You are on page 1of 16

Volume 47 - Issue 12

November 27, 2013
theeyeopener.com
@theeyeopener
Since 1967
The
best
and the
brightest
PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK
Meet 10 Ryerson students who are changing our future
2 Wednesday Nov. 27, 2013
FROM PRESIDENT SHELDON LEVY
A HOLIDAY
MESSAGE
3 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
NEWS
SCC running massive $63,154 deficit
The 2012-13 audit reveals a massive deficit and drop in cash flow now affecting spending
By
Ramisha
Farooq
As the 2012-13 fiscal year comes to
an end, the student campus centre
(SCC) submitted an audit for ap-
proval by its Board of Directors,
revealing a $63,154 deficit and
$556,796 drop in cash flow.
In a confidential finance report
obtained by The Eyeopener, Stu-
dent Campus Centre (SCC) general
manager Mike Verticchio states
that several factors, including a
high amount of spending on capi-
tal improvements and higher-than-
expected food and labour costs, led
to the deficit.
In turn, the higher than expect-
ed spending on capital purchases
caused a dramatic change in the
cash flow this year, leaving the SCC
at a cash position of $372,939
compared to last year’s $929,735.
Verticchio’s statement reads:
“The cash position may look good
at $372,939, but this is deceiv-
ing. The student centre’s financial
statements include the accounts for
the Ombudsperson’s office and re-
stricted cash of $360,013.”
“This leaves the Ryerson student
centre with $12,939 in available
cash at April 30, 2013 which is un-
acceptable,” said Verticchio.
The SCC’s largest expenses were
food for SCC-owned restaurants
like the Oakham Cafe and general
staff payroll.
Continuing Education Students’
Association of Ryerson (CESAR)
president Shinae Kim has said that
Verticchio is to blame for the mis-
management of funds leading to
the drop in cash.
“With a majority of board mem-
bers without even a clue on how
to read a financial statement ... it
is turning out to be a bad idea to
leave all this money and responsi-
bility in the hands of people who
simply don’t know what they’re
doing,” said Kim.
Verticchio was recently hired
to take over for long time general
manager Eric Newstadt.
Before taking the position, Ver-
ticchio worked in several execu-
tive positions within the Ryerson
Students’ Union (RSU) and George
Brown college.
Kim said she believes the student
centre is actually owned and op-
erated by the general manger and
CUPE1281, the union currently
representing most SCC employees
and not, in fact, the true owners of
the building, the Palin Foundation.
CESAR will now be requesting a
forensic audit in order to locate the
allegedly missing funds.
“Sitting on the Student Centre
Board comes with serious respon-
sibility as you are overseeing entire
operations of the Student Centre,
including overseeing finances,”
said Kim.
In a statement from CESAR,
Kim said she believes the solution
to cash problems is to investigate
who, what, when, where and how
the money was spent.
In order to “locate” the $556,796
a Finance Committee was formed
at a recent SCC board meeting, in
order to manage the financial defi-
cit and the cash problem, said Kim.
At the SCC Finance commit-
tee meeting on Nov.19, Verticchio
spoke about a referendum to in-
crease the student centre levy.
At an April 11 board of directors
meeting, a Capital Replacement
Fund and Cash Flow requirements
plan was submitted stating that the
Palin Foundation has never had to
remove cash for the capital replace-
ment fund and that the majority of
the foundation’s financial resources
has been spent on such capital im-
provements.
Improvements have included
further accessibility measures and
increased building repairs.
“The board of directors needs to
evaluate how capital projects are
implemented and should be con-
cerned with the length of time that
projects take to complete,” said
Verticchio.
The document states that there
are still issues surrounding proj-
ect management and coordinating
with Ryerson departments still ex-
ist.
“We have a handle on it,” said
RSU president Melissa Palermo.
“We are working to put a protocol
in place to scale back.”
Palermo credits the loss of cash
to Oakham House building repairs
and increased spending in terms of
subsidies. She also confirmed that
no single member on the board
manages the funds but the task is a
group responsibility.
Management will be working on
a new SCC budget to try and stem
the loss of cash, to be submitted to
the board of directors for the next
meeting. The financial statement
indicates that management will
also try to reduce spending by at
least $100,000. However, it is un-
clear as to how much can be saved
by the end of the year.
CESAR believes that governance
structure of the SCC should now
be reviewed to mitigate risks and
issues and equal representation
from all three stakeholders in the
Student Centre Board: two reps
from CESAR, RSU, and one from
the university.
Students snoozing through fire alarms
Fire alarms at Ryerson’s residences are not loud enough to rouse sleeping students
Toronto Fire Services respond to a fire alarm on campus.
PHOTO: JACKIE HONG
By
Dylan
Freeman-
Grist
After speaking to dozens of stu-
dents living in Pitman Hall, The
Eyeopener has found that a large
number of residents are not being
woken up by fire alarms and drills
that occur during sleeping hours.
“It was pretty scary because if
it was an actual fire then I would
have been in the building and no
one would have known,” said
Jackie Mckay, a first year journal-
ism student who has slept through
multiple alarms in Pitman Hall this
semester.
There is no obligation for a land-
lord to ensure tenants have vacated
their rooms in the case of a fire,
a fact which extends to Ryerson
Student Services and senior stu-
dent residence advisers. They, in
the case of a fire, “assist when they
can” but have no obligation to, ac-
cording Student Housing Services.
The onus, then, is on students
to ensure they remove themselves
from residence in case of a fire,
with no measures in place to pre-
vent them from sleeping through
drills, false alarms and quite pos-
sibly fires.
“It’s not really fair because it’s
not a choice not to leave if you
don’t wake up,” said Mckay. “I
think they could change the way
the fire alarms are done so they’re
within everyone’s room, or change
the system so that it is more likely
everyone will get out.”
While many students wake
with each alarm, students in spe-
cific room types, such as ones with
small hallways in the corner of
apartment clusters or “pods” ap-
pear to be particularly susceptible
to sleeping through the fire alert
system.
“I’d be very concerned because
you can’t hear it in my room, the
corner rooms, you don’t hear it,”
said Mckay.
“I think if it’s common knowl-
edