirmish line I therefore crossed the railroad to report to Major Arthur. having been slightly bruised . On my way to report Arthur I met Lieutenant Parkhurst. As my left arm was for the time useless. This incident probably gave rise to the fiction that the color had been saved by tearing it from an enemy in a hand-to-hand by some combat with an enemy. On my it was still engaged. in the act of making a scratch charge toward the right upon those of the enemy penetrating in that direction. Seeing he had missed. under the direction of General Miles. throw up his hands and fall to the ground. I saw the toward battalion. It was the yellow regimental col or and quite pretty in workmanship. This charge. composed of disorganized First and Second Division men. I found Major Arthur with most of his battalion amid a motley crowd. and when he arrived in good shooting was persuaded to stop. so I started for the same point. missile. I got an infantry-man whom I met to tear the color from the staff and button it under my coat. and told him flag. and was successful. and I hated to see it lost . for the space behind the railroad was extremely lively. looking revolver. He distance opened fire.350 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. in to I Major had the order to be prepared for any unpleasant contingency. I reached it first. and accidents were liable to happen to any one. rolling over into the ditch. I unlimbered M C KEEL.

' They yelled Yankee tion. You guns will remember that I was one of the color guard and bore Of the charge Major Knower r who was : . dismounted and with carbines at a Ready. and so. and hurried along the top. William Bell. that was crowded with fugi tives. a corporal of Company G. it seemed. and. if be any rear . and then started through a piece of thick underbrush toward the position of the battalion. turned over my instructions to him. While doing so I sa\v many men lying on either side of the works and firing.' not twenty yards from us. Catching a glimpse through the growth of a line of men coming toward us. you We did not stop to argue the ques but obeyed ." refers to. of all regiments. each line firing at the enemy so you may judge we were. I could get there. I then started for the front line. there didn' t seem to me but knowing that if the charge no\v on foot was back to my battalion. my company and giving him the colors. AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. in their front ' . road immediately in front. he started with me for that We jumped over the breastworks.' Near the railroad embank song says. successful I could get as the quickest way. crossed the purpose. ment I met Lieutenant Flint. a member of Company H.REAM'S STATION Arthur ordered adding. and seeing a number of blue uniforms. ' Drop those swords and come . but so filled was the space behind the railroad with disorganized and some pretty well demoralized troops of both divisions. as the surrounded. sprang upon the breastworks. in fact. some to the front and others in the opposite direction. that I found great difficulty in advancing." in. Dr. I found a man of who had retreated with the First Battalion. and the battle of Ream' s Station ended for us. and telling him of the chance offered to rejoin the company. for. we supposed we had met the battalion falling back in order so we pushed through the wood and emerged upon a little clearing in the presence of a long line of Wade Hampton's cavalry. all . 351 to take the colors in person to the rear. writes as follows " You w iM recall the charge that was ordered to retake the over in the cornfield a little east of the railroad. that in this part of the line ran nearly at right angles to the railroad. to us. His name was Ezra Plank.

' Forward we went. We started.352 HEAVY GUNS AND (New York ' LIGHT. and afterward. galloped up. Brown said we were surrounded on all sides." severe . but got away safely. We could then see the rebels in the corn Nash suc field almost in our immediate rear. Werner's New Jersey Battery did most ex cellent service in connection with this charge. but we were forced back again and you will recall how all that dreary night we found men sleeping by friendly bonfires. of Company one out of five who were grouped together in a pit near the railroad embankment. accompanied by a single orderly. Sergeant Brown and the other two were captured and died in rebel prison. and frequently in the mud. . was the fact that the provost guard which had been posted across the rear would not allow the gunners to return to their pieces. and started for the rear. State) colors. then surrender. because they were with out muskets. who suc ceeded in escaping without a scratch. when along came a precious morsel from some rebel musket and plunked the Major square in the mouth. Nash and I left the others. this is getting too hot The guns were retaken. Lieutenant Edmonston exclaimed My God.' Some fifty men of the regiment aligned them selves. which disabled him so I ran a very nar that he never returned to the regiment. and said: * Advance those colors. ceeded in following me through the gap. how he bled and moaned At that moment General Han : ! Arthur said Young man." A singular circumstance in connection with the recapture ' : ' ! . and that there was no possible way of escape that the only thing to do was to fire at the enemy until discovered. Austin. but received a wound through the thigh. after the line was broken. "I was the only Says Eugene A. row chance. as they were absolutely exhausted. and of Dauchey's battery M : . Private William Isham was one of the men next to me. you stand here until cock. I the Second Battalion Major order you to move. though the guns were aimed in almost the opposite direc tion from which they were originally posted. against the protests of Sergeant Brown. Oh. A solid shot came and snipped off a poor fellow's leg the rebs had turned our guns and were giving us Hades with borrowed ammunition.

and he was five months in Lincoln Hospital. found it was occupied by a number of our men and two or three dead horses. The iron hail continuing. talking. and saw our boys falling back or hug ging the works. on look ing in. swear some limping and others helping their ing. Washington. and. He said his shoulder-blade and ribs were driven in at Ream's Station. 353 " After taking a shot at the gully. He was taller. and had not gone far when I met our men falling back. hav ersack and everything. got came to a little redoubt. I Says Dr. a line of battle. among them Nate Andrews. who said if we ran much farther we would be inside the rebel lines. (Twenty-three years afterward I met him again for the first time.' I and a number of us succeeded over it ever. and asked if I would not help him to the rear. saying he was wounded in the side. I stood but a minute or two. running. He had lost his left arm and right thumb by a premature explosion of a cannon which he was loading.REAM'S STATION : AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. and very soon we reached our ambulances and wagon train. safely. except his clothes. By this time it was getting dusky. we went into a field on the opposite side of the road and sat down under a big tree. In a very short . and we ran. as we thought to the rear.) I turned back to the front again. Continuing my way to the rear. but in every way his features were just the same. minus equipments. I put my hand under his arm. Fate had dealt harder with him than did the rebs. and excited wounded comrades. John Van Pelt passed me. after giving him my canteen. When I saw John safely in a wagon I left him. when some of the boys of the regiment joined me. and it might be worse still to remain and be How gobbled. After a few minutes of this exercise. Robinson looked to the right and saw a column of rebs coming toward us. a few years ago. to fire a salute. which seemed as if it might afford some security and a chance for another shot. inside our works. He directed us which way to go. We did not go far when we met what we thought to be re-en forcementsa portion of the Ninth Corps coming toward When they passed and turned into a field and formed us. ' we came to a cavalry picket. it was taking your life in your hand to attempt to cross the railroad.

One or two of his staff were killed." Says Captain Parkhurst "The remnants of our forces soon formed a second line some half mile in rear of the first in a cornfield. At the edge of this timber there seemed to be a line of troops. accompanied by thunder and . They told us we were between the picket lines. When they saw the white piece of tent they came to see if we were dead or alive. General Hancock. and we would be captured if we stayed there much longer. leaving behind our killed and wounded. I saw our superb commander. It had now become dark and a rain set in.' as the enemy were not near enough for us to do anything with musketry. shot through side of head and face. and the noise was awfulworse than the rebel artillery. but whether reserves or remnants of broken commands I know not. were turned upon us. about half-way from the Weldon Road to a It was here that the piece of heavy timber in our rear. The rain came. We did not stay to hear anything more. belonging to the Rhode Island and Massachusetts batteries. and he only escaped by changing his course in time. but moved toward time close to Petersburg very lively. who with : ' his staff came riding across the field from right to left. Arthur. When the shower passed. for the first and only time that day. The lightning and thunder were drops were close to us and contimious. nine guns captured from us. At the first dawn of light we were aroused by some cavalry-men coming through the field. or. and I wrapped it around me. as our army had fallen back. we rolled ourselves in our blankets and lay down to sleep. bearing our disorganized forces back to the edge of the heavy timber. were hidden by the underbrush where they were forming for the onward rush which soon came. and alone charging the whole rebel force just emerging from the woods on the left. if near enough. and it seemed as if the as large as saucers. Here it was. which was white and con spicuous. I had a new piece of shelter tent.354 HEAVY GUNS AND it LIGHT. ex cept Major William A. who was dragged back and thrown into an am bulance by Lieutenant Edmonston and myself. and we were compelled to stand or sit and take it. was so dark you could not see your hand if held your face.

MAJOR WILLIAM ARTHUR. U. . MAJOR POURTU SEW YORK ARTILLERY AND BREVET LIEUTENANT-COLONEL. A.. S.

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especially officers.REAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE.M. As he was newer and dressed better than the rest of us. was the hottest he was ever in.t he might die on the h'eld and yet the responsibility for the disaster must be attributed to mis man was I . not knowing if I should wake surrounded by friends or foes. for the number of troops engaged. takes on the part of the general officers rather than to lack of courage in the men. Yet. Lieutenant Knower had not been popular before that. at Re-enforcements came. Every his own commander. our troops should have been withdrawn or re-enforced. as I could see. impressed with the one idea that it was about time to get up and look around.' waving gracefully from the top of a sapling cut from the swamp." The battle of Ream's Station. . and up. the opinion of General Walker. while the Confederates must have had. while all night long we struggled through the woods. but least. all. and went by the name of Evelina among the men but in the supreme moment we found him a hero. but 'our flag was still there. We had not above sixty -five hundred men." The work having been performed for which we were sent there. . and all organization broken worked along as best I could until about 2 A. who. threw myself down under a tree and slept. seemed alive with forms clad in blue. General Hancock spoke well of the action of our regiment that day for holding its position until untenable but has severely criticised the action of " I attribute the bad certain other regiments. he was believed to be a dandy and dress -parade officer. conduct of some of my troops to their great fatigue. as far shining brightly. When I sun was and the the awoke country. That night. General Hancock lias stated. throws much blame on the troops. owing to the heavy labor exacted of them and to their enormous losses during the campaign. not knowing whither bent. however. like myself. only upon the general course to the left and rear of the Army of the Potomac. and after that he was loved and honored by officers and men. This is . he says. three times that number. at dress pa rade and roll-call we found we had lost some three hundred and fifty men and officers. even expressing the wish tha. He was deeply chagrined at the defeat. 357 lightning..

LOSSES IN THE FOURTH ARTILLERY. not until the battle was over. Sergeant Theodore Quick. Adjutant Henry J. no doubt. in a conversation with the writer.58 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. be distributed more widely. wounded through the cheek. having been sent the longest way. The censure should. . there is" certainly some excuse for do ing nothing more than trying to save own lives. . who had previ their ously served through the Peninsular Campaign. Captain James M. wounded in shoulder and captured. William B. Second Lieutenant P. was a mere death-trap. A. Major Frank Williams. COMPANY Killed. Kopper. Sands. The position. A member of Com pany E.Colonel Allcock. When troops are sub ject to fire in front and rear at the same time. they repulsed the enemy when advancing with heavy supports twice in succession. B. Corporal William Kniffin Private Merritt Washburn. wounded through the thigh. and did not suppose there were any that day. McKeel. said that Voters burg he had been over the ground since. while the railroad embankment would have made a strong breast work. General Wade Hampton. T. Though severely punished. wounded through the neck. too. I. the loss was a source of sorrow to us all. Flanagan. as they were at Ream's Station. and never saw better fighting than was performed by the Seventh Dutch Rifles that day. had never been able to discover traces of breastworks.3." This is one of the regiments on which much of the blame for the disaster has been thrown. : Lieu tenant. But whatever the causes. serious. says "I was detailed on the right at Ream's Station. Arthur. Several charges of the enemy were gallantly withstood before the break came.

James McDonnell Privates Alexander H. A. George S. William War Albert ring. First Lieutenant George Chichester geants John H. . Missing. B. abdo Theodore F. Totten. Bailey. Samuel . Allen. H. H. COMPANY Killed. Bunyea. Blainey. W. Ser Missing. McGill. L. E. arm. leg shot off. Mitchell B. Russell. B. Second Lieu tenant Frank L. Privates James L. R. abdomen Ja cob Snyder. Wounded. J. Josiah Davis. Freeman Lyke. leg Oliver Davis. J.REAM Wounded. H. 359 men Color-Sergeant N. John Jones. in leg. Brandon. William Sheppard. Alonzo A. Joseph Burke. BURDICK. A. Reuben Brown. Knapp. Cord. William Roach. Henry V. Zephaniah Denney. William Donnell. . Charles H. Jacob Erickson Privates Peter V. James H. Purdy. Winans. Bernard Donnelly. L. Knapp. John. face John S. Albert W. Van Loan. Daniel B. Hyatt. Daniel Townsend. Blake. Dearborn Corporals Joseph S. am . W. . Norman B. Lynes. Gallahue. L. putated arm.'Van Keuren. John N. Stark. . . James H. Norman Davis. Burdick. LIEUTENANT FRANK L. Babbitt. Joseph Feitner. S. Mark D. John Trowbridge. James Dainty. Hugh Hughes. L. Knapp. Clark Lee. William Clair Corporals Edward St. Samuel Gribby. . Second Lieutenant O. Aldrich. Patrick Hughes. Robert Jones. Seamen. Bennett. Wright. Chauncey W. E. Totten. Bowman. Scott. Bear. Franklin F. David H. Dingee. . Foster. Baldwin. S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. . Thomas Buppes. O'Callaghan. John W. Jacob Rhodes. John Bennett.

White. Kelly. Lake. James Bright. James Cooney. Bistin. James Kenyon. M. Knapp. . E. Stillwell. A. Fred erick Purlee. Hubbell. Bennett. Shelton. W. First Sergeant Michael Fitzgerald Sergeants Eldridge H. James Hanlon. \ Missing. E. John Schenck. George W. Asa G. P. John Hays. Davis. severe Romanta T. Wounded. George J. George Freeze. Thorp. Huftalin. J. James Banker. Patrick Quinn. William Freeman. Isaac Ben- . H. Hay. P. Ford. Hayden. McKeever. . George W. Orson Marsh. Mangan. P. in leg Privates John Van Pelt. William Greenfield. White. Kennedy. . George Shadbolt. Ord P. Laymen. . Van Alstyne. Henry Bennett. Wood Privates Philip Monk. Pringle. Funnan. arm Charles Koumanam. . Lawton B. J. Privates James Keever. Sergeant John H. Price Corporals John W. J. Schermerhorn. R. William A. Thompson. Kirby. G. Corporal Marion Worthy. Abram V. John Satterlee. T. Lloyd. COMPANY E. Missing. G. Wounded. wounded and prisoner James S. Youmans. Hadden. Leman Granger Corporals Henry J. Beitz. William Marsh. Vanderpool First Sergeant R. John Morey. M. Murphy. Meagher. James White. A. Holley. Baniel Greenfield. in side. COMPANY C. . J. Green. Robert McMellin. A. Frederick P. Satterlee. . Pierce. Sheffer. R. H. M. Patrick Regan. Miller. Smith. John J. Charles Kelly. Moses Smith. A. M. wounded and prisoner. H. Warren. Rowe Bean. Hyde. . C. left leg. Lyman McKee. M. Williams. W. Herman B. James O'Neil. Manly Bannister Privates Zenas Church. Gallett Isbell. George E. G. Norman B. Clark. Hughes. . Michael Regan. arm and leg Nelson Heavey. Joseph Monroe.360 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Louis Winans. George F. B. Gallagher. M. Bavid . J. Baniel Quinn. Henry Monroe. B. Sylvester -Clark. Parslow. Young. Second Lieutenant Benj. A. John Buncombe. L. Alfred Hays. Weckert. Peck. Jenkins. Fetherston. Nolan. Henry Hayner.

Mahar. COMPANY Killed. Marion Gibbs. Jacob Hermann. Simon Privates George F. Privates John Michael Travers Corporal John Smith . Baker. Van Houten. Rudolph Fox. John Charles Sarles. Levi Travis. Goss. . Thomas Kegan. Charles Van Wormer. Charles Hertage. Wilson. Francis Dunnigan. Joseph Garland. Willard Jones. Daniel Cox. Abraham Newman. P. Samuel Burras. Second Lieu Missing. Leander Fitch. Privates Peter Goldsmith. . John D. Michael Fegan. James Finnegan. Henry C. Charles Cowley. Frederick R. Corporal Otto Kenkel. Herrick. Roger Gordon. First Lieutenant . Cooper. Charles . John Cunningham. John Sullivan. Timothy Hays. . Second Lieutenant Samuel Cox. A. P. Charles Bergen. William Tyrell.REAM'S STATION nett. Joseph Rogers. Alonzo Allen. Harvey L. John J. Thomas Haley. AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. James Riley. tenant S. First Lieutenant William B. Blair. John W. Hugh Watts. Edward Scholemius. George SkinkRobert J. Arthur Donnelly. Jeremiah Munson. Behee. Tuttle. Edward Kirk. Thomas Garigan. Knower. Charles Meitzger William C. Jackson Gibbs. Flint Sergeants Charles Smith. Lewis Dill. Second Lieutenant William A. William H. Frazer. Morris Harris. William Hunter. 361 Rhienhard Straub. Charles Cook. Thomas Kavanaugh. Edward Burt. Adelbert Nash. Wounded. James Frank Cook. COMPANY Wounded and Prisoner. James King. Dominick Garvey. Corporal John Dailey. Levi Emmons. . Owen Mclntee. James Heady. Francis Millhouse. John Best. Jones. Thomas Murphy. Jeffry Hay. Corliss Sergeants John Haggerty. . Hulse Corporals Eugene Johnson. kell. Ingersoll. G. slightly Missing. Austin Dey. Samuel C. August 23d. Martin Bower. William Riley. Peter Carlin. Charles Davis. Rolan Ward. Martin. Joseph W. Theodore Sands. Haviliah Baker. Matthews. George Dunnell. Robert Barnish.

G. Second Lieu First Sergeant William H. Missing. Levi B. John Thorn ton. Frank Torrey. Sergeant Charles H. Michael Connor. George B. Casper Wagner. . John Provo. D. Mahew. Ellestes Rose. Harry O'Brien. Stratton. Albert Ruess. William White. Levi Butler. tenant Joseph A. arm. Schmidt. Joseph Wounded. Andrew Fosdick. in Wounded. John Troy. . John A. Private Bartholomew Lynch. William Andrews. Wilson. Sergeant Harry Broughton Corporals Owen D. Peter Turner. I. Zaddock Smith. Privates Missing. Hawkins. Lewis Pri vates William Lovell. Henry Meyer. Sergeant Reed L. Ira Burrows. Blodgett. A. Patrick McDermott. Louis Jerome. . De Groot. Ira D. John P. arm . leg . David Kelly. James Bannon. Carlton Barber. Frederick Blair. Corporals John O'Connor. Charles Sheppard. Lawson McGarry. in leg . Crandall. First Lieutenant William Barnes. Harrison Travis. Henry B. in leg . John Wolsley. Lee. Davis. COMPANY M.362 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Syke Corporals Hobart Dodge. Missing. Joseph Mott Privates Owen Eagan. William B. Orlando A. . John Smith. First Sergeant Bruce Herington . bler. Goss. William . . James Stephens. Shennen. John Hyde. Charles Marsh. August T. Haggerty Charles Macomber. Privates 'Gilbert Cotton. Henry Mead. Brown. Hubbard Spring. Travis. Lyon. Martin. Whit man. Larnise Willey. Eli R. D. Wiltsie. Rufus W. COMPANY Killed. Private Oscar Babcock. Patrick McDermott. Jr. leg Philip Mcllvaney. Roger Molamphy. Rudolph James Maimka. William Pye. William S. Nelson H. Chamberlain.W. Saunders. McManiiis. H. in side. James D. COMPANY H. Peloubet . Rice. John Ogden. through . Adam Kennedy. John Perkins. James Slater.. Harry OmFrank Nash.

Second Corps. Michael Sullivan. RECAPITULATION. George W. John Osterhout.BEAM'S STATION AN UNLUCKY HORSESHOE. . K were on the skirmish line. hence their Company D was serving a Coehorn mortar bat I and tery in the Artillery Brigade. Officers killed 3 " " " '* wounded missing and prisoners Menkilled wounded missing and prisoners Total loss 4 10 11 26 312 366 Companies small loss. 363 Patrick Mahar. Rook. Stephen Smith. George Lemders. James McClay. and Company L was also doing duty in the Artillery Brigade this great loss being sustained almost entirely by eight companies. William Price.

or Fort Hell. G. K. and the instructions to our com manding officer were that he was to receive orders only from the corps commander. Fort Prescott. companying map. Q. (SEE MAP. Fort Hascall.) L. P. the in fact. FortMeikle. Fort Dushane. Fort Bross. C. A. Fort Alexander Hayes. Fort Davis. Fort Morton. R. F. Fort Blaisdel. largest fort on the line. Fort Wadsworth. 1864 AND 1865. O. N." The names of the Union forts and certain of the Confederate forts around Peters Their positions are shown on the ac burg are appended. T. Fort Howard. Fort McGilvery. Says Colonel Gould. and many smaller works there was hardly a piece of work on the whole line we did of sameness. Fort Stevenson. B. nodding o'er the yellow plain" found us located not very far from the old camping ground. E. Fon Sedgwick. . to General Humphreys. Fort Steadraan. IN WINTER QUARTERS. Fort Davison. I. NAMES OF UNION FORTS AROUND PETERSBURG. H. though in a new On September Our work 1st we mustered for pay. not at some time work upon. (/ UTUMN camp.CHAPTER XXVI. for a considerable period had During the fall and was detailed as engi the winter regiment with orders to report direct neers for the Second Army Corps. Fort Patrick Kelley. M. Fort McMahon. who was in command during the winter " We built Fort Fisher. : much . Fort Rice. D. 8.

* PETERSBURG .OPERATIONS MMM! RICHMOND .

Fort Lee. Fort Harrison (on Chapin's Farm. Conahey. Colquit's Salient. Pegram's Battery. so that we managed to sleep a portion of the time. Fort G. d. the fort blown up at the mine explosion Reeves' Salient. On September 5th we were ordered to pack up and move to the rear and left of the line. Fort E. Fourth United States to K. Fort McKeen. Fort Craig. 6. e. LIGHT. V. by way of variety. belonged Battery Artillery. Fort D. Fort Mahone. Fort Urmston. Fort Keene. H. O. X. Fort Siebert. C. north of James River). Fort New Orleans. Fort Lewis O. Fort Clarke. were read to him. I. M. Fisher. Fort Cummings. The cause for which the penalty was inflicted. K. A soldier was shot for desertion. U. Fort Wheaton. He was blindfolded. /. AVe worked by reliefs. Gregg. his On September 2d we marched grave being already dug. . Morris. Q. and on the morn. R. B. Fort Graves. T. having received a bounty each time. and at the " command. put up most of the turned out afternoon of that day regiment to witness a military execution. worked on Fort Tilton. NAMES OF CERTAIN REBEL FORTS AROUND PETERSBURG. FORTS ON THE PROLONGATION OP THE LINES WEST OF THE WELDON A. . and the man dropped over on his coffin. Fort Merriam. Fort Emory. . Fort F. Fire !" the guns of the detail flashed simul He taneously. Welch. P. and had deserted twice. together with his sentence. S. and built breastworks all It rained hard most of the time. L. FORTS PROTECTING CITY POINT. four miles toward the a breastwork. A detail of soldiers under the Provost Marshal stood with loaded muskets twelve paces in front of him. Fort Abbott. The next day we night. building breastworks all day and part of the night a part of the regiment built breastworks at Fort Sedgwick that night. Fort Porter. In the and Weldon Railroad. Fort Gould.366 HEAVY GUNS AND RAILROAD. Fort Sampson. and sat on his coffin. On the 7th we slept all night.

moved about three Ream's Station. 367 ing of the 8th we went about two miles in front of the breastworks and closed up the sluices of a dam for what purpose we did not know. had seized the rebel picket line. having advanced their line. There was sharp picket firing in our We front during the day. We had to put up tents the night and were fortunate enough to remain in them until 7 o'clock that morning. was a day of thanksgiving and prayer. . and remained there until daylight.IN WINTER QUARTERS. Much of our picket duty was done in Fort Sedgwick and Fort Hascall. we were awakened by sharp musketry firing in front. interspersed with picket duty. when we went to work without our before. The next day miles in the direction of it rained very hard. On the 12th we were called out again before daylight had not time to get breakfast. On the 24th. Tore down breastworks and levelled saps. we put up tents and made a company street but we were called out before daylight and worked all day. then moved to the left and went into camp. the 18th. had inspection in the morning and a parade in the evening. On the 16th we fell in in light marching order. Our artillery fired a salute in honor of Sheridan's victory at this place. where we relieved the Tenth Corps in September. Sunday. and were immediately ordered to fall in and advance to the breastworks with our muskets. where we remained until the next day at noon. Our work on the forts. and at midnight of Tuesday we moved out on the plank-road near the line of breastworks. On the morning of the 10th . On the 9th we were encamped behind the breastworks. who. September llth. continued without any important break to give variety dur ing the entire autumn. As it was raining. while we were in Fort . The work was continued for the next two days. we worked on Fort Fisher all day. On the 14th we were hur . September 12th our work was reversed somewhat. went on picket. The firing proved to be caused by our pickets. breakfast. and on the right of the line near the Appomattox. Sunday. as we tore down breastworks all day instead of putting them up. ried out to the front in support of the picket line. resting the re mainder of the time. 1864 AND 1865.

It ap 26th that on the the Second and Third Divisions of pears our corps had moved around to the left and made an attack on the enemy's line at Hatcher's Run. It was we GOING TO WORK ON THE FORTS AT NIGHT. A occupied. plank -road. and in this our forces were foiled. our division to the left of us made a charge and captured a rebel fort and some prisoners but the rebels charged and took it back again. who was killed in the Colonel Burke. ordered the attack to our right. and succeeded in cap turing a portion of the enemy's pickets on the Jerusalem assault. led another attack on the same night. led by Captain Jerry Brown.HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. of the Eighty-eighth New York. The real purpose had been to seize the South Side Railroad. ever on the alert. and considerable firing was in dulged days following on both sides. Hascall. Pennsylvania Volunteers. while this movement was in progress that General Miles. The charge was made by the One Hundred and Forty-eighth -that regiment. but without decisive into the fort in for several results. good many shells came . of and by Lieutenant Price (of the One Hun dred and Sixteenth Pennsylvania). The last of October our picket posts were located in front .

where ing attack. a heavy column of the enemy ad vancing in our front. etc. F. S. It was not an uncommon this of our period picket duty to have rebel thing during in and come themselves prisoners give up. late in the after noon. I had an abattis put in front of my regimental line. February 13. Fourth Bri gade. when. Second Army Corps. . and returned to our old camp on the morning of the 8th inst. Major Commanding. I am. I immediately sent out a picket the remainder were enOn the 6th inst. On February 5th. 6th. About 5 o'clock on the afternoon of the 5th inst. GOULD. we were ordered back.M. and 7th inst. A. on the right of the same. Lieutenant J. 6th. Your obedient servant. slashing. . and the regiment were called up every morning at 4 o' clock. inst.. give us an opportunity to test the strength of the works. and prepared a line of breastworks for their reception but they did not . 1865.IN WINTER QUARTERS. In compliance with circular of the 12th from Headquarters Army of Potomac. We remained in the same place and position until relieved with the brigade.. we had details out cutting. where we joined our brigade and were ordered into line. and 7th our regiment made a movement in accord with the following official report : HEADQUARTERS FOURTH LIEUTENANT : NEW YORK ARTILLERY. December 16th we were marched out. and lay on the ground entire time. and moved up to the breastworks in the line of battle. A. as regards this regiment. G. most respectfully. await On December 9th we moved to the left and and a all night. this command broke camp anci repaired by the way of the squirrel level road to the Tucker House. 1864 AND 1865. 369 of Fort Stedman. ii. front about three miles we remained until daylight. First Division. formed a line of battle. It snowed and rained the The next day we retained position in line of battle until 3 P. FRANK CRANE. and witnessed the ex ecution of three men who were hung as spies.. I have the honor to transmit the following report of the operations of the 5th. and had a rest of three days afterward.iu-ed all night in building a breastwork. A. half.

the thought came to me that all this meant a fight. one on our right and one on the left. : Says Colonel Gould in a recent communication of the several raids to Hatcher's "In one the troops were hard and Miles an General sent aide with a verbal order pressed. and as I sat there on my horse waiting for orders. This order reached us just as we got camp from a day's work. then to advance the regi ment through the works and await orders. and not really knowing what I was expected to do. As we came in sight filing along near the main line of breast works.' said he put through the rebel picket line. saying that he wished me to take the regiment and march in a straight line be tween the two points. Soon the Engineer from Army Headquarters came out. Wondering what this meant. and away we went.' Reaching out his hand. I finally decided that if it was to be a fight. that will take us All right. Giving the command to move forward. and that perhaps General Miles had taken this method to repay the slight to his order of the previous night. for the Fourth to double-quick the four miles between us Run and Hatchers Run. and soon returned with the written order from General Humphreys. the spot that would bring it on was where we had to occupy the rebel picket line. he bid me goodfiring day all ' ' ' * . by.370 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. arriving there in time to do considerable firing on the right. In the afternoon of next the troops were ordered back to their old camps. This before going. he located two points in our works.M. Bringing the regiment to a halt and front as near to this place as I thought best. with a vague idea that the real desire was to bring on an engagement. three lines of our troops. as far as we could see. an aide came to me with an order to halt. Why.' said I. as Away he went. we saw lying down a little distance in the rear. I told the aide I should want an order from General Humphreys into to the corps commander only. we reported kept up until after 9 P. and if you cannot do it alone the whole army is here to help you. as we were slowly marching along. hardly know ing what to do. who . tired and hungry. This was quickly done. run ning my eye down the line. I called Captain Smith. Riding a short ways in front.' them out.

M. various pieces of verse of varying merit. Some of our command. was eating with many soldiers. When not on duty. etc. prepared by the boys of our regiment. answering the latter. sew ' ! . when he called We are ordered to straighten our out. 1864 AND 1865. ing on buttons. to me. toward the left of the It was located to the line. He told me that the commanding officers all expected that a general engagement would be brought on as soon as we made the attempt to straighten the lines. Hallo. That night about 9 P. " What shall I do with the rebels ? and if you cannot do that alone we will help you. One sample must suffice : . near the of Fort Cummings. Johnnies If you don't lines. card-playing. it appears. of course drinking would out rank eating.' " Strange as it may seem. right There was sufficient variety to our work alone to prevent ennui. 371 was then in the points of line Company " K command of Company K. duds little and out of those pick up your get pits we'll have to take you out. perhaps the most important oc cupation of the soldier." The camp that we occupied most during the winter was one regularly laid out and stockaded.IN WINTER QUARTERS. and establish the right of the ' line where the rebel pickets were. actually indulged in poetry and if the columns of the Waverley Magazine and other papers given to sentiment of that period could be scanned. ' . . they picked up their traps and went back over their main line of works. and must run through where you are. I again shook hands with the Engineer from Army Headquarters. could undoubtedly be found. near enough to speak to the rebel pickets.' " Smith moved forward with Company K until he was ' " said the Captain. And be yond these essentials the time was occupied with reading the papers and letters from home. showing him we were to occupy told him to take . not saying the most agreeable. Throw them out.' I replied and if our regiment is not enough the whole army is ready and willing to assist. and that all preparations had been made for it. Quite as important was sleeping. Squirrel Level road. west of the Weldon Railroad.

dear girl. Beyond all else the sacred flame part. In raptures bright a laughing spi ite Will ever to my vision rise. happy thought. Of love performs its wonted So graven in a secret space Within this lonely heart of mine.872 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Ah. The heart that nerved the hand to do. THE SACRED FLAME. . thine. Within the vale of lasting peace. Whate'er thy name. And if the work of war should cease. the same Emotion stirs each soldier's heart . to clasp anew. An image shows a fairy face Reflecting that dear form of holds liis When Somnus Of shadow mystic folds o'er enchanted eyes.

resulting in the capture of the intrenched picket line of the enemy. " This was before daylight. though retaliatory and induced by . and that our men were hurrying : Says Frank Denio. General Gordon succeeded in captur ing the fort and neighboring line of works. to which result General Tidball. yet proved to be the true beginning of the end. picket the morning of March 25th. . when we heard heavy cannonad ing away to the right. then in command of the Mnth Corps Artillery. and when it was light enough to see. to reconnoitre the front of their respective lines. HE campaign of 1865 really opened on the movements on that March 25th day. and they with the left of the Sixth Corps. and General Wright. contributed a very important part. of the Sixth Corps. and of over eight hundred prisoners. and they were quite as gallantly recaptured by Generals Parke and Hartranft. OPENING THE CAMPAIGN OF 1865. besides those taken at Fort Steadman.CHAPTER XXVII. This unexpected movement by the Confederates caused General Humphreys. who now com manded our corps. we could easily view the Johnnies' moving columns of troops in that direction. which we thought must be in front of the city. of Company M "I was on in that direction also. and we connected on the right with the Fourth Brigade. man General Gordon's capture of Fort Steadin the early morning. The left of our brigade picket line rested on the Gumming' s road.

and moving to the right. good many After darkness came on the firing ceased. and covered the same ground occupied by the brigade front.374 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. for they were anxious to . so as to extend our line into a piece of woods to the right. showing plainly where the line of battle stood. " This was a saucy little fight. "There were dead men lying on the ground. which we did in a hurry. the Sixty-third New York and the old Sixty-ninth to the right. We were left as pickets or skirmishers. and the troops were all drawn off except Company M. While this was going on we were in column just in rear of the Sixtyninth. We de ployed to the left. not more than ten rods distant. " The Sixth Corps made an advance to the left of Fort Fisher and drove the Johnnies from an outer line of works. When morning came. Twenty-eighth got it first. for our brigade had made several advances as well as the rebels. and the whole line was one sheet of flame. The MAJ. and in the woods in front were the dead and wounded of both sides. were advancing rapidly into a piece of woods in our front. if necessary. HUMPHREYS. but did not fire. All of our line at the left was en gaged. with the Twenty -eighth Massachusetts on the left. men. when they en countered the enemy. while the fight was going on.-GEN. and our brigade. and the brigade lost a but the Johnnies suffered as much as we. for the night. the enemy's pickets peered at us from behind the trees. ANDREW A. and in a few sec onds it ran down to the right of the Sixty-ninth. They both seemed to fire at almost the same time. Just as the sun was going down we got into it.

with his powerful corps of cavalry. On March On the 29th General Grant despatched General Sheridan. GEN. There was no firing. Five of the enemy came in at the post where the writer was located." That morning we were relieved on picket by a regiment of the Twenty-fourth Corps. The pickets marched to the left without going into camp. and . Says Colonel Gould. 375 carry off their wounded.OPENING THE CAMPAIGN OF 18(55. NELSON A. which convinced me that it must have been rather warm just at that and both spot. who commanded the regiment during " March 29th General Miles' s Division the last : campaign of the Second Corps. During the winter the regiment had. 28th two hundred and thirty men from the Fourth constituted the brigade picket. including the Fourth New York Brigade and the Irish Brigade. across Hatcher's Run. I found one man of the Twenty-eighth with five bullet holes through his head. by the return of the sick and by the addition of recruits. There was no more fighting In the afternoon we fell back to the old winter i Everything was ready quarters. MILES. filled up its ranks. and so we put up the white sides went over the ground and brought off their wounded men. the latter having relieved both the Second and Fifth Corps in their intrenchments. at this point. It was here I made for a move. were detached from the Army of the Potomac and ordered to report to General Sheridan. never" . a flank movement on a six-quart pail of pork and beans that I saw cooking in one of the fireplaces Do of the regiment to our left. until in March we were seven hundred and twenty- wounded and eight strong. you remember what regiment that was ? That is one of the things that has passed from my mem ory but the beans no.

Fifth Army Corps. many of the One Hundred and Eleventh New York had been killed here and their bodies were lying about. so that batteries could not be brought up.M. or that a word of fault was ever found with him.M. about 7 A. orders were received to advance one half picket. About 5 P. First Division. the enemy. we received orders to advance. after driving the rebels out of the first line of works. Fifth Army Corps. and moved into some breastworks in front." The writer was in the line of skirmishers with Major Hamlink at the time. It was here Major Hamlink lost his leg. About 4 P.. a detachment of four hundred men were sent on At 7 P. we recaptured the ground lost by the Third Division. I do not remember his being absent from duty. March 31st. Says Colonel Gould " At Gravelly Run the Fifth Corps. We advanced woods. in position to support Battery K.M. breastworks. duroy road. opened fire upon us with artillery which was vigorous. The : r . The ground being swampy. but did little damage. we advanced in line of battle through the woods and across a swamp. There was heavy skirmishing in our front. were in turn driven back. mile and relieve the Third Division.M. the smallest man in Company K. We were advancing through a piece A good of woods quite open and free from underbrush. We were then ordered to charge.M. Although a boy. About 6 A. It w as in this charge that poor little Cady was killed. Fourth United States Artillery. The rain continued most of the day. and lay on our arms. he filled a man's place. and moving from the breastworks. Colonel Robert Nugent command in three lines of battle through a dense Halted at night. we stacked arms and built a cor ing. and we remained there under arms until 6 While yet in the A. of the next morning. met the regiment which had broken camp about noon. and then formed line of battle on the Boynton plank-road.376 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. This was done. That morning our regiment was transferred to the Second Brigade. The morn ing of the 30th we were awakened by a very hard shower. or that in all our campaigns he ever complained.M. Miles' s Division was ordered in to charge over the same ground.

At 4 A. Our orders from Colonel Gould were " to advance the line and move up as closely as possible to the Confederate in- That night. Isaac came back. The fence itself had been occupied by the pickets a part of the time until they received orders to advance. Fifth Army Corps.M. . and folio wed them up until we reached their slashing. April 1st. In this barn the Confederate skirmish line. full of water. when orders were received to Hall. after falling back from the woods. A rail fence ran along in the rear of the field we were to occupy. where we remained some three hours. Sergeant Joseph Jones and George Brownell carried him back to a stretcher." We found the position indicated. was crossed by a bridge and farm road which led into a meadow. where firing had been continuous all day. the next morning. and the regiment fell back fifty rods and intrenched. and were pop ping away at us.OPENING THE CAMPAIGN OF . nearly opposite the bridge. to relieve the brigade skirmish line. The Major was. 1865. where stood a small barn. of Company H. April 1st. 1865. which was the right of the Second Corps picket. ten rods to the rear and left of the bridge on the slope when struck. but we captured the barn and contents. and the posts we relieved were but a few rods from this fence. We the writer was detailed in charge of Company H. Five others were wounded in the charge. Oar line on the right had to move up to the bridge to cross the ditch. as the rebs to shako hands with every man. : re-enforce the Second Division. when we were withdrawn. The Confederate line was in a piece of woods with slashed timber in front. trenchments." Pickets were thrown out. 377 ground was descending a wide open ditch at the lower part. Our position was in a field with a few bushes scat tered about to the right of a swamp. moved to the left down the Boynton plank-road and took position. perhaps. we moved back to the Boynton plank-road. had assembled. which was thickly cov ered with undergrowth and having woods immediately be hind it. This position we held until dark. made it a point Colonel Gould says " We drove the Johnnies out of the first line.

I think. to strengthen the position. There were no pickets to our right. This being sufficient." and held up his pocket-flask as an evidence : ' ' of Yaw. bright night. an excellent soldier had the left. he ventured down the rest of the line without such precaution found the Sergeant at the left of the line in a state of some anxiety. found some of the men standing erect but be- . ed pits. : the defenses. up communication with our left. behind which the pickets would lie flat on the ground. A sergeant Henry Mead. the firing being kept up whenever there was anything visible on either side to fire at. He moved to the first post. seemed to understand what was wanted. The writer took position at the right of the line in the open field. The Confederates had the It was a clear. and for an hour there was hardly a shot fired. was quite pre carious. the writer took a trip along the posts to see how the boys were doing.some men. crouching down. . and our in the form of a Y. one man in the detail was Each post consisted of two or four fence rails laid across each other at an angle. because he could not communicate with the next post accordingly went around into the swamp to find the connecting pickets. but the interval was occupied in strengthening the lines. it will be noticed. place two rails with their ends across and lying in the angle flat on the ground. would push the two rails forward some distance. if to not than six more feet at a instructed were advance. as inasmuch were they occupying well-construct advantage. and. and then crawling up to the spot. About 10 o'clock there came a lull in the musketry. though they could not speak English. but no shots coming over. with his plate throw up a little dirt to strengthen hit. throwing up a little dirt as they had opportunity. and found a German officer and .378 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. the necessity of keeping . The officer said yaw. the writer returned along the . who. Taking advantage of this quiet state of things. and our shelter. good faith. was A mode of this man would procedure time. line again. By 9 o'clock our line had moved fully fifteen rods from the first position occupied. While getting over this fence. and the The men left joined the pickets of a German regiment.

which threw them into to again. of Confederates. a line of battle in blue. were seen on our left. but not a man there. I yelled to him to come back. yo great. every man having to hug the middle of the line . and then with colors flying moved forward with a yell. him men. that confusion. Says E. When the charge occurred and the brigade engaged fell back in our front. stopped on the picket line. and some of the boys said that we had better go back to the fence . : ' . unless they stop in our pits. They struck the slashed timber in front. They renewed their alignment Justin our rear. and yelling and said he was going after the that one of the men was afterward appeared wounded and that his comrade had gone to the rear with him. he halted. for he paid no attention. and our boys all rose in the pits and cheered them as they went on. two of our men were seen scurry ing to the rear. About this time. a general officer sent an order to shoot or bayo net every man who came back. and they fell back. 1 379 was reached the Confederate a brisk fire. a brisker fire than ever was opened upon our line. but as our orders were to advance the line. and in front and the firing grew very warm. This order was repeated by our Lieutenant with the addition. we remained most of us merely displaying greater affection than ever for mother earth. Running along the line. that he did not hear. looking like a skirmish line.OPENING THE CAMPAIGN fore the Ob 1865. Feeling the responsibility of the and soon The distance was position. ex cept the wounded. imme diately to our right. received a galling fire both in front and on the left flank from the body of skirmishers in our front. we saw coming from the woods. or he was so intently occupied. It The result of this was.' As a result all who came back in our front. in the vicinity of the swamp. ground. W. Burge "I was one of the men detailed on picket on the night of April 2d. Looking off to the left. Then for an hour we pickats suddenly opened at the 11 o'clock a number At about popped away enemy. This was about 12 o'clock. pace toward after the Sergeant going at a brisk the fence. just as the Sergeant had gone over the fence.

I hear the Yanks have been through our neighborhood. Bullock and I were on the same I had a short shovel and found another near the post. The writer never felt more like a murderer than he did on picking up the following letter. write and let me know what they did. but we could not hold them. I have written and writ- . principally on our right. that I DEAR RACHEL I have taken my seat to let you know am well at this time. and must have gone through the Confederate works. our regiment losing a heap of men. which I gave to George. who " find lay there lifeless : : " MARCH 27. youngish man. indicated an important movement. Frank has been sick. I don't think we made much in the We did not lose frolic. and men in their works. At day break we decided to advance arid see what was in our We went forward. Our men charged the Yanks' lines. 1865. The heavy cannonading during the night. but did not get into it. out of our many company. Saturday night we marched all night. and was a very hot time while it lasted. and about sunrise next morning we went into a fight. We have had bad times here. nothing but the bodies of some Confederate pickets. If there is any chance for a letter to come. It lasted about three hours. 1 have not had a letter since February 22d. and took them. George H. both worked till near morning making a rifle-pit. We were run out for a fight last night. " About 3 o'clock another line farther to our right charged. As soon as things became quiet they moved back to their command on the right. and I hope these few lines may you all enjoying the same blessing. would say to what regiment he belonged. found lines. evidently dropped from the hand of a dark-visaged. as the fire in our front suddenly ceased. I hope not very bad. but is better.380 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. for you do not know how badly I want to hear from home. still unfinished. and moving up to the enemy's front. though we could still see of one of our Union pickets. Henry King got wounded in the shoulder. body We had things pretty secure when orders came to go forward.

but do not know whether you receive them or You do not know what I would give to hear from not. and see how much he has grown. in winter Write soon. I want to see the baby and little Buddy. get a while. Such is human nature. from the standpoint of the sol On our side at dier. If it were not for hope. our nerves which had been held at a tension. little we realize the importance work performed." though our labors were perhaps trifling as compared with the aggregate of fighting. It is bad to have children and not know how they look. If Rachel should now chance to read it. but I cannot tell when. Root. the latter mortally and if regrets arose then at sight of the Confederate dead. to-day. 381 ten letters. I have forgotten how he looks. from listening to the roar of artillery and from participating in the animated scenes about us now relaxed and dull. . we had no ground for sympathy. Weary from loss of sleep and constant activity through the night. Well. Warner. and Wood had been severely wounded. she will at least know something of the feelings. with which her husband yielded up his life. too. The circumstances of their deaths may have been quite as pathetic as that of Ra chel's husband but for us. . For the most part our feelings then were quite the reverse of sympathetic. yet they were done at a critical juncture. " We are about twelve miles from Petersburg. what would we do ? I want to see you and the children very badly.OPENING THE CAMPAIGN OF 1865." quarters. Though did of that occasion or of the " Each had done his duty and had done no more. This letter was unsigned. least four men of Company H Mainka. they were impulsive and momentary. There were other forms in gray lying farther to the left where we passed through the lines. home " Will this war ever stop or not 7 It does not look like of heart maybe the Lord will out do not it. us after bless " I have a little hope of seeing you all some time. and let me hear from you all. and when no less results than the overthrow of . .

We went through the breastworks. and came up with the regiment at dark found that they had been heavily engaged during the day and lost ninety-seven men. .382 rebellion HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. That night on picket is a memory of which every man who participated may well be proud. and the triumph of the national cause were de pendent upon the fidelity and loyalty of every soldier en gaged. . but had gained an important victory.

seizing and oc cupying the enemy' s breastworks. nevertheless played a very prac tical and successful joke on the Confederates the next day. in accordance with orders received. They then pursued the enemy some two miles farther and joined battle. It appears that the regiment remained on the Boynton road. supporting the Second Division of the Fifth Corps.CHAPTER XXVIII. ENERAL SHERIDAN. and so our regiment came to be engaged. SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT. On the afternoon of that day our corps commander had been instructed by General Grant to throw forward his left and seize the White Oak Road. in attacking four thousand prisoners. on the morning of April 1st. General Humphreys accordingly despatched Miles' s Division for this purpose. they moved back over the same road some three miles. General Miles came to our front. advanced to the left. Says Colonel Gould " Before daylight. till the morning of April 2d. Pickett was forced back by the impetuous cavalry commander. which they had evacuated.M. a repulse due somewhat to the rain and the marshy character of the ground. though at first driven back at Five Forks by General Pickett. to Five Forks again. in his at tempt to get in Lee's rear. we were on the move by brigade front. which would prevent reenforcements being sent to the enemy. Just after daylight we came in sight of very formidable breastworks. when. aided by General Warren's corps. and a halt was called. April them at Dinwiddie Court-House. losing some 1st. and about 9 A. and asked me for a ser: .

384 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. .

Coming out of the We woods. were soon close up to the rebels. if SERGEANT JAMES BOG AN. Sergeant Parkhurst being one of the killed. I never knew that they received it. The signal was given. in order to get a better formation. Corporal . and the order was given. I called for a sergeant and two men to volun teer for this purpose. and then over. swinging into column and taking the road. which was all clear land but the excitement was such that the desire prevailed to charge. and the enemy concentrated their fire upon them. this wet piece of ground and We moved down and across ' Forward " ' ! When we were in easy range of the rebs. pieces of artillery facing us. and we were forced to fall back. Here I tried to call a halt. we again formed into line. 385 geant and two men for scouts. More responded than I could use. and in full reti eat. with a loss of ninety-two men and five officers. the Scanning willing faces. they opened a concentrated fire upon us that no troops could stand. to see if the works were abandoned. for I saw the rebels were more than anxious to have us advance up the hill. as the rebels were seen on an opposite hill across a low piece of land. and but a minute to decide in. together with their artillery and three hundred prisoners. having I selected Sergeant Parkhurst and the two More brothers of Com pany K.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT. with the mouths of several through a small stretch of timber. and the works were ours. While we were re-forming. They discovered the enemy some ways from the works. I understood afterward that General Miles promised them they came back alive that they should have some special recogni tion for what they did. They went on and up to the works. . safely en sconced behind breastworks. Shortly after the whole division charged together. and they also had to fall back. and we advanced to the works. the Fourth Brigade on our left came up.

Our troops immediately advanced across the railroad. New York Herald the of the correspondent following gave account of this affair at the tiihe : April 2. regardless of the hailstorm of bullets and shell which met their advance." In this charge two men of Company A. Sergeant James C. was one of the first to reach one of the rebel guns. and as our lines reached their works they broke and fled. " Tlie rebel works captured. E. and wheeling it around. it being on an eminence from which an open field sloped nearly a half mile.' we told him number " ' .386 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. But nothing seems impossible to our brave troops. "We captured in the affair four hundred " BATTLE BEFORE PETERSBURG. " 1865. James Bogan and David Winans. Bogan. " The position held by the rebels was a very strong one. of Company M. The enemy fought desperately. Fourth New York Artillery. including thirteen officers. distinguished themselves by capturing two The pieces of artillery and turning them on the enemy. He stated in our presence that the loss of the South Side Railroad was something like a bless ing in disguise. . Captain Charles E. in token of surrender. but it was not in rebel human nature to withstand the onslaught. acting on the staff of General R. and that the rebels expected to win their independence within a month. among whom was Colonel Brown. and they were soon sweeping across the open space. he loaded and fired at the retreating rebels. of the Confederate engi neers. YA.. Frank Denio. where they were halted and dispositions made to hold it. though many remained behind waving their handkerchiefs. Lee. The battle-flag of the Forty-seventh North Carolina was captured by Private Frank Denio. capturing one of their flags. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. This occurred at Sutherland Station. Shorter. was among the number captured. After firing the gun he left it and pursued and captured a large of them. of the One Hundred and Fortyeighth North Carolina. and thirty-six prisoners. Certainly. of Company M.

had obliqued toward the enemy's line. As we showed ourselves they opened the ball by firing on us first. also another line in the open field about midway between them and us. lined on either side by a dense growth of alderbushes. and I was one. in his movement to the left. Tabe Cool was on my right and Hank practice very long. when we came to a large cleared field. of Company M. We reached this. for they made the splinters fly out of the rails We did not hold ourselves up for target right lively. striking it some distance below the First Division. who succeeded in capturing a battle-flag. line of battle we found strong line of skirmishers in pits about tAventy rods in front of them. furnishes the following interesting account of the affair : " The morning of April 3d we passed through their outer line of works and through a field into some woods. which was still in the woods.' In the mean time. We advanced out of the woods. and saw that they had a strong line of works running parallel with a turnpike road just in their rear. Upon meeting General Miles. where a small stream of water ran. General Humphreys shook him hear tily by the hand. Eaton on my left. and were feeling our way up through the field toward their line of pits when we noticed some shots coming from our We took a look back. and congratulated him upon his splendid ' success." Frank Denio. the Second Division. where and just beyond we formed and advanced. and had gone about five rods when we had to climb over a ten-rail fence. As we left the fence there was a gradual descent toward the centre of the field. and found everything all lovely for about half a mile. line on the right. Also that they had a their hospital tents. and they seemed to fancy firing at such high marks. led by General Humphreys.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT.11 1 took a peep up across this clearing. Here a call was made for vol unteer skirmishers. and found that our right and rear. 387 we intend to give you your liberty in that time. having moved upon a road running parallel with it and connected with the right of the First Division. We started on through the woods. had not ad- . and came out on the other side.

Tabe Cool lay quivering like an ox that had just received a blow in the head from an axe. for I had noj-ecollection of having climbed over at all. The Fourth Brigade was there. where so many of our wounded had taken refuge. " Somehow or other. but though ' ' : staggered to his feet. I made a bold dash to gain the protection of the pile of dirt thrown up from the pit just at my left. Their . so I had no chance to get back. This time we passed the alders. and I. and did not dare fire a shot at them for fear of hitting Eaton. B. Our line on the right soon drove the and we advanced Johnnies. and exactly in rear of a church or school-house which stood exactly in front of their works. and saw the Johnnies rush out and set the old buildings on fire in the field in front of their works.' at the same time firing a shot through his knapsack. and I found my self behind a large stump about fifteen rods from their works. standing behind a good tree. We made a few more advances. behind the friendly pile of earth. I yelled to him Are you much hurt ? He made no reply. Do not for it that we went over was so close to the ground that we get could not crawl under. " Over the fence to my right front was a cleared field. pass very close to my ear. We then made a grand break We must have jumped very for the woods and high fence. They did not come as far to the right as where I was. O. and when he did come out on our side some one said Halt. again over the fence. and whirling around several times. He halted. when I felt a shot ' : . high. As they were between the pits and their works. saw them take him up through the field to their works. I lay there and saw the advance and defeat of the Third Brigade on our left. and that was the last I ever saw finally reached the alders of Cool. vanced as fast as we. my breast. and that we had the enemy almost in our rear as well as in front. and drove the Johnnies from their pits into their main line of works. and about the same distance across as the field on my left. as As I threw myself forward on it had hit a brick. I turned over and looked back. and it struck something. poor Eaton got tangled in the alderbushes. you Yankee S. .388 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and just before sunset they made a charge and carried the entire works in their front..

they left one piece of artillery. I quickly stepped through and drew my gun to my shoulder. and so I changed my mind. To the left of the church they still held fast to the works. or rather laid down behind them to escape the artillery that was firing on them from our lines some distance to the left. " I ran across the field to a point on the road just oppo site the farm-house. tore The Fourth part of the collar from my fatigue coat. and we stopped and took a hand at this by loading and firing it a few times (I think twice) at a battery of two pieces that was still in the line about fifty rods to our left (their right). and I was going to climb a large gate which opened into this field. Suddenly I espied a large pin which fastened the gate. and passing over my shoulder at the right. as the enemy were not over five rods from us. this the works of carried portion of their Brigade having line. " Private Boughton was on my left. and pulling this out. started for the rear along a road to their right and rear. the man from Company F doing most of the work.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT. but having a ball in my gun that lacked about six inches of being down. as he seemed to understand light This battery soon limbered up. and artillery practice. when a rebel that stood in front of the church let go on me. the Johnnies were already getting to the rear and dis appearing as fast as they could by jumping down to a deep cut through which the South Side Railroad ran. and a man from Com pany F. I did not make a very successful shot. and so was about to they got away. " As they ran from the works in front of the church. 389 left came close to the fence on my right. " At this time there was no one but the Johnnies in the works. I went directly to their works. where the road passed through . and they were hugging the ground closely. and we three were the only ones of our picket line that went ahead. and as the battery passed to the rear I tried to shoot one of the horses and capture the whole thing. but it was a dangerous proceeding. " We ran in close behind the church. and the ball struck my gun at the lower band. and I got up and ran ahead as they advanced. fire.

but these are facts. and I was a mere lad. LIGHT. and who immediately came running up and over the works. entire confidence in . That night our regiment bivouacked on the field at Suth- . if alive. but I know we got all the Johnnies about three or four hundred and I was one of the men to guard them to the rear. I saw a man somewhat in advance of his regiment pick up the same. by us three men. and that was the end of this little affair.' " It was a long time ago. still has. as we were the only Yanks inside of the rebel line at this time." Every man in the regiment who knew Frank Denio had. but it makes me fighting mad now even when I think of it. in fact. I turned the colors over to a Lieutenant Granger. and he turned them over to some officer. What troops first came up I do not remember. and pass on after the retreat ing rebels. A medal was awarded to a man of some Pennsylvania regi seventh North Carolina 1 : 1 ment. an officer on General Miles' s staff. at the suggestion of General Miles. signalling to our skirmishers. And that is all I have to show for a piece of foolhardiness on the field at Sutherland's Station. nevertheless. as well as this stretch of works to the left of the church. and. who had been lying in front of their works all this time. I knew him well. " Gould was satisfied that I was entitled to the Major credit of capturing the colors. He was wholly devoid of fear. and so backed discharge with the fact that I was called to the front of the brigade the next morning and complimented for the same by General my Nugent. I was not with my regiment. were taken. As the Second Brigade was advancing at this time and near the enemy's works. and one of those impetuous fellows whose enthu siasm would carry him through any danger. which. It is saying a great deal. throw them down.390 HEAVY GUNS AND lines. and waving them over his head. who said saw a man pick up a stand of colors. and had not been since we passed through the rebel hospital in the forenoon.his statement about this affair. toward our and picked up their colors the Fortygot on the top of the works and waved them back and forth. and did not see them again until we were marching back with the prisoners.

The regiment was relieved from the skirmish line. It appears that Lee. and thirteen colors. and a vigorous dash of our cavalry resulted in the capture of some three hundred prisoners. and en camped near the Nintercomac. On the morning of the 5th we had marched about two miles when we overtook the rear guard of the enemy near SERGEANT FRANK DENIO. of the 3d our regiment fell in and marched to the south some fourteen miles. of the 6th.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT.. and bi vouacked. three pieces of artillery. A detachment was sent to City Point with prisoners." says Colonel Gould. Longstreet arriving The line of our at Rice's Station at daylight of the 6th. and the officer.House to the westward. and he must fight or surrender. and drove them about We lost that day. nearly as many wagons. as Amelia Springs. That night it was ascertained that Richmond and Peters burg had been abandoned. passed the Fifth Corps during the day. The next morning we were on our way at 6 A. we encountered an officer ac The Fourth was on the companied only by an orderly. taking many prisoners. with the probable object of gain ing North Carolina to unite with Johnston. and rejoined the brigade at 10 A. and that General Lee's army was in full retreat to the south. eighteen men wounded.M. remarked. crossed Namozine Creek. " On the " as evening of the 6th. finding he could not break through at Jetersville. We have Lee headed off now. moved his columns west. skirmishers. At 6 A.' ' . riding by my side a short distance. 391 erland's Station. right of the brigade. we were marching in column.M. five The regiment was immediately sent out miles We engaged the enemy. At Sailor' s Creek the enemy made a stand. columns was marching immediately changed from the di rection of Amelia Court.M.

He came back. At & P.' Riding back a short distance. and coming up on the other ' : side. and opened fire upon them. Our regiment followed the cavalry at a breakneck pace on " General the morning of the 7th. and to be ready to skirmish at 4 A. and taking in the situation. to us was given the privilege of opening the battle. and came upon the rebels moving on a cross-road. Mahone's Division were destroying this bridge when Barlow's Division of our corps came up in time to seize it. and at the same time destroy. Says Colonel Gould Sheridan assigned the troops on their arrival at Jetersville. I asked the orderly who the officer was. Lieutenant Washburn was among the first to reach this point. supposed every one else was like himself. and talked for a minute. with the other half. crossed the Appomattox at Farmville. we found some three hundred Union soldiers who had been prisoners. We moved out in the forenoon about a mile from our starting-point. The hope of reaching Danville now appeared to be abandoned by the Confederates. which was over waist-deep. and await orders. General Sheridan. who would rather fight than not. " Not knowing who the officer was.392 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. crossed at High Bridge. saying that our regiment should have a chance to fight the next day. not seeing any insignia of rank. with one half the remaining force. we got an order to camp for the night." April 1th. centering at the large wooden bridge that the rebels were doing their best to cross. Word was immediately sent back to General Miles. acknowledged the salute. Phil Sheridan. I called on the regiment to give three cheers for General Sheridan. and Gordon. They were given with a will and a tiger. With a look of contempt. who came out himself with a section of The skirmish light artillery. His example was quickly followed. sprang into the stream. some of our own regiment being among the . he replied. Longstreet. line pushed on quickly. Our line was hardly established when an order came to move the Fourth to the rear about one hundred yards. and as we were the first of the infantry there.M. Our other two divisions were moving to reach the Lynchburg stage road.M.

and cap turing many prisoners. and by the time we were fully equipped for action the battery opened. I kicked things and left. Our regiment camped the night of the 7th near Farm- . started off. driving the enemy across the Appomattox River. strong enough to hold back our skirmish line. Sheridan and the Fifth Corps. but while orders went back for some artillery. we were waiting I put on my red drawers. It was the There on the op finest sight I had seen for many a day. and various other right ral wearing apparel were scattered around. Such a skedad dling was seldom if ever seen as occurred across the val full view. Toward night we came out on to a main road. lay Lee's ley. Walking up to it. and in : M army. We were danc ing around half dressed when we heard the rattle of the guns in a road to our right. and found the rebels with a small force thrown across it. and the others changed for the clothes they had captured. We kept up a running skirmish fight left all be day. took up the chase on the early 8th. New red shirts. which had been foremost in column all day. about a half a mile from us. on the north bank of the Appomattox. drawers. We soon came to the edge of the woods. Company lied on the centre. and soon cleared the road/' The The Confederate line of march that day was strewn with abandoned baggage of all sorts. pursuit when about half way through a piece of woods. posite side of a valley. grabbing what he thought would be of value. charged this work. and took a peep out. I noticed a large pile of leaves. While lay quiet.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT. morning of the also many cannon and prisoners. Late in the afternoon the gallant Custer reached Appomattox Station and there captured the supplies which were intended for Lee's hungry troops. and each man. that part of the line resem bling a lot of Punch and Judy tramps. Irish Brigade. that the enemy in their haste to get away hind them. We did not show ourselves. 393 number." April 8th. During the night of the 7th Lee' s army moved westward again. on the south bank. and the Second and Sixth Corps. Says Frank Denib " While in of the Johnnies the afternoon of the 7th.

Lost one man here before we had gone twenty feet from the ravine. an orchard. with a Johnnie be hind every available cover. the and at dawn were on the tramp again. when there appeared on our left. and came toward me. We engaged enemy the next morning about five miles from Buscam Court House. and found the line in a deep wooded ravine. some hay-stacks and farm buildings beyond. alternately fighting infantry and Bosser's " About noon we were advancing across a field.' and they dropped them. till afternoon. with about thirty rounds of ammunition. one of the wounded rebel cavalry-men had thrown away. swung gave more than ten rods into the woods on the other side this field when there arose out of the leaves six strapping John I had a Spencer carbine that nies. They were glad to quit. a squad of about thirty of said cavalry. for we were too smart for them. and we soon took the advance rear. again the rebs did not there but a few as our line on the right soon stay minutes. . and could not drive the Johnnies out I think we had about thirty-five men. with cleared fields. and they would take care of them. They tried to get between us and the woods." says Frank Denio. around and them a cross We had not gone fire. Part of Companies F and H were stalled here. Drop those guns. They came up to a high fence that ran along the woods. I think his name was Snyder think he died right where he fell. shooting my chum. Followed them . and as we got behind the nearest trees they opened on us. ' cavalry. and I passed them toward our rear and told them to keep on till they struck the advancing troops. . but did not. " We had not been more than an hour and a half on the " before we were ordered to de reserve. We crawled up the bank and made a run for them.394 ville. We did so. . of course. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. I said. behind an old upturned root. and drove them out of their works. who was just to my He went back to the right. Dave Bowman. so I was well fixed for most anything that might turn up. coming out of some thin woods. and got about fifteen rods from the woods. and put them out with the help of the other men. ploy and advance.

They were just throwing down a rail fence so as to jump their horses through. I stepped to the corner of the house and fired the eight shots from my carbine as rapidly as I could. I then placed myself later I About fifteen minutes on the other side of the high rail fence alongside of Hunt as soon as I could. We kept just be in of the troops skirmishers and front hind the advancing in the rear. We got too far to the right. and he came out and took a ham that I had. while we sat in the bushes laughing at them. for our cavalry were on the right flank looking after things. Here the rebels had built what was called Round Fort by some." This lack of ammunition had to be proven to the satisfac- until about 3 P. I saw about twenty of our supposed friends (Johnnies) making for the house. and slipping around the house. when ordered back to our brigade. and while at a house I saw some cavalry about a half mile to our right. But we came very near paying dearly for this.M. of General Miles' s staff. K. and stepping back into the thick bushes. made for the woods close at hand. " Says Colonel Gould : " On the 8th we skirmished were relieved and joined about 6 P. 395 They did as ordered. but Orville Hunt and looked again and saw no signs of them. and I went ahead. Major Church. which we we .. Our line was relieved shortly after this (as we were out of ammunition) and ordered to assemble on the centre. but accidentally taking a glance back of the house across a field. Telling Major Church that we had but two hundred and eighteen men. and I told Hunt we were all O. A Connecticut regiment had charged this work and been repulsed. " men did. Three or four cavalry -men came around the house each way with their carbines in their hands and looked in vain for us.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT.. looked back at the house. and took in all the houses we came across. rode up to General Nugent with an order for the Fourth to charge this same work. We then passed to the right and struck the troops. at Farmville. who was in the house. I yelled to Hunt.M. and hardly three rounds of ammunition to a man. he turned his horse and dashed off. They had seen us also. which most of the I did not. and came up with them at the place where Lee's heaquarter train was taken.

" firing On the evening of the 7th General Grant had sent a letter to General Lee asking the surrender of his army. As quick as the rebels got the fire in their rear they broke and ran this. to which. COLONEL ROBERT NUGENT. " We were excused. We had orders not to fire. and some other Says Frank Denio : brigade did the business and were most beautifully whipped. We crossed the road. and found ourselves facing the rear of the rebels. and having them inspected. guns in hand. I think. and after several . with the Fifth and . The flight and pursuit were kept up without any regard to this correspondence. and a reply received that after noon. A second letter was sent on the 8th.396 tion of HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. we came up with Longstreet's skirmishers. The cavalry. a negative reply was returned. which went to prove that the Johnnies were not all dead yet. howeven At 11 o'clock of the 9th inst. Major Church returned with orders for the Fourth to move to the right. were in their front. The temptation for the Fourth to fire was something beyond control. watching for the advance in their front." The regiment was moved a short distance in front of the brigade. who were packed in behind their works. Major Church by laying the cartridge-boxes on the ground in front of each man. We were then ordered to move to the right. : Says Colonel Gould " After we were fur nished with ammunition. with orders not to fire until a brigade which had been ordered to charge in front had become engaged. and pass to the rear of where the rebels were intrenched. within an hour. Twenty-fourth Corps. and ammuni tion enough borrowed to give each man ten rounds. was the last the of done by any infantry Army of the Potomac. across a road.

U. BREVET LIEUTENANT-COLONEL.MAJOR SEWARD F. 8. V. . GOULD.

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' " The Twenty-sixth Michigan was in front as skirmish ers for our division. we never hated except that they struck at the old flag. we the living. Artillery. and they claim that it was through that M ' ' : ' : regiment that the negotiations for the surrender of Lee's army took place. General ? rushed to the road and said he said Lee has surrendered. until on the one side and on the other a quar ter of a million of men fell and yet the men we fought.SUTHERLAND'S STATION AND THE FINAL PURSUIT. that great company of heroic souls that were and are the Army of the Potomac. ! Dear old army . " That same afternoon we went up to the woods and. . Says Frank Denio " Company M lay exactly across the turnpike up which we had advanced. It was that Major. stood face to face with the army that had looked at us for four years across the flaming pit men with whom. So it rises and stands before me the ranks all full. 397 halts and advances. and when the we took had to break the stacks to let place negotiations the officers pass up and down this road. which they had brought from Richmond. Its tents are struck. " The Johnnies sent in a flag of truce. swelling together the roll of honor. . in a hundred grapples. . sep arated by a double line of pickets. we had fought with remorseless desperation and all the terrible en ginery of death.Gen down this road and through Company eral Rollins. we halted the last time in the last line of battle the Army of the Potomac ever formed. " We stacked arms here just as we stood.'* . its fires are dead . they the immortal. . Grant' s chief of staff. and that is the end of it. So it was as a skirmish line but as a line of battle it belongs to the old Fourth New York Heavy . folded the banners that lighted its swelling way silent the bugles that beckoned to fame across death's abysses van ished the embattled hosts that shone in the morning sun scattered the friendly band that shoulder-to-shoulder stormed the gates of glory. and which led almost in a direct line through and into Lee's army. came on his horse when we And What is it. and it came : through our line at this spot in a United States express wagon.

We are permitted to refer to the experiences of Major Knower. while men returned to the command after we were yet in the Held. horror. Some were more fortunate than others in the : circum stances of their capture. EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. We were so unfortunate as to have a good many of our men captured a few at the battle of the Wilderness. and others. Colonel Corliss.CHAPTER XXIX. Quite a number of these Lee's surrender. McKeever. A. disgust. inside the Confederacy was marked by experience one of the four Johnnies dropping his carbine to the level and two My first of my breast and demanding my watch. surrounded us. some at the North Anna and Cold Harbor. Hayden. cnHE chronicles of the captured ! What and pro feelings of pity. he asked for my money. where. we adjectives halted and obeyed the demand to throw down arms. Sergeants Wright. files dropping out. we were greeted with the command to throw down our swords The invitation being coupled with lurid and come in. found sympathy do they create. Marsh. I had a few hard- . Bunyea. Sands. Lieutenant Peloubet. In the act of mildly fibbing. by saying I had none of that commodity. Hubbell. at that time very popular in both armies. at Ream's Station. Their line advanced. Finding I had none. Major Knower says " When Lieutenant Flint and myself broke through the screen of shrubbery and found ourselves in presence at short range of a line of Hampton' s dismounted cavalry. as already shown. I instinctively put my hand upon my vest-pocket. indeed. but the : chief portion of them.

They then escorted us to the Provost Guard and turned us over. Yank.' at the same time throwing toward him my pouch. Human nature.' Suit ing action to words. The two to escort us to the rear but Johnnies proceeded remaining filled with a laudable desire not to be too quick in reporting back for duty. as the bullets were incessantly spotting the trees around us. and also from the necessity of lying about them to the next comer. until it was too late for our guards to get back to the front in time to do any fighting. however. snatched off my hat. When. fair play I'll trade with you.' giving me a Virginia clay pipebowl with a reed stem. he re lieved me of all my funds. and there is no insurance against losses through warfare. for. they moved at a very slow pace. His conscience seemed to smite him. . and started to follow his companion. a fact which. and amicably discussed the state of the war. Agreeing to this. too. I gained a relic which I still have. my only consolation being that Lieutenant Burt. for thrusting his hand in the pocket. . ing exchange and threw his own greasy oh. that fair was no robbery.' I have a dim recollection of seeing just the same kind of conduct on our side of the in Washington. remarking that if we were going to be hit. so that the wounds might be slighter. he said. I called after him. it would be better to take the chances as far in the rear as possible. 399 earned dollars. three . of Company B. too. Aroused by this last indignity for even a worm will turn and the pipe had cost ten dollars l Say. and lost a good pipe. turning back. you've take the tobacco. in exchange for my meerschaum. Flint and myself pointed out to them as a very injudicious proceeding. He then started to join One of his comrades remark his command in the advance. ' lines.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. Then catching sight of the stem of a meerschaum pipe that was protruding from the side pocket of my coat. His next action made my pardonable false hood a truth. we all found cover behind the largest trees. he reckoned he'd take that. would feel the loss more than I. it being his pipe that he had loaned me. { got the pipe ' . Here. and cherish by the trade. is all alike. Johnny. how greasy home-made head-covering at my feet. he grabbed the pipe.

Before he reached his headquarters the rebels had broken through the main line. bitter darkness rested like a pall all around us. and any money found concealed would be confiscated to the Confederate Govern ment. while our clothes were searched for possible weapons or probable money. when exchanged. and held it so that he rode right into their ranks. and the rain fell in torrents. before referred to as bringing us the order from General Gibbon to hold our posi tion. and surrendered five dollars greenback. I still hold the five-dollar Ushered in blueback. and here commenced the first experience of prison life. but darkness." " They quickly possessed them Says Colonel Corliss selves of everything the writer had except his pants and shirt. it would be accounted for and returned to us when we should be exchanged but we would all be searched. anyhow. lightning flashed through the air with startling effect. and have since advanced in value. About the first face I saw there was that of Captain Porter. will ad mit I received six months afterward. at that time were at the rate of twenty-five to one. whose prisoners we were. A group of some two hundred officers was packed in the lower room serving as an entrance hall. a five. We received exaggerated of of our statements. and grouped us about a large. I weakly yielded to the voice of the tempter. Then after dressing we were sent up a ladder to the second floor. And to give the Southern Confederacy its just due. As greenbacks dollar Confederate bill in return therefor. course.400 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Here Ser Dick he be Turner anathema geant (may maranatha) made us a speech in which he informed us that if we volun tarily gave up what money we had. but it was bad enough. we stripped to the buff. . we reached Libby prison. Thunder began to reverberate through the heavens. marched us quite a distance back. so had all firing. days afterward. By 8 o'clock in the evening the rain had ceased. struggling fire. it was just at nightfall. : Wade Hampton's cavalry. By this time darkness prevailed. losses. and will swap even with any one. where we were turned over to the tender mercies of the infantry. parties of five into an inner room. which was all I had left.

which we were told would be our first stop. we started for Petersburg. quite a loss.us over the battle field. It is an oftrepeated tale." " Of Says Lieutenant Peloubet : The officers to Libby my capture by Hamp on August 25th. Petersburg. seven teen hundred and sixty-two missing. which might have been averted had we returned to our army on the night of the 24th. . ' ' . Prison. would make too long a narrative to put in this histon's cavalry. It did not take long to form the line. then These bright. It was a sad spectacle to see our dead lay there stark ' ' ! naked. made a weird spectacle I shall never forget.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. the rebels running to and It was the fro. smoky lights burning here strip the dead. Fall in fell upon our listening ears. reserves. In the afternoon Richmond was reached. . where but a few hours before we had fought so bravely and lost the naked dead and wounded. turned over to the tender mercies of the militia Boys from fifteen to eighteen years of age. weary tramp of twenty-four hours. We Yanks were shiv ering and hoping for something to eat. night of the 27th ere we reached the outskirts of Peters burg. We were Belle Island and other prison hells. and soon. flanked by our captors. 1864. also nine guns. stripped by the Johnnies of every article of clothing the long. They marched . where our captors turned us over to the home guard 'although as vivid in my memory as though it was but yes terday. . the dismay at finding a myself prisoner of war. These were as considerate as could be expected the former were as mean and insulting as The enlisted men were marched to they could be. when we were placed aboard the cars. they were entirely different in their treatment of us from the soldiers in the field. The rebels detailed for this work had large light ed pine torches which they would stick in the ground. with scarcely a mouthful to eat our arrival at Hog Island. 401 for correct reports show our losses to have been six hun dred and ten officers and men killed and wounded. * . where we rested until morning. In a little while the command. The horror of marching over the almost de serted battle-field. I shall say nothing. and there in the dense darkness.

402 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. but was repulsed.. knives.' and I got over dar." " I was in the Alfred Bunyea. yelled out Yank. " We were fed on corn.' as they called the clothes. money.bread after this Down ' search for contra band of war. Resistance was useless. They formed us in line. one flight of stairs. and then we were put into cattle cars and sent on to Richmond.' of the more strict than at search. you drop dat gun and git over dar. watches. we in a few hours were changed into a mongrel crowd. robbery. and started with others to leave. and the door was shut. A ' : ' : . our clothes and effects. we found a group of Confederate officers seated under a tree. through another. or else an exchange was made. and one by one we were marched up to that tree and stripped naked. of Company A. were returned to us. and up Prison. and on our way to the rear. I cannot say what room I occupied in that famous Hotel de I went in at one door. pouring in. only repetition Petersburg. and had to stand quietly and see our clothes examined and searched for money and valuables. tory. says breastworks at Ream's Station. a Libby.' I never heard such vile epithets from any lips as were hurled at us by the women of Rich mond as we passed their houses. ' the principal street we marched. It was a perfect ovation of curses. such as they did not keep. until we reached the gates of Here. and then after taking all they wanted. " Our treatment up to the time of arrival at Hog Island at the time seemed hard enough. and I need all the space I can have to tell the more acute story of life in rebel prisons of war. whistling Yankee Doodle. but then our hardships had only begun. a rally was made by the boys on the right. and shoes. One poor fellow was strung up by the thumbs for hours because he resisted this . when the Johnnies. handing us worn-out shoes in place of good boots keeping almost everything of value and while we came into Petersburg fairly clothed in United States uniform. etc. Many a patched but ternut coat covered the back so lately proudly wearing the The writer was fortunate enough to only exchange hat blue. " Upon our arrival at Petersburg.

a clerk in the prison. near the river.' The last part of this proposition proved to be all in their minds.' have your " One day we saw a batch of prisoners taken away. and We were the third batch. way to the floor above. kicked .EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. Libby Prison. we fared pretty well. and kept us there over night and the next day and put us in We The Johnnies used to approach us with the remark Well. when the guard ordered him back. They searched us every day. and when you are paroled. and a guard was put there to wr atch. ' : have any greenbacks. Says Charles Marsh we were packed so closely that we all had to stand. to brier roots. was covered all up. a small piece of corn-bread and bacon once every day. When the prisoner reported the pro posed escape of his comrade to the Lieutenant in charge. we will give them back to you. marched all night. Yank. and was about to swim the river." " When first put in Libby Prison. would roll them up in a cud and put them in their mouths. if you until evening.M. up greenbacks we got on Belle Island. and we were started off around by Dinwiddie Court-House. took everything we had that they wanted. : famous for his cruelties to prisoners. They used to allow us to go out of the prison on the Manchester After the stockade. The Johnnies searched us. One of our * : . with a breathing hole left. Dick Turner. but some fellowprisoner gave him away. then shipped us to Richmond were there about a week. intending to skip after dark. you want to give them up. were taken to Saulsbury Prison. the next day. and pretend to put in their pipes and smoke them. In the morning one of our comrades was found in a dying condi tion. and the next day a second lot. Sometimes our boys would tear them before their eyes. in North Carolina. 403 heavy thunder shower came up. but instead. the officer said You are a rascal you ought to brains blown out. dug out. side. where we often dug number dug a big hole one day. and arrived in Petersburg about 2 o'clock P. The fellow in the hole waited until it was dusk. and getting into it. came upstairs on his and seeing the dying man. and we crowded from him to give him room and avoid trampling on him.

We were not allowed to go near or look out of the windows. and a very small piece of listed : As corn-bread in nearly three days. the experiences of the two classes were some what different. but the memory of these and similar inhuman acts that I have witnessed rankles as an unhealed sore. and many had not had as much as that. I saw a major shot and killed for just stepping one foot over the dead line pure wanton mur der.404 HEAVY GUNS AND in the side. " About four hundred officers occupied this room. I said: 'Don't you know that man is dying?' The look Turner gave me convinced me that silence was golden in this instance at least. Lieutenant Peloubet speaks as follows "I was in a room about forty feet wide and one hundred feet long." the officers were kept entirely separate from the en men." Some of the officers fared better than others. but he was commended and furloughed for his gallant con duct. C. I had eaten but half an ear of roasted corn. that was the one comfort of Libby. " At Saulsbury. probably from the fact that they formed the acquaintance of rebel officers. We did not fully appreciate this till we reached other pens. and we all slept in one bed. him Not being initiated in prison discipline. We were tired and hungry. tin plate. Two meals a day were served to us mostly very fair wheat bread and a small piece of boiled fresh beef in the morning and bean soup in the evening. was the famous Libby Prison. with nearly all our boys. a spoon. I can forgive them all else.. LIGHT. two small biscuits. " We had plenty of water. and clad in clothing occupied by other tenants before we got them. I spent just one month in Libby. " We arrived so late in the afternoon that supper had been served before we got there. The first place of confinement. and obtained various privileges through such ac- " . We tried to get at the sentry who did the cruel deed. N. at Richmond. perfectly destitute of furniture. and cup. except each one was allowed a blanket. We could wash. Of this place.

and have my * : valise sent 's home by express. the regiment and myself were gobbled up by the rebels at Ream's Station. Watts. more forcible than polite. My shoulder-straps are in Send for them. " WILLIAM B. The whole company is possession. Where we had looked for tender sympathy we found only hard-hearted jeers and laughter. Flint. First Lieuten ants Chichester. of course.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED.. the loudest in welcoming their com rades in misfortune as they slowly climbed the ladder in ' ' . and write to me.' fresh fish. from the coming light below. Tiere -nine men. He was a genuine good fellow. " DEAR FOLKS A change has come over the spirit of my and I am now a member of the renowned institu dreams.' filled the air. and were. the first new-comers caught on. a chorus of fresh fish. quaintance. Stifling our sorrows as best we could. mingled with all sorts of remarks of a per sonal nature relative to captured coffee-boilers and sich. This. KNOWER. although I had one bullet put through my coat-sleeve and one through my hat. " Find out how Love to send letters.' Nine other officers of tion whose name heads my letter. on the 25th. and while endeavoring to apologize to an unseen sufferer. Corliss. brought out the usual compliments. " RICHMOND. and Peloubet. letter : 405 This may be inferred from the following " LIBBY PRISON. August 28. VA. Knower Second Lieuten ants Dearborn. especially by the Major who conducted us to Petersburg. : . perhaps. I am unhurt." : Lieutenant Knower' s experience is here given " The room in Libby Prison was intensely dark to us. Barnes. It was hard. thirty " The officers here are Major Williams. and the first groping steps of the new arrival was apt to bring him stumbling over the legs of some older victim who had retired for the night. Yanderpool. 1864. Write to the commander of the Fourth Heavy (New York Artillery). to all the dear ones at home. Since our capture we have been treated very well.

It after 12 o'clock the motley crew join and silence had settled down upon the prison. but I noticed that no one seemed inclined to enliven the occasion by song. with at least one thought to give me There could be no picket duty that night. during which attack we could plainly see the shells bursting in the air and hear the sound of the guns. and was comparatively sheltered from the weather. the commander told us that we must stand in that position for 'two hours. It was swept out twice a day by colored men. was undoubtedly the best they had in the Confederacy. if not graceful. that we indulged in singing Union songs until long after taps. I consolation ' pect of being liberated forthwith by the entrance of the Union troops. had running water and a bath-tub on each of the two upper floors. head to the turn. we were all so elated with the seeming pros wall. it was not as comfortable a place to live in as was William's Hotel. penalty of being shot if we left our places or sat down. When we was organized were confined at Saulsbury Prison pen a plot for escape of the whole number confined . under ' . ment upon " us. Groping around among the unseen forms stretched out upon the floor.' Libby Prison. the rebel relief guard marched into the prison and routed us all up form ing us into four ranks on the floor. I found a vacant place. however. where we were confined. scrubbed twice a week. LIGHT. I remember one night after the attack upon Fort Harrison.' At the time no notice was taken of our patriotic zeal. to the performers who had brought the punish ' . and after we had been dismissed the compliments of those who did not or could not sing were many.' until the candles had nearly burned down the time was not quite two hours. after the search was before the last man had come to sank to sleep. and we stood there with the guard surrounding us. but at 2 o'clock next morning. judging from my experience of others.406 HEAVY GUNS AND below stairs. or even the bar racks at Fort Ethan Allen. their muskets at a ready. The long room was dimly lighted by a few tallow dips. Still. and from what I have learned of other prisons. and lying down. as the dips were miserable affairs and burned rapidly.

I ' back and forth by means of papers wrapped around stones. and in an hour every officer was on the cars bound for Danville. for the purpose of drawing rations. before the contemplated break.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. I think we could have astonished them. and had we made the attempt. . When the relief marched in a quick-sighted Sergeant saw it. while the stone flew across. the two guards locked in with us occupying the lower one. There were only two guns to take. as we could then gobble both reliefs. each under the command of a sergeant.' but communications were readily passed some eight thousand in all. artillery guarding us. There the paper lay unnoticed by the sentinels for about an hour. of with a section but two regiments. At 4 o'clock that afternoon a strong guard was marched in the enclosure. we were imprisoned in the two upper stories of a tobacco warehouse. perhaps. which was to have taken place at 2 o'clock the next morning their guard being changed at even houss. The plan failed by a mere ac In the enclosure the officers were separated from cident. one at each angle of the officers' side of the enclosure. the men by a line of eighteen guards patrolling between two dead lines. while their limbers were just behind them. all ready for our use. In the afternoon. then picked it up and read it. wrapped the paper around the stone so loosely that it dropped between the dead lines. thus giving us a chance to capture thirty-six muskets and cartridge-boxes at the outset. and the officers who were in the conspiracy all knew their There were parts and were prepared to carry them out. both already loaded with canister. and neither defended with any obstructions. Va. It was a great pity. for the enlisted men had been organized by the Johnnies in companies of one hundred men. while others patrolled . we could have swamped them by mere weight of numbers. there 407 think the plan was feasible. a successful capture of the section would cer tainly make things lively that morning but it was not to be. from nervousness. Each camp of this regiment being in short range of the guns when fired to the rear. and thus armed take the guns by assault the officer whose duty it was to throw over the paper notifying the men of the time. " At Danville.

hoofs. that the utmost jealousy ex. and horns portions of most every other part we frequently discovered. or ' ' ' in lieu boiled beef served at four in the afternoon. apparently. I took what I may now say with pride was a stunner of a chew (spoiling the enemy. for convenience of distribution of rations. Yank. The dis tribution generally gave each member about a quart of muddy. perverse nature of mankind. to each share. more in sorrow than in anger. Fridays by what was in courtesy called pea soup. plug. and was distributed by means of any cup or old tomato-can that Providence or good luck might furnish through dint of borrowing. into messes. and then said. For having made the usual request. about a quarter of a mile dis This fare was varied twice a week Tuesdays and tant.' the guard handed me his plug of North Carolina. indeed. and when the bottom of the pail was reached. judging from the residue left in the bottom of the pail.408 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Say. This after getting I remember once upstairs we dried and used for smoking. but I kept the chew. mingled with dirt or weeds. the hide. Our beef soup was made. The soup when served was delivered in a water-bucket. the same in which we washed ourselves or clothes. wan ted and would bring for our selves from the Dan River. let's have a chaw. John ny. . The guard looked at it for a moment. and had fourteen members. warm water. for we were a very poor mess. Say. perhaps. but write simple facts. from the entire animal boiled down except. Our mess was number seventeen. give me the chaw. The prisoners were divided. You might think that this simple Yet such is the fare was hardly worth quarrelling over. you know) and handed back the remainder. We used to beg a chaw of tobacco from the sentinel on duty. in my desire for a smoke I overstepped the bounds of po liteness. and always took as big a chew as conscience would permit. c around the building outside. and from that time until nine the next morning all the water we. a tablespoonful of small black beans. when we did indulge in that luxury.' At Danbury our fare was about six ounces of corn-bread at nine in the morning. I am not exaggerating. and you keep the I acknowledged my fault.

We had several escapes while at and so strife . while in most may justly have been consid ered the worst off. I know I have stood quite close to Lieutenant Flint when he called out names. to be drawn corre sponding with duplicates placed on the loaves but the num bers for the largest loaves always seemed to stick under the hat-band until the last. . the sizes of the loaves were quite irregu and dissensions arose among the brethren. As the division lines were very uneven. captured. We had to bring water for ourselves from the Dan River twice each day. one each being given to every two men of the mess. lar. I noticed that no one shamed his comrades but nanimity. Invalids and those with pampered stomachs used to trade the inside mess for the crust two for one portion. alas it was soon discovered that the man with his back turned always secured the largest loaf for himself and partner it was suspected that he received some signal. Danville. The bread in pans was usually marked in lines before bak ing. Then we adopted the plan of putting numbers in a hat. Finally. . to reach which they had to cross a mill-race. Our bread was simply rye meal that had not been bolted until we got hold of it baked in very hot ovens in large dripping-pans after having been mixed with water and very little salt. At first the method was for one to turn his back and as each loaf was pointed out to name the parties to whom it should go but. two different messes in their turn taking the duty. the Messubis of the mess would start for the river. . every one who tried it was in the end re The method of escape was quite ingenious.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. Under escort of four guards. we took the method of each in turn first choosing a loaf in the morning this was It gave a fine scope for generosity and mag satisfactory. two at the head and two in the rear. isted lest one should get fact the one who got the 409 more than his fair share. and possibly might have unconsciously touched his foot on such an occasion. ! . by taking advantage of the opportunity to exercise these praiseworthy virtues. so as to divide each pan into six loaves. but though for a time successful in getting away from the prison. This resulted in an outer crust very hard and an inner mass of moist. uncooked meal.

placed beyond a doubt the fact that we had arrived in God's country a sentiment we had begun to cherish when we first saw the old flag . 1865. with full pails strung out into a long line. and everything would be serene. on February 22d. upon a narrow. would quietly slip down into the ice-cold water and sneak out of sight be neath the planks. on a winter day. When the word to advance was given. This gave the opportunity for escape. and had a very enjoyable ride to Richmond. Some many. At first each man carried two pails. handkerchief." Lieutenant Peloubet. we knew the sooner we were paroled at the prison. three men who had been brought on stretchers sick from the hospital to the boat died before we reached the place of exchange. but after awhile it became the custom for some to carry but one. who always managed to be upon the bridge. knocking on the doors and clamoring to Dick Turner to let us in a ludicrous contrast to the time. Besides. Our first meal at An napolis Hospital. " In February we were sent again to Libby Prison. though six or eight tried it. unrailed plank-bridge. a halt would he called to rest. of real-for-sure ham and eggs. a comrade with but one pail would pick up also the one left by the fugitive. with un limited hot biscuit and coffee. arriving at which place we broke away from our guards in a body and made a dead run for the prison.410 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Those at the head and rear would engage the guards in conversation. I just simply snuffled. to be exchanged. A party would go out just before nightfall. the quicker we would be exchanged. On our way down the James River. six months previous. Ten per cent of the officers with whom I was imprisoned died during the six months of confinement three were shot by guards the rest died of sickness. : . while the seeker after freedom. It must have been a cool proceeding to escape in that manner. of the trip to Saulsbury Prison Says . having no . the column being half way across the mill-race. about six feet wide and four deep. when we only wanted to get out but a man is never satisfied. ' ' ' ' streaming out over our lines as we crossed at Chapin's farm. in fact shed tears as for me. and when returning from the river.

We were marched to a train of cattle cars. Most of the men were jolly. frightful. but where were we going ? Wild rumors of exchange were flying. even trying to tear off our clothes to cover themselves. may be recalled by those soldiers who were there. hardly to be imagined by those who were not there. into the stockade. Soon the cars moved. and twice dur the these rebel renegades made breaks to see if ing night they could get anything away from us. " We arrived about dark at Saulsbury. Burning thirst prevailed. and treatment there : 411 " One fine Sunday morning in the lat ter part of September. which \vas so hard that we could not possibly bite it. just standing room. during which time we only had water twice to drink. We had fresh air. The result of this unusual feasting and the bad air. we were out of Libby. tedious ride. and the journey. crowded condition forcing us to stand up. and they gave us no water. we were between six and seven. marched into the stockade. marched downstairs. at any rate. but it did not last long. for a while. through the ranks of the rebel renegades. and every one handed a well-filled haversack. stepping on us. ' * travelled night and day with hardly any stoppage anywhere. until at last we insisted upon having something We Instead of keeping us three days on the road. They would run all over us. The air had become so foul as to be hardly breathable. and put eight hundred officers in six . was Before night most of the haversacks were empty. They did stop at a little town. who would grab anything we had. Well. as resulting in a very horrible condition cf things.. " We went along slowly day by day the same. and furnished for the eight hundred officers three boxes of hard tack. except that we stopped once and went back nearly seven miles to get an officer's hat that had blown oft it was too valuable to lose.M. we were wakened about 3 A.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. We were taken upstairs in a and put on the floor to sleep. journey was intense. 1864. The suffering on that six days' to eat. Then came the want of water. and told to get in sixty in each car. Our long. sixty locked in a car. Next morning they took us large building.

counting us as we came downstairs. there were put through this hole enough to be counted twice to make the original number ' ' : . and counted us again the original number was there. commandant of Danville Prison. " During the latter part of our confinement we fared pretty well. and I was dressed in the lightest of summery costume. and we were all there. The secret of this Avas away back in a dark corner behind a post. Counted us all that day. " Then they counted us again. escape.412 log. It was here that I saw Major killed. that several had been captured and returned to Libby. The next day they came back. etc. with a squad of soldiers. and formed us in four ranks and counted us. "One day Colonel Young.cabins HEAVY GUNS AND of LIGHT. across the line he was shot. " They suspicioned that some had escaped. . and then he chinned for an hour or so. and we were all there. and reversed matters. and counted us as They we went upstairs. a hole being cut through the floor. and we were all there. said Which of yous got away. During this time we were formed into regu There was a line about twenty lar military brigades. and my courage was not equal to making any attempt to used by a sentry. ping incidentally " My shoes were soleless. bordering a walk that was We could not go within twenty feet of and the enlisted men were twenty feet on the other that. held together by rags. and there we remained twenty days. and at last offered parole to fifty soldiers who would tell them how we managed to keep up the original number when thirteen had escaped. two rooms each. and when some had been counted and went down or upstairs. finishing by saying. then put us all on the lower floor. For step side. brought to Danville. By some means we kept the account good until thirteen had escaped. boys ? " We told him to look at his roll-call and find out. had them load still their muskets and aim at us. feet from the front of our tent. Rebel officers and civilians offered us in ex change for drafts on our friends their Confederate money.

Corn-bread alone became monotonous. and tea or onions. and stacked their muskets within fifty feet of our prison. we were all ordered to turn over or spoon at once. $16 a pound. $15 butter.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. Confederate money. Each one furnished his major lost his life. and we paid $60 a. and we were marched through snow and slush to the depot. they when we sang. and left them without guard. " We were divided up into squads or messes of sixteen^ and when we slept. February. signing a fictitious name. quietly. boys. and we made a rush. right in plain sight. and sung out water The guard opened the door to let us out for water. " With this I could buy pork at $12 a pound flour. and yet another his hat. Rally round the flag.. month for the use of a cook-stove. so we mixed it with warm water. I 413 gave a fellow a draft on Calais. from $3 to $5 each coffee for $400 a pound. . " The night we were taken out of Danville was cold and in bitter. quota of kindling-wood every day. " Our principal occupation was cutting kindling-wood. The rebels offered us $50 to $500 for a pair of boots. was in sight. . so that if the bones stuck through under the feathers on one side. $1 to $2 each pound eggs. a good glee club one of them. and left standing an hour and half. another Major's coat. . for $100 in exchange for $700. " Our sources of amusement were many. making gruel. and I never heard anybody cheer harder than . when a volley was fired. Not a person ' We hastily formed into military order. room enough was left. Twenty-five had reached the One outside.' " One day a regiment of soldiers came into town. and from $25 to $50 for the hats of those sufficiently fortunate to retain them. Me. The guards would bring us in chunks of wood for a consideration. The rebel officers used to come in and being hear us sing. with our feet almost frozen. which we did. grabbed our pails. and they returned. $3 a a dozen sweet potatoes. ' : ' ! " The next morning a surgeon came down wearing the his boots. ap line and field officers. . and were told to follow our pointed Twelve Guard. .

set ting fire to the building. Privates Hayden and Hubbell. and told ' : them " ' : I knife. and I went inside of the guard ring. last man left the prison the old stove having a big fire in for our last supper some one overturned it. and the so-called Southern Con federacy never discovered the secret passage or learned how the count was kept up. Then we were well guarded now four small boys and one old man attended us. and counted for the last time. We were allowed to go where we pleased. were then put on transports. Fourth New York Heavy. and I sung out Hello. The Con those who would give up and other valuables would receive a receipt for vte stated that them. treat you as r Some of the enlisted men after leaving Libby were in Pemberton Prison a few days.414 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1865. After about an hour's march I saw an artilleryman. sent down the James River. We knew that some good change was at hand. You have lots of Keep it. gold. you did me. We marched two miles across a neck of land. and when they were exchanged such articles would be . which was taking prisoners to City Point. federate their "At Pemberton officers Says the former Prison : money were searched. but our arrival was different from our first visit.'" r w on't. and for the first time in six months we saw the United States flag. recognized them. spoke with them.' and I reported for duty to that battalion. " As the We were put into cars and taken back to Libby Prison. rebel prison life was to guard the self -same men who cap tured me seven months before. and tobacco. and . on February 22d. " We signed parole papers. of Company C. report for duty. and when found. " some stragglers did not come into shelter until hours after the others. " I was told to go out with a certain squad and find my regiment. experi enced this change on account of the crowded condition of Libby. money. w hen you took my my watch. and was put on officer of the guard that The first military duty I did after seven months of night.

forks. and some that was not extra. The doctor said " I could manage it if I had a blanket. who were transferred to Saulsbury. he might get back into Northern lines again. who were hurried to the rear. also under the lining of the blouses and caps. haver the extra clothing. other valuables and keepsakes. Getting into conversation with one of the attendants. diary and photographs by putting them in one of his shoes. Dr. Wright managed to escape rather ingeniously from this place. We were ordered to remove all of our clothing. and rubber blankets." Subsequently those imprisoned in Pemberton were also transferred to Saulsbury. and it was examined very closely. but nothing was ever returned. McKeever." " Very well. as an order came to move the prisoners at once. They were not all searched. and in a day or two found themselves in Libby Prison. Wright. the pieces of tents. Hubbell saved his sacks. an. who lay with his head out from under the blanket. Wright found that he was from New York City and knew some persons that the doctor was ac quainted with. carried over : . so that he did not share the fortune of the other members of the regiment. and slipping it to one side. Dr. Among the captured of Company B. So when the officers making the exchange came around to count the badly disabled. We did not know why the change was made. through the seams and under the bands. canteens. spoons. assistant surgeon.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. a leg for the occasion. and Peck. of money. was Dr. all They took money. but we were carried to Belle Isle. was counted as a legless man. and had not much chance to dispose of it or send it away. as knives. 415 returned to them." said the surgeon. They must have received a large amount we had just received pay a few days before. looking for greenbacks. Quite a number gave up money. I will get you a blanket. and soon after was put upon a stretcher. on August 25th. Wright. In a day or two this new-made acquaint ance had informed the doctor that the badly wounded If he could manage to lose prisoners would be exchanged.

Accordingly he applied to the surgeon to get him admitted into the hospital that night. but when they found they were going on the train in a southerly direction. McKeever was one of the few of our regiment who sur vived and returned to the command. B. After they got within the Union lines the doctor recovered so rapidly that the One of the Confederate guards were greatly surprised. Sands. to the river. They also had experi ence in eating mice. dogs. Among these was the plan of getting counted in lieu of some friend who had died or gone into the hospital. and was duly exchanged. and soon after they understood they were to be exchanged. their joy was tinged somewhat with uncertainty. which proved too great for many a prisoner. The surgeon said nothing could be done. This service to his friend saved his life. was John B. He was taken to Annapolis. and there detailed as an assistant in the general hospital. and Peck was sick. I was a prisoner from the time of my capture at Ream's Station up to a short . most remarkable cases known to surgery. They reached Saulsbury Prison. but McKeever was so strenu ous. of Company E : " The only man I was personally acquainted with of the Fourth who died in Saulsbury. and were quite joyful at being called out with a squad of others one morning. Says T. McKeever felt very certain that if his friend was allowed to lie in his usual quarters he would die before morning. that he finally succeeded. where a leg de veloped within half a day. Martin. bones. He had numerous op portunities to enlist in the Southern army. McKeever and Peck were removed from Libby to Belle Isle.416 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Early in the winter they experienced a very cold night. and placed on the boat. and located there for a number of months. They were among those who took part in the insurrection. and Peck was taken into one of the wards in a shivering. and though sorely tempted by the extra rations offered as inducement. he rejected all overtures. feeble condition. and other rations sup posed to be included only in Chinese bills of fare. and had the usual experience of the starving in resorting to various devices to secure enough food.

some : prostrated by sickness. and two others were members of that battery the fourth was in the Third New York Cavalry. and some of the boys thought John Morse also went. and reached our lines after five or six weeks' travel. 417 time before Lee's surrender. S. and if I re: . C. he was with others taken to Charlotte. for I had my arms around his neck in Saulsbury Prison when he died. First New York Artillery. where they were subject to a surveillance about the same as if they had been prisoners for awhile. It seemed to us then that the end justified the means. to I I was of volunteers. and in that despondent state of mind that made us feel almost indifferent to life itself (and I firmly believe that had I not enlisted in the rebel army I should never have lived to get home) and we made a com pact that we would enlist.. one these bury fight into there would be a chance to enable me to thought get the Union lines with my brother. "VVe enlisted in consideration of the extra amounts of ra tions. He says "I was one of the boys of our regiment that went into the rebel army. but could not get through the pickets until the day Lee surrendered. He says " When General Stoneman made his raid through the there came an order for volunteers to go to SaulsCarolinas. When this man left the prison. and a chance of getting out of the loathsome prison. " We were not allowed a gun in our hands for more than two hours at a time until this expedition occurred. when I was taken out with a squad of prisoners to fell timber for breastworks. and the first chance we had to get away would desert to our lines.EXPERIENCES OF THE CAPTURED. whether it did or not." One of these men who went into the Confederate service had four brothers in the Union Army one was a Lieutenant in Battery L." One member of the regiment has furnished a very frank statement of his enlistment in the Confederate service. but this . : . " Three others of our regiment went out with me. which would at least insure us against starvation. under General Stoneman. We reached Saulsbury some time in the morning. We were most dead with hunger. Stoneman. was a mistake. Seven of us got away.

got new Enfield rifles out of the rebel arsenal that morning. regret. and never took the oath to the Southern Confederacy. engaged in a battle with Stoneman's troops. which I. the battle was in the forenoon. The act of enlistment stands as a blot upon my record.418 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT." We all . member went correctly. to the arsenal to get guns. We and Stoneman had them pretty well whipped before we got and then we all threw our guns and ran into our " own lines. and while there the Confederates were fighting. though I sincerely be lieve that but for that act my bones would now be moulder ing among the graves of that Southern prison. of course. to the ground.

an order was brought by General Miles and reac by Colonel Nugent. An order from General Meade was read on the 17th in reference to the death of the President. FROM BURKSVILLE TO WASHINGTON. marched through Burksville and some eight miles further down the Dansville Railroad halted at 9 p. announcing the movement of the army the next day to Manchester. April 15th the sad news was read to us. in front of a very fine residence occupied as Division Headquarters. M. There being no further use for an army in that quarter. we had the first inspection since breaking camp. we were not surprised on May 1st at the reading of a circu . Sunday. On the morning of the 2d a circular from General Hum phreys was read in reference to the line of march. On the 26th we had orders to lay out this camp according to the revised army regulations. lar on dress parade. Awakened about 4 o'clock on the morning of the 3d by bugles and drum corps playing reveille passed . for the night. and came to Washington with the regiment.CHAPTER XXX. jHILE lying in camp near Burksville the officers had numerous applications from contrabands to act as servants and quite a number were thus employed. . of the assassination. while on dress parade. the 16th. The next day. At noon we fell in line. the 28th. Ya. also received the same day. On Friday. of Rumors of Johnson' s surrender were President Lincoln. . where we pitched our tents on a descending piece of ground. from which we concluded that we were to remain here for some time. that Johnson had surrendered on the same terms as Lee. On the 18th we broke camp and moved about a mile southwest.

The Twentyfourth Army Corps were drawn up in open order. It was raining hard on the morning of the 5th. marched all day through a beautiful country. where the road was shaded on either side by large trees. The column moved off. Several of us went down to Manchester. In one place. across the Chickahominy. There was little to indicate that this region had been dev astated by a f our-y ears' war. At night we illumined the camp with candles. about 12 A. We had orders to wait for the Second and Third divisions to pass us. the Third Division ahead. courtesies. many of them in the tree-tops singing plantation melodies. Took up our march at sunrise of the 4th. some of which seemed improvised for the occasion. Jeffer son Davis' s house. Marched through the principal streets. Marched about twenty-five miles and encamped some five miles from Richmond.420 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. In some places were exten sive fields of grain. though there were many people along the way with water. as they were quite patriotic in sentiment. mov The inhabitants ing on the Broad or Richmond road. It was a very hard march. through a beautiful country. and ladies were conspicuous at the windows and doors of the houses. On the 6th we lay in camp until 10 o'clock our Irish Brigade trimmed their caps with shamrock. and pre sented arms as we passed. Sunday morning. and other points of interest. went by Libby Prison and Castle Thunder. . as it was hot and dusty in the streets. Crossed the Appomattox River and halted at a point some three miles beyond for the night. Entered the city of Richmond at 11 o'clock by crossing from Man chester on the pontoons.M.. and we only moved to within sight of Richmond and went into camp. We halted on a piece of bottom land two miles from the Pamunkey River for the night. we passed a crowd of negroes. who showed us various . May 7th. reached Amelia Court-House about 12 M. passed by Hanover Court-House. looking well. showed themselves at intervals along the road. and the whole corps had knapsacks well packed and in good order. where we noticed a quantity of army stores destroyed by the Confederates.

and shivered all night got out of the wet next morning. and did not get up until the next day. and several houses demolished with bullet and shell. also the Po passed also by some old Confederate intrenchments and encamped within about 10 miles of FrederMoved off about 8 A. According to his daily record Slept horribly. Rain continued most of the night and the weather grew A very cold. " what 1 '' are you doing there ?" " said "I am all right. Tuesday morning a good many of the command awoke to find themselves soaked with rain.M.FROM BURKSVILLE TO WASHINGTON. On We . Second. and encamped about five miles from Fredericksburg. Passed through Falmouth crossed Potomac Creek. of Company A. Passed the old battle-ground. Johnnie !" said Miller. Scenery about the city Entered from the south its numerous spired very fine. One of the Lieutenants and a canteen of whiskey fell out to rest. cool and comfortable reached Fredericksburg about quite 10 A. . The boys gave him a cheer for his nerve. About 5 P. the chimney of which was . Polecat Creek. there were indications of a shower marched ." he. .about the only thing left. 421 the 8th marched on the telegraph road to Fredericks burg.M. and halted for the night at Dickinson's Farm. passed Chesterfield Station. The condition ' ' : of the regiment may be inferred from the writer's experience that night. and Third. terrific storm came up before we could pitch tents-*-hail and rain together. and after a hurried breakfast of hard-tack and coffee fell in line about . domes and ruined dwellings made it appear not unlike an Oriental city. On " Hello. the llth our brigade built corduroy roads in the fore noon. into a field for the purpose of encamping. . a cadaverous-looking individual wgs seated on the remnants of a fence in front. .' Oh. Crossed the Rappahannock on pontoons laid by the Fiftieth Engineers. wet to the skin. marched in the afternoon through pine woods mostly. the order of divisions being First. In front of the ruins of a house. The roads were very muddy. . crossed the Ta.M. on the 10th weather icksburg. . We were the second division in order of march passed through Thornburg. I've just got home.

f capture of Jefferson Davis' s staff. As we came through a piece of woods that morn there ing lay a pair of white horses. the . halting but a half hour for dinner. we seemed to be marching in a circle. We had brigade dress parade that day. Cheer after cheer arose from the different brigades and regiments We encamped in a beauti as they beheld that spectacle. Though just how the poor horses could be a vicarious sacrifice for the sins of their owner provided the rumor was correctseemed difficult to understand. The Fifth Army Corps were encamped on a hill west of us in fact. Marched steadily all the afternoon. and a good many citizens from Washington came out to see the soldiers. "Thirty miles. Maryland Heights. May 14th. Our division led off on the 13th.422 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. halted at Four Mile Run. and the column moved off toward Alexandria. waiting for the pon toons to be laid. Sunday. About 6 P. ascending a hill. in sight of the Capitol dome. 7 A. ful position for the night.M. about o A. They were said to be a rumor was headquarter team of the Fifth Army Corps. On the 15th we packed up again. . when. We read in the Sunday morning Chronicle an account of the . killed by a stroke of lightning. where we pitched tents on an eminence covered with oak bushes.. with the blue waters of the Potomac.. " How far is it to Alexandria For about two days the answer was invariably. part of the way on the railroad.M.M. Every native that we met was beset with the question. halted at Acquia Creek until 10 A. came into view. which completely surrounded the camp." If we could rely on our informants. there were not afloat among the soldiers that wanting those who thought the death of the horses a species of retributive justice for their personal suffering. We marched pretty steadily all day. was a delightful day.M. As some of the men had suf fered from the heat and fatigue of the march. and the men were wondering where they were." A two general officers had laid a wager of a basket of wine as to the marching qualities of the Fifth and Second Army Corps. the one reaching Wash ington first to be the winner. struck a turn pike that looked familiar. both dead in the road.

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Curtin. Capitol dome. On Saturday. Meade. Sherman. May 23d. was in progress at Washington. passed through Pennsylvania Avenue. Adjutant. were reviewed at the White House by Generals Grant. It was a fine. Avhole 425 of region was dotted by the white tents the army.Gen Townshend. On the 30th the Second Army Corps was reviewed by Gen erals eral Humphreys. clear day. Secretary Stanton. President Johnson. of New York. the Sec ond Corps was to have been reviewed by Governor Fenton. Fenton. and the attempt on the lives of Seward and Johnson. of New York. Meigs. President Johnson. and the scene at sunset was beautiful. marching about twenty-five miles altogether. and also those whose term of enlist ment was but one year. A de spatch from the War Department was sent to the regiment. we reached camp in a demoralized condition. of Pennsylvania. crossing on Long Bridge. the writer had charge of a detail for picket along the Potomac. On the next day occurred the review of Sherman's army. and a number of officials crossed the Potomac on pontoons near the Aqueduct Bridge. Arlington Heights. Nothing of special importance occurred until Tuesday.Gfeneral Robert Nugent presiding. which was witnessed by a good many officers of our regi ment. and a part of the city further to the left. with Brigadier. round amid a cluster of of . On the Sunday following we had brigade dress parade.FROM BUKKSVILLE TO WASHINGTON. postponed. Governors Reuben E. but on account of the rain the review was . On Friday. the barracks and works of two forts. winding hills on the right the blue heights the Maryland beyond. Hancock. when the grand review of the Army of the Poto mac took place. At this time the trial of the conspirators for the murder of President Lincoln. and Andrew G. Our corps marched through Washington. the white tents of the Fifth Army Corps . including the writer. As it was quite warm and sultry. the 27th. The view from our post took in a valley extending from the Potomac. in the form of an order to muster out all men who had been in service since 1862. June 2d.

and as a memento of the occasion. The scene was poetic. the shadows could pervade And to the soul their hue impart. The broadening shades from Arlington Are striped with rays of ribboned light. the monument Is seen no more the day is dead. . the following is inserted : SUNSET ON THE POTOMAC. The rose. A golden shimmer lies unrolled Adown the silvered river's way. in the immediate foreground. The crimson pales to purple tint.426 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Which mark the throes of dying day. To violet next then gray as lead Till through the dusk. and the line of picket posts stretching across the front of the picture.red arch of the sinking sun Rests lightly on the western height . As dome and city slowly fade. A sadness steals across the As if heart. From flambeaux near the gates of gold.

New York regiments. ceased to exist as such. Companies L and M were transferred to the Tenth New York Infantry. and the remaining six companies mus tered out June 5th. 1862. Y. The artillery regi ment. and Genesee. ments were the Eighth Heavy Artillery. AND MUSTER OUT. Two additional companies were organized for this regiment in January. originally the One Hundred and Twenty. and mustered into the service of the United States August 22d. One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. 1866. added to this class were many who had served nearly their full term of enlistment. [HEN Lee and Johnson had and the war thus closed early surrendered. to the Fourth. 1864. there were many excellent soldiers who had come into old regiments as re cruits that spring.CHAPTER XXXI. was organized at Lockport. to serve three years. were These regi transferred to our regiment in June. and having no special business to call them home. N. Many of these had been in the service before and . and 1865. The Eighth Regi . 1863. and One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Infantry. 1865. CONSOLIDATION OF REGIMENTS. The enlisted men of Companies G. the men being distributed among our companies. of course. the Twentyninth Senate District. K were transferred to our regiment June 4th. The entire organization was raised in the counties of Niagara. The four companies transferred' I.ninth Regi ment of New York Volunteer Infantry. the One Hundred and Eleventh. H. Orleans. It was changed to an artillery regiment in February. in the cam paign. and whose term of ser vice had therefore just begun. mustered out as organizations. preferred to remain And so it came about that portions of four their full time..

The writer had the honor to belong to it for about one week. to serve three years. Cold Harbor. Wilderness. Bristow Station. Totopotomoy. and Ream's Station. Petersburg.428 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. This regiment partici the battles of Gettysburg. Triumph. It was mustered into the the Twenty-fifth Senate District. Cold Harbor. Deep Bottom. Totopot- omoy. Strawberry Plains. Petersburg. It was raised in the counties of Cayuga and Wayne. An elaborate history of this regiment. and Petersburg. companies and Yates. Mine Run. It participated in the following battles Gettysburg. N. . from which a large number were transferred. and Ream's Station. It was mustered into the service of the United States August 23d. Totopot omoy. Spottsylvania.. Bristow Station. has been published under the auspices of by Wilson. About the same time. Totopotomoy. North Anna. Cold Harbor. August 29th. Y. Petersburg. Spottsylvania. : North Anna. Ream's Station. Strawberry Plains. North Anna. United States service for three years August 20th. Struggle. Po River. North Anna. " . Po River. The One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Regiment. Bristow Station. Strawberry Plains. ment participated in the battles at Spottsylvania. and was as an organization mustered out June 3d. The Geneva. 1862. the companies being for the most part raised It was mustered into the United in Rensselaer County. at N. and Boydton Road. 1862. One hundred and seventy-six men of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York Volunteer Infantry were also This regiment was transferred to our regiment in June. entitled Disaster. Seneca. Straw berry Plains. 1862. in pated States service Wilderness. Y. N. Deep Bottom. Wilderness. Po River. Y. The organization was mustered out of service June 3d. It participated in the battles of Gettysburg. 1865. Mine Run." written Mrs. two hundred and forty-two men of the One Hundred and Eleventh Infantry were transferred This regiment was organized in Auburn. organized were raised in the counties of Ontario. and was then taken out by his friends as not being old enough. 1865. to the Fourth. was organized at Troy. Spottsylvania. Deep Bottom. Mine Run. Ream's Station. Deep River. Cold Harbor.

. FOURTH NEW YORK HEAVY ARTILLERY.MAJOR.

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Washburn. and Lieutenants . with headquarters at Fort Richard son. 4th several of the posts united in a celebration at Fort Berry. Major Richmond. and other officers were there. will be remembered. General Lew tial AVallace was the President. Car penter. Georgia. caterer. AND MUSTER OUT. and the writer. Judge-advocate. in Washington City. was that common to garrison duty. Lazarus. located west of the Potomac. in contrast to our pre vious work. for dinner. 431 a committee. September 26th (when the regiment was mustered out). The duty from this time until Tues day. resulted in the conviction and execution of Wirz. both officers of merit. We had dinner under the arbor. Major William B. it Advocate. Richardson. of which Lieutenant-Colonel Allcock was a member. of which Major C. from Fort Worth to Fort Albany. Henry T. Most of the companies moved into their respective forts on Saturday the 17th. a court-mar was held for the trial of Captain Henry Wirz. A riot at Long Bridge occurred that day. The writer was officer of the shelter tents. after which a good many speeches were made and toasts drunk alto gether a very pleasant time. Two captains. Richmond. one of these was held al which Captain H. of Canandaigua. Seely.. also Lieutenants Traverse. L. N. Knower was one of the members of the court. ternately. Lee and Henry E. orders came for the regiment to be in readiness to move. late com mander of the Anderson ville Prison. is chairman. our Two barrels of ale and other drinkables were purchased. and for the most part pleasant. It was rumored that we were to gar rison nine forts. We had a large arbor fixed up with boughs and On July Arrangements were made with Smith. Cromby. of Beginning August 23d. June 16th. day.CONSOLIDATION OF REGIMENTS. Y. were promoted and attained the rank of Major about this time. Captains Watts. On Friday. A. At the Forts Berry and Barnard. A number of court-martials were instituted for the trial of members of the regiment at the different posts. Carpenter was President. Cauldwell. and Colonel Chipman the JudgeThis trial. Wheeler.

September 30th. and separated for our respective homes. when we were paid off. where we took managed breakfast. reaching Jersey City about noon. and on the 28th we fell in line and marched to regimental headquarters from thence to AVashington. arriving York. for New to reach Philadelphia . had charge of such a detail. For two years after leaving the service the writer had chills and fever al different most daily. swarms of mosquitoes. At that time it was infested with rats. even larger than the Jersey variety. The facilities for acquiring malaria were of the very high est order. and owing to the marshy surroundings. ravaged the neighborhood. Thus closed the service of one of the largest regiments organized during the war a regiment with an exceedingly varied experience in the different arts and branches of war fare. On September 26th we were mustered out .432 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. The writer. and a good many of the detail there did not fail to take advantage of their opportunities. the site of the city of Jackson. relieving Lieutenant Cromby September 5th. to headquarters to com a detachment of guards. Baseball clubs were organized at the posts during their stay here. On Saturday. laid out during that famous warrior's adminis tration. crossed the river. and several match games played between the Cromby and Wheeler were ordered mand A detail was kept constantly on companies. where we were quartered until October 6th.M. of the United States service. and marched down Broadway to Battery barracks.M. but only by morning. from our regiment. we took the ferryboat to Hart's Island. but at the date of this writing that same old building is the only landmark of the city. of Company M. and one which received the commendation of nearly every general officer of whose command it chanced to con stitute a part. at Bridge guard duty Long with Lieutenant Peloubet. there about 5 P. Made up of many different classes and left We Washington at 7 P. Our headquarters were in an old hotel. and which was intended to surpass Washington .

instead of acting merely as infantry. State of New York) New York in the War of the Rebel forthcoming work. the bulk of the organization proved in time of trial enduring. 433 grades of men. Through the influence of Colonels Tidball and Allcock. A. lion. .CONSOLIDATION OF REGIMENTS. ' ' REGIMENTAL LOSSES. courageous soldiers. The following statistics are based upon tables in Colonel Frederick Phisterer's (A. Of. The losses of the and lamenta active service were excessive regiment during ble. This may be attributed in great measure to the fact that we were fortunate in our commanding offi cers. we were permitted to retain some right to the name under which we were organized in being attached for a period to the artillery brigades. AND MUSTER OUT. A.. the fate of nearly all the other heavy artillery organizations. though not proportionately as large as that of some other regiments." showing comparative losses of the Fourth and of the other regiments whose members were in part incorporated with it.

never arise in this free land. dreary night marches. they at least the risk of their lives military losses do not always indicate great show that men have faced danger at A shall perpetuate peace. and in the development of those arts which. that the ambitions. May the conditions of anarchy. the talents. successes. quarter of a century has drawn its veil of incident across the horrors of that time. Though great and certainly those who share it for the public good are fairly entitled to worthy homage. which alone can justify war. oppression. and the bloody pageantry of battle. May they never come again. and energies of its citizens be fully exercised in the con quest of the base and selfish.434 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. contributing to the good of the whole. . re and bellion. . and only as a dream come back those scenes of mustering armies.

THIS portion of the His tory includes the names of all the officers and men of the regiment. prominent Dutch and Irish fam ilies are found hi the genea logical line. D. and. COLONEL THOMAS DOUBLEDAY. SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. distln squished ly also General Abner Double. New York. February 18th. Among the prom inent an- cest ors was Peter Donnel Abner Doubleday. was born. the first Colonel of the Fourth New ^ York Heavy Ar tillery. Though his im mediate ancestors were English. . the namesake of the day. Doubleday. N Ballston Spa. FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS.PAKT SECOND. brief sketches of each. Thom as D. 1816. so far as data could be procured. brother of our Colonel.

may be attributed chiefly He resigned his commission about the last of 1862. 1862. Doubleday's business for a con In religion he was an Episcopalian. the brevet of Captain. and Cooper. He was accidentally T killed. 1866. As may be supposed. re signing in 1838. June 25th. 1847. He was engaged in the occupations of civil life until war was declared against Mexico. August 17th. perhaps. 1818. He hated to say no to any one. was appointed a cadet to West Point. March 8th. and while in civil life was very regular in his attendance upon the services of that Church. and returned to the occupations of civil life. were Shakespeare. siderable period was that of stationer. Doubleday's usual characteristics prevailed in his family he was an affection . May 16th. war the brevet of Colonel For similar services in the field during the was war lie conferred. N. September 13th. Mr. At the close of the war General de Russy returned to the regular service as an officer of artillery. and the drama. as a military to this fact. New York. GENERAL lie GtTSTAVTJS A. 1882. man gained by his illustrious brothers. as stated in Part First of this work. was He . He early developed a fondness for art. after completing his education. The subject of our sketch was educated at Auburn. He was kind to his and subordinates in a marked degree and the favor with which he was regarded by them was constantly being exhibited in their words and Kindness of heart was. and to Colonel of the Fourth United States Artillery. His earliest oc cupation. and was promoted to Captain. Doubleday was united in marriage to Miss Mary Augusta Ward. He was brevetted Major for gallant and meritorious services. DE RUSSY was born in Brooklyn. 1841. That he did not attain the measure of success highest order associates . 1879. and July 26th. 1857. N. Va. 1865. ate husband and kind father. June 3d. being run over oy a stage on Broadway. 1847. Mr. Y. Lieutenant-Colonel. As a military : man Colonel Doubleday possessed two characteristics of the he had great courage and great energy. 1847. actions. August 25th. an accomplished and beautiful young lady belonging to one of the oldest families of New York City. March was brevetted Brigadier-General of Volunteers. was that of a clerk in a bookstore. August 20th.. he was appointed a Second Lieu tenant in the Fourth United States Artillery. Y. Colonel Doubleday's greatest fault. He was made First Lieutenant. 1835. in action near Fair Oaks. For gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Malvern Hill the brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel was conferred. ornamental gardening. Dickens. For gallant and meritorious services during the 13th. Colonel Doubleday had two children.436 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1849. and conceived a special liking for paint In literature his favorite authors ing. Stephen Ward Doubleday. For gallant and meritorious ser vices in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco. Some time in July. in May. where he remained three years. who was a Lieutenant in his father's regiment. he was appointed Major in the Third United States promoted Artillery. he was brevetted First Lieu For gallant conduct at Chapultepoc he received tenant. December 16th. 1865. and a daughter. Mr. November 3d.

. H. by the way.Colonelcy Heavy Artillery. Every soldier who COLONEL H. was retired 437 November 3d. Mass. especially when emer- . who were threatened by an overwhelming force of Mexican troops. then commanded by Gen With that regiment (in which. and equipment of the regiment. State of New York. Lieutenant Hall was then transferred to the staff of General Henry Whiting. United States service General Taylor attached them as an independent company to the Fourth Regiment of United States Infantry. as well as Pay master. being commended especially at the breaking out of our late war. offered the Lieutenant. March 25th.. and was with Assistant Quartermaster-General in charge of the Eastern Division of the Army. and they were honorably discharged by General Taylor. then with the Army as Quartermaster- that officer on the field during the conclusive battle of Buena Vista. where he served acceptably for seven years. General Whiting was appointed General. Grant was then Second Lieutenant) the company had a full share of the fight ing in the three days' battle of Monterey. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall accompanied the regiment 30th. 1861. S. with headquarters at New York City. Mr. Arthur. was generously awarded Lieutenant- Morgan on December Colonel Hall by Colonel Doubleday and the line officers. while he was residing in Claiborne County. by officers of the Regular Army to General Chester A. and now resides in the city of Detroit. HALL. aided by General Arthur and Colonel George Bliss. 1882. Volunteers were urgently called for. In 1846. General U. to Washington. was appointed his First Assistant. Of this company the subject of our sketch was elected and commissioned Second Lieutenant. in charge of that office. Colonel H. The first response was from a com pany raised at once in Claiborne County and organized and equipped as rifle men. completion. then just enter ing on his duties as Quartermaster-General. from whence by orders they proceeded to garrison the forts " defenses of constituting in part the Washington. The experience he there acquired was utilized Mr. Jr. Miss. through the courtesy of Colonel Thomas D. served under General de Russy will testify to his superior executive qualities as an officer and his uniformly kind treatment of his men. had been equipped and despatched of the Fourth Regiment After the seventy -five regiments constituting the first call by the President to the seat of war. Hall. They proceeded at their own expense to the seat of war After muster into the and reported to General Taylor at Camargo. The term for which the company had enlisted expired during the truce that succeeded the battb. eral John Garland. General Zachary Taylor was in command of a small body of Regulars of our Army in Texas.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN." Some credit for the proficiency of the drill of the regiment in infantry tactics.. and soon after at his request Lieutenant Hall was appointed Chief Clerk. the war with Mexico com menced. Doubleday. apart from their regular drill as artillery. then Acting Adjutant-General of the State. Hall was born in Boston. Mex. When peace was declared with Mexico.General. the gaining of which probably made General Taylor President. and was commissioned by Governor After assisting very materially in the organi zation. H. 1816. Mich. Hall was.

DAVIS. COLE. Commanding Company F. WILLIAM ARTHUR. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. W. Second Lieutenant. VA. HENRY I. COLONEL In view of the sudden and unexpected separation which is to sever the connection so long existing between us. Company A. Fourth New York Volunteer Artillery. when heavy guns were not gencies arose in the future career of the regiment available. Company A. we. and eminently capable. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. HUGH WATTS. Second Lieutenant. 1863. First Lieutenant. SEARS. by which we lose one from among us whom we have long looked with feelings of love. M. are in the field.438 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and esteem. KOPPER. as officers of your late command. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. feel called upon from our hearts to express to you the deep feelings of regret that suggest themselves on this occasion. Company H.. Second Lieutenant. Company F. Fourth New York Artil THOMAS L. WILLIAM BARNES. we may meet in an everlasting union. 1863. Company H. L. should by the precarious fortune of war feel called upon to resign. lery. Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. On May 23d. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall was promoted to the Colonelcy of the regiment. GEORGE W. we attribute to you the credit of having made us what we competent to command has so long been associated. Second Lieutenant. Artillery. Company H. DEARBORN. respect. Fourth New York Artillery. O. FRANK WILLIAMS. First Lieutenant. and we hope that when all wars have ceased. Captain. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Fourth New York Heavy W. C. Company A. Be assured that you have our best wishes for your future prosperity and happiness. D. Assistant Surgeon. H. We assure you that. August : 10. Regimental Quartermaster. Artillery. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Captain. BEMIS. HAYDEN. Adjutant. and regret that one so should be dstached from the position with which he THOMAS ALLCOCK. J. We do not on to pursue the course stop to inquire into the uncharitable causes which have led you you have chosen. Fourth New York Volunteer . Second Lieutenant. and on August 6th ensuing he resigned and was honorably discharged. Fourth New York Artillery. officers of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. RICHARD KENNEDY. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. EDMONSTON. Fourth New York Vol unteer Artillery. Major. The following document was drawn and presented to Colonel Hall on the occasion of his departure from the regiment : FORT ETHAN ALLEN. Company F. We only wish to express our regrets that one so qualified by long experience in the defense of his country.

Fourth New York Artillery. Second Lieutenant. ruary. He returned to New York City and resumed his duties at the QuartermasterGeneral Department. CHARLES MORUISON. THOMAS ALLCOCK. T. and until the winter of 1851. Artillery. In 1848 he graduated. Company D. he was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Second Artillery. 1853. by assisting in the settlement of the war claims of the State against the General Government. BRADT. feeling confident that they would attach their signatures also : Lieutenant H. SMITH JONES. Fourth New York Artil lery. " WATERBURY and WARNER. Wishing you every happiness. M. LEE. Fourth New York Artillery. At this post he only remained a few months. Company B. Company C. 439 Volunteer Volunteer Captain. Captain. D. K. He was appointed Brevet Second Lieutenant in the Third United States Artil In Feb lery. and joined his company at Fort Defiance. C. He was then ordered to Charleston Harbor. and he continued on this duty until the fall of 1859. Artillery. Lieutenants PRATT and MCCARTY. Artillery. standing eleventh in a class of thirty-eight. when he was detailed to accompany Captain (subsequently General) Whipple in his explorations for a Pacific Railroad route. MORRISON. O. 1849. This duty occupied the winter of 1853-54 and the ensuing spring. then stationed at the Artillery School of Practice. Fourth D. MCPHERSON. JOHN WHITE. in the expedition to Harper's Ferry to suppress John Brown's raid. Second Lieutenant. and in the spring he joined his company at Savannah.. BREVET MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN John C. and in the fall he joined Sherman's battery of that regiment. CARR. he was promoted to First Lieutenant. Yours affectionately. he was in Florida. I regret that the following officers are absent on detached service. D. Fourth New York WILLIAM H. N. DEAR COLONEL : I am requested to hand you this document as an evidence of the deep regret which the officers who have signed it feel at your leaving us. TIDBALL. Va. In March. Chaplain. He was brought up as . In the summer of 1849. Company B. Fourth New York New York G. Company D. at Fortress Monroe. Captain VANDEWEILE and Lieutenant McKEEL are in New York. but at an early age he emi with his parents to Belmont County. Company E. Tidball was born in Ohio County. Company A. ABRAM G. Colonel Hall now resides in Brooklyn.a grated farmer. In 1859. First Lieutenant. Lieutenant Tidball became personally acquainted with Col- . I remain.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. when he rejoined his company. L. The next fall he was assigned to duty on the Coast Survey. Company D. Company H. and after receiving a common school education he entered West Point in 1844. as ever.

I can now readily see how by his own magnetic in fluence he was enabled to hold together. on battery. and was at once hurried to Washington to participate Manassas campaign. Captain Tidball continued in the advance of the Army of the Potomac. and. but by successively retiring as the rebels advanced. with his battery. his Army of Northern Virginia and deal heavy blows with it against and respect of Potomac for four continuous years. the withdrawal of the at Gaines's Hill. been promoted to Captain. Light Battery into a Horse Battery. and won the admiration He was all by his soldierly bearing and gentlemanly manners. returned to in the . and taking up new positions. Says General Tid- onel (afterward the Confederate General) Robert E. on the right. accom panied the Army of the Potomac to the Peninsula. and others were organized. pre-eminently the beau ideal of both. Military critics and the other of his campaigns. May 14th. In the battle of Gaines's Mill Captain Tidball reported to General Sykes. and lent his great qualities as a military leader to the aid of those who were treacherously endeavoring to break up the Union for their own selfish ends. and assisted in the siege of Yorktown. 1861. and in this campaign he commanded the Soon after the Manassas campaign Captain Tidball organized his battery. in a letter to the writer : " At Harper's Ferry he was our commanding officer. and pressed the enemy closely.440 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. After a short stay Lieutenant Tidball was transferred to Company A. May 23d and 24th. Before the opening of the Rebellion the company was ordered to Washington. ball. with horses and equipments. Lee. and in an action at Mechanicsville. and ordered to Fort Leavenworth. his battery played a conspicu. of his regiment. and to rejoin the main force. was then despatched the secret expedition for the relief and re-enforcement of Fort Pickens. but so far as I am able to judge he never made but one serious mistake in his life. against the most adverse circum stances. where the enemy was pressing upon the flank of the National Army. Kan. ." the noble are Army of the wont to condemn this. Upon the evacuation of that place he joined in the pursuit. which took up its new line of battle unmolested. This was the first battery of the sort organized in the United States. and that was when he mistook his native State of Virginia for the whole United States. and as it was new. The The battery assisted in putting lhat post in a defensible condition. and in July New York. He placed his guns on the right of Weed's already in position and by their united efforts six successive attacks were repulsed and the flank was held against Jackson's efforts until the other portions of the line were forced so far back that the batteries were in In this duty he was in no way assisted or supported . ous part. near Williamsburg. having all the cannoneers mounted. army to a new position by other troops. Lieutenant Tidball had. in the mean time. under Stoneman. he was able to hold them in check. with his battery. After the battle of Mechanicsville General Porter directed Captain Tidball to cover. participated in a skirmish which was the forerunner of the battle of the next day. that. there were many sceptical critics but as the war progressed the efficiency of horse -batteries became apparent. From what I saw of him during our three weeks' service together. In the spring campaign of 1862 Captain Tidball. to form part of General Scott's force assisting at the first inauguration of Presi dent Lincoln.

Captain Tidball was ordered out immediately. and by their fearful fire the enemy was checked. Captain Tidball's battery was held in reserve until near the close of the day. when Captain Tidball was assigned to the cavalry division under General Averill. sideoable consternation. under Col onel Childs. About 8 o'clock on the morning of the Antietam battle Captain Tidball was directed to cross the centre bridge. the battle having ceased. when. who maintained the unequal contest in a manner nowise unfavorable to himself. Unimportant marches and reconnoissances occupied the time until November 1st. Hagerstown. Captain Tidball moved with the cavalry in pursuit of the retreating rebels. tain Tidball should place his guns on an eminence and open fire which was no sooner done than the enemy concentrated all his batteries upon Tidball. On July 3d the enemy made a reconnoissance in force. in hot pursuit of the enemy. posted to cover the crossing. in conjunction with General Pleasanton guarded the right tlank of the army. marching his infantry division by a shorter route. who.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MKN. and consequently was pre vented from participating in the second Manassas campaign. and Amissville in all of which Captain Tidball. and all the reserve batteries were thrown forward en masse. and now heard the enemy's guns with con. danger of being captured. but without his artillery. of the river. and at the crossing of the Potomac he had a spirited artillery contest with the enemy's . under General Pleasanton. Continuing the pursuit toward . and a succes The most important of these were at Pied mont. who. Markham. Although suffering considerably he held his position until after dark. he started with the cavalry. leaving the Captain to drive back the skirmishers with canister. 441 to the other side About dark they were withdrawn On July 1st the last of the seven days' battle took place at Malvern Hill. son. he was ordered to withdraw from such an exposed point. of participating but he was held in readiness for any advantage that might at the . The rebel rear-guard was overtaken a short distance beyond Boonsborough. and commenced shelling the National troops. . arise. with his At the battle of Fredericksburg he had no opportunity battery. at Harrison's Landing. a circuitous march brought them to Antietam. The Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry preceded him. was engaged. the day after the battle of South Mountain. and after a sharp skirmish the National cavalry was driven back in confusion and it was not until Captain Tidball brought up his pieces that order was restored and the enemy routed. The enemy was moving sion of flank collisions took place. batteries. he succeeded in driving off the enemy. Potomac withdrew from Harrison's Landing Captain Tidball remained with the cavalry to cover the rear. arrived at the same His combative zeal led him to insist that Cap time. when a furious assault was made. on the turnpike leading from Boonsborough to Sharpsburg. but the Colonel was killed and the regiment withdrawn. same time in a parallel direction. and at daylight on the the When Army of the morning of September 15th. . General Richard. In this movement Captain Tidball's battery took most honorable part. on account of the rain and mud had not yet taken up the line of defense fully. and throwing his battery well to the front. as it moved from Harper's Ferry to Fredericksburg. 1862. and to establish his bat tery on an eminence well advanced toward Sharpsburg. He joined the Army of the Potomac again on the march to Antietam.

The regiment was stationed in the defenses of Washington. Colonel in command of the Artillery Brigade of that corps. was somewhat defective in discipline and instruction but by energetic labor : these deficiencies were corrected. the Third. of . without doubt. After the battle of Chancellorsville the horse-batteries. where Tidball it. Owing to heavy rains and swollen streams the expedition was much delayed. Hancock determined to assault. and in the pursuit they performed their duty with marked credit. placed sixty guns in position. and commenced playing on the enemy's works and. and as speedily as possible Colonel Tidball . When the spring campaign of 1863 opened. preparatory to the advance which resulted in the battle of Chancellorsville. eight in number lmt afterward increased to twelve. consisting of thirteen batteries in addition to his own regiment. had a magical effect in suppressing his. where the enemy made a desperate line. his artillery fire contributed greatly to the success of the assault. to the Army of the Poto was assigned to the Second Corps. The enemy were driven away sufficiently to destroy the bridge. This fire. on both sides of the river. Falling Water. Captain Tidball was selected to accompany General Stoneman on his raid. Tidball 's battery was attached immediately to Averill's command.442 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Funkstown. and Fuller's. and prevented the National Army from crossing. and then the command. Hagerstown. and was engaged with the rebel cavalry at Aldie's. for the protection of the bridges. which soon followed. Ashby's. and at daylight opened fire with them. In the Gettysburg campaign Tidball's Artillery Brigade was attached to Pleasanton's Cavalry Corps. moved with mac. well intrenched. and though an old regiment. at once strange and destructive to the enemy. In the battle of the Wilderness Colonel Tidball. of the First United States Artillery. and Williamsport. The batteries were Snicker's. Colonel Tidball's batteries again had ample opportunities for displaying their skill and hardihood. crossed the river and entered the National lines at Chancellorsville during the battle. larly two of them posted near the centre of the Second Corps. The rebels did not have an opportunity to destroy the bridge. could was placed These rendered valuable service. commanded completely. which. . particularly in the engagements at Boonsborough. met the enemy May 1st in strong force. assault and partly succeeded in breaking the National In the battles around Spottsylvania Court-House. In the month of August the Governor of New York appointed Captain Tidball Colonel of the Fourth Heavy Artillery from that State. particu place but three batteries in position. but about twelve hundred yards from the bridge. under Hancock. and consequently was not so fruitful of results as it otherwise would have been. consisting of his own battery. This was the first occasion on which Coehorn mortars were used for field purposes in our service but from this time . moving to Ely's Ford. . with Graham's and Randall's. guarding the railroad bridge and ford across the Rapidan. placed it guns but at night he placed six Coehorn mortars in position. on account of the nature of the ground. The batteries were so situated that Colonel Tidball could not silence them with his fieldtheir batteries. it and in the following March Colonel Tidball numbering over two thousand men. At the North Anna the enemy was strongly po>ted in General redoubts. were organized into two brigades one of them was under command of Captain Tidball. almost constantly engaged during the battle of Gettysburg. passing through Oulpeper. and other gaps of the Blue Ridge.

and was ordered to repair to West Point without delay. the enemy rushed from his works. On March 30th the grand move commenced.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. the penalty of which he attempted He was brought to trial before a court-martial. When the Secretary heard of this neglect of his order he dismissed the Judge-Advocate from the service. To accompany column General Tidball selected a hundred artillery-men under These carried primers. The Judge -Advocate hav ing doubted whether this ought to be done till the examination was concluded. superior 1864. and ordered Colonel Tidball to the field. miles. and sustained them with spirit and skill. On December 1st the Ninth Corps exchanged positions with the Second. Strong columns swept along the works to the right and left. the assaulting . leaving the Ninth Corps to hold its position. with but little resistance. and spirited officers. as the three hundred yards between the lines to a sweeping cross-fire of artillery. with almost continuous fighting. when. All resistance was crushed was ordered to take place at 4 o'clock A. He occupying the extreme left of the line on the Petersburg front. An assault along the whole line. organization among them the captors was destroyed by the batteries. and at Cold Harbor a portion of his batteries were posted on precisely the same ground which had been occupied previously in the battle of Gaines's Mill. and other implements. Colonel Tid appointed Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy. The Colonel was very soon reinstated in the good opinion of his the court went on. swung off toward the left to Five Forks. After ball fifty was days' campaigning. charges preferred by Colonel Tidball but as soon as the Secretary heard of . captured Fort Steadman. onward they were 443 Colonel Tidball con in great demand for close fighting. April 2d. 1865. It was also 'impossible for were exposed by the artillery alone and a division of infantry marched into Fort Steadman without opposition and captured a large number of prisoners.M.. the son of a former law partner of immediately ordered to the field. Just as Colonel Tidball was becoming settled in his duties an incident occurred which caused him to be cadet. lanyards. rejoined the Army of the Potomac in the early part of October. This state of affairs continued until March 25ih. his batteries occupied a position During the severe fighting of the succeeding days on the most advanced line. and was assigned to the command of the Artillery Brigade of the Ninth Corps. On this portion of the line General Tidball had ninety guns and forty mortars of various calibres the enemy had about an equal amount of artillery opposed. After the crossing of the James Colonel Tidball p:aced his batteries close upon the skirmish line. and occupied the right of the line from the Appomattox River to. and the latter. at that time extending about fifteen . to escape. and. General Tidball hastened to the spot and placed several batteries in position on a crest commanding Fort Steadman. they were checked and driven back. approaching the neighboring batteries. and at the " Hare House" he threw up a light work. and was brevetted Brigadier-General to date from August 1st. historic from the fierce assault made upon it by the enemy March selves 25th. All . the Secretary of War committed an offence. A large portion of the Army of the James had been united with the Army of the Potomac. A the proceedings he ordered the trial to be stopped. and some distance beyond the Jerusalem Plank Road. just before daylight. tinued to participate with the Second Corps. upon to escape by falsehood. which grew into the shapeless figure called Fort Steadman. then officers. until.

the quiet routine of a military post and the command of but one battery. " When there were no longer enemies in arms to vex our land. the Ninth was charged with keeping open com munications with Petersburg. General Tidball immediately opened along the whole line. the very fact that such was my I was glad of it The status was evidence that peace had returned to our distracted country. On October 1st he accompanied his regiment to New York Harbor. This position of affairs threw the Ninth Corps in the rear. The assault was intended to be a surprise. Through this vast r-gion a large military force was re quired to keep the Indians down. was indeed a sudden transition. General Tidball collected and forwarded to City Point all the surplus artil After lery and ammunition. to date from April 3d. The assault was successful. This was his old Horse rejoined his battery at the Presidio of San Francisco. charge of any artillery that might be captured and to turn it upon Other parties carried tools to cut through the parapets. though Union had been saved. and things went on almost as army rank and to the quietness of peace if no great war had convulsed the nation for four long years. like myself. .. the surrender he accompanied the corps to Washington City. Captain. and the works were held the enemy. to bridge over the time necessarily required to bring . A large military force \vas required in the States lately in rebellion. peace footing. and participated placed in command of an Artillery Brigade in and for gallant and meritorious services at Forts Steadman and Sedgwick. and the enemy was in full retreat toward Burksville. 1865. he Artillery. where it was mustered out. had held volun teer rank. which was held in readi ness to move. and the enemy did the same and probably a more terrific cannon ade was never heard. *he war. and then proceeded with the corps to Burksville. wise successful. After having been for four full years with the grand old Army of the Poto mac." says General Tidball. to remove obstructions. as likewise in the battles of the Army of the Potomac up to and This battery had won for itself much including the Gettysburg campaign. and he was justly proud of it. and to prepare a road for the artillery. General Tidball reverted to his regular army rank viz. Battery A. and in command of many batteries in its most arduous campaigns. Upon the muster out of the Fourth New York Artillery. after the close of in the grand review. His regiment having been assigned to the Pacific Coast. returned to their regular service. Regular officers who. and I was proud of the partcomparatively humble it was that I had taken in the great war for the suppression of the rebellion. which he had commanded in many skirmishes and actions while on cavalry raids.444 were to take HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. eclat Second and renown. ' The other portions of the army were like against all attempts to retake them. He was the defenses of Washington. " in a letter to the writer." At no period of the history of this country has emigration spread over the territories between the Mississippi and the Pacific more extensively than during the years of the war. and General Tidball did not open fire until the enemy's guns announced that the head of the column was approaching the works. razed to a " But. and while the other corps were pursuing the enemy. the huge armies of volunteers were mustered out and with gladness returned to their homes and civil pursuits. was made Brevet Major-General of Volunteers. .

This included the Paul and St. and northward to the Arctic Circle. to exercise such authority as was necessary to prevent crime and preserve order among the inhabitants. he was sent to Nevada to attend to some threatened dis turbances among the Indians of the Walker Lake Reservation. C. Otherwise the condition of things was about the same as at Kodiak. each of the four old regiments of artillery. was transferred to the Atlantic Slope. as the military commander. From Kodiak he was transferred to Sitka. and he was as signed to the command of the District of Kenai. were held by those called the best people of this region. These he settled without bloodshed or much trouble. Various tours of duty from time to time enabled him to become acquainted with the Pacific country. and a great many adventurers flocked there in search of furs and fortune. After three full years of service in this land of drear and drizzle. where for a time he maintained a post to prevent the utter extermination of the seals until Government should take measures for their preservation. He had many minor disputes to settle. nor for many years thereafter. 445 rebellion to the status of peaceable in other words. in command of the entire territory. In consequence of this demand. havin'g been seven years upon the Pacific in Alaska. winter of 1871-72. he applied for duty elsewhere. and was successful in So remote and so preserving harmony. embracing all that vast area of land and water extending westward from Cook's Inlet to the extremity of the Aleutian Islands famous fur the seal islands of St. Major Tidball was assigned to command a post at Raleigh. for the purpose of seeking promotion to a Other duty took him to Arizona and other distant places. the small army of Regulars of about fifteen thousand was consid In this increase an additional Major was given to erably increased in 1866. Congress had not then. Captain Tidball was fortunate in being selected as one of these additional Majors. where he was While here. isolated is this place. provided any kind of law or government for this terri tory consequently. in command of the District of Astoria. brigadier-goneralcy. in Behring's Sea. during the assigned to nominal duty at Yerba Buena Island. he aimed only at justice. The transfer of the territory to the United States opened the fur-trading and other interests to all comers. and was sent to San Francisco Harbor. The savage Ku-Klux outrages that so prevailed in this part of the South had been by this time pretty well extinguished so he had but little to do except to endure the fall In the Coast. sneering contempt in which Yankees. His headquarters were at Kodiak. or Slope. George. unencumbered by statute law. it devolved upon Major Tidball. from San Diego to Puget Sound. and much of the time . where he remained about a year. N. He remained at Kodiak two years. the period of reconstruction. It did not occur to him to nurse the difficulty into an Indian war. and was designated to his old regiment the Second Artillery and assigned to duty at the mouth of the Columbia River. them from the anarchy of unsuccessful statehood . that intervals of from three to six months would elapse between communications with the civilized world. so that his time was fully occupied. This brought him within monthly communication with the States. and especially Yankee soldiers. These people were far from . of 1872 his regiment. as it is called. But as he was . In the mean while Alaska had been acquired from Russia.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. the head centre of the Russian American Fur Company.

Full of enthusiasm. and is intended to be supplemental to that taught at the United States Military Academy. In travelling with him. A most all. as Super intendent of Artillery Instruction. he is kind and considerate to and moving. In the summer of 1883 he made a very extended journey with the General. and many other subjects important to the artillerist. I therefore set myself about preparing a manual for heavy artillery service. 1883. in 1874. " I was very happy when. especially upon such a journey as our last. Occasionally he took journeys with the General. " This was the last official journey made by General Sher Says the General man before his retirement in February of the following year.446 HEAVY GUNS AND : LIGHT. November 1st. being reconstructed. and customs of service.three months of time. field This woik fortifications. My relations with him were of the most pleasant nature. 1881. when he went on inspecting tours or to attend army meetings. I flatter myself that I was hijrhly successful in this com mand. Major Tidball was invited by Geieral Sherman to a posi tion on his staff. strides over them so easily to general Always restless results. 1889. 1889. as bringing him into contact with many old friends of the war. by the advice of General Sherman. and cavalry tactics. I how he projected and carried out the great strategical movements that made his name famous throughout the world. 22d. 1882. I was assigned to the command of Fort Monroe and the Artillery School at that could readily perceive place. I had an opportunity of studying the General of the : Headquarters was the investigation of the various questions his character well." March Artillery. which has for officers of artillery for the my its energies unremittingly to the develop object the more thorough preparation of performance of the important functions devolved upon them by the advancement made in artillery and its cognate branches during the last half century. extending over twelve thousand miles of the Northwest and requiring over. Says the General I was assigned to duty at the Artillery School at Fort Mouroe. having reached the prescribed age of sixty-four. contained in the annual report of Army for 1883. I extended to include submarine mining." In January. " When he relinquished command of the army. is very elaborate and interesting. army regulations. General Tidball's report of this journey. while recognizing minor details. Va. remarkable man he is. This. the Major was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel of the Third Artillery. . The course taught is both theoretical and practi cal. Owing to the advancement in artillery science and material the text-books of former days had become obsolete. I never have met any one else with so active a mind that. he never shows impatience or petulancy. During these five years I devoted ment of the school. June 30th. This brought me to congenial duty and my family to pleasant society. 1885. This brought him into close personal relationship with that distinguished soldier. These were always pleasant. This occupied hinr for a considerable period most busily. Lieutenant-Colonel Tidball became Colonel of the First In January.. was published the Army and in 1880 and adopted by the War Department as a text-book for continues to be so. Among his duties at Army and they were endless arising from the various interpretations of infantry. which command I held until my own retirement in January. artillery. his scope of observation was greatly enlarged. and furthermore brought him into an official circle where It still Militia of the United States.

was born January 27th. strength. service after leaving the regiment.. 1862. Lieutenant-Colonel. State at of New York. was born August 31st. October 27th. New York. Brevet March 13th. as an invalid. Present post-office address. GENERAL ULYSSES DOUBLEDAY. first and second. 1864. August 25th. . Cold Harbor. January 4th. Buncombe County. C. County of New York. 1862. where he was reared and educated. 1861. He was appointed Acting Assistant May Adjutant-General of the State. one girl and two boys. Post No. Major of the Second Battalion. He remained in the military paign.. 1863. The early reputation which the regiment enjoyed for efficiency in drill and discipline was due in great measure to the efforts of Major Doubleday. Was discharged December 4th. Pa. and vigor. 1824. and in command of the regiment until wounded.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. GENERAL THOMAS ALLCOCK. He subsequently became Lieutenant-Colonel. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. State of North Carolina. 25th. He was with the Third Bat ber. N. 1865.. by reason of ending of war. where he was educated. and com manded a brigade at the battle of Olustee. D. with headquarters at New York Depot. Is married and has four children. nected with the State Militia and was appointed Captain and Aide-de-camp. Brigadier-General. 1862. D. Was in the Florida expedition. May 21st. Present post-office address. Asheville. on Second Brigade staff until mustered as Major in the Fourth New York Artillery.. and has since removed to Cleveland. He was discharged as Colonel and Brevet Brigadier-General at New York City by reason of close of war. 1864. O. United States Volunteers. at Auburn. Has been engaged since the war in banking. and in the enjoyment of health. Deep Bottom. 1861. where he now resides. 1865. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. At the age of twenty he engaged in the banking business. Brevet Colonel. Is a widower and has three children. was commissioned March 4th. Weldon Railroad. first Captain of Company A. Totopotomoy. and Ream's Station. While in the service he was on detached duty several times. in England. 1866. 1815. 1856. Y. 8. 1864. Hanover Court-House. pitched his family tent at Germantown. two girls and two boys. Was wounded August 25th. talion while the three were separated. to December 4th. April While in the service he was on detached duty from Septem 13th. and Brevet BrigadierGeneral. R. Washington. with date of rank from December 13th. and in other engagements in the South. He was promoted to Major. 447 ho was retired from active service. On the organization of the regiment he became Major. MAJOR THOMAS the SEARS. He was engaged in the battles of the Wilderness. He was while Major engaged in the battles of Pope's cam Was wounded slightly at Groveton. Be longs to G. Has been engaged since the war in the drug business. Spottsylvania. at New York City. Petersburg. at Ream's Station. North Anna. At the age of fifteen years he engaged in the study and After coming to New York he became con practical work of chemistry. A.

MAJOR WILLIAM ARTHUR. from January 1st. No data has been fur- MAJOR EDWARD the first F. Spottsylvania. August 25th. 27th. to April 6th. 1864. December 23d. 1862. 1873. N. and brother of the late President Chester A. etc. was at which last. New York. an analytical digest of the obligations. 1856 was School Commissioner. Received an academical education. he is at the outset confronted life. State of Florida.. Born May 28th. 1ST" appointed wounded. regulations. Fourth Dis trict. . 1865 accepted April 29th. as First Lieutenant. Graduated from Albany Medical Vt. D. Entered the Volunteer Service. June 10th. . 1862. February 22d. and Malvina Stone. December 22d. November 5th. Com pany H. He died of disease at that post.D. 1863. master. Was Commissioner of Bureau of Refugees. of a soldier. "With no knowledge whatever of military laws. and customs. October 7th. Freedmen. Third Artillery. in Hinesburgh. Chittenden County. 1865. is the youngest son of the late Rev. 1863. January 29th. with Captain of Company G. 1863. January 1st. 1864. . Y. 1863. Albany County. offense-. so scattered through the Regulations and elsewhere as to be little accessible to the soldier especially to the volunteer fresh from civil . Engaged at the battles of the Wilderness. in command of the regiment just after Lieutenant-Colonel Allcock was . College. 1865. and to a penalties. February 23d. from the Arm}' Regulations and other sources. Third United States Artillery. Va. until the regiment was brought together at Totopotomoy Creek.. 1866. United States Army. January 19th. and Major of the regiment. Appointed Captain in Veteran Reserve Corps. and little or no opportunity of learning them. 1866 Regimental Quarter 18th. July 28th.. Honorably mustered out of Volunteer Service. cam command of the First Battalion prior to and during the paign of 1864. YOUNG. great extent still are. Honorably mustered out of Fourth New York Artillery. Major and Paymaster. 1862. Appointed Second Lieutenant. 1866. Arthur. and at Ream's Station. In com mand of the Second Battalion from the time of breaking up camp at Brandy Station. Totopotomoy. 1861. He was promoted to Major. North Anna. 1866. uished of his civic record. Va. Petersburg. April 6th. I selected Major Young for this work.448 1863.. February 1st. Major Young had it well advanced when he was taken sick. because he appeared to me to have literary taste and a tendency to such pursuits. Cold Harbor. " Major Young had previously been Assistant Provost Marshal of the vicinity about Chain Bridge. I never knew what became of his manuscript. . Says General Tidball " Major : Young up to the time of his death was engaged in preparing. HEAVY GUNS AND and was in LIGHT. It is readily seen how advantageous such a compilation would have been. to January 1st. with penalties for offenses of which he had no conception. and Abandoned Lands. All of these things were at that time. William Arthur. was commissioned October date of rank from July 25th. He was a man of scholarly tastes. Deep Bottom. Fourth New York Artillery promoted Captain in same company. until discharged. he was severely wounded in face . 1834. to July 28th. 1866 accepted April Promoted First Lieutenant. : . 1858.

at Petersburg. 1865 Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. Married Alice Bridge Jackson. Says a member of the regiment : " Major Frank Williams seemed to be absolutely without fear. G. . . . Mass. Va. was enrolled in Company A as Second Lieutenant 1861. Y. with date of rank from brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel. Fort Macon. daughter of the late Dr. Y. March 2d. Ga.. 1867. He was enrolled on April 2d. United States Army. 1866. He was. . 1863. and was wounded in the shoulder. at Croton. He now officiates as Post master at Avon. for Brevet gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Ream's Station." He was mustered out on expiration of term of ser For gallant and meritorious services he received the vice. Terr. and was mustered as Captain of Company 15th. Governor's Island. ren. Va. promoted to First Lieutenant 6th. March 2d. Fort Buford. Forts Wadsworth and Savannah. Va. 449 28th. also wounded and captured at Ream's Station August 25th. as First Lieutenant April 4th. COLONEL DERRICK was mustered F. Charleston. 1864. 1864. pany A May 27th. in connection with the recruitment of Company B of the Eleventh New York Heavy Artillery. and his fault was that he appeared to think every man as desirous of getting into an engage ment as he himself was. 1864 was paroled and reported for duty December 12th. Charles T. N. . . A.May 12th of the same 17th. . New York Harbor. February 20th. GOULD entered the military service at the age of 19. for gallant and meritorious ser . which afterward became of K the Fourth. He was mustered November . COLONEL SEWARD F. HAMLINK as Orderly Sergeant of Company C when first organized. . served at Fort War Fort Fort Adams. 1863. Hamilton. . as Captain year. 1863. . Major and Paymaster. and at present on duty Helena. Tex. 103. Fort Pulaski. vices in the battle of Spottsylvania. New York Harbor Omaha. He was. Neb. 1867. January 31st. Ga. 1862. in the city of Rochester. January 1st. Kan. 1865. N. . Colonel Gould was in command of the regiment during the last campaign and with it until mustered out. 1875. 1863. R. Brevet Major. with date K He became Major December . had command of the five companies engaged in the charge June 18th. Since entering the Regular Army. Alice Bridge and Susan Elizabeth. C. 1864. . at the age of 22. and became Captain of Com He was promoted to Major. has two children. September and mustered as such December 14th. 1863. passed through the grades of Second and First Lieutenants.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. . at New York City. COLONEL FRANK WILLIAMS. 13th. at the post of San Antonio. Jackson. C. . for gallant conduct in the battles of Spottsylvania and "Ream's Station. Dak. Mon. I. March . S. N. Member of George Washington Post No. Mass. of rank from November 5th was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel for meritorious conduct on the field. R. 1865. 1875 accepted July Brevet Captain. Major of Volunteers. Riley. of Boston. February 23d. . December 22d. and was commissioned . July 26th.

C. Octo Was Post Adjutant at Fort Marcy ber 23d. Henry September 25th.. clothing. Recruited his health and four months thereafter he enlisted fifty-two men for the Eleventh Heavy Artillery with his own means. Henry E. worked at blacksmithing. . while at Fort Richmond. 1865. N. 1863. during the winter of 1863 and to about April. and from that time engaged more or less in farming and nursery business until the self. He now resides in Washington. and re-enlisted and was mustered into the Eleventh Heavy Artillery as First Lieutenant. at Fredericksburg. 1822. MAJOR HENRY of the Fourth E. Joined the regiment.. served under Warren in the Fifth Corps. December llth-13th. and was promoted to Major February llth. 1863. 1862. received the . August 26th. January 19th. I. Y. rejoined the regiment. he enlisted for the One Hundred and Fortieth New York State Volunteers twenty-three men with his own means. at Rochester.. RICHMOND.450 Captain of HEAVY GUNS AND Company LIGHT. For honorable and meritorious service. year 1862. He then engaged in blacksmithing and wagon-making for him. Lee was mustered Company A. LEE. and was promoted to Major in May following. enlisted in Was . under Burnside. was born at Churchville. 1862. He was never wounded. 1862. 1865. carpenter work. 1863. Monroe County. was reared a farmer and understood well its practical work. Morgan. From August 30th. Company G. His father was a farmer Billings Richmond. mustered in as First Lieutenant commissioned as First Lieutenant by Edwin D. 1865 was again wounded in the opening of the last campaign. 1864. Commandant of New York Harbor. Y. he was trans ferred to the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. also under Hooker. Va. August. S. N. Went to California in 1850. at D July 12th. and was engaged in the milk business in Sacramento for about three years came home in 1854. and worked more or less at this trade until he was twentyone years old. D. T. at Fort Ethan Allen. 1861. Cal. . 1862. charged for disability at Henry House. One Hundred and Fortieth New York Volunteers. losing a leg was mustered out with the regiment. Governor. as First Lieutenant. He was educated in the common schools in Churchville. and became quite proficient as a blacksmith. Was commissioned as . New York Heavy Artillery. and was in Hooker's Grand Centre Divi Dis sion. October 10th. 1863. and was mustered out on expiration of his term. At fourteen years he commenced working in the summer months in his father's carding and cloth-dress ing establishment. 1864. Va. August 31st. MAJOR HENRY At the original organization of T. regiment succeeding Lieutenant Mears. He now resides at Los Angeles. and August 30th. but at Sutherland's Station he received seven bullet-holes through his Since the war he has attained distinction in the legal profession. July 14th to 25th commanded sixty veterans at New York and Yorkville to suppress New York riots under orders of General Brown. with the exception of one term in Lima in the winter of 1840. mining. June 21st. He the second Adjutant of the became Captain of the same com Was pany January 4th. . He was wounded Cold Harbor. brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel.

Berky's place. Berky's place took porarily as Assistant Surgeon. Goodrich. Berky resigned Dr. 1862. New York. and A. resigned Sep Dr. and commissioned by R. 1864. J. Dr. Since then he has been engaged in the coal and lumber business and selling farmers' goods generally. October 9th. F. 9th. The first medi cal officer having a commission from the State of New York of full Surgeon in the Fourth Heavy Artillery Volunteers. and because thriv was no immediate vacancy " in the State service either at home or at the front. Mudie. and was appointed in Dr. DR. Dr. Dr. were dated September 26th. R. was Dr. Past Worshipful Master of Riga Grange 168. by Governor Horatio Seymour was constantly on duty with Company I. A. D. until the surrender of Lee and muster out. 1864 promoted to Major. Medical Director State of New York.been examined in Albany by Dr. 1865. He has been engaged since the war in farming and nursery business. Vnnderpoel. 1865. Special Orders of muster out No. for full Surgeoncy. C. such as salt. phosphates. 433. M. Is married and has had nine children. George Bayles received a com mission as full Surgeon. . Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. BERKY. Mudie. 220. A Second Assistant was appointed to the regiment after reaching Washington. October 9th. and agricul tural implements. tiles. REESE age of 33. BERKY was enrolled November date of rank. 1861. 1879. Belongs to Asa L. E. from May 4th. GEORGE BAYLES was the second medical officer having the rank of Surgeon of Volunteers con nected with the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery Regiment. Is Past Commander of said Post. Lawrence. When Dr. June 13th. B. lie had . Davis. DR. F. at Churchville. 1861." he was given duties tem The promotion to Dr. . George Baylee. Governor. This Second Assistant was Dr. . A. three girls and six boys. 1865 was promoted to Captain before Peters burg. and commissioned as Captain by Governor Horatio Seymour. A. as Surgeon tember 15th. 1865. March 30th. 451 Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. G.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. Bayles went out with him as his First Assistant Surgeon. Dr. Post No. F. M. place within the year that he entered the service. First Lieutenant. 1864. REESE B. P. New York Harbor. December was with the regiment from the Rapidan to the surrender of Lee 23d. and Past Worshipful Master of Churchville Lodge 667. Fenton. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. and the regiment was mustered out at Hart's Island. Berky. C. December . Mudie became his First . . at DR. In 1876 was elected Sheriff of Monroe County. which term expired January 1st. Dr. He at the 10th.

George Bayles's present address is 408 Main Street. arriving there July 2d. where Surgeon Haywood remained with such of the sick as could not be further transported conducted the remainder of the sick. and received school and academical education in Henrietta and at the Collegiate Institute. There seemed no intention to employ the Fourth Heavy Artillery in any active campaigning. dated." Dr. M. Y. Va. Orange. 1862. when he was transferred to the Department of the East. first 1862. Surgeon United States Volunteers. N. numbering about one hundred. 1862. Palmer. 1862. 1862. His commission as full Surgeon dated (with the rank of Major) from 1862. near Alexandria.. McDougle. Bayles in a letter to the writer the fortunes of my late comrades since the war. of Rochester. Surgeon United States Volunteers. the regiment did some very meritorious service. September 29th the amputation of a thigh. -was born HARTWELL C. commission to date August 21st. after which he practised his profession at Knowlesville. indorsed by General O. Y. New York Volunteers. by order of General Richardson. from about May 1st to 25th. with ington. N. retreated with the sick of this hospital to Savage Station. Assistant Surgeon Greenleaf. till February when he received a commission as Assistant Surgeon of the SixtyRegiment. June 28th. 1862. : DR. 1862. N. 1862. S. C. I understand.. 1828. At the age of nineteen years he commenced the study of medicine and sur gery with Dr..' where. under charge of Surgeon Nathan W. at the field hospital of this division near Antietam. . O. 1853. Vt. March 3rl. His commission as Assistant Surgeon He was mustered in January 9th. Y. . the battles of Antictam and Fredericksburg. in June. in Henrietta. last operation made at this hospital.452 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Was detailed in charge of the sick of the First Division Second Army Corps. Was detailed April 4th. with rank. Was detailed on May 30th. Twentieth Regiment. " I have not been able to follow Says Dr. Davis Second Assistant. as I have been a very busy man in my profession. E. N. Was Operating Surgeon by order of J. Assistant and Dr. Medical Director. The muster was made to date September 30th. 1862. by order of the Post Medical Director of Yorktown. inclusive. Howard. He remained with the regiment while it was stationed along the chain of forts around Washington until March 13th. 1862. .... to take charge of a hospital at Clermont. Moon.. D.. Surgeon-in-Chk-f First Division Second Army Corps. Orleans County. After leaving the regiment I went into very active general hospital and transport service. Rochester. If I had stayed with the regiment I doubtless would have had a sufficiently active service at the ' front. so I applied for ap pointment in another department of the medical service. and performed the 25(11. by G. Haywood. 1863. United States Army. September 30th. in army wagons through to Harrison's Landing on the James While in this regiment was in River. from September 17th to September 29th. from January 6th. X. for duty at general hospital of the Second Army Corps at the Turner House. Massachusetts Volun teers. composed of the sick of General Howard's Brigade mainly and of the First Division Second Army Corps. 1862. and after completing his studies under him graduated at Woodstock. Dr. J. Monroe County. TOMPKINS March a common loth. Taylor. 1862. Va. Va. H. Y. and was mustered in as such at Wash Was promoted Surgeon of this regiment.

by order of Brigadier-General Hancock. tailed April 6th. Va. C. June 29th. with laudable pride. 1865. by order Brevet Major-General Miles. Special Orders No. 21st to April 5th. Second Army Corps. nearly one year. First Division Second Army Corps. March 28th. New York Artillery. Re ceived a commission as Assistant Surgeon of the Fourth Regiment. Corps. Headquarters First Division Second Army . 1862. Surgeon H. at Washington. Tidball as Surgeonin-Chief of the Artillery Brigade. First Division Second Army Corps.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. New York Heavy Artillery. 1865. 1865. January 19th. D. Head quarters Army of the Potomac. C. September 26th. Y. Under their command the ment. 65. 1862. 1887. in clusive. Miles. Special Orders Was absent on Headquarters De Russy's Division. Barlow and Nelson A. 1863. Miles. Returned to Knowlesville.. No. and twenty days from same cause in latter part of October and first part of November. March. with shells exploding and penetrating through the house and about it. serving as such till July 16th. 89. two sons and one March daughter. February 18th. Barlow and Colonel Nelson A. November 16th. and on account of business. sick leave at Washington. D. 112.. Detailed Chief Operating Surgeon. Detailed Operating Surgeon in the First Division Second Army Corps. New York Heavy Artillery. . Was mustered out of the United States service with his regiment. which he conti^ :es to the present date. Performed many capital and other operations during this time. August 22d. Orleans County. the first at Antietam and the latter at Fredericksburg. by order of General Meade. that General's stars. at a house at Fredericksburg. December 13th and 14th. by Special Orders No. it secured alike their lasting fame and their Brigadier- . 453 Dressed the first wounds received in battle of Generals Francis C. Va. 1864. 1863. Va. Fourth Brigade. Resigned from the United States service on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 1865. it was commanded by Colonel Francis C.. during a service of three years and one month. Is married and has three children living. mainly of the First Brigade. De by command of Colonel John C. the Peninsular campaign and the subsequent battles of Antietam and Freder icksburg. from about November 1st to the 20th. due largely to the great merit of these officers. June 12th. where he formerly resided. near Falmouth. fifteen days from Detailed Surgeon-in-Chief. and resumed his professional practice. probably unsurpassed by any Such was its bravery and good conduct in infantry regiment in the service. 148. which Colonel Tidball commanded.. 1863. Headquarters Hancock's Division. by Special Orders No. when relieved to report to his regiment then detailed for special service near General Meade's headquarters for siege service and construction of forts near Petersburg. Tompkins refers to his connection with the Sixty-first Regi New York Volunteers and of the Fourth Regiment. August llth. 1864. De Russy's Division. First Divi Army Corps. N. of fifty-five days. 1864. Had sion Second charge of a hospital of the wounded. and mustered again into the United States Promoted Surgeon service in the above-named regiment. 220. 1865. making a total loss of time in the United States service from above causes. 1862. by Special Orders No. Third Brigade. Chancellorsville and the Wilderness. C. 1863.. inclusive. of the Fourth Regiment. Detailed Surgeon-in-Chief Sec ond Brigade. reginvjnt acquired a rare degree of efficiency. During the period he was a medical officer of ths first-named regiment.

became one of the most distinguished regiments in the service. where-it was destroyed to prevent . Colonel John C. the intelligence and attainments of its officers. receipted for by him. was instituted during the winter of 1863-64 and about seventy men were discharged. there was a demur at once. twenty-two hundred and fifty strong. Bat teries had no surgeons. by the appointment of its commander. and Sur geon H.454 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Nine days of continuous and incessant storms of sleet and ~iin occurred. whose men were not injured. injuring a number severely. per haps for a couple of days. and only to be got by the Surgeon in-Chief in an emergency by much entreaty. 1864. with twelve batteries of the Second Corps. it nearly. Colonel Tidball assumed command of this regiment in August. C. The Fourth Regiment. It went but little into quarters without adequate facilities to make itself comfortable timber could be had to make bunks the men had to encamp in the . as well as all doubtful soldiers in the regiment. In the night a battery would often be ordered to a distant point. Tidball. Further. But the commander of the . and no one to blame. if not quite. mud.ircd belonged was readily given to transport its own injured men. New York Heavy Artillery. Even after this the regiment went into the field at Brandy Station. equalled some of Hancock's brigades. but when the Captain of another battery was appealed to. 1864. A board of examination was ap pointed and a rigid examination of all recruits. on the night of May 7th. 1864. Soon matters mended. John C. 1864. by the number. and finally swamping one wagon loaded with the most valuable medical supplies near the Armstrong House. In fine.. The ambulance of the battery to which the inj. except by a repeal of the law. A few pine boughs with blankets alone at first separated the men from the mud. on the occasion of the next accident he might have need of similar cour This same trouble re tesy for sick or wounded men in his own command. character. About 3 o'clock on the morning of May 4th. and a battalion was sent to each corps of the then Army of the Potomac. and no one in its falling into the had an ambulance in care of the brigade know of it outside of the battery except tlie Chief of Artillery. about twelve hundred recruits were added to it. he surrendered it when it was represented to him that. Still. Tompkins succeeded Surgeon Abram L. in which event the usual medical attendant would be unable to attend to it. 1863. Then began the troubles of the Surgeon. The ambulance was very nice to carry such necessary articles as the Captain needed. The Medical Director would allow one Assistant Surgeon to about three batteries. except such as were detailed to them from other service. peatedly occurred. The medical transportation of the brigade was hauled by partially broken but incorrigible mules. and was irremediable. The old and many times decimated regiments of Hancock's Second Corps looked at the regiment in undisguised astonishment as it marched by that dis tinguished General's quarters. the first night of leaving camp that became inextricably snarled up with the pinetrees after moving from the field hospital in the Wilderness. and the genial character of its accomplished and brave Colonel. enemy's hands. by act of Congress. was organized into the Artillery Brigade of the Second Corps. . its commander. Cox as Surgeon-in-Chief of the brigade. One battalion. The troubles of the regiment now began in earnest. that upset one of the medical supply wagons in the mud on the night of May 3d. March 27th. TidAfter ball. and physical stamina of its men. the horses of a battery with limber ran away and over about a dozen men lying asleep on the ground. Va. each battery.

pre vent this. Jones. and they were thus of necessity dependent on such medical aid. and batteries. no long line of promotion. participated. sent to City Point. . The Surgeon and one Assistant had all these suddenly to provide for to bury Captain D. both of whom declared there was no adequate remedy. the wounded were all. Captain McKeel and Lieutenants Dearborn and Flanigan were killed and LieutenantColonel Thomas Allcock and Major William Arthur were wounded. and also before the Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac. about three hundred men whom only about fifty returned. The regiments were composed of brave men and After all the great battles the labors and led by brave and competent officers. On August 25th. and occurring under. Tidball. and to establish the field hospital as near them as prac ticable. On the occasion of an assault on the works before Petersburg. nor is the data at hand. as there were not enough Surgeons or Assistants to supply one to each During a battle also the batteries were often suddenly scattered at battery. There was no remedy. to procure suitable rations at perform operations. Smith . of order. New York Heavy and duty performed tion of age. Tompkins now resides at Knowlesville. in which a battalion of the Fourth Regiment. Y. 1864. batteries when possible. There was plenty of work for the Surgeon Volunteers. While in camp the hospital became as useful as any in the infantry service. and in behalf of friend and foe alike. exerted in a for the benefit of humanity. about one hundred wounded men were in a short time brought to the hospital with various gun-shot wounds. N. Nine capital opera six amputations of the thigh. To them came no military prestige responsibilities of surgeons were immense. K. which know no distinc sex. an action at Ream's Station. and three tions were performed. quite a distance apart. or glory. a very good hospital service was established for the Much pains were taken to ascertain the position of the Artillery Brigade. Notwith standing this difficulty. and one in the Sixth Corps. . He cannot furnish the Surgeon's particular experience. New York Heavy Artillery. Small hospital and very flags were placed at various points between the hospital thus collected into many injured and wounded men of the artillery were their own hospital. of the regiment were taken prisoners. All the difficulties above enumerated incident to the hospital and medical service of the artillery were plainly pointed out at the commencement of the campaign by Colonel John C. who died in hospital that morning . one in the Second. These. were the most disastrous engagements of the regiment. by once for one hundred wounded to . terrible crisis of civil war of well-earned professional honor and skill. Va. 1864. as could be nearest obtained. Its service by bat talions. are noted as examples. from infantry regiments or other sources.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. Three days after. one in the Fifth. . or condition. June 18th. but the satisfaction of conscience satisfied in the Sixty-first New York Artillery. the last at dusk resections of arm and forearm. Dr. in accurate statistics of the entire casualties of the regiment. per haps. as well as in the Fourth Regiment. who had the magnanimity not to blame his Surgeon-in-Chief for difficulties insepa rable from the nature of the service. so that the usual medical attendant could not attend them all. battery 455 would bitterly complain. This matter was laid by the Surgeon-in-Chief before the Medical Director of the Second Corps.. but an Assistant Sur geon to each battery.

Deep Bottom. Clinton P. Va. N: Y. Resigned. New York Heavy Dr. at New New Salem. 1865. November 30th. vania. . at Marysville. Va. 1863. 1865. late Assistant Surgeon. Enrolled January 10th. and was promoted to Assistant Surgeon. with field and Resides in Buffalo. December 7th. . Enrolled September 5th. Assistant Surgeon. acted as Hospital Steward. 1864 discharged July 29th. at BurksHill.456 HEAVY GUNS AND DR. Enrolled April 14th. Hendrickson. 1865.. ASSISTANT SURGEONS. DR. J. ALONZO CHURCHILL was transferred as surgeon from the Eighth New York Heavy Artillery June 5th. 1863. 1863. Y.. afterward had charge of a hospital in Newport News. 1865. near Alexandria. Post No. Commissioned Fourth Artillery. resigned October 4th. cated at selaerville He was edu Salem and RensAt the Academy. age of eighteen years he en gaged in the study of medi cine. Alameda. . 1864. 1862. one girl and two boys. Assistant Surgeon.. on tender of resignation. Present post-office address. Rochester. 26 . Frank B. . 1842. . 80. He was with the Second Bat talion engaged in. 1865. 1863. Oakland. N. M. January llth. Assistant Surgeon . Cal. Washington Kelsey. Cal. and was honorably discharged on September 8th. Is now married and lias three children. Clayton L. Belongs to G. Private in Company M. staff. R. Archibald F. Hendrickson. with rank from November 23d. Lawrence. 1865. Enrolled June llth. William Mat thew. . North Anna. Albany County. Assistant Surgeon. New York Heavy Ar was born March 16th. Williams. . at 1863 Davis. age 24 mustered out September 26lh. 1863. A. ville. age 31st. 186. . at Washington November 5th. at age 36 mustered out September 26th. with field and staff. Has been engaged since the war in the practice of medicine. 1865 rendered Supernumerary and mustered out June 12th. William M. ALONZO CHURCHILL. Assistant Surgeon. . Charles F. New York Heavy Artillery discharged Febru ary 23d. transferred from Eleventh . LIGHT. Petersburg. in the Eleventh New York Heavy Artillery . 1862 resigned July .. Cold Harbor. Va. Fourth tillery . Ream's Station. date of rank Enrolled November 4th. 1865. the battles Spottsyl- of the Wilderness. . and graduated at the Albany Medical College in May. Mudie. at Albany age 24 . Assistant Surgeon.

1863. 1865. until about December 1st. at Ream's Station August 25th. Va. United States Volunteers September 16th. near Petersburg. . . 1863. . for " distinguished gallantry and bravery" at the capture of the South Side Rail road.. ADJUTANTS. when. July 28th. was mustered out of tlie service n'tuniing to Albany went into the clothing business. New 12th. Transferred from York Heavy Artillery June 5th. 1865.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. Henry .. as Second Lieutenant in F. Thomas A. 1864. of Company C mustered out January received the brevet of Major for gallant and 20th. 1865. MEARS. 1865. Enrolled January 29th. Va. Simon G. and subse joined the regiment released . Corliss was transferred to the Fourth New York Artillery from the Eleventh New York Battery June 19th. 1862. as Second Lieutenant was taken prisoner August 25th. to First Lieutenant became Adjutant July. andria. on his own application. . 1861.. : . Assistant Surgeon. First Division. till mustered out on expira tion of term. 1865 . . 1864. 1862. 1862. January 28th. . . the Eighth Place. near Alexandria. where he . Va. 1863 left the service . rendered Supernumerary. at New York was appointed Adjutant from First Lieutenant.. Enrolled as First Lieutenant of Company C October 23d. Transferred from Eighth New York mustered out June 12th. at Ream's Station. . when he re was promoted First Lieutenant immediately. in February. . 1862. 1864. was assigned to duty as Assistant Provost Marshal. 457 Heavy Casey. was commissioned as Adjutant February 18th. Since the war has been engaged in civil engineering. . was afterward brevetted Colonel United States Volunteers upon recommendation of Brigadier-General Ramsey and Major-General Miles. In 1867 was appointed by the Governor Assistant Commissary of Subsistence in the National Guard. Md. July 4th. . Kopper. Assistant Surgeon. Annapolis. 1864. at Scottsville age 23 promoted in same company February 13th. Brevet Colonel Stephen P. 1865 was wounded at Totopotomoy slightly. 1865 mustered out June . from Libby Prison the middle of October following was at Camp Parole. transferred to Company E Enrolled January 3d. . with . J. Wood. Va. 1863. D held the position from July. .. for appointment to Commissary of Subsistence Depart ment. Va. 1863. rendered Supernumerary. Francis P. GEORGE W. . at New York age 27 mustered out September 15th. at Washington. . . James H. . succeeding Lieutenant Lee promoted to Captain. 1865 shortly after the surrender of General Lee was ordered to report to Major-General Miles at Fortress Monroe. meritorious services. Bailey. 1862. appointed Acting quently Adjutant of the regiment Assistant Adjutant-General upon the staff of Brigadier-General Ramsey com manding Fourth Brigade. Now resides in New Heavy Va. 1865. General Department of Northern Virginia remained here until December 16th. April 2d. near Alex Artillery June 5th. the campaign . Tex. Resides at Toyah. Second Army Corps in March was commissioned Captain shortly afterward brevetted Major United States Volun.. Company Company . which he still follows. as First Lieutenant . and more severely York. teers was with the Second Army Corps in all its engagements to the end of .

LIGHT. April was educated at the common school. Fourth New Married August. . Lt W D Herrick Company G February llth. . An injury pre last boat . ami promoted to Captain of Company L May 17th. O. 1865. stated When appointed Adjutant not appears as such on muster-out roll of field and staff was commissioned First Lieutenant in Washburn. to First 18th. . Ohio was South four years prior to war was in New Orleans when United States arsenal at Baton Rouge.458 HEAVY GUNS AND . military. was born in Oriskany. N. W. 1839 academies and Oberlin College.. 1864 . La. 1865 accidentally killed on a railroad in Texas. He is still prominently connected with is Masonic. and left for dead in the streets. 1865 He now resides in Miles's staff he was mustered out December 9th. shot through the knee. D. N. 1865. 1865 was brevetted . Acting Assistant Adjutant-General 01 staff of Major-General John C. in promotions as follows Corporal October 1st. Again mobbed and pounded at Columbus. 1861. Cairo. . Company H. 1863. . and G. . was ap 30th. August Sergeant December appointed Adjutant February 25th. N. in 1873 was elected Department Commander in 1887 was Assistant Quarter rank of Lieutenant -Colonel . was constructing. : made Second Lieutenant and transferred May 19th. listed as a privatf in Company H. Canandaigua. N. and again in January. . . P. Y. . en York Heavy Artillery pro moted before Petersburg 1864. at Canandaigua. Va and sent to . to General pointed Adjutant February 5th. Corliss . . at Edinburgh. and circles. one of the number being killed. age 18 promoted Corporal . Major for gallant and meritorious conduct mustered out with regiment September 26th. pounded. 1865. New York Harbor. history became a member of the G. . as civil engineer. as First Lieutenant to Company F was appointed Adjutant February 25th. 1865 mustered out September 26th. Thomas C. organizations. April 2d. Herrick. Ky. 1865 wounded while in command of Company F at Five Forks or White Oak Road. A. was commissioned as Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Y. Enrolled December 27th. . N. W. Y. December Lieut. 1865. 1862. WhitwelJ. 1862 . 1864 Company F. which he. 18th. with company. 1865 date of rank March 20th. Stephen J. Albany. early in its was for several years commander of his Post at Albany. 1862 . . master-General . . Parkhurst. . First Lieutenant. 111. . and forts at mouth of Mississippi were taken possession of by Confederate troops was fired at Sergeant August 1864 . a-.. at Mexico and Canandaigua 22d. D. . brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in City Point Hospital. 1865. and with others going North mobbed. Y.. Oneida County. vented entering the service until August. in 1889 elected unanimously President of the Fourth New York Heavy and social Artillery Association.. transferred February 25th. by Vigilance Committee at Memphis. A. at the age of 22 31st. . and escaped on allowed to depart for first Union point.. R. Tidball discharged with the regiment October. . fully as active in business First Lieutenant in . R. . Enrolled September 14th. . 1865 above action and for conspicuous service in every engagement in which his regiment participated afterward made Acting Adjutant of the regiment and . Y. 1865. 1862.

HENRY J. The position on the rolls as Sergeant he held for a considerable length of time (or until he re ceived his commission as Second Lieutenant. General A. made application to the War Department for permission to have him detailed by Special Orders to accompany him (as previous orders had been promulgated for all enlisted men on special duty to be returned to their respective regiments). The march from Washington to Harper's Ferry.. James. Date of rank. with morning of December llth. appointed Regimental Quartermaster De cember 29th. Commissioned May 31st. Quarter Eagan. QUARTERMASTERS. December Knight. Enrolled December 27th. master of the'Eleventh Artillery mustered out as Supernumerary. 1864 date of rank 30th. but not acting in that capacity. but was a means of getting plenty of hardship and soldier experi ence. about dark. which was the Third Division. Y. under fire. Richard. Sears 's Company on Sep tember 8th. Regimental Quartermaster . Their division was soon across the river and stationed on the outskirts of the Here Price's duty as Ordnance Sergeant brought him for the first time city. and assigned to' duty with Lieu tenant Eddy (Fourth New York Heavy Artillery) on the staff and appointed Commissary Sergeant. at Croton Falls. to Company L as First Lieutenant . while stationed in barracks on Staten Island (Port Richmond). The battle of Fredericksburg opened on the 1862. 1865. 1864). 1864. he was promoted to the grade of Quartermaster Sergeant. Joseph N. owing to the fact that during the month of June. 1861.. . cannonading long to be In escorting his train to the vicinity of the troops. 1863. 1862. Lancers. Lazarus. Whipple commanding. During the winter of 1861-62. by request of Lieutenant Eddy. W. and afterward through Virginia to their position on the banks of the Rappahannock. Enlisted in Captain Thomas D. then near Harper's Ferry. 1862. 1865. Price. First United States . Veteran. 1865 date of rank 1865 mustered out with regiment September 26th.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. and on September 25th mustered into the United States service in New York City in Company A. at New York with Com pany F age 34 transferred September 14th. necessary to become a toughened veteran. which was transferred into the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. 1862. at New York Quarter master in the original organization of the regiment resigned October 22d. which position he filled until General Whipple and com mand was ordered to join the Army of the Potomac. . . 1864 promoted to First Lieutenant March 14th. March 13th. Theodore. Enrolled January 27th. in front of Fredericksburg and back of Falmouth. he was detailed as clerk to the headquarters defenses south of the Potomac (Arlington House). 459 May 31st. remembered by those who were present. . 1861. Kennedy. General Whipple. was without much excitement. Lieutenant to halt his train till he could reconnoitre and find the location of the division. 1863 . . but a change of front led Lieutenant Eddy directly into the Eddy ordered him . Date of commission December 30th. . N. March 4th. Third Corps. having for several months acted as clerk to Captain Sears. Richard P. THORP. and Lieutenant Price was thereupon appointed Ordnance Sergeant of the Third Division. .

But. the position I occupied. with one I was truly thankful to get out slight wound from which the blood flowed. escaped. I jumped my horse over a ditch and dashed through their skirmish line at full gallop. was detailed into the ollice of Colonel J. brush ing up and get ting disciplined for future events before spring. a sad. and on the removal of the regiment to the front was to ton. the mud deepened. Wadsworth. " When the Chancellorsville movement commenced. ment was ordered accompany the four companies by transport to Washing Hamilton. and in a few moments the rebel skir mishers were upon me. It was enough to scare the wits out of any one. A few minutes later down came General Pleasanton and his guard. and the General also informed me that General Whipple had re quested him to send to the State Department of Xew York for a commission of Second Lieutenant as soon as a vacancy occurred. " General C. who had been holding me up with an empty gun. made a dash through and up the plank-road leading to Here was my time to escape. and Richmond. and soon after the I made application old Third Army Corps was consolidated with the Second. I escaped unharmed into our own lines. I was again detailed. We were about the first to land Soon after arrival was detailed as on Riker's Island. mud-bedabbled men. amid a shower of shot and shell from both armies. and turning the corner. A soldier bullet came from a sharpshooter and gave him his mortal wound. Captain. hugging my horse's neck Comanche fashion. to General Daniel Sickels to be returned to my regiment for instruction and promotion. ! following my example. There I was with thirty pack-mules and sixty thousand rounds of rifle ammunition on their backs tangled up in the thicket and sur rounded by a mob of Johnnies. The dispirited army once more returned to their old camping grounds. cut loose the pack of mules. '' : Our march to Banks Ford was Says Lieutenant Price in a recent letter very pleasant. New York Harbor. though he had several shot holes through his clothes and equipment. with a party of three commissioned officers and six sergeants. My assistant. at an intersection of roads. " My winter was spent at Fort Marcy. " Sunday morning following. and bidding good-by to the Chancellorsville. Graham took command of our division. expecting in the morning that the guns would open up and the pontoons be ready for our crossing. alas the rain came down in torrents. and was to have been appointed aide on his staff. detailed to remain behind and turn over all the stores (ordnance) to the next . and the grand move ment collapsed. a young man. our command was in When Howard's men broke and the advance during the crossing of the river. Here I remained until our detach clerk in the office of the Adjutant-General. " Soon after returning to my company at Fort Marcy. to proceed to New York City to assist in the conscription. of rare merit he was and a fine gentleman. Tidball as clerk. of a bad job so easily. at an early hour. in time to prevent the enemy's lines. K. demoralized lot of water-soaked. ran away. C. The train was parked for the night. then stationed at Forts . was entirely ex posed to the raking fire of both sides. That day the reserve trains were ordered back over the river. a fact which Lieutenant Price discovered ordnance train from following his example. I called upon General Whipple I had just turned to leave him when that fatal for instructions and orders. however.460 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. and jumping on.

this life seemed almost a dream. He was no gentleman. parties. his medical officer at the fort. myself among them. gives a daily record of his imprisonment in his book published soon after his confinement and release it is well worthy of reading. and John Mitchell on his arrival there sent to the War Depart ment for a detail of six officers of his old staff. Dr. After four years of almost incessant hardships and discouragements. and I was on many occasions detailed to escort him on his daily walk around the parapet of the fort. . My duties associated me occasionally with the noted prisoners. to receive all the property and stores of the Confederates left on the ground (the order I kept a number of years. especially Jefferson Davis. master of Major T. " Two little review in Washington. and with only a handful of men to muster after that unfortunate engagement but the next day Rich mond and his company came marching in. and October beginning to growl with its bleak storms. Miles. as Brigade Quartermaster. together with the men returned from hospital and otherwise. This duty kept me nearly ten days. army regarding the surrender. but it was finally lost). . officer 461 coming in command of the fort. anyhow and his language unfit to be spoken by any rational being however. excursions. Sears's Battalion. arrived. and later I received an order from the Chief of Ordnance. Surrounded by the pleasant society of the post. . Army of the Potomac. and his public affairs. Who the old Harry he was I never knew. and on arriving there I was appointed by General Terry. one after the other. Many pleasant hours I have sat with him and listened to his silvery tongue as he related the stories of Southern heroism. post duty became very monotonous. was appointed Acting Quarter On . State rights. Sixth Army Corps. arriving at the regiment. commanding the department. and I was assigned to Company F. . picnics. and who cared ? I was returned to duty with my regiment on their entry into the trenches at Petersburg was appointed Acting Adjutant on the field at Ream's Station by Major Arthur after Adjutant Kopper was wounded. and for several months it was my pleasant lot to be engaged in a series of duties that were perfectly delightful. followed in constant succession. commanding First Division Second This position I held until the " items of the last campaign I will mention. but owing 1o the change of corps I was afterward relieved. coming on. " The fall weather. wet and cold. almost always My accessible by steamers. and in the cam paign was appointed on the staff (temporarily) of Colonel Tompkins. and with these. but did not care. our ranks presented quite a line. Sixth Army Corps. " General Miles having received the commission to proceed to Fort Monroe and take command of the military district and State prisoners Jefferson Davis. my com mission as Second Lieutenant came. no damage was done. my commission as Captain and almost simultaneously I received an appointment as Ordnance Officer on the staff of Nelson A. but in the division of the regiment into three battalions. Clay.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. etc. About the time of the Fort Hell escapade. duty called me away to different sections of the country. and Grant was at the head of things then. and I was cursed by some high official till I was sick.. C. Chief of Artillery. rides. C. and we again . and placed in charge of transportation a most unfortunate appointment. One that I was de tailed to convey the first dispatch from Lee to the commanding General of our Army Corps. as Acting Adjutant Inspector-General of the military district of Fort Monroe. Craven. then encamped near Stevensburg. Va. for the first night's march my train stampeded. D.

1865. ADAMS. by election of Was officers of the regiment. CHARLES H. Washington. Clinton County. War Department. John's. 242 Elm Street. 1865. St. sickness. Barr. He was a son of a soldier of the War of 1812. Oldest son served in One Hundred and battle of At the tied next to the horse of a Seventy-seventh Regiment New York Volunteers.. .462 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Was discharged September 26th. which wore soon accepted. and escaped captured between Warrenton and Beacton. Beardsley. The writer settled in New York City. 1863. 1812. at the age of 23. N. Alexander F. Appointed First Principal Musician July 1st. where he remained several years. He was educated at Albany. Department. dated July 12th. John. Appointed Sergeant Major June. Department of Virginia. Major Price now resides at 6th. As the battle began Chaplain Carr went to get his horse." Enlisted as private September 8th. . brevetted Major New York . August 24th. NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. Appointed Hospital Steward June 3d. 1865. 1864 commissioned as First Lieutenant. CARR at Kinderhook. dated January 25th. October 30th. Appointed Quartermaster Sergeant Juno 5th.. Albany. studied theol ogy under Drs. Y. or a prisoner. Va.. Ball. Frederick L. Va. 1865 captured at Chancellorsville. 1865 retained in service by Special Orders 416. at Participated in all the Ream's Station Chaplain Carr had his black horse Chaplain of a Pennsylvania regiment. . August 2d. 1861 mustered in September 25th. 1865 detailed to Fort Monroe. . His grandfather was also a soldier of the Revolutionary War for five years. and as he reached to untie it. 1861 re-enlisted as veteran November Mih. Special Orders. CHAPLAIN WILLIAM was born H. 1864. 230. 1865 . by scouts and escaped. Thus passed four years and two mouths. Augustus. . 1865 mustered out by Special Orders 574. War Department 254. without loss of one day by wounds. Beman and Kirk. Va. 1863. a continuous service. appointed Acting Adjutant Inspector-General by Special Orders.. Appointed First Principal Musician December 16th. longed for retirement to private life and occupations. 1864 commissioned as Captain. . Ira J. Post-office address. Appointed Sergeant Major October 24th. dated March 13th. enrolled as Chaplain April 15th. 1863 commissioned as Second Lieutenant. Is married and has eight children.' Barker. James. Mich. Y. N. 1862. Appointed Assistant Commissary Sergeant February 3d. Has been engaged in the ministry of the Gospel since the war. and entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church battles. . War . and once again we were free American citizens. put in their resignations. Columbia County. 1864. Anderson. July 2d. 1865. State Volunteers brevetted Major United States Volunteers October 26th. May 26th. a shell came and blew the other Chaplain's horse in pieces. 1865 . November . Ahrens. 1865 . . Several of the staff not wishing to make the army a profession.

Beisheim. Carr. Owen S. 8. 1864. Albert S. I Lt. Edward Wheeler. Sherman. 1st. Appointed Quartermaster Sergeant January 1st. 1863. Appointed Hospital Steward December 1st. Brevet-Col. William C. Appointed Sergeant Major March 29th.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS ASD MEN. 1865. 1. Appointed Sergeant Major January 28th. \V:ishburn. Eleventh as Supernumerary. William H. Walter D. Henderson. 463 2. Frederick. 1862. Appointed Commissary Sergeant January 3d. 1865. Musician. 1865. J. Appointed Sergeant Major May 18th. Roswell. Appointed Commissary Sergeant April 25th. Plank. Appointed Second Principal Musician July 7th. 1863. Mosier. Brewer. James H. Flanagan. Appointed Hospital Steward November 28th. Gleason. Ichabod. "William H. 1863. GROUP OP OFFICERS. 1864. Hospital Steward. . P. 1863. Appointed Commissary Sergeant September 5th. 1864. Ezra. James. 1865. Appointed Quartermaster Sergeant February 13th. 4. Phillips. Lombard. Henry W. 1865. Lt. Appointed Commissary Sergeant June 4th. Nelson. Transferred from One Hundred and Pear.) Curtice. Hospital Steward. | 5. 1863. 2. Dorr. Lazarus. Bronson. 1862. Frank J. James V. Second Principal Musician. Palmer. 1865. Appointed Sergeant Major July 23d. Smith. Appointed Sergeant Major August 6th. (See Line Officers. Appointed Commissary Sergeant January 1st. Victor. Burt. Lt. Appointed Sergeant Major February 2d. Gray. 1864 Sumner. Appointed Musician July Dickens. 1865. B. Martin V. 1863. Aiken. Peter. Theodore. 3. Justus. Charles W. 4. Appointed Quartermaster Sergeant January 3d. Appointed Second Principal Musician January 30th. Chaplain William H. Lt. McElroy. Appointed Commissary Sergeant January 5th. Supernumerary from Third Battalion. Huysman. 6. B. Henry P. 3. Corliss. Knight. John. Thomas Delanoy. 1862. Frank G. Napoleon. 1862. Foote. Benjamin A. Appointed Commissary Sergeant January 6th.

. LINE OFFICERS. Frank B. . . at Paterson age 25 was promoted Second Lieutenant March 4th. 1862 discharged . Zabriskie. Station mustered out April 18th. 1863. 1864 promoted to Schenectady age 21 Second Lieutenant. 1864. 1863 trans ferred to Company and promoted First Lieutenant April 14th. Albert J. . . Aiken. 1861. Guilford New York. January 12th. County. Allston. Second Lieutenant. at promoted to Corporal June 4th. Martin V. in Company C. in Rochester commissioned as Second Lieutenant April Post-office address. November 28th. 1836 . at Albany age 23 transferred to Company I. 1865. 1862. Livingston County. N. in York. 1862. June 21st. at Oswego age 21 promoted from Corporal in Company C. . N. Appointed Sergeant Major January (See Assistant Surgeons. Resides in New York . to Sergeant. Wash Burghardt. Captain. 16th. Greensborough. William. Resides in New York City. 1865. Has attained distinction in the legal profession. 1863 discharged De cember 5th. afterward Third Battalion of the Fourth left service in July. Has attained eminence in the law. in 1861 was commissioned First Lieutenant of Company D. Enrolled January 27th. Company . 1864. then First Lieutenant December 10th. Taylor & Perkins. . care of Sharp. Was enrolled as Orderly Sergeant in . Charles H. ADAMS. was commissioned Captain of Company William S. . Born October 23d. pany C. 1839. in commissioned as Captain February 3d. age 31. Enrolment November 24th. Neb. : Brown. 1861. was graduated from Williams College. New York City. LIGHT. 1862 resigned Feb . . 1862. at Port Richmond age E March 4th. 12th.464 Williams. H . 1862. Enlisted in Company D September 8th. . 1865. 1865. 1862 he was Assistant Company Adjutant-General on staff of Governor E. 1865. at New York. . then to Second Lieutenant in Company E. Japhet. 1862. William H. Va. Company B. enlisted August 1st. . 1861. Patrick's Station.. Was enrolled November 20th. Burt. Barnes. 375 ington Street. D. Y. Com . was conspicuous Bliss. 1864 cap tured at Ream's Station mustered out April 8th. . 120 Broad way. in Rochester. 1862. 40 . A August 21st. Born March . HEAVY GUNS AND Hospital Steward. ROBERT G. George. William B. Address. in Rochester in organizing the Eleventh Heavy Artillery. Augustus C. Enlisted as private in Company D August 23d. transferred to Company B as First Lieu tenant acted for a period as Regimental Quartermaster mustered out at . City. Enrolled September 24th. age 36. July 12th. Ball. Sioux City. December 22d. Enlisted Barnes. 1864. N. . December 10th. . M : . Post office address. B. Morgan resigned from the Fourth. C. Jr. . Y. 1864 mustered out June 20th. 1864. at Sergeant in Company F promoted to Second Lieutenant May 1st. . . 1861. . 1863. . a Testament which was in his breast-pocket saved his life at Sutherland 18f>5 Post-office address. . ruary 28th. . 1864 died April 17th. January 20th. . 1863 age 24 was commissioned Captain of Company H December 17th.) 21st.

1865 he was not mus . age 47. age 18 . 465 Md. Formerly served in Tenth New York Volunteers and in Tenth New York Heavy Artillery enrolled from civil life in Company A July . the company. tered. 1862. 1861. he was 1861. Bemis. 1864. 1865 he was mustered out with . Burt. to promoted Second Lieutenant transferred to . ber 9th. Blodgett. 1864 died of wound received in action at Ream's Station. . as Captain of said company and 18th. and also March 25th. Cooper. but date of rank. 1863. as Second Lieutenant. Was commissioned Second Lieutenant March 14th. . at South East . . as Sergeant in Company F . Burghardt. 1863. January 29th. to accept tenant mustered out of Company D April 28th. at Annapolis. Com trans pany F January 23d. Enrolled in Company H December 27th. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery he was mustered out with the company. 1865. at Canan- daigua. on tender of resig Resides at Oneida. . promoted to Corporal April 7th. of wounds received at Sutherland's Station April 3d. Abram G. August 25th. Cal. Was commissioned First Lieutenant August 19th. at New York. mustered out Decem Post-office address. 1865. Berlin. H. was not mustered. 1865 mustered out with San Diego. Y. 1864 ferred back to Company D as First Lieutenant St. . . Frank L.. . Harvey L. 1865 date of rank. John R. 1862. Lieut. Chas. Wm. Berwick. mustered out with com pany September 25th. . as Second Lieutenant in Company I. at Ballston age 21 20th. 1864. and promoted to First Lieutenant Jan uary 1st. Carpenter. Enlisted in Bradt. 1864 .. Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. 1865 . then he was transferred to Company D as Second Lieu . First Lieu tenant . He enlisted December 20th. at Batavia (age 33). Enlisted Burdick. 24th. Samuel. . . Bartholomew. June 16th company. Lieut. 29 years of age at this time he was commissioned Second Lieutenant May 1st. Carl.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. H. August 28th. 1865 promoted Captain of Company H February 19th. Company November D November Spa . He was transferred from Company H. February 4th. 1865. 1865. and transferred to Company G . George W. wounded 8th. N. commissioned Second Lieu tenant July 3d. 1863 discharged Novem . John. William C. Morris R. Vs. Stafford County. Kan. 1864. . nation. ber llth. 1864. commission in Company K as First Lieutenant. August 15th. 1861.

I. Enrolled as Captain in Company I May 5th. Rodney. at . 1862. . 1875. 1864 transferred to Company I by promotion to Second Lieutenant June Lewisborough age 23 . . of phthisis pulmonalis. he to accept a commission as First was transferred to Company Lieutenant captured at Ream's Station he was discharged from Company October 31st. George. Second Lieutenant Com pany K commissioned May 18th. Cole. Crombie. resides at Little Falls. . 1864 mustered out . Enlisted in Company A September 4th. at Gilboa. as burg. 1864. Mich. . Cook. . Sea Cliff. 1862.c t Lieu tenant May 18th. at he was discharged on tender of resignation January 25th. N. 1863. . Crombie. . this . transferred to Company 1863 transferred to Company E as Captain April 6th. as Second Lieutenant he was mustered out of Company G for promotion to First Lieutenant Company F September 14th.. at Rochester a. Coddington . Cox. 1864. Daniel. . Enlisted September 23d. Dexter. Edmund D. . Geo. John C. . First Lieutenant in same company commissioned First Lieutenant November 4th. . 1865. Crawford. Chichester. 1862. Albert. 1863. Enlisted March 6th. . Mrs. . to Fir. near Peters age 19 commissioned March 20th. Re 1862. January 19th. M .c 10 pro moted to Second Lieutenant (from Sergeant) March 12th. 1865 be was mustered out with company. Va.. 1864. Commissioned June 21st. M . 1865. 1863. Va.. . N. 1865. 31st. 1861. promoted to Corporal April 7th.^d^^^k. 1865 mustered out with company. 1863 discharged October 16th. Samuel. 1862 on January 23d. Lieut. Company G June 27th. . 1862. Curtiss. Clarke. N. . Naples. and Second 27 Lieutenant September 29th. 42 . N. age he was promoted Sergeant January. Edward C. Enrolled and commissioned Second Lieutenant of Com pany H. . . 1863. Birdsey N. . Enlisted at Rochester and mustered was Lieut. . .466 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. May 20th..H. Y. 1862. 1864. . Va.L. at New York age promoted Quartermaster Sergeant October 25th. leaving a widow and three children. . age 27 discharged September Post-office address. sides at . as Second Lieutenant in Company L June 21st. Enlisted as Second Lieutenant in Com pany F during the campaign of 1865 he was promoted First Lieutenant May 17th. "864 . . at . transferred to Compai^ L . M . Chi chester. Y. at Arlington. Y. Rochester. Enlisted August 20th. L. . c. . Y. Enlisted August 5th. 1865. 1865. 8th. Lewisborough age 21 was First Sergeant in company was commissioned Second Lieutenant in Capt. Coddington. Elliot L. . 1864. 28th. resigned because of physical disability August He died at Flint. then transferred to Company G Second Lieutenant transferred to Company B mustered out with company. Carpenter. William. . Enlisted in Company G June 17th. Church. wounded on the Vaughn Road August 23d. J. 1862 commissioned September 19th. 1864 transferred as Second Lieutenant to Company I discharged on tender of resignation January 18th. 1864. Y. 1863 he died at Fort Ethan Allen. N.

Enlisted September 30th. in discharged on tender of Post-office resignation October 14th. . . 1861 mustered in as Second . . Neb. Doubleday. at Fort Ethan Allen age 19 commissioned as Sec ond Lieutenant same date was ambulance . Va. Mustered out with the regiment September 26th. C. Y. 1861.. months' ser commissioned as First Lieutenant in Company C January 2d. . 24th. Was born at Scipio. Benjamin A. 1862. Eddy. Jr. 1837 educated in . Stephen W. with company teers. N. at Washington age 18 mustered in as Second Lieutenant of Company B September 21st. Was enrolled in Company A September at Croton promoted to Sergeant September 25th. On records of War Department. 1868. . 1864. December . N. Adelbert S. Westchester County. ary 26th. . 467 States for meritorious service brevetted Major United Volun . 1863 captured at Ream's Station dis charged June 3d. in three . Doubleday. Oscar L. . 19th. S. 21st. at New York City age 22 promoted Sergeant March 5th. 1862. at Spottsyl- vania. Thomas. 1863 discharged March 9th. by reason of appointment to Captain and Aidede-Camp on the staff of the Judge Advocate General. Dickens. . 1865 mustered out with company. Enlisted . Delanoy. 1862 on vice detached duty on the staff of Brigadier-General Whipple for some months in in Illinois April. 1861. . ary 21st. New Salem. 1865. First Lieutenant February Dewey. Enlisted December 5th. on resignation. wounded May foot . . 1865.. New York Was City. Edgar W. 1864 wounded June 18th. O. age 20 Lieutenant May 1st. 1862 mustered out July llth. son of Colonel Thomas D. Ashland. . dress. discharged February 24th. Frank. at Croton promoted to Corporal October 7th. enrolled in Com pany H December . 1863. Dearborn. De Russy. 1861. enlisted Capt. . Rene E. P. 1861 age 25 . . Post-office address. 1864. Dearborn. Dennis. . Lieu *- E D Cod- - . 27th. 1861. 1865 transferred to Company B Febru . Donnell. Company D . officer in campaign of 1864 . . 1865 mustered in as First Lieutenant May 19th. Lieut. September 21st. Y. . 1862 transferred to Com pany D for promotion as First Lieutenant Janu . Eddy. 1864 left . Residence. commissioned as 20th. at Canandaigua . before Petersburg. transferred to Company I in 1865 as Second Lieutenant commissioned as such February 20th. Was enrolled in . September 12th. public schools of New York City . 1865. 44 ad Wall Street. A. L. promoted to Second Lieutenant February 3d.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. 1863.

23d. . 1843. office address. 1861. . Farrell. Flint. 1861. June 4th. Re age 26 . Was born April 1st. 1865. HEAVY GUNS AND was promoted to Captaincy of . March 4th. 1864. Transferred by promotion from Sergeant Major. Gleason. 31st. and commissioned Second Lieutenant May 18th. Gordon. Enlisted . Frank J. 1864. 6th. Was appointed from Private 34. with date of rank from April 9th. . Cal.468 1862 . N. of Company G captured at Ream's Station pro . Was commissioned as Second Lieutenant May llth. 1864 discharged April 21st. was discharged October 9th. City. C. William A. Ser geant. Y. Edwin O. . N. . New York Eddy. 1864. from the effects of which he died in hospital at Philadelphia. June 30th. commissioned October 10th. First Lieutenant engaged since December 30th. 1864 . Battery I. . at Canandaigua . . . D as First Lieutenant December 23d. 1862 promoted to First Lieutenant. 1861 age 30 left the regiment October 25th. E. "W. 111. mustered out with regiment. Was commissioned May llth. 1864 pro . New York City commissioned as Second Lieutenant March 25th. Abram M. moted First Lieutenant of Company A May 31st. Was . 1865. Gates. Post-office address. moted 1865 .. LIGHT. Filley. Michael. . at Canandaigua. Norman. was commissioned as Second Lieutenant educated at University of Illinois Twelfth New York Volunteers transferred as First Lieutenant Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. . . February commissioned Second Lieutenant 6th. Was Was . 1864. 1865 . in Com age 21 was successively Private. 1864. . sary Sergeant killed at Flanagan. . born October . Pa. at Charleston. Transferred by promotion from Regimental Commis commissioned as Second Lieutenant August 1st. pany M (D of the Eleventh) . N. 1864 was . 1863. June 2d. at Ferry. . Samuel. S. 1864. 1864 was wounded at Cold Harbor. 1864. 1863 mustered out June 26th. 1862. at Petersburg Company B at Cold Harbor discharged engaged in banking since the war. mustered out with the company.. as Second Lieu Foster. 1865 . Ulysses D. Y. C. near Petersburg. waa 21st. sides at New Hope. . at Dobbs was educated in public schools enlisted November. 1865 Foster. . 1864 mustered out October . the war in hardware business. . as a private in the Monitor regiment age 23 was commissioned as Second Lieutenant April 16th. Post-office address. Edmonston. . November 10th. of Company B. Ky. Ichabod. Los Angeles. as Second Lieu Fitzgerald. tenant. July 1st. tenant to Company C commissioned May 15th. Received commission as First Lieutenant January . Furrey. Resides at Summit. Y. at Jordan. William C. Has been engaged since the war as mer chant is married and has three children. Was enrolled January 14th. Ream's Station. 1864. Post.. Was enrolled December 20th. Corporal. Frank C. not mustered. 1862 on detached duty much of the dis time captured at Fredericksburg slightly wounded at Spottsylvania charged at Petersburg June 29th. Bloomington. Patrick. 1842. commissioned as Second Lieutenant January commissioned in Company . .

1862. 1864. Louis. Died recently at Rochester.. Acton. . at 29th. 469 1864 age 22 mustered out with regiment. . Y. 1864. 1862. Company . 1864 transferred out with regiment. George W. 1864 . C. commissioned as Second Lieutenant May 27th. N. Henry W. Ingalls. Commissioned March 4th. 1864 mustered out January 17th. Smith. . in Florida. have already been narrated in Chapter XXI. 1864. Y. at age 18 commissioned Second Lieutenant October 31st. to accept a com mission as Major in Thirteenth New York Artillery. . Was commissioned as Captain of Company De age 25 discharged February 19th. 8. . March "25th. Henry G. . January 9th. and Captain May 30th. N. Hildreth. . Daniel T. . . 1837. M cember . Holberton. 1864. D. . G. one of the original officers with the company at Forts Greble and DeKalb to the time of his death September 10th. Va. Hatch. near built gun platforms at various places. U.. May 12th. Mills' Mills. Artillery . 18th. of Company F. Was born at Rochester.. . 1862. 1862. H January 13th. acted as Provost Marshal at Fort Ethan Allen resigned April 10th. Died in regular service A. on detached duty at was Arlington Heights was wounded June 18th. Y. at Jones. transferred to Fourth New York Heavy . 1841 educated at private school at the age of 19 engaged as Adjutant Fiftyfourth N. Station engaged since the war in clock factory. Hayden. N. James W. Post-office address. . May 1st.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. Thomas. of Companies E and A. 1862. Was born October 16th. Was born August academy 21st. General Abner Doubleday 1863. . ton. New Bedford. was enrolled with the Eleventh New York Heavy Hassler. 1835. Litchfleld County. B. Howard. . Conn. 1863 . . K. . Canandaigua. 1863 left the regiment November 18th. 19th. First Lieutenant . at New York age 23 com missioned as Second Lieutenant July 3d. C. Was enrolled January 4th. D. The circumstances of his death. enrolled in . 18B1 . B. 1862 resigned February 28th. January 1st. at New Y ork age Grey. Enrolled June 13th. was discharged October 4th. Theodore. Huysman. Vt. of Company K. Was . 1862. Conn. 1865. Company G. Commissioned as Second Lieutenant. in the same company Ballston Spa. Mass. Post-office address. became First Lieutenant November 19th. 1862 . William C. as Second Lieutenant in Company D . 1865 mustered . promoted Second Lieutenant July 1864 . First Captain Company D. Ferdinand R. was educated in common schools enlisted September at Hartford. . . Harris.. . . 1863. June 17th. Was enrolled at the age of 24. 1862 promoted First Lieutenant. 1863. 28th. Le Roy. July 24th. August . detailed for a time on the staff of 23 commissioned as First Lieutenant . to Company I February 19th. particularly at Ream's Petersburg. Andrew J. Company K. died at Georgetown. at Georgetown D. Alleghany County. 1863 promoted to 6th. of disease. N. before Petersburg discharged January 20tli 1865. Artillery as Adjutant . Y. 1863. educated at to common schools and enlisted . . S. of Company He was Enrolled as First Lieutenant. date of rank. Home. . 1864 Post-office address. October 4th. of this work. 1864.

D Company of the Eleventh. 1867 unassigned July 22d. September 26th. Knower. at Washing at New York ton in January. 1863 . 1864 . and Captain of Company M. 1865. 1865 mustered out with regiment . / \ f leaving the army . Y. 1863 promoted First Lieutenant in the same company slightly wounded . 1863. with which he still remains and is stationed at . July 18th. 1864 while in the service he was on detflrhed duty from . . . 1864. .. . Born August 25th. 1862 date of rank July 25th. 1842. Corporal. ^ "\^ S>* ^^\ / m\ V*. 1862 First July llth. July 12th. Hyland C. Was born 1841 at Buffalo was educated was enrolled as Second Lieutenant. which he was musPost-office address. hi . . Was born March 8th. 1866 Brevet First Lieutenant and Brevet Captain March 2d. mustered out September 3d. Hyland C. at Balaton Spa educated in Kelly. and was commissioned in Com pany H March 22d. Lieutenant February 3d. .470 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Born.. Resides at Manchester. Ernest L. : Baltimore. . fifth Infantry Artillery March 25th. Captain November 20th. 1865. G . N. in Company afterward . public schools and Rochester University mustered as Second Lieutenant April 18th. with te'red out. 1866 Second Lieutenant Forty-fifth Infantry. resigned April 14th. . "William B. at Spottsylvania . Date of commission July 12th. Kinney. enlisted May 12th. Originally mustered as Senior First Lieutenant in date of commission October 27th.. 1862 . Horace E. of the M Fourth was Private. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. 1869 assigned to Third December 15th. 1864 Captain Veteran Corps December 3d. Company G. II HL red to ] Company F May 19th. July 28th. for gallant and meritorious service in front of Petersburg. at Petersburg . schools. Company 1862 . brother of Edward C. 1863. 1870. . 1865. Knower. business. at Canandaigua. Kirkpatrick. Commissioned May llth. Samuel B. New York appointed in New York Second Lieutenant Fourth New York Heavy Ar tillery Lieut. was with the regiment up the newspaper 1864. 1864. N. Va. Has been since in to the time of discharge. . Kimball. as Second Lieutenant transfer . date of rank May 6th. . . and Sergeant in that company. Kirk. Phelps. Edward C. 1864 mustered out December 31st. attending the latter after . 1865 date of rank April 20th. Howard L. H. Kirk. . 1867. 1846 was educated at common Canandaigua Academy and Amherst College. 1864 First Lieutenant Forty- wounded . in leg June 18th.

. . . . Y. Henry P. Y. Charles. but was not mustered as such mustered out January 16th. originally Sergeant. was mortally wounded at Spottsylvania May 19th. was brevetted Captain and Major and mustered out with regiment. N. More. Luce. 8th. Va. 471 April. same company January First Lieutenant August 7th. Enlisted at Rochester . Was . 1861. 22d. McKeel. and Captain of Company A. November direct 3d. mustered out with regiment. date of com mission July 12th. of . S. Samuel I. McPherson. September 10th. Gardner L. . Duncan D..SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. M Company A. 1864. 1862 Second Lieutenant April . at Alexandria. 1862. 1862 Sergeant-Major June. 1865 mus . 1863 killed in action at Ream's Station. . 1842. . Napoleon B. . Artil promoted to First Lieutenant . 1864 date of rank June 30th. Va. at Brooklyn was Artillery and Brevet Major. 1864. originally a Sergeant in Company C and 25th. 1863 . Westchester County. Was appointed from civil as Captain December . 1864. . 1863 received his commission as Captain. 1863 . Grant. First Captain of Company B. as First Lieutenant in Company B was discharged as Captain and Brevet-Major at Petersburg. 27th. 1864. as Commissary of Musters Second Army Corps. mustered June resigned 21st. 1864 lery (horse batteries) during campaign of 1864 March 14th. Twenty second Army Corps office was captured at Ream's Station Box 2940.. . Fourth New York Heavy "Was born February 2d. . Lynes. at expiration of time. 1865. Post-office address. 1863. at Moresville veteran dis charged October 4th. . . Originally enrolled as First Duty Sergeant of Company became Second Lieutenant March 4th. 1865. tered out with regiment.. 1861 discharged April 12th. Michael J. at Croton Falls. Merrill. N. Y. Enlisted October 23d. Littlefield. 1865. Enrolled in Company Lee. and First Sergeant same day November 17th. Post- Purdy's Station. First Lieutenant. Theodore. Va. 1862. at Brooklyn. he was enrolled August 15th. Mustered as Second Lieutenant March 30th. pany M Frank November B. Was born June 24th. was discharged May office address. August 25th. was Captain of Company life L (original organization) Miller. educated at the Academy in Albany . became Second Lieutenant Was in the .. Post- Learned. 1861. 1865. 1864 date of rank December 22d. 5th. Enrolled October 10th. A . 1865. Second Lieutenant. 1862 . N. 1861. Captain of Company M. K 1863 . with date of commission January 8th. Company C January 13th. 1864. N. at North Salem educated in North Salem he enlisted August. Became Orderly Sergeant of Com was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in . Charles B. . at New York promoted to Sergeant October 1st. 1863. as Second Lieutenant on resignation promoted Corporal January. Herman M. First Lieutenant May 27th. Y. . 1862. He resided in Michigan until his death. promoted Second Lieutenant and transferred to Company H . Fairport. Morrison. 1864 did not muster as Captain. Kings County. on resignation for disability. town of North Salem was wounded just above the knee at Ream's Station . Morrison. . and iis Assistant Inspector-General of the Third Brigade. Commissioned February 24th. and transferred to Company detailed with Battery A.. 1865. . . Fifth IT. . New York City. James M. by reason of expiration of term of service. 1833.. Lillie. Brooklyn. Resides at Grand Gorge. 1864 left the service July Post-office address. . to October.

Va. First Sergeant January. McCormac. 1862 . . as First Lieutenant to . . 1843. at Niagara from 1864 . Richmond. 13th. Resides at Muskegan. 1864 discharged July 6th. pany I . Company B McNaughton. of Company E. 1864. 1864 date of Marcotte. transferred April 14th. near Alexandria. Rochester. Residence. . was discharged September 26th. First Sergeant to age 23 promoted Second Lieutenant December 30th. Company M as Second Lieutenant 26th. 1865 . . was made Corporal January . Henry D. at New City educated at Bloomfield. mustered out with compa ny September Mich. . . 1865 commissioned Second Lieutenant in Company B mustered out with company veteran. . Peter. 1863 Second Lieutenant December 30th. . J. . James. . Resides in Astoria. 1863. 1862 date of rank November 15th. 1862. 1865. Brockport. N. as senior officer at Fort Barnard. to accept promotion as First Pennsylvania Light Artillery. Y. by reason of resignation. 1865 date of rank March . Ansel L. after the sur render of Lee. Nolan. 1864. Transferred from non-commissioned staff as Sergeant Major May 18th. N. Richard A. Cal. 1863. enlisted November 10th. Was commissioned November 12th. 1865. at . 1835. discharged December 20th. 1862. and until Lieutenant Price. . S. 1865. by promotion from as First Lieutenant mustered out September Second Lieutenant. mustered out with regiment September 26th. to Company . Resides in Newark. Minard. LIGHT.. as Sergeant to Second Lieutenant Com . J. 9th. Washington. Was mustered in Company as Second Lieutenant on organization discharged Feb . commanded that post muster out was in no other company but Company E. Captain Dexter was placed in command of the brigade. Sergeant June. 1864. San Francisco.472 llth. On returning to Washington. . N. Michael J. T. . . Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. 1862 . . Joseph A. 1865. at New York age 24 trans ferred by promotion April 20th. 1864. Va. Was born September 29th. at . Y. John D. .. Major of was mustered out February 23d. N. Residence. 1863. at the age of 18 at Port . rank November 12th. . James. Murphy. . Was commissioned December 18th. McNeil. . Y. N. in which he enlisted . 1862 promoted to First Lieutenant January 13th. Pitt M. Nixon. Pear. C mustered out with regiment. ruary 25th. 1864 First Lieutenant May 31st. Was commissioned March 9th. 1865 not mustered. O'Rourke. 1865. of Company A. 1865. at Staten Island was educated at district schools at same place he enlisted January llth. 1865. Price. Nelson. 1865. Enlisted August 9th. Thomas. McNeil. John W. York Peloubet. Matthews. 1865 date of rank June 14th. Sergeant in Company K transferred to John D. Was promoted from Sergeant in Company F to Second Lieutenant in Company A transferred from Company A. HEAVY GUNS AND 1863 . . . 26th. 1862. Enlisted April 25th. H . I.. . Was a veteran from the regular service served with Sheridan when he was a Second Lieutenant in Oregon enlisted April 27th. Commissioned June 29th. . Born December 21st. at New York age 25 mustered out May 18th.

Sedgwick. 340 Stuyvesant Avenue. as First Lieutenant. One of the original officers of Company E . Discharged June 12th. 1864. Henry. Sweetman.. Date of rank December 24th. Bloomfield. . of Company M. 1864. June 17th. Enrolled January 29th. . Fourth New York Heavy . Captain. 1865. . William H. John W.. Parshall. Abner. Post-office address. at N. 1864. Second Lieutenant Fourth Pratt. November 9th. J. . at was promoted Second Lieutenant August 17th. 1871. Capt John w - man In compliance with General Orders No. Smith. Company I was captured August Ream's Station was discharged October 6th. Second Lieutenant. Seeley. March SIB : 17. Date of commission April 14th. Born in Washington. March 10th. 1863 discharged to accept appointment at the Military Academy Second Lieu tenant Third Artillery June 17th. 1862. . and would respectfully request an examination by the Board of Field Officers appointed to examine and select non-commissioned officers for promotion in this regiment . at the expiration of time. N. 1865. 1865. 1863. N. Pendletou. Alvah J. Was transferred from the Infantry as Second Lieutenant. William. Edward H. 1863 discharged March 21st. . . Artillery. . 1864. September 26th. was for the most part written by himself. 1862. Rimmer. Eighth New York Reibling. . 1865. VA. Brevetted Major for gallant conduct. Eleventh New York Heavy Artillery transferred by promotion from First Lieu tenant. Com May 18th.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN New York pany 473 M City . 1862 age 22 he was dis charged May llth. . 1 herewith transmit the following history of myself. Island. 1867 First Lieutenant September 21st. Enrolled in Company C July 29th. Brooklyn. . D. Frank. C. August J. Essex County. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. 1865. Company B. Raymond. Smith. The following sketch of Captain Sweetman. . 1864. January llth. to Captain of Company K mustered out with company. . . . 1864 promoted to First Lieutenant January 31st. New York Heavy Artillery. as will appear : FOBT MABCY. . to accept promotion as Second Lieutenant in Company I. Seymour. 1864. Resides at Cleveland. 1864 date of rank March 22d. transferred to . One of the original non-commis sioned officers of Company A. . discharged June 3d. at David's . 1863 Sanford. Transferred from Company H. First Lieutenant 25th. to Company A of the Fourth mustered out with company. Post-office address. 1863 mustered out September 3d. 1840. Academy enlisted in Canandaigua was educated at Cananduigua the Fourth Heavy Artillery at Canandaigua was dis . . Heavy Artillery. Was commissioned October 7th. 1864 discharged March 8th. and mustered out with regiment. charged 1865 at Elmira. Y. Clark. . Ohio. 1863 date of rank May 20th. 1865 mustered out with regiment . he rose by successive steps to Captain date of commission March 14th. Company M. at New York discharged . Henry L. January 4th. . . 1865 date of rank February 4th. 1865. 1864. Was born February 5th. now deceased. 17 from dated Fourth New York Headquarters Heavy Artillery.

1863. in Company A. N. under Recruiting Officers H. to Fourth New York Heavy Artillery was on detached duty at General Whipple's Pleadquarters at General Lee's house in the summer of 1862 as Sergeant of the Guard was also on detached duty at General Tidball's Headquarters at Stevensburg in the spring of 1864 until the raid to Deep Bottom as Ambulance Ser. 1861. Was born September 21st. having the charge of magazines and other ordnance stores. N. 1861. First United States Lancers. January 1st. 1861. Scare's Com My father school. Poughkeepsie he enlisted September 25th. 1863. when we removed to North Salem. although at the latter place pany of the First United States Lancers was mustered into the service at New York City on September 25th. 1840. at which place I remained until enlistment.. T. being a horticulturist I deemed this also my business when out of most of my time.474 I HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. tain first Cap of Company F. Westchester County. My company was transferred to the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery. Washburn was transferred October 13th. Feel . was educated at public and private schools graduated from East man's College. Y. it was ordered to Fort Marcy to form part of at its garrison. and Alexander. State of New York. I was enlisted at North Salem. N.. ing that my country still needed assistance. in which space of time materials and things have vastly changed alterations and improvements made not only in the fort but in the camp and surroundings. 1861. Sep Teed. subsequently garrisoned Forts Snyder. Enrolled January 23d. D. at Somers. and . service from patriotic motives only I desire to remain so until the country shall no longer need assistance in put ting down treason. 1862. and at the age of five years with my parents came to country and settled in the city of New York. . New Edward A. at Capt. was born in Ireland. . . I again joined myself to the army as a veteran volun teer on November Having entered the 28th. on September 8th. T. Y. . Westchester County. York. and in the performance of which I have endeavored to perform my part. where we remained until the year 1866. of Company A. Tudor at Fort Bennett at the age of 24 . Isaac N. Wood bury. I will be twenty years of age on this October 21st next.. . AVJIS occupied until enter ing the Army of the United Spates. Y. . Edward A. Lee and R. Would also here state that hi addition to my other duties have at several posts acted as Ordnance Sergeant.. Tudor. . resigned tember 29th. at Katonah. 1862. Lee for Captain T. which post has been my field of labor for nearly one year and a quarter. by Lieutenant H.

L. Fourth New York Heavy Artil promoted lery. and was with him when he occupied Baltimore City after the riots in April. . and commissioned Second Lieutenant March 14th. Vandeweile. in which he had served five years. when he was sent to the hospital for the Post-office address. Company F. . 475 geant. Taylor. as Spa March . Thurber. He then made the Virginia Cam paign terminating in the battle of Bull Run. 1864. with date of rank 9th. John B. . in Company B. Ky. 1861. 1862. Y. . serving in various Indian campaigns until he wa* retired March 20th. Mattituck. and made the Maryland Cam paign under General Benjamin Butler. March 13th. 1864. serving continuously in Virginia battles in and through all the campaigns and commanding the regiment after the battle of Ream's Station. 1862 discharged . Morehead. at North Bristol. Was enlisted in Northampton August 13th. Eighth Regiment New York State Militia. 1866 he was appointed March 28th. Michael W. 1862. 1861. and at the breaking out of the war was a member of Company E. Thomas S. Lewis. sides in New York City. he was promoted to Sergeant December 25th. . to December 10th. N. a Captain in the Tenth Regiment United States Cavalry. 1865 mustered out with regiment was wounded June 28th. being mustered in as First Lieutenant November 1st. being mustered out April 30th. . Was born in New York City October 26th. William L. Captain in Hancock's First Veteran Army Corps May 17th. 1865. 1864. 1843. at Gaines Mill. 1862 . He was mustered out in New York City. 1865. afterward Company B. . Bora June 22d. Second Lieutenant. sioned Second Lieutenant 4th. Corporal and Sergeant in Company G. Was commissioned March 25th. Rowan County. August 25th. 1861.. and to Company Promoted and transferred to Company H May 18th.. Thurber. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery September 29th. 1861 Captain. Van Name ^an ^ame ization in William E. 1879. when he was mustered out he was then appointed General Grant's Campaign .SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. 1863. 1865 captured at Ream's Station and paroled mustered out with company. 1865. . Artillery Brigade Second Corps. Enlisted November 24th. . Post-office . 1867. N. up to Febru ary 1st. 1864. Re. 1865. July 21st. M . 1863. Eleventh Artillery commissioned Second Lieutenant May llth. . Enlisted February 25th. Va. First United States Lancers. 1837. Trites. enlisted May. Suffolk County. March 20th. address. Benjamin W. 1863.. Vanderpool. 1865. . He was mustered in the United States service April 22d. was with them from the Wilderness to the second raid to Deep Bottom. 1862 promoted to First Lieutenant October 30th. August 8th. Y. He recruited Company B. Y. . 1861. 1861. Lieut Wm. 1864 age 24 he was commissioned Second Lieutenant May 18th. at Ballston age 39 promoted Sergeant April 6th. Travers. John G. as Company B March Was mustered in in the original organ Second Lieutenant he was commis . 1862 . of Company M. 1864. N. serving in the First and Eighth Regiment. Van Dyke. discharged May 5th. 1864. and was mustered out with the regiment September 26th. was educated at Buffalo. first time. Va. at East Otto.

Y. Geni'ml Wallace. William. New York City. 1863. Nathan S. N. Captain October 18th. Warner. and promoted to Captain of Com . 1862. Geo. 1865 Firs Lieutenant Nineteenth United States Infantry July 28th. Saginaw. 1864. at Barre. Hugh. Eighth New York HeavCompany K. Y educated at Millville Academy and Genesee Wesleyan Seminary and Colletrr. . . prepared with loving hands perished. March 31st. River. Fourth New York Heavy Artillery January 4th. Resides in Canandaigua. September York was originally a 20th. Walker. Artillery as First Lieutenant in Company H. Fort Missoula. James. . and placed them on his casket. I September 1st. . . Captain. which winter had already covered with snow. : . 1871. N. missioned Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant May 27th. Lima. 1862. 1869 . . at afterward was com Sergeant in Company New F . but was not mustered . Mich. Wood.. A out at expiration of service January 26th. . 1864 he was mustered . at Rochester age 22 was with General Miles for nearly a year and up to time of muster out in June. First Lieu was discharged June 29th. has furnished the following account of his death to have been thrown from his hqrse. at Alex tenant. Transferred from Post-office address. 1865. .476 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. assigned to Thirteenth Infantry July 14th. for gallant and meritorious services ii the field was successively Corporal. . Thomas May 20th. Orleans County. Residence. andria. he was commissioned Lieut. 1865 Waterbury. Va. H pany 1863 as Second Lieutenant January 17th. and Brevet Major . 1865. 1869 . Y. . by the rapids. Saginav County. ant. H. 1864 May llth. 1865 he was captured at Ream's Station August 25th. Was a Sergeant in Company C and promoted to Second Lieutenant March 27th. pany mustered out with company. but so benumbed with the cold he fell from exhaustion and The ladies of his post. 1865 during service on the staff was commissioned as Captain and mustered into Company F was brevetted Major of United States Volunteers by Presi dent. . by reason of resignation. he was again promoted to First Lieu tenant January 12th. " He was supposed Wallace. and was mustered out with the company he was subsequently First Lieutenant in the Third United States Infantry. 1865. Second Lieutenant. in crossing the Missoula : Was commissioned First Lieutenant in Company K S. He was enlisted . . . His father. 1863 he also received a commission as First Lieuten he was killed in action May 6th. Swimming some distance down the stream. Watts. . February 26th. Wiard. to rank from March 13th. George H. he succeeded in reaching the opposite bank. 1862 First Lieutenant January 6th. and hearts the cross and wreaths from the blighted flowers and leaves. enlisted in Company C July 29th. Born August 7th. Sergeant. 1863 mustered out January 3d. Was a Sergeant in Company when organized he was then promoted and transferred to Com . 1865. . N. George. 1865. he was mustered out with com Captain pany. 1840. 1866 unassigned . Born in New York appointed from New Yon Second Lieutenant. Warner.

George W. at Winans. he enlisted August 18th. Thy doom is written. . First Lieutenant in the Fourth he was mustered out September 28th. N. and full of woe. Hart burg . beloved by all his com ' a source of rades. Born October 3d. Commissioned May 27th. 1864. Wheeler. Albany. was soon after promoted Sergeant December 2d became Second Lieutenant. Y. Genessee Co. Wm. . Young. Edward. discharged as Second Lieutenant October 6th. Post-office address. 18th. in Company E . mustered out with company. " ' full of Few O man are thy days. he was educated at Albion Academy and State Normal School. 477 " Lieutenant Wallace was a brave and gallant officer. and. 1839. and March 18th. Mich. 1865. Y. . N.SKETCHES OF OFFICERS AND MEN. N. at 16 he was engaged in teaching school Lockport as Corporal on formation of Company K. resigned November 16th. White. was bright promise for the future. . Albion. Post-office address. Conn. at Hart's Island. . Eighth N. Enrolled December 15th. llth. Was born February 3d. enlisted August ford County. 1862. as Sergeant to tion to Second Lieutenant Company . ment. Y. was pride to the regiment. Was mustered out with regi Lieut. educated in High School at NewVernon. in Oak Orchard. 1863 Sergeant April 27th. . Wlnans. with date of rank March 9th. . Dust thou To dust thou shall return. 1864 transferred May . 1862. ' " ' Behold the emblem of thy state " In flowere that bloom and die. Samuel R. Wescott. 1865. A. Post-office address. New Britain. N. White. a Corporal in to Second Lieutenant in Company F . William H. George W. at Rochester age 19 pro moted Corporal June 10th. 1862. of woman born . John. Flint. Was enrolled as promoted May 19th. 1 " His young life. H. Y. 1861. 1865. in the language of his regimental commander. Y. Enlisted August 9th. . at New York City . . K for promotion mustered out with regi ment. at Port Richmond age 23 mustered as Second Lieutenant January 28th. . H. . . at . 1862. . 1835.. Wilson. 1863. 1862. 1863 discharged October 12th of the same year." " ' " art. Company K . 1865. for he had not reached his thirty-second year. William H.

veteran . Sweetman. . . Matthew Quinn. 3. discharged by virtue of General age 31 . Harrison Totten. Isaac N.478 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Sergeant. . Lyon. . First Sergeant Silas Haviland. . 1862. Alexander H. 12. Y. Napoleon 15. Corporal. 6. Sergeant. 8. Lieutenant. George L. age 18 Archer. James H. 14. Teed. Enrolled August 21st. at North Salem . while prisoner of war. Enrolled September 4lli. Albert Bunyea. Louis Deion. Allen. 1861 Enrolled August 29th. Corporal. 16. KiiMpp. Aldrich. 1. 13. Abel D. N. Northey. May 3d. 11. 1864. AIKEN. Alonzo A. Bailey. Bailey. 1862. 5. 1862. November 1864. 10. . 7. at prisoner of war at Ream's Station. 1865. Enrolled at Croton Falls October 31st. 10. William H. Arthur D. Transferred from One Hundred and Elev enth mustered out with company. Transferred from Allen. mus . 4. Charles. Horton. June 30th. David Rogers. received June 18th. William E. Lvnes. Serceant. of wounds. Teed. Sergeant. tered out September 29th. age 19. Enrolled December 9th at Croton Falls. Theodore Quick. prders . Sergeant. died . 1865. Enrolled August 28th. at Salisbury. 1862. at New York age 23 died. age 21 . Special Orders No! 546. Edward A. Bailey. THOMAS. Adelbert. age 29 discharged by order of Secretary of War. 15. . Kniffln. at North Salem No. 18th. 9. David H. Verdine E. Corporal. 26. One Hundred and Twenty-sixth North Salem . 2. George E.

1864. James H. at South East age 18 . at New York age 27 died. Enrolled August 27th. Enrolled September 6th. 1863 age 24 veteran from Twenty-seventh New York captured August 25th discharged by Special Orders No. . Neb. . 1862. Burke. Sergeant. received June 18th. discharged by virtue of General Orders. 1862. 1862. . Martin S. Enrolled August 21st. Brown. 1861. X. . . Albert. Jonathan. Gilbert. November 17th. Brewer. 1865. 1861. Sing Sing. Bunyea. James C. 1862. Burke. Stephen D. . Y. . Stromsburg. 1862. age 18 veteran discharged August 2d. at Brewster's age 32. while prisoner of war. age 21 . 1861. Y. 1862. Enrolled July 29th. at South East died February 15th. 1863. Patrick. at Union Vale Bannister. . at Croton Falls. Oscar. at Port Richmond age 29. 1861. Amos. prisoner Baker. at New York age 24. Enrolled December 23d. Musician. at Lewisborough age 33 dis charged by virtue of General Orders No. at Brewster's age 18. Enrolled September 21st. Babbs. mustered out with company. Enrolled August 30th. N. Y. age discharged August 4th. "With regiment September. Bland. . Bannister. Charles A. 1863. at Fort Ethan Allen. age 32 . Michael. Brooks. 1865. Howell's Depot. Mitchell. . Enrolled October 4th. Burch. Thomas. 1861. 1861. . under act of Co'ngress approved July 5th. Orrin. 1861. Y. 1864. Joseph. Enrolled August 27th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh . 1862. Cross River. 1865. Brown. Baldwin. . 1863. Carpenter. Enrolled December 10th. "War Department. . . 1862. veteran . . Pleasant ville. 1862. County. Brown. . Samuel. Y. 19 . Enrolled December 29th. Enrolled September 12th. Beatty. at New York. Peter. Enrolled August 25th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh died from wounds. Edward. Charles H. . at Brewster's age 21. age 19 . 1884. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. 1862. Butler. at Lewisborough of war at Ream's Station died at Salisbury. Joseph A. Enrolled January 18th. In company. 1862. . . Enrolled September 19th. James. at Salisbury. . at Brooklyn Blarney. . 1863. . N. 1865. Smith. Benedict. Albert W. Orange . . Carr. . at Mount Hope died of wounds. 1865. Barnes. Cassidy. 1862. . Discharged by order of Brigadier-General Gates. September. Mitchell W. . William S. January 27th. N. N. . veteran Brown. prisoner of war at Ream's Station mustered out June. Enrolled September 16th. . Enrolled July 21st. .COMPANY A. .. George. prisoner of war at Ream's Station. Butler. Bradley. 1862. at Croton Falls Bogan. 26. Enrolled December 9th. 77. age 32. 1861. Enrolled November 5th. Polk County. . . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh while a prisoner of war at Andersonville. . discharged March 31st. . May 3d. 1862 age 44 discharged at Fort Marcy. Britto. Enrolled September 1st. Ga. Theodore L. at Croton Falls . at South East age 19 died December 13th. Va. at New York age 21 May 3d. June 24th.* Enrolled August 29th. age 30 . 479 .

Condon. Transferred from . . Alexander. Discharged at Fort Ethan . 1863. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh discharged Clark. at South East Allen. died of wounds after capture. 1864. Enrolled October 15th. 1863. at South East age 33 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. veteran died August 15th. George. Charles. 1864. . 1861. May 3d. age cap . Lewis G. John. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh wounded May 6th. Enrolled September 21st. dis- charged at Fort June 9th. N.. at Patterson. Cole. Alonzo B. Sergeant. Enrolled September 8th. Corbon. Enrolled August 31st. N. 1861. . at Croton Falls . May 3d. . 1864. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh September 3d. . . 1862. Walter.480 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Y. 1865. age 33 . Allen. 1864. William J. Cunningham. Enrolled December 10th. . May 2d. 26. 1861. discharged June 16th. Edward. . 1864 Conway. age 43 . wounded Clark. veteran . Enrolled December 10th. Y. charged by order of War Department. Patrick. . . Enrolled August 26th. Ephraim. George. . at Patterson. November 19th. 1862. 1862. Enrolled December 9th. 1862. Cowl. Patrick. Peter. Condon. age 18 dis . Davis. . . Chessen. Davis. One Hundred and Twenty-sixth . Clark. at New York . at Croton Falls . Clements. . age 39 . Josiah. Y. Enrolled September 24th. 34 Enrolled December 9th. charged at Fort Ethan Allen. Thomas. . Bloomingsburg. Enrolled October 28th. Cronin. 1861. Michael. Carmel . Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth wounded . at discharged by order of War De partment. Corporal. 1861. at Pawling age 31 an mustered out with company. at New York . Y. Sullivan County. Enrolled August 21st. . 1862. Artificer. . August 25th. 1865. Patrick. September 17th. . veter Davis. . 1865 discharged August 2d. . 1862. 1865. at Croton Falls age 26 dis Cree. at Union Vale age 26 discharged November 19th. 1865. May 3d. Norman. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh wounded May 19th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers wounded July 3d. 26. Crane. 32 Clay Street. . 1864 mustered out with company. 1865. 1862. Jarvis Cole. 1805. May 16th. veteran wounded April 2d. 1861. age 24 mustered out June 3d. 1862. Herman H. N. Enrolled September 13th. Jarvis. 1861. Lyndon J. Clancey. at South East age 25 .. Brooklyn. 1861 age 32. Enrolled September 2d. Cole. Davis. 1865. 1864 mustered out with company. . N. Artificer. 1865. Enrolled December 10th. Clements. discharged by reason of expiration of service. . . . mustered out with company. George C. Collard. tured August 25th discharged by virtue of General Orders No. .

. 481 . 1861. . De Flonde. May 3d. Delavan. August . Dutzcare. and August 25th. Enrolled September 19th. 1862. 26. at. at Croton Falls. Discharged by Brigadier-General Gates. John T. 1862. Enrolled September 1st. Kisco. 77. 1865. at Croton Falls wounded April 6th. . Y. Thomas. Enrolled October 7th. Frank H. at New York age 20. Artificer. Y. at New York age 26 dis charged by virtue of General Orders No. . G. A. Enrolled November 14th. 1861 veteran discharged 526 East Forty-seventh Street. . 1863. 1862. Donnelly. .. New York. 1864. 1861. New York. . Dean. 1861. at Salisbury. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh out with company. Enrolled July 30th. 1861. Enrolled December 10th. Uriah. Henry R. December 12th. N. . Corporal. Alexander. Bradford J. . age 27. Joseph. Enrolled August 27th. Duncan. 1865. . 1865.. out with company. 1865. Francis. . veteran mustered out with company. 1864. Enrolled August 8th. wounded July 1863. Samuel F. Dingee. . Shadrack. . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh . De Grunde. Dunn. at New York veteran mustered out with company. 1864 and March 3d. Peter. Discharged by General Orders No. 1864 died at Anderson ville. Enrolled September 4th. Donnell. Davis. Devonport.. Zephaniah. . 1862. 1861. November 18th. . Bernard. 1865. . John.COMPANY A. March 2d. at Bedford ago 23 died at Salisbury. Lewis. 1865. N. Transferred from 1862. at Brewster's . May One Hundred and Eleventh 3d. .. at New York age 35 vet eran died. while prisoner of war. Enrolled September 12th. Corporal. age 30 . Franklin. 1861. sixth . 1864. Deion. mustered mustered . ing at battle of Weldon Railroad. 1861. Louis. . Humphrey. O. 1865. Drews. at New York died July . Corporal. 26. Corporal. 1861. died June 9th. N. Christopher. May 3d. 1862. . William. 2d. Dwyer. at South East age 26 dis charged June 17th. charged by virtue of General Orders Xo. Enrolled August 27th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mus tered out with company. Transferred from One Hundred and Twentymustered out with company wounded May 6th. Ga. Decker. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth miss . at Brewster's . 1865 discharged July 8th. . August 23d. 1865. Y. . Corporal. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh out June 12th. . . Dingee. at Yorktown age 22 dis Mt. John. veteran prisoner August 25th. 21st. . William E. Dishaw. De Golyer. Dingee. 1862. Dickens. 27th. Doyle. . Enrolled November 5th. veteran age 19 Mount Vernon. Wounded April 2d. Croton Falls . veteran . . Doyle. John. . 1865. mustered out with company. Oliver. Denney. Doanc. age 18 . Moses D. Enrolled August 12th. 1865. Dickens. Enrolled December 12th.

April 14th. Ford.482 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. T)er 21st. Discharged by order Brigadier-General Gates. Enrolled September 8th. New York City. Enrolled February 19th. . died August 12th. died February 15th. . Md. 1864. 1864. 1865. discharged July 9th. 1862. . Joel J. Va. killed in action. 1865. Grivly or Gribe. December 4th. Daniel. Y. . Foster. Gile. prisoner of war at Ream's Station died at Salisbury. Hiram L. Peter. age 86 age 33 . 1864. died January 10th. 1865 died May 26th. 1862. Enrolled December 5th. N. Graham. Enrolled August 25th. Wright D. at Deep Bottom. age .. 1862. sixth 1864. Eastwood. William H. 1862. mustered Flynn. at South East age 32 discharged by General Orders No. 40 died October 13th. Samuel. Hundred and Twenty-sixth . Charles H. out with company. Gregory. Patrick. 1863. war broke out in 1861 Jhe joined a military company that was formed among . 1864. Pa. 77. 1862. New York. 1862. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh. Robert. Feitner. Enrolled January 13th. John K. Ferguson. May 19th. . 1864 age 23 August 16th. Enrolled March 25th. Fayette County. . Fulton. Tarrytown . Farrington. Transferred from One Graham. Walter. at New York age 18 dis> . . Alvin. Ferguson. Corporal. at South Ea. at New York . Enrolled September 20th. Edwards... Thomas B. . Enrolled August 22d. 1864. . Plynn. 1864 age 24 mustered . Eddy. . . Va. at Enrolled August 25th. Gray. 1861.t mus tered out June 3d. Fullier. 1864. . at Elmore. Gallahue. Enrolled December 31st. at Annapolis. Katonah. at Brewster's age 24 . Enrolled August 25th. 1864. at Lincoln Hospital. wounded mustered out July 18th. . . Foster. Ganning. Leonulas Elsworth. 1862. 1863. and Hudson River Institute. 1865. 1865. William S. at Alexandria. 1865. Wounded May 6th. at New York age 21 mustered out June 3d. . . Enrolled September 10th. Walter. Enrolled September 20th. Horace. . Transferred from One Hundred and Twentymustered out with company. 1861. Corporal. James. 1862. George W. Edwards. Reuben J. . . 1873. Graham. 1846. He was educated in the public schools in Pittsburg. Sutton A. . War Department. John. at New York died NovemFort Ethan Allen. Was born in Belvernon. Gilbert G. 1865. Sergeant. 1864. 1863 age 33 . . Enrolled December 22d. charged February 13th. . .. When the Pa. 1864 age 22 wounded June 23d. Enrolled March 16th. Enrolled March 28th. Thomas. at Bedford age 21 mustered out June 3d. . Claverack. Va. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. . mustered out with company. at Wallkill age 20 Foster. at Patterson . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh out with company. at New York Hospital. . Joseph. at New York age 27 .

1865. . Union City. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh . at Lewisborough age 37 cap tured at Ream's Station . 1862 He was connected with the field until April 1864. Sergeant. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. 1865. . Huges. May 3d. William C. N. Sergeant. at Tarrytown veteran from Thirty-eighth New York . Hysartt. County. Hubbard. Enrolled October 3d. 1861.COMPANY Fourth A. 1865. Harris. Hoag. Crawford . Sergt. Katonah. is No. by virtue of General Orders No. at Tarrytown age 25 . 1862. Patrick. Enrolled August 27th. Enrolled September 24th. Discharged by Colonel Bliss. Erie County. N. Enrolled December 24th.. Sergeant. 1863. Y. Enrolled August 30th. Cuddebackville. 1864 . 109 West One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Street. 27 Hyatt. Enrolled August 25th. Hudson. Albert S. 1864 was sent to Salisbury Prison. Y. 1865.. died at New York City. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth mustered out with company. mustered out with company. Danbury. Aaron. 1865. . mustered out June 3d. 26. Spartansburg.: . William. Charles. Pa. at New York . Transferred Jerome. 1862. New York. 1865. . . New York. . Enrolled August 25th. . N. George W. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. at New York mustered out June 3d. . Company A. Hunt. . February 1st. James. mustered out with com pany. Hyatt. : age 22 . Gilbert.. Enrolled Au gust 30th. defences of Washington hospital during the battle of the Wilderness at connected with the Artillery. Enrolled September 7th. 1864. . Clark. Conn. 1862. . Verdine E. 1862. by virtue of General Orders No. Sergeant. June 3d. Howe. at Bedford age 26 discharged June 3d. Thomas. May 3d. Enrolled September 24th. Rufus. Hammill. 1865. Wounded April 2d. 1865. the students under the auspices of the school. at Croton Falls. 1865. Charles F. Bernard. Edgar. 483 He enlisted in . . His grave in the ceme tery at Salisbury. at Croton age 20 veteran mustered out with company. Harvey. at Croton Falls age 22 discharged by Colonel Bliss. mustered out with company. February 14th. Hamilton. Horton. from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. 26. 1865. at Lewisborough 26. 1862. at Ream's Station. . age wounded and captured August 25th. dis charged June 3d by virtue of General Orders No. Enrolled August llth. Hitt. . New York. August 25th. May 3d. New York Heavy he was taken captive at the battle Ream's Station on the Weldon Railroad. Pa. C. Cyrus. Vista N. where he died. . James Hyatt. Robert D. Y. March 3d. 1191. . 1861. 1861. .. . at Bedford age 29 discharged Hitt. 1862. Hynard.

John veteran . . John. at North Salem veter prisoner at Ream's Station. South Norwalk. George. age 18 missing in action at Ream's Station. First Sergeant. . 1864. Ezra. at Wilderness. . by General Orders No. of war at Ream's Station. at Croton an Knapp. Enrolled September 8th. 1861 . Y. Enrolled August 13th. Enrolled August 28th. Transferred to Company tember 30th. W. May 6th. Clinton. Enrolled September 12th. 1862. at Hatter. Enrolled September llth. missing at Spottsylvania. age 22 . . . Y. Enrolled September 12th. George S. 1863. age . 1861. N. Kidd. September 29th. 1861. at Paterson. at Brewster's . acci Falls . . Ream's Station. Robert. Edgar Hitt. Joseph S.484 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. . May 3d. Knapp. . whose picture adorns this sketch. Enrolled August 27th. killed at William E. James. . by expiration of service. Henry. Auburn. was what might be termed a small boy a youth over whose head only sixteen summers had passed. 1861. N. received June 18th. 1864. Enrolled November 9th. 1864. at Hughes. by Colonel H. L. 1862. Neb. July 13th. Knapp. Jackson. 23 . Kniffin. at Croton Falls veteran . Haviland. In the year 1862 Mr. charged December 20th. . Jeremiah T. Henry C. . Va. War Department. Enrolled August 19th. captured at Ream's Station mustered out with company. Enrolled September llth. Knouse. Lockwood. Kent. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth missing . 1861. 1864. . . 1864. . Enrolled December 19th. at Bedford age 19 dis Hatter. . 1861. 1862. age 23 prisoner of war at Ream's Sta tion mustered out July 25th. 1862. at Patterson. February 10th. Oscar. Kennedy. William H. Enrolled September 24th. . 1862. age 21 discharged by expiration of service. 1864 . <jred amj Twenty -sixth 18th. Eli R. Hugh. Owen. Silas G.. prisoner of war at Ream's Station. at Albany age 18. George H. H. 1861. Harris. Knapp. age 25 . May Hubbard. Corporal.. . Conn. Enrolled December 19th. Enrolled March 30th. G Sep Enrolled March 25th. Jones. at North Salem age 21 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. New York age 21 discharged June 16th. at New York dentally shot at Fort Marcy. Transferred from One Hun- New York . 1865. age 23 mustered out on expiration of term. 1862. 77. Knapp. Enrolled September 21st. at Lewisborough age 21 died of wounds. . . Alonzo A. 1865. Enrolled August 13th. 1861. It was during the . Mitchell B. Heddy. 26. . at Croton Falls . Lockwood. N. . 1864. Haggadorn. Jeremiah T. King. Abram. Sing Sing. veteran. 1865. at New York age 44 prisoner . 1861. Jones. Howe. 1861.

1862. Lockwood was in all the battles in which his company was engaged. with words of encouragement and prayers He stayed at home one week and then joined Company A. having been sent down by his father to pay an insurance premium. 1864.COMPANY summer was his A. The ball struck him between the second and third ribs on the right side and passing clear through the body came out below the shoulder-blade. young Lockwood stepped into a recruiting The office on Franklin Street and enlisted. He received a good education in the common schools and J. they told him to go." they said. of course. " Wait. 1865. When the came to advance it seemed a moment of life and death.20 A.. At daylight on the morning of that day his company charged through the cornfield and took one line of works. and as it was obeyed. stained with the blood which flowed 28th. of that year that he sought to impress upon his fond parents that it But they couldn't see it in fight the battles of his country. 1862 when in the city of New York. 1864.M. T." Lockwood didn't propose to wait. Fort Franklin. where he remained until March.. During the whole time he was in the army Mr. had good home training. and this one was too young duty to But young Conn. and his boyhood days were spent there in the city of New York. that light. so the young soldier's career began. and . until 11. and by that time the line had reached him. Va. At the time he enlisted he was living with his parents in Bedford. from the Wilderness to Petersburg. and there stayed works. Upon this spot Fort Hell. except during the time he was in the hospital suffering from wounds he was never sick and was never away for a day except on one short furlough after he was wounded. but. at for his safety. And recruiting officer was Frank Williams. And indeed it him into the works. Lockwood was then taken to the Carver United States General Hospital. Lockwood was always ready for duty. retains it. on June 18th. When he told his parents that he had enlisted they were. he went with his company to Fort Marcy. After this his company advanced out upon the Jerusalem plank-road . in the defenses of Washington. and so one day it was August 28th. When leaving home his mother had given him a Testament. two of his comrades helped him up and word was All together they dashed forward to make another charge. Md. This he carried carried tion. They had one son already in the war. 485 and too small. "you are too young yet. surprised. It was in the front. in his inner pocket. At Petersburg he received what was nearly a fatal wound. opposite Fort Damna was afterward built. and he still from the wound on that day. Lockwood was born in New Canaan. Va. Westchester County. like the sensible people they were. Mr. In December. where he remained xintil the end of the war. He fell. Then came the order to fall back. just three years after On August . The headquarters of the regiment at that time were at Fort Ethan Allen. They then had orders to charge upon the last a moment of life to some and death to many! Lockwood was a little in advance and had gone about fifty feet from the works when he was struck by a bullet. Lockwood.

I was not then perfectly well very thin. 1862. in canal near Chain Bridge. " WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK. Until 1880 he was engaged in the furniture and undertaking business with Hoyt Brothers. Y. Mr. when I did I was then not take quite so much exercise as I had done during the war. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. drowned December . not for conquest. 12th. 26. Lawrence. at South East . always have a me. and is a member McKeel Post No. White Plains. . I had not recovered from my wound of Gettysburg the previous July (3d). Md. Lebanon. N. at Ramapo age 18 vet eran captured August 25th. 1865. Boyle. . Enrolled August 13th. R. Wounded April 2d. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth charged November 9th. age 29 . Lockwood has been engaged in business and has been quite successful. " stationed in Baltimore. he was so eagerly striving to depopulate. at New York age 21 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. May he live long and prosper. James H. Corporal. November Lashier. Lockwood. Lockwood. Y. at Union Vale age 46 . Joseph. Lockwood was the youngest member of his company. The General 1879. G. . . 1862. . . vice. at Salisbury. at Katonah. Address in care of J. at Hector age 22 dis charged by virtue of General Orders No. Enrolled August 25th. Enrolled September 3d. sends two. 1865. N. twenty-five years ago. 1861. but for principle a war for the right and not to satisfy ambition. . I am very glad to comply with your wish. Thomas. Le Barr. Ferdinand. discharged by Dr. Enrolled December 10th. he has seen the error of his ways and taken a very attractive and amiable help meet.486 his enlistment. ser he was discharged by reason of expiration of term of Since the close of the war Mr. Freeman. May 3d. T. One of the cherished memen toes in his possession is a letter from General Hancock. Putnam. He is one of the leading undertakers of Westchester County. . 1865. 120. 1862. 26. in action June 18th.. I warm place in my breast for men who served under and with I am very truly yours. . He now has a fine establish ment of his own at White Plains. 1861. dated February 25th. Lane. . Loomis. N.. It is an answer to a request for the General's photograph. 1864. Benjamin F. The extract is given as an expression of that feeling felt by many of the grea commanders for the soldiers who fought in a war. 1865. and says of : They are the best I have. 1862. 1864. Lockwood has been that he was a bachelor. Y. John. . 1864 died. and Rockland counties. Light. Enrolled November 4th. The only objec Within the past year tion to Mr. Enrolled August 29th. Henry C. Lyon. at Bedford age 21 killed . and is President of the Undertakers' Association of Westchester. and through his descendants increase the numerical strength of a land which. 1864. One was taken in 1864 about January. 10th. May 3d. dis Lyons. while prisoner of war. The second was taken in 1866. . of that place. A.

. at Cross River. New York . Enrolled March 18th. Augustus. 1861. was while the company lay at Fort Ethan Allen. but was so young and slightly built in appear 1862. Manley. When it moved to Fort Marcy he became post bugler. out with company.. at Bedford cap discharged May 20th. at McGloin. H. Y. 1864 mustered out with company. 1864. Eldad B. Battery Enrolled March 15th. in spite of the carried his point. Monroe. scoring his first victory by joining the service August 27th. . age 19 . A. Enrolled August 25th. 1864. B. William. E. . When enlisted. Meade. Murdock. Corporal. Enrolled October 29th. N. Enrolled March 17th. . Was born February 23d. . Albert. September 4th. N. Wm. Alexander. at Pawling . William H. tured at Ream's Station . age 32 mustered out with company. . Miller remonstrances of parents and other friends. George. 1865. A. 1862. 1865. Mark D. Bernard. Enrolled December 10th. wounded April 2d. Enrolled January 5th. . 1845. discharged August 17th. Enrolled October 29th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh. . veteran . 1864. Transferred from Fourth McCausland. 1862 mustered out with company. McGloughlin. H. left leg amputated discharged by Major-General Auger. that he usual occupations of youth. Miller. John. Brooklyn . 1861. WestMiller. Hartsdale. chester County. Mosier. at Tarrytown age 33 wounded June 18th. McGowan. Y. Patrick. H. Enrolled December 10th.COMPANY McCade. his older brother. Charles. Eldad. age 20 487 . 1864. John. McGlora. He enlisted as a Private. McElroy. in which place he attended school and engaged in the . N.. at Patterson. age 37 . age 33 . ance that he was soon excused from duty with the musket and given a drum this . which occupation he followed until the company . Robert D. age 22 mustered out with company. 1864 mustered out Sep . at Brooklyn mustered . McCord. tember 20th. 1863. Malloy. Miller. Patrick. evinced such a determined purpose to follow his brother's example. John J. at Tarrytown mustered out with company. Y. 1864 . A.

at New York died November 24th. N. . . Northey. 1862. Enrolled September 8th. Morey. Y. Sergeant. of General Orders No. N. Penny. John. . 26. Y. . Y. D. 1862. . Enrolled September 9th. McDonald. Owen. at South East age 22 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. Parker. C. May 3d. 2391 Third Avenue. May 3d. June 3d. 1865. . McNally. Peter. Enrolled at South East. H. Moody County. Minard. Joseph. Robert. at Lewisborough age Miller. George S. Corporal. 26. . age 30. Morgan. . George. 1861. D. McDonald. Flandreau. 1862. Y. May 3d. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth O'Brien. James. and was discharged. 1864 discharged October 5th. Enrolled August 27th. Michael. 1864 . died October 3d. 1865. McDonald.. 1861. 1865 mustered out with company. George R. 22 mustered out June 3d by virtue of General Orders No. 26. Enrolled September 18th. June 18th. McDonald. Enrolled March 28th. prisoner of war at Ream's Station. . ability. at Schenectady age 24 mustered out at Petersburg on expiration of term. Enrolled December 10th. . mustered out with company. War Department. August 30th. August 27th. at West Bloomfield age 30 discharged by General Orders No. Nathan D. 1862. 77. William H. McBride. . . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh battles in . 1861. 1864. Y. . 1865. . C. at Washington. all followed the fortunes of his company during the which it was engaged. Sergeant. May 3d. Y. . age 22. at Bedford age 25. while on furlough. age 25 . 1862. Nichols. 1864. Martin H. Enrolled August 27th. Enrolled September 4th. . McGill. Enrolled August 30th. Nichols. Mattice. age 23 died August 16th. . 1861. 1861. . 26. Sergeant. Enrolled December 9th. at New York age 26 McDonald. at Pawling 5th. June 18th. Charles. . Morrison. Nixon. Fair Haven. at New York wounded discharged at David's Island on Surgeon's certificate of dis . wounded May Enrolled December 10th. age 20 captured at Ream's Station returned to company and was wounded April 2d. Dak. New York City. . Henry J. at Gorliam age 20 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. 1862 discharged by virtue . Payne. at Fort Snyder. 26. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh dis charged August 18th.488 went to the front. William H. James. Enrolled January 5th. . HEAVY GUNS AND He LIGHT. mustered out with company. veteran . William H. 1862. vet eran mustered out with company. at Patterson. John D. 1865. 1864. at Jamaica . Merrigan. at South East. David. Enrolled October 6th. 1863. . at Fort Cass. . 1864. Enrolled August 25th. N. 1865. 1862 age 26 killed in action. at Patterson. Transferred from One Hundred and Elev enth . 1861. mustered out with company. Enrolled at Troy. 1864. William. 1865. Bernard. Richard. . . Enrolled December 12th. Va. . Sing Sing. N. 1862. at Patterson. . N. 1865. Enrolled August 25th. 1862. per General Orders No. . N. . . Corporal.

. at Croton Reynolds. Y. by General Gates. at Croton Falls age discharged by expiration of service. 1862. Matthew. Enrolled September 7th. Rockwell. Sergeant. South Norwalk. 1865. . N. ^-^^^t^ ^^m fj^^. Reed. 1861. Enrolled August 28th. Enrolled at Croton Falls. Riessen. Roake. 1861. Brewster's. 1864. age 36 dis . 1865. at New York age 21 dis charged by virtue of General Orders No. 1864 discharged April 28th. . 1864. Falls age 18 mustered out October 20th. A. charged by expiration of service. at . Enrolled August llth. 1865. Rogers. . Rogers. Y. Purdy. David. at Tarrytown age 18 discharged August 4th. mustered out with company. J. James P. George. October 20th. N. Enrolled January 12th. Quinn. Ferdinand. Brooklyn. Y. pany. Enrolled September 12th. 1865. . . at South East musteyd out June 3d. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mus tered out with company. Theodore. Henry M. Corporal. Sergt. 1864. non. 380 Dean Street. 1864. North Salem. Rockwell. at Tarrytown age 17 at . . Katonah. . 1861. Rogers. Y. Enrolled October 2d. .. . . . N. George. Rice. 26. Sergeant. Enrolled October 2d. Rockwell. N. at Salisbury. Timothy. 1865.. Enrolled September 20th. September 6th. . . Enrolled October 7th. mouth County. Daniel. David. N. . 1865. Enrolled October 15th. Conn. 17 Elc-'enth . Purdy. war . 1861 age 19 . Patrick. 1865. George S. Louis. Y. Elijah. Mills Reynolds. 1864. Transferred from One Hundred St. Robert A. Mills. . Quintard. 1864. . Mon. . Enrolled September 12th. 1864. at Croton Falls age 22 killed in action at Ream's Station. Harrison I. Transferred from One mustered out with com Hundred and Eleventh . . . Enrolled August 19th. Lewis B. Rathbone. Reardon. Enrolled January 5th. at North Salem . May 3d. Enrolled January 13th. at Towners age 32 vet eran discharged June 26th. . Enrolled November 9th. Towners age 30 veteran. N. Mount Verveteran . . 1863. Reynolds. 1862. at Croton Falls. at Croton Falls veteran mustered out with company. . From the Twelfth New York Volunteers. prisoner of Ream's Station died December 4th. 489 18th. Rusco. Sergeant. Robinson. 1865 mustered out with company. 26. 1864. 1862. September 8th. Henry. 3710 Ohio Avenue. Norman B. Oceanic. 1861. . . Transferred December 8th. Quick.COMPANY wounded June . May 3d. Joseph W. 1864. . Penny. . 1861. discharged April llth. Edwin. . at New York age 32 wounded April 2d. Enrolled September 1st at South East age 32 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. veteran . 1861. 1861. 1861 mustered out with company. wounded May 6th. and Mo. Y. at New York age 23 dis charged February llth. . N. 1861.

tered out with company. 1865. Enrolled August bury. . Enrolled October 7th. Corporal. . Enrolled September 6th. 1865. N. mus Enrolled August 28th. Secor. 1862. Long Island City. Theodore S. at Bedford age 25 dis Secor. Enrolled March 28th. 1865. Y. George H. age 17 veteran mustered out with company. Rodney. tered out with company. Leonard H. N. Corporal. Enrolled January 31st. age discharged November 19th. 1861. age 14 . 1862. at Patterson age 40 dis Shears. Drummer. Stowell. StllL Leonard H. Swords. mustered Enrolled March 28th. .. A. died at Salis . John B. Clark. Y. at South East Still. Falls . Shean. Seaman. 77. 1864. . Enrolled February 8th. by General Orders No. . at New York. out with company. Katonah. Musician. Enrolled August 29th at North Salem out June 3d.. 1864. Jacob. 1862. at Lewisborough died of wounds received April 2d. as drummer . charged November 20th. Genoa. died. . Joseph S. . N. mustered out with company. April 16th. 1865. Emerson M. charged by virtue of General Orders No. N. May 3d. in Brooklyn Shield. O. Pleasantville. Smith. Y. 1865. Y. Swartz.490 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. mustered * . December 12th. Enrolled August 8. Clark E. George H. Brewster's. James. . 1862 Sears. Y. Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth mus Scott. David A. Smith. Nyack... mustered out June 9th. Wagoner. 1862. 1862. John O. 1862. Enrolled August 30th. James IT while prisoner of war. Jehial. . George B. . 18 . 1862. . William E. N. Y. 30th. . at New York age 19 Russell. at Bedford age 44 discharged See. 1865. . 26. . Transferred from One Hundred and Elev enth mustered out with company. Smith. . February 28th. Enrolled January 3d. Jae. Shurger. 1862 . Sing Sing. 1862. at Fort Snyder. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh . 1862. Enrolled September llth. Corporal. at Croton See. G. at Emory Hospital. H. James H.. Md. Suttou. Corporal. . 1864. . . Enrolled August 25th. 1862 age 27 dis charged by expiration of service. N.

. G. 1865. 1864 veteran discharged July 7th. 1861. Enrolled September 21st. Enrolled September 18th. . Enrolled December 10th. Enrolled October 3d. Townsend. missing August 25th. William B. Hamilton. 1865. at Bedford mustered out June 3d. 1862. Enrolled October llth. New York. 1861. Enrolled August 13th. Albert. William H. A. Starr V. V. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh dis charged September 9th. 1862. at Croton Falls age 40 dis charged November 24th. Enrolled December 30th. Henry V. Isaac N. at Bedford age 34. Enrolled August 20th. 1861 age 19 died November Sloate.. . Enrolled October 25th. . at Schenectady age 18 1st. at New York 1st. 7th. May 3d. . March 20th. 1862. at Golden 's Bridge. . . Discharged by General Orders No. . Turk. G. . Ream's Station. Bounded April 2d. Sergeant. 1865. 1861. Brewster's. Eugene N. 1862. . Y. 1889. 1861. at Croton Falls -discharged .COMPANY A. Joseph H. . John. Sutler. age 34 . . Isaac S. Obed P. Tryon. Tucker. . Sprague. Justus. age 44 . age 21 . 1864. at Pawling age 44 veteran discharged January 2d. 1862 age 31 prisoner of war Scott. Enrolled January 24th. N. at Field Hospital. Falls veteran mustered out with company. . Discharged by General Orders No. 1861. Totten. Brewster's. Enrolled December 10th. . Sprague. . at South East age 27 discharged by virtue of General Orders No. Timerson. William H. 26. Totten. Augustus. Daniel . captured at Enrolled December 7th. at Pawling age 19 . . age . Talmadge. 1861. 77. 491 Smith. Alonzo. . Enrolled August 30th. . 26th. N. O. Gilbert. at Croton Totten. Harrison. Enrolled October 7th. 77. Joseph. Smith. at Pawling . at Fort Richardson. 1861. . 1862. . . Enrolled at Brewster's. Augustus. . Terrell. 1862. . September 16th. at Brewster's age 21. A. 1864 . discharged April 1865. First Sergeant. 1863. . Teed. at Croton Falls age 18 Deep Bottom. 26. age 18 age 43 . Enrolled August 29th. 1865 died April 10th. Hope age 21 discharged June 3d by virtue of General Orders No. Sheppard. August 18th. . at Croton Falls . died July Thomas. at Annapolis after parole. at Mt. died October . 1861. . Enrolled January 4th. Y. City Point. 1865. . 1863 age 19 wounded June 18th. 1865 veteran mustered out with company. at Enrolled December 10th. Enrolled August 25th. 1864 mustered out with company. . Corporal. February 24th. William. Enrolled August 22d. 208 East Thirty-fourth Street. . 26. discharged by expiration of service. N. 1862. . fiince Enrolled at Albany. . Stanley. 1861. 1864. 1861. 1864. 1861. wounded 1865. 1864. O. Thomas. Enrolled October 15th. May 3d.. . at Croton Falls . . November 19th. Y. Townsend. 1861 age 44. May 3d. Totten. Teed. 1865. at Bedford age 18 dis charged by virtue of General Orders No. David H. . 1862. Corporal. Edward A. Sweetman. .

Moses J. May 3d. 1865. at Patterson age 28 prisoner of war at Ream's Station. 1861 . tered out with Enrolled September 8th. 1864.. 1861. . Enrolled September 24th. N. . at New York age 43 trans Williams. Winans. 1861. . Enrolled December 10th. Theo'dore F. 1862.. at Patterson. Wallace. Corporal. Totten. . . John S. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mus company. Enrolled March 15th. C. Washburn. John B. Y. Enrolled prisoner of war at Ream's Station. at Brewster's veteran mustered out with company. 1861. Washington. veteran . Corporal. . Transferred from One Hundred and Twenty-sixth. N. Enrolled December 25th. at Lewisborough . at Pawling . in New York age 23 dis . Yonkers. Merritt. Y. at Brewster's age 20 mustered out September 29th. Wilson. William H. July 29th. Schenectady. Daniel. Enrolled October 17th. Artillery. 1864 . . Townsend. First Rhode Island Light wounded at Ream's Station . Enrolled November 12th. . Wilson. 1862. during a part of the campaign of 1864 mustered out by virtue of General Orders No. Enrolled December 31st. HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. Charles E. May 3d-. 1865. Anthony. Discharged by expiration of service. Henry. . Corporal. lost discharged January 16th. at Lewisborough . Y. John S. at New York. Chauncey W. age 21 was on detached service with Battery B. 1864. Wallard. 1864. age 28 at .492 22 . 1862. out with company. . a leg June 18th. . Wixon. Enrolled September 8th. wounded May 6th. N. George W. . . Y. Va. at Croton Falls age 21 . 1861. mustered Whitmore. Enrolled December 10th. Enrolled August 5th. . N. 1865. Wagner. William. . at Pawling. Wilson. Enrolled September 2d. . by expiration of service. Enrolled August 30th. 1861. mustered out on expiration of term. Enrolled January 9th. N. February 25th. Enrolled March 25th. prisoner of war at Ream's Station. veteran. Wilcox. killed in action. 1862. Mattituck. Vanderburg. Y.. age 25 August 23d. 1862. at Harewood Hospital. Corporal. Wright. . mustered out on expiration of term. Isaac S. N. Goshen. at New York . 1862. Enrolled December 25th. mustered out by expiration of service. at Pawling age 26 . died July 18th. Washburne. Van Kerren. Jacob. Paw . ling August 19th. 1861. . of wounds received August 23d. 26. . from sunstroke on march. . ferred to V. Nyack. age 19 . Sergeant. David A. George S. Trowbridge. . Alonzo. 1862. . charged by virtue of General Orders No. John W. N. . October 13th. 1864. . Sergeant. Boutonville. . 1865. 186 1 veteran killed in Alexandria. Winans. Enrolled August 13th. 1864. Webb. 1864 veteran. . Enrolled November 12th. 26.. Elijah. Wright. at New York age 24 died August 28th. 1864 age 33 1864. 1861. age 25 veteran mustered out with company. . .. 1861. at Schenectady veteran mustered out with company. Elbert B. Y. Y. . Enrolled August 29th. George. . 1861. R.. Wixon. 1865. 1861. at Ramapo age 20 discharged December 27th.

Chas. . Sergt. Enrolled Wixon. 1861. 45. Moses. . at Enrolled New York . tember 6th. mustered out with company. Star V. Corporal. B. age 18 . prisoner at Ream's Station.COMPANY Warren. James. mustered out February 4th. Albert S.. 2. L L. . Waters. Corpl. at New York mustered out December age 26 27th. S. Anthony Wallard. 1864. A. 8. Wixon. Wright. Moses J. W. 1863 age 24 mustered out June 10th. Sylvester B. Enrolled De cember 12th. on expiration of term. . E. Young. 12th. De . at Brewster's age 21 . William. Washburn. on expiration of term. Totten. James A. Lieut. Sergt. J. 1861. ft 3. . Weeks. Enrolled September 24th at Croton Falls discharged June 14th. 1862. E. age 22 . cember age 28. 1861. age 23. at New York Weeks. December 19th. 1861. 4. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh . Nixon. 1864. 493 Enrolled March 17th. 6. Gallahne. Enrolled December 28th. 1865. at Bedford . George R. Enrolled Sep Winn. 1865. . .

1861 age 21 tered out with company. Porter. Andrus. Roxbury. 8. Y. Enrolled October 26th. 1864. Enrolled December 27th. tered out with company. mus mus . Enrolled January 4th. 1861. More. Y. at Moresville mustered out October 29th. Enrolled January 4th. . 1864. 1864. Y. J. Enrolled October 18th. . Apjohn. Isaac McKeever. James Barr. at Cairo veteran .. Sergeant. Blake. Jacob Snyder. at Brooklyn age 21 died August 25th. 4 and Geo. Grand Gorge. 1. Ames. S. Francis C. 21 Appleford. 2. 5. N. Enrolled September 23d. Henry L. George. A. K . Thaddeus Laymon. 1864 (privates shot off cut his own throat). James 9. George L. Post-office address. 5. Samuel J. L. Robert D. 1861. ACKER. . 6. Post-office address. 7. ' age . . at Jamaica. First Serg't 6. Thomas. . Lieut. . N.494 COMPANY B 4. 1862 killed June 18th. Andrus. J. mustered out with company. 1864. . 3. .

Bowman. . . Wallace. Banker. mustered out age 19 May 14th. 1861. enth . 1864.. Corporal. Enrolled January 5th. . Charles H. . at Brooklyn age 24. N. at Hurley. . 1861 age 20 served three term expired November 10th. . Enrolled February 24th. mustered out August 2d. 1861. at Shandaken mustered out with Blair. Andrew H. Y. n. Samuel. at Catskill age 23 mustered out with company. 25th Laban S. age 18 495 . 1864 1864. Enrolled February 13th. December 25th. 1861. John. died in Salisbury. 1864. E. Peter. 1861 mustered out January 3d. Busher. 1862 age 25 taken prisoner August 25th. Bowman. Enrolled October 21st. 1864 died at Camp Parole. Reuben. 1864. 1864. 1864 . . Charles M. Enrolled January 14th. . N. Beebee. company. Enrolled September 25th. Briody. Brendle. 25th. . Enrolled September 24th. Veteran Volunteer. Richmond County. Enrolled December 22d. Bennett. Postoffice address. James L. mustered out with company. Milo. captured October 30th. Enrolled January 4th. age 20 Died in Salisbury. Enrolled October 15th. . Lewis. 1864. 1864 rejoined company and mustered out June 3d. discharged August 4th. 1863 died in Salis March 3d. at West Troy . at Brooklyn wounded June . tured August 25th. Charles. cap . One Hundred and Eleventh Volunteers prisoner August 25th. age 40 . 1864. Enrolled November llth. at Brooklyn . 1864. Bullis. 1864 Batty. at Staten Island Bailey. Transferred from Company . N. Dry Brook. bury. . Enrolled December 27th. leg amputated discharged January 7th. Bowers. 1864. 1865. 1864. Transferred from Company G. November 3d. 1861. . James. at Brooklyn . Bear. John. 1863 age 22 died in hospital . November.COMPANY Brandow. . Ralph. . One Hundred and Eleventh . . . 1865. 1865. 1862. Albert. 1865. B. . Adolphus. veteran captured at Ream's Station August 25th. November 28th. . 1865. Brown. 1861. Bacon. Enrolled January 30th. Castleton. Brandon. 1861 . . . 1864 veteran. 1865. One Hundred and Elev . 1864 age 38 mustered out with company. Y. Philip. Philip. . Babbitt. at Gilboa died in Salisbury. age 27 . Enrolled December 27th. Bennett. Transferred from Company E. Y. . Enrolled January 9th. age 21 . Enrolled December 20th. Brinkman. . . mus New York June Barker. 1862. . Enrolled August 14th. 1864 age 24 captured August mustered out June 12th. Edwin H. George N. Bertrand. 18th. . .issing at Ream's Station. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. . Enrolled December 29th. . William E. years 1865. . Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. Brown. 1864. Enrolled tered out September 26th. Ulster County. Frederic.

He was Fort Edward and Eastman's College. at New York age 33. 1863. . charged February 25th. . wounded June Enrolled October 15th. . at New York mustered out with company. 22d. which resulted in such debility that he was discharged August 12th. New York Cronenberger. at New York age mustered out June 3d. at Gilboa. at Moresville died at Fort DeKalb. Clark. at Portland. Enrolled December 29th. 1862. Barr. John. and the Department of the Gulf. 1861. . Louis F. Clair. . . Cross. 1st. 1862. . 1865. Y. He reenlisted New York up Red Alex. 1861 age 21 mustered out October 14th. 1864. Enrolled September 28th. 1865.496 Batters. 1865. Poughkeepsie. politics. 1862. 1862. LIGHT. He charged November 8th. Corporal. . James. X. Y. . Enrolled November 1st. Alexander E. 1864. . John. Barr. July 26th. and merchandise. 1862 age 23 mustered out June 3d. Enrolled August 16th. HEAVY GUNS AND Thomas. 1863. at Schenectady . Borthwick. Post-office address. Silvester. N. 1865. where he re E Borthwick. harie County. dis Clark. 1861. in the Second Veteran Cavalry and saw service in Virginia River. Transferred from Company K. Enrolled August 18th. Joseph. Since the war he has been engaged in mining. age . Y. . Enrolled September mustered out June 3d. 1865. age 25 . One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. Niel. 1864 Enrolled August 16th. 1845. Conklin. 1863 age 23. Brooklyn. N. . Patrick. October 1st. at mustered out June 3d. 1864. sides. Drummer. Y. 1861. Schoeducated at Institute. Enrolled September 18th. N. Station . at Brooklyn age 25. Sergeant. William. Clapper. Sergeant. November 28th. James. 1. at Broome. 1865. 1864 . 1864 mustered out June 3d. 1862 captured at Ream's died in Salisbury. Thomas J. and at Mobile. He was dis son. Enrolled December 14th. Was born February Charlotteville. at Camp son. Colgan.. wounded June 18th. 18 Brandow. 1864. Veteran. 1865. Bossom. Robert H. N. He is married and has one belongs to G. Enrolled January 5th. at New York wounded June 18th. enlisted He November 6th. Wilson. Burke. . 1861. R. . Post No. . . Simon. First Sergeant. Carroll. . and was with the until taken with typhoid fever at Fort De- Adamcompany Kalb. Enrolled October 10th. Sergeant. Niagara County.. at Moresville. . Musician. Enrolled December 29th. A. Enrolled December 27th. Ore. Martin.. Curtis. at Brooklyn age 39 mus tered out with company. 1864. John. . 1862. Coney. 18th. Y. Sergeant. Enrolled August 18th. 22 . . Connor. 1864.

David A. Homer. Ga. Enrolled October 22d. Post-office address. New York. Post-office address. Daley. . De Silva. 1864 . 25th. Transferred from One Hundred and Eleventh mus January llth. Tioga County. . 1862 age 22 taken prisoner August Post-office address. Decker. at Gilboa age 18 veter an mustered out with company. Owego. 1864. 1863 age 22 mustered out with company. 1864. age 21 . trans Navy. 1861. Delaware County. Enrolled August 20th. . . at Staten Island . . N. 1864 . N. prisoner August 25th. . Enrolled February llth. Daniel D. veteran . Joshua P. mustered out with company. Erickson. Enrolled January 5th. 1864 . at Copake. age 21 . . J. Enrolled December 17th. 523 8th Ave. at Brooklyn . enth. Transferred from Company G. Y. . 1864. at Brooklyn died on Stateni Calkener. Y. Henry. rolled February 12th. March 28th. Greene County. Enrolled March 3d. Hudson. Adelbert E. Disten. 531 W. at Germantown Post-office address. James. 1865. 1864 died in Salisbury Prison. . 1864.. Egnor. 1861. Troy. Street. 17th. discharged July Dwyer. tered out . 1864. 1861. at Staten Island age mustered out December 16th. De Silva. age 22 . 1865. . at Brooklyn discharged May 12th. Driggs. . 1865. . Y. 1864. Cunningham. Enrolled September 23d. December 29th. 6th. at Elmira. N. 1862.COMPANY B. Y. . ferred to the Enrolled January 1st. 1862. Sullivan County. Enrolled December 26th. Erickson. age 25 . Y. at New York mustered out June 3d. mustered out with company. January 22d. at Gilboa mustered out December 5th. 1866. Enrolled December 17th. Y. Y. May 27th. . at Gilboa age 19 mustered out with company. 1864 died at home. New York. Dibble. Henry A. 1864. Enrolled January 26th. . . Andes. Bernard. Almeron.ames S. Patrick. Dawson. by War Department. . 21st. N. Enrolled December 24th. Veteran from Sixth New York Volunteers. . Nathan A. N. Post-office address. Earl 8. 1863 Reserve Corps April 27th. N. N. 1861. at Cairo discharged Dean. Enrolled December 29th. 1862. 39 Duncan. Post-office address. veteran captured at the North Anna River. David. 1861. June 18th. One Hundred and Eleventh wounded discharged June 14th. 1861. Charles T>.. Gilboa. Island. age 85 . Davis. One Hundred and Elev Collins. . En . age 44 . Peter. transferred to Veteran . Peter. Post-office address. at Brooklyn 9th. Enrolled January 21st. : Enrolled January 2d. Cummings. Transferred from Company E. William. 1864.. 1864. discharged December 1864. 1864. Darling. . 1864 died at Augusta. Y. N. Enrolled August 19th. Barney. Post-office address. 1861. 1865. Enrolled October 19th. 497 . . 1865. 1864 age 33 discharged October Castile. Corporal. . Coom. 24th mustered out June 3d. 1865. Enrolled January 18th. Dante. William E. Cairo. . Thomas. . May 1864. Eldred. Enrolled September 27th. .

. Enrolled January 13th. Enrolled November 2d. Greenwalt. 1862. Gannon. Charles. 1865. Patrick. July 18th. Esterbrook. Enrolled January 28th. 21st. Gallagher. . Gilboa. Corporal. Flannelly. Enrolled January 16th. John. Enrolled August 21st. John. 1864. 1865. . Veteran Volunteer. Fetherson. Andrew J. Andrew. Post-office address. George. Ellis. 1865. Fullington. .. New Brighton. last heard Enrolled February 4th. 1864. 1862. Enrolled November 13th. 1864. 1861. . 1864. 1865. Enrolled Felch. 1864. . charged August 29th. at -wounded June 18th.498 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. at New York age 30. . George. mustered out with company. mus Finch. Corporal. New Brighton. Enrolled March 4th. age 23 . mustered out January 23d. . 1862 age 25 discharged Feb ruary 18th. David. at Greenport . . at New York age 21. : age 40 . three years . 1861 age 21 veteran mustered out with company. at New York age 24 taken prisoner August 25th. . Y. 1862. . at New York age 20. N. Gannon. Y. at New York age 35. Simon. N. New York . Y. Enrolled January 18th. 1863. Enrolled January of in hospital. Peter. Enrolled August 18th. Enrolled September 23d. Amos. Enrolled November llth. . June 4th. 1861. at Brooklyn age 30 . Timothy. 1864. Finnerty. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. at Albany age 20 died in Freeze. 1864. Fanning. . Schoharie. . at Tarrytown . Fickle. tered out with company. . 1864. Gordon. at Castleton oner at Ream's Station mustered out June 29th. Arthur H. at New York age 27 died on furlough December llth. Enrolled December 30th. Transferred from Company I. Thomas A. 1864 mustered out June 20th. Fleming. at New York . Ford. Enrolled January 19th. . tered out at New Lebanon age 30 mus June 6th.1864. at East Durham served . age 18 . Enrolled August 15th. . Cal. mustered out with company. in prison. . Enrolled September 23d. 1864 mustered out with company. died December 10th. 1863. . John. Enrolled August 26th. 1865. age 22 . Ford. 1862. James. Enrolled February 10th. age 18 . Enrolled March 4th. . 1864. at Gilboa age 20 died . pris Gardener. . Alfred. William C. 1862. Stephen. at Shandaken age 38 . 1865. Staten Island. N. . . . . 1864. John. Furrey. Enrolled July 27th. discharged January 8th. 1864. 1864. Benjamin. 1864 age 25. : . Finn. James B. Post-office address. 1862. Gorman. Enrolled March 12th. Los Angeles. Elmer. John. Enrolled August 14th. at Kortright age 18 mustered out with company. Levi. 1864. 1864. 1865. Post-office address. Fox. . . at Gilboa age 28 . Samuel. March 5th. Enrolled September 28th. Post-office address. Staten Island. N. . Farquher. Y. . 1864. term expired . at New York age 27 dis charged December 9th. 1863. Fitzpatrick. . at Copake age 43 died at Fort Marcy June 8th. 1861. . Guilde. at New York dis . Salisbury Prison.

Louis J. Byron. Y. Hoagland. Roscoe. Enrolled October 31st. . Michael. at Staten Island an mustered out with company. Hanlon. Island veteran age 21. veter . Patrick. One Hundred and Elev . at Staten . Transferred from Company E. . Edward. John F. 1864. . 1862. . June 4th. Harrington. Harney. Hunt. One Hundred and Elev enth New York Volunteers June 4th. . Eleventh New York J. at Gilboa. Enrolled September 25th. Enrolled December 29th. 1864. Franklin. at Stamford age 18. at Troy age 36. . Enrolled January 25th. Y. James. Resides in Brooklyn. 1861. Enrolled November llth. . mustered out with company. October 30th. at Ashland. 1862. Drummer. Hay. Howard. 1865 mustered out with company. at Brooklyn age 25. 1864. June 4th. Transferred from Company E. Joseph. 1865 mustered out with company. Mo. Hay. Y. 1864. Enrolled January 19th. James. 1861. Enrolled December 17th. New York Volunteers. 1864 . enth New York Volunteers. Chickapee Falls. at New York died in . 1865 mustered out with company. Heine. 1861. N. . James. Henry. Enrolled August 23d. Jefferson. Humphries. 1864. June 4th. enth New York Volunteers. 1863. N. Enrolled December 27th. Alden M. One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers. Hubbell. Post-office address. . at Albany age 18 taken prisoner at Ream's Station mustered out with company. Transferred from Company K. tered out October 5th. 1864. . 1864. Perry. mus Gross. Enrolled January 18th. in L. : . 1864. Y. tered out October 5th. prisoner August 25th. Robert. Post- office address. Drummer. Gilboa.. November 27th. Post-office address. . Died in Salisbury Prison. Edward. at Brooklyn age 22. mustered out with company. 1864. Salisbury Prison. Lyman. Hoagland. 1865. . Delaware County. William. at Brooklyn age 28 . Halleck. 1861. at Brooklyn age 25. Transferred from Company I. Hoyt. age 19 taken prisoner August 25th. 1864. mustered out with company. Helfman. 1861. N. One Hundred and Elev . 1864. Enrolled September 20th. Enrolled January 12th. June 5th. Enrolled January 16th. Volunteers. Enrolled September 28th. 21st. at Shandaken age 23 . 1863. Mustered in February 9th. . Kansas City. at New York age 20 . . 1864. Enrolled September 25th. . Stamford. Enrolled January 5th. 1864. N. N. June 4th. 1865 mustered out with company. Sergeant. 1861. Jefferson. . Edward H.COMPANY B. Hayes. One Hundred and Eleventh . Transferred from . Mass. Hartnut. Transferred from Company G. Haurer. 1864. George. Y. at Brooklyn age 20 Getty. Genoa. Enrolled September 28th. Goglns. 1864 mustered out September 30th. Gow. Solon D. 499 . Post-office address. mus Grove. . Hubbell. and captured near Petersburg . . at Schenectady died August camp. John H. 1861. . at Copake age 18. 1865. at Gilboa age 21 mus Harris. Enrolled December 21st. . at Brooklyn age 18 tered out October 5th. Hartwell. 1861. Company I. One Hundred and .

500 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1861. Enrolled August 13th. Pa. 1865 mustered out with company. address. Joseph. Athens. . June 4th. at age 34. 1862. Jeremiah. John. Enrolled September 28th. George. William H. Thomas. 1862. 1863. at Conesville served three years term expired mustered out January 3d. 1865 captured near Salisbury October 30th. prisoner August 25th. Enrolled August 15th. Va. I. 1865. . Johnson. Lewis. June 4th. . . 1865 Kearns. at Shandaken age 22 mus Post-office address. captured at Ream's Station. Kennedy. 1864. age 18 . Volunteers dis New York age 24 . John. 1864. . Thomas. Enrolled January 13th. address. . 1865 mustered out with company. . One Hundred and Eleventh mustered out with company. at Brooklyn Kays. Kelly. Johnson. veteran Jenkins. Harvey. mustered out May 24th. . Enrolled December 16th. Neb. One Hundred and Eleventh war October 30th. Enrolled January 28th. . . Enrolled October 1st. 1864. at Copake age 44 mustered out June 6th. at Brooklyn ferred September 22d. at East Durham age 22 prisoner at Ream's Station veteran mustered out June 9th. One Hundred and Eleventh . Y. . Kingsley. New York York. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. Vernon. . 1863. at Moresville . 1861. tered out June 10th. Knapp. Hyatt. June Transferred from Company Johnson. Enrolled January 19th. June 4th. John L. December 23d. Enrolled March 18th. Transferred from Company E. . . 1865. 1861. Romantus. E. Greenville. at West Troy age 40. . Charles. New York Volunteers. Kolscb. Enrolled September 29th. Lane. . June 4th. 1865 G. Transferred from Company . N. mustered out with company.. . Healy. June 9th. 1861. . Enrolled December 21st. Hitchcock. 4th. 1864. 1864. at Fort Ethan Allen. trans from Company A. 1865. Hadden. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. . Levi. Alfred G. Walter 8. 1861. Enrolled August 28th. charged July 3d. 1865. Sergeant. at New York age 24 served three years term expired mustered out June 6th. . . Enrolled January 2d. at New York discharged . . 1864. Post office . 1861. New York Volunteers. Lyman. June 4th. 1864. 1864. Jayner. 1865. Died in Salisbury Prison. Hitchcock. 1864. Enrolled Kelly. Hay. 1865. June 4th. Kennedy. Lake. Thomas. . Edward. William. Rufus. 1865. Enrolled October 21st. Hay. Transferred from Company G. Patrick. Bradford County. at Gilboa age 23 served three years term expired Post-office mustered out October 5th. 1862. Transferred age 40 . . New York . discharged April llth. New York Volunteers. 1863. . Enrolled September 28th. . . 1864. 1862. at . Transferred from Company . 1862. at Gilboa age 21 mus tered out October 5th. Enrolled October 28th. Transferred from Company G. Falls City. 1865 prisoner of Kenyon. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. 1865. . Geemale. . . 1865. Charles. at New Kinsey. at New York age 35 .

transferred May Landrush.. 1865. at Mount Pleasant age 25 mustered out with company. Enrolled September 3d. Landrush. 1864 mustered out November 1st. at Albany mustered Lee. 1861. . Thaddeus. at Brooklyn age 31 mustered out with company. Corporal. . at Blenheim age 22 pris . N. Transferred from Company and Eleventh New York Volunteers. Y. Enrolled October 21st. . in Salisbury Prison. Y. N. 1865 mustered out with company. D. 1864. Lethed. June 4th. . Mangan. at New York age 21. Schoharie County. at New York age 30. Lemlily. Franklin W. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. at New York age 29 mustered out June 5th. Enrolled November llth. at Gilboa age 20. 1864. . James A. Mangle. Anthony. One Hundred and Elev Lester. age 18 Lemlily. as prisoner of war. Enrolled January 8th. Enrolled January 25th. . Samuel. Enrolled October 19th. Lowry. veteran captured at Ream's Station. August 14th. at Conesville mustered out January 3d. Y. June 4th. Transferred. Enrolled September 23d. Winslow P. Mallen. Enrolled January 14th. 1865 discharged August . 1863. 1865. Lloyd. Enrolled January 25th. Post-office address. 1st. reported sick on muster out of company. 1865. Enrolled October 23d. Enrolled October 28th. Middleburgh. . fifth Transferred from . . . Magle. 1861. Mackey. John. . . 1863. 1865. at Staten Island age 27 veteran mustered out with company. Lumbard. N. . . 1865. age 23. 1864. . Robert. at Brooklyn age 23 prisoner August 25th. . Y. 1865. 1864. John. . Bernard. at Gilboa . at Blenheim age 18 mus tered out November 2d. Enrolled October 20th. 501 . Wayne M. Lemlily. 24th. Logan. at Gilboa veteran discharged September 26th. at New York age 25 .COMPANY B. Francis G. Company D. . Y. Ashland. 1865. Lawyer. 1861. Patrick. Enrolled October 7th. George E. Post-office address. . One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers. Mangan. . . Gilboa. One Hundred and TwentyI. 1864 mustered out July 26th. . . Layman. Joel B. at mustered out September 26th. at Hurley . Michael. Martin. . Transferred from Company I. Enrolled September 23d. Masterson. 1861. Enrolled December 29th. Daniel I. Transferred from Company D. . June 4th. Lawrence. 1864. One Hun dred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. 1865. age 23 . George. 1861. Enrolled October 23d. Transferred from Company G. enth New York Volunteers. 1865. 1864. . Anthony. James. June 5th. at Gilboa veteran mustered out with company. Brooklyn. oner August 25th. Scotland . 1861. Corporal. Enrolled December 27th. Enrolled December 22d. from Company 1865 . 1862. 1865. Francis. 1861. Thomas G. Y. New York Volunteers discharged October 21st. 1862. Mackeys. New . . Post-office address. died Lutes. age 36 out June 3d. . John.Martin. age 18 . N. . veteran . N. 1864. . Morris. 1661. Meagher. Vaultem. Enrolled October 15th. at Gilboa. 1861. Matthew. to the navy. 1861. 1864. . 1861. June 4th. One Hundred age 26 . N.

1865. Enrolled January 4th. Murphy. 1865. 1864. One Hun dred and Twenty-fifth New York Volunteers. Philip. . P. Enrolled August 27th. . . 18th. John C. McCarthy. age 21 . 1865. 1863. at Staten Island age . as prisoner of war. at Brooklyn age 40. June 4th. died July 20th. William. 1864. McAdam. at New York age 21. mustered out July 24th. Y. Enrolled August 18th. 1864. Sergeant. discharged May 17th. Morehouse. 1861. Post-office address. 1862. pany. William. 1862. 297 Spring Street. etc. James. Enrolled August 14th. . Sergeant. Enrolled January 18th. Post-office address. at New York veteran mustered out with company. Enrolled December 19th 1861. . . . 20 . . Grand Gorge. 1862.502 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 1861. . 3d or November 9th. . 1865 reported absent on sick list on muster out of company. Joseph D. at Conesville veteran September 26th. Thomas. Moon. at Staten Island age 18 veteran mustered out with company. William. at New York age 21. Mosher. Barney. . . at New York age 24 mustered out June 3d. N. Luman D. . 1862. 1861. Transferred from Company I. Edward. 1861. Mayham. 1865 mustered out with com . and Eleventh New York Volunteers. Enrolled March 15th. wounded June Enrolled December 10th. Enrolled November 1st. MrAvoy. at Gilboa age 24 veter an mustered out with company. One Hundred and Twenty -fifth New York Volunteers. 1862. . . at New York age 24 mustered out June 3d. Enrolled October 21st. . Malcolm M. mustered out with company.. . Y. McHugh. 1861. 1861. 1862. at Fort Marcy wounded June 18th. . Alanson E. at Brooklyn age 42. . 1864. Corporal. Mullen. . 1863. 1865. Enrolled January 13th. killed June 18th. New York. since June 21st. at Staten Island age 45 . Myers. . 1865 mustered out with company. 1864. by sharpshooters. 1864. Enrolled October 3d. age 24 . at Albany age 36 . One Hundred Miller. McKeever. . . . . at New York age 19 Mattice. Clark. 1864. Enrolled December 26th. McGinnis. . Enrolled December 27th. at Ashland. 1862. . . at New York age 26 prisoner August 25th. . Isaac. Hugh. 1861. Enrolled January 21st. Montague. Marsh. . 1862. veteran prisoner. James. . . Transferred from Company H. 1864. Enrolled December 19th. Francis. Enrolled December 22d. mustered out with company. at Germantown age 22 . R. . .. 1864 mustered out with company. R. McLean. Enrolled January 3d. . Matthews. . at New York age 21 mustered out with company. at West Troy age 21 . Murphy. at New York. John. Transferred. McCormick. at New York killed October . June 5th. Murphy. Enrolled August 14th. from Miley. N. 1864 Mullen. T. Enrolled December 17th. . Thomas C. Alonzo. . 1864. June 5th. at Staten Island died Mosher. 1863. October 6th. Company D. Martin. Patrick. John. Enrolled December 27th. Enrolled October 19th.

Enrolled November 14th. Wm. . . at Hiram T. M. Enrolled January 29th. . . Albert. First . . at Brooklyn age 26 en transferred May 1st. Oakley. Enrolled October 22d. June 5th. ville Died since the war. . One Hundred and . N. . 1865. Gilboa. Y. at New York . William J.COMPANY Murphy. Sergeant. Richland. Corporal.. fifth New York Volunteers. Joseph. Post-office address. 1864 mustered out June 16th. at New York taken prisoner August 25th. Transferred from Company D. Charles.. at Gilboa age 19 mus tered out September 30th. . William C. Oakley. Del . 1861. Enrolled August 18th. McCarthy. 1862. . Roxbury Enrolled October 17th.. 1864. Sergeant. died. June 4th. South Parks. . Michael. . George W. Enrolled December 19th. 1865 company. 1865 mustered out with company. Dennis. . tober 18th. One Hun New York Volunteers. Oakley.. One Hundred and TwentyPhilo. 1861. mustered out with company. Henry. discharged June 8th. Joseph. . Timothy. N. 1861. McCarty. Post-office address. 1861. A. Polion. Staten Island age 19 Enrolled December 19th. 1864. Jeremiali. . 1864 veteran mustered out with 17th. O'Keefe. at Brooklyn age 32 . at Moresmustered out with veteran age 21 company. 1865. 1861. Volunteers discharged August 12th. 1864. 1864. 1864 mustered out June 3d. 1864. N. Munroe. Oakley. at Staten Island . age 22 . Stuyvesant Falls. 1861. taken . Enrolled tered out with March 3d. 1863. Enrolled March 1st. Stamford. Eri P. at New York . O'Callahan. 1864. Monroe. 1864. at Gilboa . C. Peck. address. J. N. Enrolled September 28th. 1864 mustered out September 30th. Murphy. at Ship Island. Y. Michael. . died in Salisbury Prison. at Sergeant. Enrolled March 15th. Murray. Enrolled December 29th. Transferred from G. listed in the navy age 24 . 9th. . 1865. mus . William dred and Eleventh R. Enrolled January 21st. age 18 . William. age 23 . 1864. 503 Company . at Gilboa age 19 taken Post-office prisoner August 25th. . . discharged July 29th. Transferred from unassigned recruits Second New York Heavy Ar tillery. Y. C. 1865. company. James W. at Gallatin prisoner August 25th. . More. 1861. age 31 . Atlantic County. . Enrolled September 23d. Pierce. Has since veteran . Enrolled October age 24 prisoner Au gust 25th. Transferred from Company D. Enrolled October 31st. B. Michael. aware County. 1864. at New York discharged May . N. Twenty -fifth New York . age 30 mustered out Oc . 1862. mustered out with company. 1864. Porter. 1863. at New York age 26 pris oner mustered out with company. 1864. . Nolan. .

at Gilboa. Rogers. . 1863. at Ghent age mustered out with company. 1864. 1862. I. 1861. Post-office prisoner August 25th. Y. 1861. of Sandwick. 1861. Enrolled October 29th. Schermerhorn. Manorkill. Selleck. 1861. . Enrolled January 13th. Marcus. John. . at Brooklyn Mustered out with company. William. Post-office address. New Lebanon . George. disease. Balti . June 4th. 1864. James. Sturz. Isaac N. Westerville. . Jamestown. HEAVY GUNS AND 25th. Willard. . age 28. Richtmyer. Post-office . age 22. Warren County. . at Brooklyn. Enrolled August 18th.. . William. Ryan. 1865. Sergeant. Roche. 1864. 1864 Rockfeller. Riley. at New York age 24 pris oner August 25th. age 22 . Riley. 1862. Volunteers. more. 18th. Post-office address. killed June Small. Enrolled September 28th. Andrew. Secor. Reuben. 1861. 1864. W. Y. 5th. Enrolled January 4th. 1865 mustered out with company. Enrolled August 23d. N. Enrolled December 22d.. Jacob. Sheridan. Martin. Strack. . at Genesee Falls age 24 Roe. Schermerhorn. . at New York age 34 mustered out June 3d. 1862. 1864. Alexander. Died June New York Harbor. . 1864 LIGHT. 1864. 1865. Enrolled December 21st. Rhodes. N. Sanderson. 1865. age 18 . Richard. Hiram. . Y. . James D. Carl. Mustered out with company. 1861. . 1861. . . mustered out with company. at David's Island. . prisoner August . Enrolled January 29th. Y. N. enth Transferred from Company . at Gilboa veteran mustered out with company. Samuel. 1862. Enrolled December 31st. 1861. Gilboa. 1864. Ouster County. 1863. Martin. . at New York . at Gilboa age 18 . . wounded Enrolled December 31st. Enrolled October 21st. Pa. wounded June 18th. . address. 1865. at West Troy age 35 taken mustered out October 22d. Prink. Md. . Neb. 1862. Hiram. . Grand Valley. 1864. mustered out June 3d. John. . mustered out with company. 1865. at New York mustered out June 3d. 1863. August 23d. Enrolled December 27th. tered out with company. at New York . at Albany age 18 prisoner mustered out with company. 1864. One Hundred and Elev . veteran mustered out September 26th. at West Conesville died at Fort Marcy November 20th. 1863. at New Scotland age 21 Stillwell. Enrolled December 19th. at Staten Island at . Enrolled January 13th. Enrolled September 20th. William F. 86 Collington Ave. . . 1864 mustered out July 6th. in action before Petersburg discharged September 28th. age 26 Richtmyer. New York . N. 1864 mustered out June 23d.504 Pringle. at New York age 29 Pelse. Enrolled September 23d. address. prisoner August 25th. . . at Ghent age 26 mus Rockfeller. Henry T. 1865. Daniel S. 1862. Died at Prattsville. at Conesville age 19 mustered out December 17th. Enrolled January 19th. . 1864 Enrolled November 16th. 20 . died on furlough. Enrolled November 9th. . . Enrolled October 24th. 1864. .

George. East Maine. Conesville.. 605 . 1861. at Enrolled August died in Salisbury 20th. Enrolled September 23d. at . uary John H. 1864. 1863. West Conesville. Enrolled October 20th. Enrolled September . at Blenheim age 23. 1862 (cause. at East Durham age Sinclair. Jacob. . Sergeant. 1862. Schoharie County. 1865. Enrolled January 13th. . 1861. Y. Enrolled September 23d. Michael. Enrolled October 7th. 1862. Enrolled February 2oth. 1864 June 9th. Broome County. Enrolled February 10th. Tompkins. Post-office address. Amos. . West Saxe. Patrick. 1864. Brooklyn age 18. 1865. 1864. Edward. Y.. Shoemaker. at Gilboa Silver. leg amputated . 1862. Y. 1864. N. Steele. Enrolled December 31st. Wis. One Hundred and Eleventh New York Volunteers. Henry Y. at Fulton . 1865. at Albany pris mustered out with company. . Enrolled September 23d. N. Sth. Mendon. Snyder. . Post-office address. 23d. Charles. Postoffice address. . N. 1864. . Y. Post-office address. . Monroe County. Post-office address. John H. Edmund. 1861. Stephen D. 1865. John H. office address. Artificer. William H. . 30th. Snyder. William H. November 16th. age 21 . mustered out September 26th. 1865. Enrolled October Soule. N. Smith. C. New York . Michael. Y. Y. 100 Church St. . June 4th. . at New York age 42. 1861. 1861. Post- West Salem. Shufelt. Ferdinand. 1864. Eau Claire County. 1861. at Ghent age 18 mustered 23 . 1861. . out with company..COMPANY Shaefer. George. PostEnrolled October 23d. Albany. New York Post-office address. Shields. Prison. Transferred from Company G. 1862. mustered out with company. . . Smith. at Ashland age 22 . . office address. N. age 21 taken mustered out prisoner August 25th. New Haven. at Oak Hill discharged January 21st. At Gilboa died in hospital October llth. Henry B. age 25. 1861. Taylor. June 4th. Enrolled December 27th. 1865. . at Milton age 44 mustered out May 18th. . 1862. N. Smith. Enrolled December 27th. discharged Enrolled January 21st. at Gilboa age 23 dis charged July 31st. veteran . Smith. Corporal. Smith. Sergeant. William R. N. B. Jacob J. May . Enrolled January 15th. December 29th. 1864 . One Hundred and Elev Stevens. Stark. . Augusta. veteran wounded June 5th. Saratoga County. at New York age 28. Abram. 1864. Smith. John.. . Charles. discharged February 5th. at Moresville age 26. 1861. 1864 mustered out with company. Snyder. . Enrolled January 13th. Jacob. disability). Conn. . . 1864. oner at Ream's Station . at Brooklyn discharged 2d. Shoemaker. at New York age 19. Enrolled December 14th. at Shandaken age 33 . Corporal. Wis. 1865 mustered out with company. enth New York Volunteers. August 25th. . La Crosse County. at St. at Ghent age 44 wounded . . Enrolled Jan . Enrolled October 31st. Transferred from Company D. 1863. Ballston Spa. 1861.

Til. age 27 missing. John. Timmons. at January 4th. at Gilboa age mustered out with company. 1864. Van Onnan. Shawnee County.. One Hundred and . . at Copake mustered out with company. Enrolled January 29th. 1865 discharged June 15th. Enrolled October 23d. 1864. St. : . Sidney. . Williams. HEAVY GUNS AND Enrolled LIGHT. at New York age 28 mustered out June 3d. 1864. Phelix. . Greene County. Enrolled October 7th. 2332 Chestnut St. D. Sergeant. Post-office address. L. 1862 mustered out June 3d. at Staten Island . New York Kan. Whitman. John H. Volunteers. . Y. 1864. Enrolled February 15th. 1864. enth New York Volunteers. X. June 4th. Eleventh veteran New York Volunteers. 1861. Post-office address. at Ashland age 21 wounded transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps December 2d. N. . Van der Hide. 1865. Van Loan.. at Gilboa age 21 mustered out with company. White. Thomas. Sergeant. January 16th. . One Hundred and . November 22d. Sergeant. William R. John B.. Van Segar. N. Enrolled January 28th. at Brooklyn age 41. Tompkins. mustered out with company. November 10th. Louis. . 1865 discharged June 24th. Oliver. Howard. Enrolled January 4th. James 29 . veteran . White. . 1862. Thomas. Eleventh Transferred from Company A. Wilbur. Enrolled September 23d. . 1861. 1865. 1864 discharged October 10th. Post-office address. 25th. at Gilboa age 21. . Walsh. . Veltman. Albert B. . A. at Brooklyn age 40 . 1864. Burton. 1865. Post-office address. 22 Mark St. Enrolled September 28th. Wakarussa. 1863. Alexander. Enrolled September 24th. at Burlington age 19 . Gilboa. Van Ethan. . Solomon. 1864. at Fort Greble. Chicago. 1861. Hunter. 1863. . . wounded Weller. . Y. John.506 Tyler. 1861. . Enrolled August 27th. Weaver. at Brooklyn age 30 served three years term expired mustered out October 5th. . Trask. 1865. William. at Gilboa age 28.. 1862. at Moresville age 21 . at Fishkill age 21 June 18th. died at Camp Parole. 1864. 1864. at Brooklyn veteran volun . N. . Enrolled October 23d. Enrolled December 24th. teer . 1861. Enrolled January 19th. 1864. 1861. William A. Shandaken . age 44. missing. Post-office address. . Frederick. Mo. Thorpe. died in hospital August 25th. . Y. Michael. Francis B. Young. Post-office address. 1865. at New York age 28 had previously served in Confederate Army. Wakeman. June 5th. . John. C. at Albany . James. Transferred from Company D. Enrolled December 22d. Enrolled December 29th. at Brooklyn age 19 died in Salisbury Prison. Enrolled October 5th. Enrolled November 14th. 1861. Enrolled October 23d. at Moresville age 21 mus tered out October 29th. Enrolled November 9th. 1861. age 19 . C.. wounded June 18 . . . 1864. 1864. Gilboa. 1862. 1864. Frederic. Enrolled January 18th. Enrolled August 5th. Transferred from Company D. Treizise. Veteran. age killed August . 1864. Thompson. Welch. 1864. . . 1865 . Van Loan. age 2a . 1861. died at Staten Island. June 4th. 1861. .. Edmund. . One Hundred and Elev . 18th.

John W. White. . 1864. 1861. 1865 mustered out July 5th. Wright. . at Albany age 37 served one year mustered out June 3d. taken prisoner mustered out June 28th. Weismer. age 24 . Enrolled August 27th. 1861. Y. Y. Weismer. Enrolled December 31st. Sergt. age 20. at age 18 . Wright. 1865. 507 Brooklyn . Joseph. Enrolled September 3d. 1864. Adolph. Enrolled November 14th. N. at Staten Island age 22. Christian. 1863. Wright. June 4th. Discharged (cause. Caleb T. Wohlers. Is now a practising physi cian and located at Grand Gorge. . Quartermaster Sergeant. 1861. Enrolled January 19th. . Thomas. at New York . 1865. age 29 . Enrolled September 25th. . One Hundred and Elev enth New York Volunteers. Malbone. 1865. Nathan M. disability). B. Enrolled October 14th. died March 28th. 1864. Wilcox. Enrolled September 23d. Yonkers. 1861. . Duane L. 1865. at New York age 30 mustered out Gil boa . . at Fort . 1861. Enrolled September 27th. 1863. One Hundred and Elev enth New York Volunteers. 1862. N. Transferred from Company G. 1864 . June 13th. . . November 2d. at New York 25th. John N. . . John N. Wright. . Christian. Alfred. Woolheiser. at Brooklyn age 22 . Williams. .. . at Moresville age 19. 1862. Warren. Wallace. John. 1864.COMPANY Williams. at Gilboa age 21 mus tered out October 5th. C. Wickert.. discharged May 7th. Transferred from Company A. Richard. 1863. 1864. Whitman. Enrolled December 19th. at . Enrolled December 29th. at Copake age 18 mustered out with company. N. Ethan Allen died in Salisbury Prison. 1865. August 1865. June 4th. Radford Street. Enrolled October 31st. George. mus tered out with company.

12. Miller. at Scottsville mustered out with company. T. at Norwich age 18. 4. Peter B. NELSON O. 169 Adams Street. Robinson. Enrolled August 1st. Hugh McPhillipe. . 1864. Phillips. D. 10. at Rochester age 24 mustered out June 5th. at Millen. James M. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Andrew Beattie..508 HEAVY GUNS AND LIGHT. 15. Eli 13. . W. 5. 1. . John W. . George Dcit/. 1862. Dansville. COMPANY C. 5. 15. John F. Ga. 3. captured May 27th. Austin. 11. . T. . 6. 1864. O. 1863. Murray. 10. 12. 2 . 4. . Corporal Ed. . 1862. Sergeant. ABBOTT. Nelson Moore. 9. Andrews. 1. R. 6. Hubbell. Mich. 11. 7. John Dailey. 14. R. C Smith. 8. James F. Toledo. Aldrich. 14. Enrolled December 18th. age Adsit. O. Enrolled July 5th. 9.. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. 2. Anthony. Daniel Torpy. 1865. Nathan J. at North Norwich died October 22d. . John Bradley. 13. 1864 Enrolled January 2d. Austin. Corporal. 8. 2. Dusenbury. Patrick Boyle. Robert A Corey. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery age 31 .

eran . N. Roches Bishop. charged September 12th. 1862. 111. Daniel D. at Hornellsville mustered out with company. Y. . January 12th. Saulsbury. 1865.. James F. Heavy Bloss. 1862. James. at Albion . . Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Billette.. at North Norwich Bissell. 1863. 1861. discharged December 27th. Adams County. at Norwich age 18. . Enrolled June 30th. discharged August 2d. 1865. 1864. . 1865. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. vet mustered out October 5th. . at Norwich Fort Ethan Allen of disease. Bookey. William R. 1861. 1861. Robert. Enrolled July 31st. . 1864 reported to regiment mustered out June 12th. age 25 . May . at Rochester age 25 mus Ballard. 1862. tered out January 17th. 1864. Y. Enrolled December 30th. Beardsley. . at Rochester age 18 died at Saulsbury. Enrolled November 6th. Edgar. at Rochester Bills. 509 . mus Bennett. Transferred from Eighth mustered out with company. wounded in thigh at Petersburg ster. 1862. James. Corporal. . Enrolled November 15th. Enrolled January 2d. Corporal. . 1864. Quincy. ' . Minneapolis. N. at Albion age 42 Ball. captured at Hatcher's Run. ter. Beckwith. Andrew. at Caledonia age 24 dis Artillery . . Enrolled August llth. 1865. discharged August 9th. Enrolled February 15th. Enrolled October 23d. 1861. 1865. Banister. 1862. Artillery . 22 mustered out June oth. at Rochester age 22 Bancroft. 1863. . Richard. Beckwith. Lyman. October 27th. Sergeant. Beard. age 39 . veteran had previously served in Twenty-seventh New York Volun . Minn. . 1864. age 21 . N. . 1865. Bird. Enrolled January 4th. . West . Enrolled June 25th. Transferred from Eighth Bookey. Y. 16th. 1862. Charles. 1862. . Blackwell. dis charged May 2d. 568 Sixth Avenue. . Enrolled August 4th. 1864. 1861. 1862. 1865. 1865 Babcock. Enrolled October 19th. Monroe. at Rochester age 18 . Artillery . Monroe County. . mustered out with company. age 20 teers . 1865. age 80. . at Rochester . Alexander F. Patrick. at Scottsville mustered out with company. Hiram. age 28 age 19 . Henry. Manly. . Barber. Y. Charles. Transferred from Eighth New York age 43 . Blanchard. Cohoes. . at Newstead tered out July 31st. mustered out with company. Enrolled August 5th. Enrolled January 15th. 1862. . Enrolled December 20th. Corporal. Nathan J. at Caledonia age Beattie. . age 21 died at veteran. 1861. Ransom E. mustered out with company. N. . Enrolled December 20th. at Scottsville .. George W. James H. New York Heavy New York Heavy Artillery . Blackburn. died at Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy mustered out with company. Lowry. dis charged March 22d. December 3d. Rochester. Joseph B. . at Oswego age 27 Barry. 1864. Web Enrolled July 29th. .COMPANY C.

510
Bourdon, Benjamin.

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
Oswego
; ;

Enrolled October 19th, 1861, at

Boyle, Patrick. Enrolled December 14th, 1863, at Rochester tered out with company. Chili Station, N. Y.
;

age 18. age 19
;

mus

Brace, George W. Enrolled August 7th, 1862, at Rochester age 26. Bradley, John. Enrolled August 6th, 1862, at Rochester age 32 received gunshot wound at Petersburg, by reason of which was discharged December
; ;

.Y. Albion, Enrolled August 4th, 1862, at Rochester age 40 discharged November 18th, 1862. Caledonia, Livingston County, N. Y. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. Brickins, Thomas. Bright, James. Enrolled January 4th, 1864, at Norwich age 22 captured at Ream's Station died November 29th, 1864, in prison at Salisbury, N. C.

26th, 1864.

N

Brady, Hugh.

;

;

;

;

;

Bronson, Walter D.

Enrolled August 12th, 1862, at Rochester

;

age 21
;

;

transferred July 23d, 1864, to Field and Staff as Sergeant Major.

Brown, David.

Enrolled January 5th, 1864, at Rochester
Scottsville,

;

age 27

mus

N. Y. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artil lery mustered out with company. Bruso, John F. Enrolled October 7th, 1861, at Rochester age 21. Burlew, Uriah D. Enrolled January 23d, 1864, at Prattsburg age 39 mustered out with company. Buunell, Sherman E. Enrolled February 9th, 1864, at Rochester age 22 mustered out with company. Burrows, George. Enrolled December 24th, 1861, at Norwich. Burton, Charles. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery veteran mustered out with company. Byrne, James M. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out September 8th, 1865. died Cain, Peter. Enrolled December 20th, 1861, at Scottsville age 19 June 28th, 1862, in hospital at Fort Corcoran.
tered out with company. Brownell, Congdon C.
; ; ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Campbell, John.
tered out

June

5th, 1865.

Carley, J.

W.

Enrolled August 5th, 1862, at Rochester age 27 mus Jesus Marie, Chihuahua County, Mex. Enrolled October 17th, 1861, at Oswego age 44 discharged
;

;

;

;

September 19th, 1862. Carley, Solomon R.

Watertown, Jefferson County, N. Y.
Enrolled October 22d, 1861, at Oswego
;

age 27

;

died

May

7th, 1865, at City Point, of disease.

Carpenter, Charles. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. Carpenter, George W. Enrolled January llth, 1864, at Jamaica, L. I. age 19 mustered out with company.
;

;

Enrolled August 12th, 1862, at Rochester mustered Case, Schuyler W. out June 5th, 1865. Luther, Lake County, Mich. Enrolled January 4th, 1864, at North Norwich age 21 Case, Truman E. mustered out with company. Norwich, Chenango County, N. Y. Church, Zenas S. Enrolled December 30th, 1861, at Norwich age 23 mustered out June 9th, 1865. Clark, Asa G. Enrolled August 16th, 1862, at Rochester age 25 missing
; ; ;

;

;

;

;

Ream's Station. Clark, Edward. mustered out June
at

5th, 1865.

Enrolled September 5th, 1864, at Cincinnatus age 27 Rummerfield Creek, Bradford County, Pa.
;

;

COMPANY
Clark, Charles E.
10th, 1865.

C.

fill

January

Enrolled January 10th, 1862, at Rochester mustered out Rouseville, Venango County, Pa. Clark, James W. Enrolled December 29th, 1863, at Chili age 23 trans ferred April 24th, 1865, to Second Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps. 164 State
; ; ;

Street, Rochester,

N. Y.
Enrolled September 2d, 1864, at Tully
;

Clark, Johnson.

age 22

;

mustered

out June 3d, 1865.
21
Clark, Sylvester, Artificer. Enrolled August 5th, 1862, at Rochester age reported missing in action August 25th, 1864. Mustered out May 31st, La Crosse, Wis. 1865.
;

;

Enrolled December 26th, 1863, at Webster age 21 mus company. Union Hill, N. Y. Coleman, Henry V. Enrolled February 16th, 1864, at Rochester age 28 mustered out August 26th, 1865. Albion, N. Y. Cook, John. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mus tered out June 23d, 1865. Cook, William H., Jr. Enrolled August 14th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 died at Fort Ethan Allen, October 3d, 1862.

Clow, Charles.

;

;

tered out with

;

;

;

;

;

Coon, Sylvester. Enrolled tered out June 12th, 1865.

August

20th, 1862, at Rochester

;

age 21

;

mus
;

Coon, William G. Enrolled August 20th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 died October 26th, 1862, at Fort Ethan Allen. Cooney, James. Enrolled August 18th, 1862, at Rochester age 30 veter
; ;

;

an

Va., September, 1864. Coppinger, James. Enrolled February 1st, 1862, at Port Richmond age 18. Enrolled January 9th, 1864 Coppinger, Richard. age 21 discharged
;

died at Belle

Isle,

;

;

;

September 27th, 1864. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Corley, John H. mustered out with company. Corey, Robert A. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 23 mus tered out May 19th, 1865. Webster, N. Y. Enrolled October 21st, 1861, at Canasteo age 18 mus Covert, Theodore. tered out October 21st, 1864. Belmont, Alleghany County, N. Y. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Covell, Orrin B. mustered out with company. Cramer, Charles. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company.
; ; ;

;

;

;

;

Crandall, Silas.

Enrolled January 14th, 1864, at Otsego

;

age 18

;

died

February

10th, 1865, at hospital, Annapolis,

Md.
;

Crane, Henry S. Enrolled December 6th, 1861, at Staten Island age 21 captured May 6th, 1864, and released December, 1864, at Charleston mustered out February 20th, 1865. Elizabeth, N. J.
; ;

Transferred from Eighth Curran, George E. mustered out with company. Albion, N. Y.
Curtice, Calvin L.
Curtis,

New York Heavy
;

Artillery

;

William R.

Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 24. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery

June

5th, 1865.
;

Dailey, John. Enrolled December 21st, 1863, at Rochester tered out with company. Rochester, N. Y.

age 18

;

mus

512

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
;

Davis, James 8. Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 tured at Ream's Station died at Salisbury, N. C., November 2d, 1864.
;

;

cap

Dayton,
5th, 1865.

W. H.

Transferred from Eighth

New York Heavy

Artillery

June

Dean, Lucien.

Transferred from Eighth

New York Heavy Artillery mus
; ;

tered out with company.

Dean, Rowe. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 22 in action August, 1864 died at Salisbury, November 10th, 1864. Debeau, James F. Enrolled July 31st, 1862, at Albion age 21 141 Tompkins Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.
; ;

;

captured
veteran.

;

21

Decker, James H. Enrolled November 29th, 1863, mustered out with company. Elizabeth, N. J.
;
;

at

Port Richmond

;

age

Enrolled December 31st, 1863, at Wheatland age 18 cap Deitz, George. tured at Ream's Station 423 South mustered out September 26th, 1865. Division Street, Buffalo, N. Y.
; ;

Delavan, George B. Enrolled June 6th, 1862, at New York. De Wolf, Albert. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out witli company.

;

June

Dillon, Timothy. 5th, 1865.
J.

Enrolled June 20th, 1862, at Rochester

;

mustered out

Doan, John

Enrolled October 29th, 1861, at Rochester

;

age 21.
;

Donielson, Isaac F. Enrolled August 19th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 transferred January 23d, 1865, to Second Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps.

;

Maple Rapids, Clinton County, Mich. Downing, Mark. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery June mustered out with company. 5th, 1865 Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Doyle, Daniel, Sergeant. mustered out with company. Artillery Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Doyle, Thomas. Teteran mustered out with company.
;
;

;

;

21

Duncomb, John, Sergeant. Enrolled January 3d, 1862, at Rochester Union captured August 25th, 1864 confined at Salisbury veteran.
;
; ; ;

;

age

City,

Enrolled December 24th, 1861, at Rochester age 26 mustered out August 2d, 1865. Rochester, N. Y. Eddy, Fidelius. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Sep tember 26th, 1865.
lery

Erie County, Pa. Dusenbury, E. R.

;

Eggleston, Benjamin F. Transferred from Eighth mustered out with company.
;

New York Heavy
;

Artil

Embury,

Philip.

Enrolled July 4th, 1862, at Rochester

age 22

;

discharged

September 27th, 1862.
Etherington, Albert. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Fargo, Jeremiah C. Enrolled August 16th, 1862, at Rochester age 21 mustered out June 3d, 1865.
;

;

;

at Rochester
shal's office

Farwell, George S., Quartermaster Sergeant. Enrolled August 12th, 1862, ; age 23 was on detached duty as search patrol at Provost Mar
;

;

mustered out June

5th,

1865.

North

Chili,

Monroe County,

N. Y.

COMPANY
ville

C.

613

Enrolled October 26th, 1861, at ScottsFitzgerald, Michael, First Sergeant. age 18 mustered out June 5th, 1865.
; ;

Enrolled February 4th, 1862, at Port Richmond charged November 17th, 1862.
Fitzpatrick, John.

;

dis

OFF PICKET.
Sergt. Geo. 8. Farwell.

James Beckwith.

Fitzsimmons, Philip.
died

Enrolled February 10th, 1862, at Port Richmond

;

December

8th, 1864, at hospital, City Point,

Va.

Fitzsimmons, William.

Enrolled January 30th, 1862, at Port

Richmond
;

;

discharged August, 1863. Fosket, Robert M. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at West Bloomfield age 18 was wounded October 18th, 1864 died January 31st, 1865, at Washington,
; ;

D. C.
Transferred from Eighth Foster, Whitaker. mustered out with company.

New York Heavy
;

Artillery
dis

;

Fowler, James S. Enrolled July 24th, 1862, at Rochester age 21 charged October 31st, 1862. Livonia, Livingston County, N. Y. Francis, John R. Enrolled December 5th, 1863, at Scottsville age T mustered out with company. issington Springs, Jerauld County, Dak. Franklin, Burton B. Enrolled September 6th, 1864, at Reading age mustered out June 5th, 1865. Tioga Centre, Tioga County, N. Y. Freeman, William. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age
;
;

25
31

;

W

;

;

;

21

;

missing at Ream's Station August, 1864 discharged May 17th, 1865. Enrolled February 9th, 1864, at Rochester age 19 Fuller, Daniel S. tered out with company. Tekama, Burt County, Neb.
; ;

;

mus

514

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
;

Furman, George T.

Enrolled August 14th, 1862, at Rochester

age 21

;

died January 29th, 1865, at Saulsbuiy. Gardner, Charles S. Enrolled December 28th, 1861, at February 1st, 1864. Gilboa, Schoharie County, N. Y.

Norwich
;

;

discharged
23.

Gibson, Mortimer.

Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester
;

age

Gleason, Frank. Enrolled January 2d, 1862, at Rochester geant Major and transferred to non-commissioned staff.

promoted Ser
;

Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery Gordon, W. H. mustered out with company. Granger, Leman B. Enrolled January 3d, 1862, at Rochester age 18 vet eran reported as missing in action since August, 1864 died at Saulsbury,
;

;

;

;

March
;

21st, 1865.
;

Green, Abner, Sergeant. Enrolled October 18th, 1861, at Mumford age 29 veteran mustered out with company. Oshtemo, Kalamazoo County,
;

Mich.
Green, Isaac B.
tered out

Enrolled August 12th, 1862, at Rochester
Allen's Hill, N. Y.

;

age 24

;

mus
;

Enrolled January 7th, 1864, at West Bloomfield age 19 8. mustered out with company. Greene, Eugene A. Enrolled January llth, 1864, at West Bloomfield age 18 mustered out May 26th, 1865. captured at Ream's Station Honeoye Falls, N. Y. Groesbeck, Dennison E. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 22 transferred to Sixth Veteran Reserve Corps March 30th, 1864. Kalamazoo, Mich. Grow, William. Enrolled October 18th, 1861, at Canasteo age 25 mus tered out October 19th, 1864. Excelsior, Kalkaska County, Mich. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 22 dis Haight, J. H. charged October 4th, 1862. North Chili, Monroe County, N. Y. Haight, W. A. Enrolled January 2d, 1864, at Plymouth age 27 mustered out with company. Enrolled June 12th, 1862, at Falls Church age 40 dis Hall, William.
; ;
; ;
;

June Green, John

5th, 1865.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

charged

May

5th, 1863.
;

Hallock, Daniel Y. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out September 27th, 1865. Handee, Richard. Enrolled October 19th, 1861, at Rochester age 21. Hanlon, Patrick. Enrolled January 5th, 1864, at Rochester 'age 38 mus tered out with company. Saginaw, Mich. Hart, Jacob. Enrolled September 6th, 1864, at Florence age 28 mustered out June 5th, 1865. Harvey, John. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at West Bloomfield age 24 died November 13th, 1864, at hospital, Washington, D. C., of disease: Hawkins, John. Enrolled December 6th, 1861, at Port Richmond age 24 veteran mustered out with company.
; ; ; ; ; ;
;

;

;

;

Hawley, Lawton B. Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 22 mustered out May 22d, 1865. Gloversville, Fulton County, N. Y. Hayden, Michael. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 21 mus tered out August 4th, 1865. Webster, Monroe County, N. Y. Hay man, James, Corporal. Enrolled August 4th, 1862, at Rochester age
; ; ; ;

;

18

;

discharged

May

1st,

1864.

COMPANY
Hayner, Henry H.
Henderson, James.

C.

515
;

Was

captured August 25th, 1864

died January 21st,

1865, in hospital at Salisbury,

N. C.
;

Enrolled July 9th, 1862, at Rochester

age

26.

Herrick, Elijah W. Transferred from Eighth mustered out September 26th, 1865.

New York Heavy

Artillery

;

Herrick, Frank J. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Hewett, Samuel. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Hodskey, Daniel. Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 28. House, William A. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Howard, Charles B. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artil
;

;

;

;

lery.

Howard, Leroy. Enrolled August 6th, 1862, at Rochester age 18. 306 Vermont Street, Buffalo, N. Y. Howe, Lyman C. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery. Hoyt, Edwin P. Transferred from Eighth New York Heavy Artillery.
;

Enrolled October 28th, 1861, at Genesee age 23. Hubbell, Oreb T. Enrolled July 26th, 1862, at Rochester age 18 tered out July 26th, 1865. Ogden, N. Y.

Hoyt, John.

;

;

;

mus
;

Huftalin, David. Enrolled December 28th, 1861, at Scottsville died at hospital, Annapolis, Md.

;

age 40

Hughes, James.

Enrolled November

1st,

1861, at Scottsville

;

mustered out
trans

Toledo, O. Hurd, Franklin. Enrolled January 4th, 1864, at Rochester age 35 ferred to Second Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps December 8th, 1864.

May

30th, 1865.

;

;

Wool-

cott,

Wayne County, N. Y. Hyde, E. H. Enrolled November llth, 1861, at Rochester age 21 died at Salisbury, N. C., November 26th, 1864. Enrolled December 30th, 1861, at Norwich age 21 vet Isbell, Gallett H.
;
; ;

;

eran

died in prison at Salisbury, January 30th, 1865. Transferred from Eighth New Jacobs, Eugene.
;

York Heavy
;

Artillery

;

mustered out with company. Jewett, Orson T. Enrolled February 15th, 1864, at Albion age 18 veteran served in Twenty-seventh New York Vol unteers mustered out with company. New York City. Keeler, Benjamin L., Corporal. Enrolled July 26th, 1862, at Rochester age 21 mustered out June 6th, 1865. Traer,
; ;
;

;

;

Tama
York
;

County,
age 35
;

la.

Kelly, Michael.

Enrolled December 19th, 1861, mustered out April 24th, 1865.

at

New
;

Kenyon, James L.
age 23
;

discharged

May

Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Albion died at Saulsbury, Jan 17th, 1865
;

uary 28th, 1865.
Jackson, James J.

Corp'l B. L. Kee-

Enrolled October 22d, 1861, at Oswe-

ler -

go

age Keyes, Anson, Sergeant. Enrolled July 26th, 1862, at Rochester mustered out June 51 li, 1865. Los Angeles, Cal.
;

22.

;

age 28

;

516

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
;

Kirby, John H., Sergeant. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age captured at Ream's Station paroled March 1st, 1865 mustered out June 27th, 1865. Oceana, Wyoming County, W. Va. Keyes, Daniel E. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 21 discharged February 1st,
21
; ; ; ; ;

1864.

Knapp, Cluster R.
1861,
at at

Rochester

;

Enrolled November 23d, veteran captured age 18
;
;

Ream's Station
Kromer, Joseph.

;

died in Salisbury Prison,

November

26th, 1864.

New York Heavy
company.
Danlel E. Keyes.

Artillery

Transferred from Eighth mustered out with
;

Enrolled OcLansing, George J., Sergeant. tober 1st, 1861, at Rochester age 25 discharged
; ;

pany B, Tenth

to accept promotion as First Lieutenant, United States C. T. Cortland, N. Y.
;

Com
;

Lathrop, Milton. Enrolled August 24th, 1862, at Rochester charged June 10th, 1865. Loweree, George E. Enrolled August 1st, 1862, at Albion charged March 15th, 1864. 103 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md.

age 21 age 18

dis

;

;

dis

Lubbock, Robert, Sergeant.
field la.
;

age 24

;

veteran volunteer

Enrolled January 5th, 1864, at West Bloommustered out with company. Cedar Rapids,
;

Luce, Charles B., Sergeant. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age discharged to accept promotion to Second Lieutenant, Company L. Lyndon, Elnathan L. Enrolled August 5th, 1865, at Rochester age 21 mustered out June 5th, 1865. Albion, Mich. Lyon, L. A. Enrolled December 2d, 1861, at Rochester age 27 discharged October 31st, 1862. 527 West Forty-ninth Street, New York. Mallory, William II. H. Transferred from Company K, Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Mann, Dwight. Transferred from Company I, Eighth New York Heavy
;

21

;

;

;

;

;

;

Artillery.

Mapes, Medad.
veteran volunteer
;

Enrolled January 17th, 1862, at Port Richmond
died September 16th, 1864.

;

age 40

;

Martin, Edward C. Enrolled January 14th, 1864, at Richmond age 18 died April 9th, 1864. Marsh, Orson. Enrolled March 17th, 1864, at Batavia age 33 captured August 25th, 1864 mustered out June 12th, 1865.
; ;
; ;

;

Marsh.William. Enrolled November 26th, 1861, at Port Richmond age 20. Martin, Jared W., Jr., Sergeant. Enrolled^July 29th, 1862, at Rochester age 27 discharged for promotion to Captain, Company F, Second United States C. T. McCabe, Michael. Enrolled October 26th, 1861, at Scottsville age 21 mustered out with company. McCormick, Andrew. Transferred from Company K, Eighth New York
;

;

;

;

;

Heavy

Artillery.

McCreeden, Thomas.

Enrolled October 23d, 1861, at Rochester

;

age

31.

COMPANY

C.

517
;

McElroy, F. G. Enrolled November 18th, 1861, at Oswego age 21 dis charged to accept appointment as Captain of C. T., United States Volunteers. McEntee, Thomas. Enrolled December 19th, 1863, at Rochester age 20 mustered out September 26th, 1865. Avon, N. Y. t Transferred from Company K, Eighth New York Heavy McGillis, James.
;
;

;

Artillery.

McGuire, Barnard. Enrolled December 18th, 1863, at Rochester mustered out with company. McGuire, John H. Enrolled December 18th, 1863, at Rochester mustered out with company. Blair, Neb.

;

age 18 age 19

;

;

;

A HALT

AT THE SALLY-PORT.
Jas. H. Bishop.

TIME, MIDNIGHT.
Sergt. L. J.

Jas. B. Wilder.

McVicker.

Mclntyre, John J. Enrolled May llth, 1861, in Thirty sixth New York Volunteers two years' service enrolled January 5th, 1864, at Rochester age 21 mustered out with company. Scottsville, N. Y.
; ; ; ;

McKee, Leman H.

Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester

;

age 19

;

died

at Saulsbury, October 28th, 1864.

Transferred from Company K, Eighth New mustered out with company. McMillen, Robert. Enrolled October 17th, 1861, at Oswego age 18 vet eran volunteer captured August 25th, 1864 mustered out June 12th, 1865. Minneapolis, Minn. McMillen, William. Enrolled October 17th, 1861, at Oswego age 18 dis
McLafferty, Simon, Corporal.
Artillery
;

York Heavy

;

;

;

;

;

;

charged February
18
;

21st, 1863.
I.

MrNiiuirliton. J. C.

Enrolled

November

20th, 1861, at Rochester;

age

discharged

May

28th, 1862.

518

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.

McNicholas, Thomas, Sergeant. Enrolled January 5th, 1864, at Rochester ; age 18 mustered out with company. Leadville, Col. McPhillips, Francis. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at Rochester age 18 mustered out with company. Saginaw, Saginaw County, Mich. McPhillips, Hugh. Enrolled December 19th, 1861, at ScottsvilK age 19 veteran volunteer mustered out with company. Mumford, Monroe County,
; ;

;

;

;

;

N. Y.
McVicker, Louis J., First Sergeant. Enrolled November 26th, 1861, at Port Richmond age 18 mustered out with company. Elizabeth, N. J. Mead, Reuben S. Enrolled January 2d, 1864, at North Norwich age 30
; ;

;

;

mustered out June 3d, 1865. Melbourne, James. Enrolled January 5th, 1864, at Caledonia age 26 mustered out with company. Mumford, N. Y. Enrolled December 20th, 1861, at Scottsville age 18 Miller, Romania T. wounded and captured at Ream's Station mustered out December 28th, 1864. Scottsville, N. Y. Miller, I. H. Discharged May 6th, 1862. Millhouse, Francis W. Enrolled June 28th, 1862, at Rochester age 33. Milliken, William D. Enrolled August 1st, 1862, at Albion age 25 dis charged for promotion to Second Lieutenant, Company E, Twenty-second United States Colored Troops. Monroe, John. Transferred from Company I, Eighth New York Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Monroe, Salmon H. Enrolled August 13th, 1864, at Nor wich age 41 discharged August 3d, 1865. Norwich, N.Y. Moore, James. Enrolled December llth, 1861, at Ro
;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

chester

age 29. Moore, Nelson, Corporal. Enrolled January 17th, 1862, at Rochester mustered out January llth, 1865. Lock
;
;

Box

F, Warren,

Warren County, Pa.
Enrolled July 8th, 1862, at Rochester
;

Morey, Jonathan.
Saulsbury. Morey, William.

age 21

;

died at

Enrolled July 2d, 1862, at Norwich age 43 discharged September 27th, 1862. Morgan, Edwin J. Enrolled January 28th, 1864, at Jerusalem age 29 mustered out June 15th, 1865. Potter, Yates County, N. Y. Morton, James. Enrolled March 27th, 1862, at Albany age 19 mustered out March 29th, 1865. Cedar Rapids, la.
;
; ; ;

;

;

39

Mosher, Charles. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at West Bloomfield mustered out May 13th, 1861.
; ;
;

;

age

Moshier, James H., Musician. Enrolled January llth, 1862, at Albion mustered out September 26th, 1865. 66 Genesee Street, age 21 veteran
Rochester, N. Y.

;

Muiar, Edwin. Enrolled February 24th, 1864, at Rochester age 26 dis charged August 10th, 1865. Scottsville, Monroe County, N.Y. Munson, Frank, Corporal. Enrolled October 24th, 1861, at Mumford age 21 veteran volunteer mustered out with company. Ben Haven, Mich. Mygatt, William H. Enrolled January 1st, 1862, at Norwich discharged
; ;

;

;

;

;

August

4th, 1862.

COMPANY

C.

519
; ;

Nixon, Aaron. Enrolled October 21st, 1861. at Hornersville age 23 dis charged June 15th, 1863. Nolan, Thomas. Enrolled October 30th, 1861, at Hornellsville age 26 ; discharged July 9th, 1862. None, Nicholas. Transferred from Company I, Eighth New York Heavy
;

Artillery.

Nott, Lindorf A. Enrolled December 3d, 1861, at Rochester age 23 dis charged September 26th, 1862. Oakley, Norman L. Enrolled November 4th, 1861, at Rochester age 21 veteran injured June 14th while crossing James River mustered out with
;
;

;

;

;

;

company. Seattle, King County, "Wash. Terr. O'Connor, Christopher. Enrolled December 19th, 1863, at Rochester age 21 transferred August 1st, 1864, to Company I, Twenty- second Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps. Died at Soldiers' Home, Bath, N. Y.
;

;

O'Donoghue, James.

Enrolled October 23d, 1861, at Hornellsville

;

age 19

;

wounded

at Petersburg.
;

O'Riley, Anthony. Enrolled November 6th, 1861, at Rochester age 26. O'Neil, James. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at Richmond age 21 died
;
;

May

24th, 1865.

Ott,

Henry.

Transferred from

Company

F.
;
;

,

Pageot, Joseph. Enrolled October 22d, 1861, at Oswego age 27 trans ferred to Second Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps. Keene, Cheshire County,

N. H.
Palmer, Frank C., Corporal. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 19 mustered out June 5th, 1865. National Hotel, Rochester, N. Y. Parkinson, Alfred H. Enrolled February 22d, 1864, at Albion age 19 captured May 6th, 1864 died at Andersonville, August 4th, 1864.
; ; ;

;

;

Parmeter, Benjamin.

Enrolled October 17th, 1861, at

Oswego

;

age 28
age 29

;

discharged November 13th, 1862. Parsons, Marshall M. Enrolled August 9th, 1862, at Rochester transferred to E.
Patrick, George.
;

;

;

Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester age 27. Enrolled September 6th, 1864, at Salina Patterson, Albion K., Corporal. age 36 mustered out June 5th, 1865. Oakland, Cal.
;

;

Patterson, Joseph.

Enrolled October 19th, 1861, at Rochester

;

age 21 age 19

;

died
dis

March

31st, 1862.

Pero, Peter.

Enrolled December 23d, 1861, at Scottsville Enrolled January
1st,

;

;

charged
20

May

28th, 1862.

Persell, Frederick.
;

1864, at

North Norwich

;

age

discharged July 5th, 1865. Enrolled August llth, 1862, at Rochester Phillips, Chauncey C. mustered out June 6th, 1865. Algona, Kossuth County, la.
;

;

age 21
trans

;

Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 22 Phillipps, Dorr. ferred to non-commissioned Staff by promotion to Hospital Steward. Hillsdale County, Mich.
Phillips,
;

;

Osseo,

age 26

John F.. Musician. Enrolled December 7th, 1861, at Rochester; mustered out with company. Enrolled January 1st, 1862, at Norwich, N. Y. Pike, Henry H. age 18 veteran mustered out with company. Norwich, N. Y.
;

;

;

520

HEAVY GUNS AND

LIGHT.
;

Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 26 died Pool, Rufus K. February 2d, 1864. Power, Patrick, Corporal. Enrolled November 20th, 1861, at Rochester age 22 mustered out with company. Enrolled August 13th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 dis Pratt, Oscar E. charged to accept appointment as Captain of Company F, Seventh United
;
; ; ;

;

States Colored Troops.

Purdy, Sidney, Corporal. Enrolled December 30th, 1861, at Norwich age veteran mustered out with company. Queale, John, Corporal. Enrolled February 20th, 1864 age 19 mustered out with company. Quinn, Daniel. Enrolled December 30th, 1861, at Camp Ward age 18 veteran mustered out with company. Post-office address, 166 East One Hun dred and Tenth Street, New York. Quinn, John. Enrolled November 26th, 1861, at Port Richmond age 23 veteran mustered out with company. Post-office address, Stapleton, S. I., N. Y. Quinn. Patrick. Enrolled January 30th, 1862, at Port Richmond age 18 mustered out June 12th, 1865. Ragan, Patrick. Enrolled February 3d, 1862, at Port Richmond age 20
;

18

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

was captured
bury, N. C.,
9th, 1865.

Ream's Station, Va., August 20th, 1864 recaptured at Salis while in arms against the Government voluntarily made himself
at
;

;

known, claiming he
Roycraft, John.

enlisted in the rebel

army

to prevent starvation

;

died July

Enrolled December 23d, 1863

;

age 27

;

mustered out with
age 21

company. Reed, Reuben M.

Enrolled August

1st,

1862, at Rochester

;

;

mus
;

tered out April 19th, 1865.

Robinson, William D., Corporal. Enrolled July 16th, 1862, at Rochester mustered out May 15th, 1865 studied age 19 medicine after leaving the army, and is now a
;
;

practising physician.
Street,

Post-office address, 12

Grove
I,

East Orange, N. J. Transferred from Reid, Robert.

Company

Eighth

New York Heavy
;

Artillery.

Robinson, Giles F.
1863, in Sherburne

Enrolled December 25th, age 19 mustered out with
;

company.

W. Enrolled October 17th, 1861, age 23. Rogan, Michael J. Enrolled January llth, 1862, veteran volunteer at Port Richmond age 21 mustered out with company. Enrolled October Rolson, William, Sergeant. 22d, 1861, at Oswego age 30 discharged FebruRobinson, Silas
;

at Hornellsville

;

;

;

;

;

Wm.

D. Kobinflon.

ary

1st, 1864.

Romer, James H.
Rochester
Corps.
;

Enrolled August 9th, 1862, at

age 22

;

transferred to

Company A,

Sixth Regiment Veteran Reserve

Post-office address, Seneca Falls,

N. Y.

COMPANY

C.

521
; ;

Root, James B. Enrolled August 7th, 1862, at Rochester age 23 dis charged May llth, 1863 became captain in another regiment. Post-office ad dress, Brockport, Monroe County, N. Y. Rowe, William M. Enrolled December 30th, 1863, at Rochester age 24 mustered out May 19th, 1865. Post-office address, Fhelps, Ontario County, X. Y. Saulsman, Elias. Enrolled January 29th, 1862, at Rochester age 29 cap tured June 22d, 1864 mustered out June 29th, 1865. Saulsman, John H. Enrolled January 29th, 1862, at Rochester. Enrolled June 25th, 1862, at Falls Church, Va. age 21. Schaffer, John. Enrolled December 29th, 1863, at Chili, N. Y. age Scheffer, Herman P. 23 died December 22d, 1864. Schenck, John. Enrolled August 15th, 1862, at Rochester age 22 mus tered out with company. Chili Centre, N. Y. Enrolled August 9th, 1862, at Rochester Scofleld, Robert C., Sergeant. age 28 mustered out June 5th, 1865. Washington, Pa. Transferred from Company I, Eighth New York Secor, Almond, Artificer. Heavy Artillery mustered out with company. Shadbolt, George W. Enrolled November 23d, 1861, at Rochester age 25 mustered out November 25th, 1864. Sheehe, Michael. Enrolled December 24th, 1863, at Milton, N. Y. age 28. Sheldon, Byron, Corporal. Enrolled August 5th, 1862, at Rochester age 27 died November 19th, 1864. Shelton, Frederick T. Enrolled August 12th, 1862, at Rochester age 21 mustered out May 31st, 1865. Post-office address, Silver City, Grant Cou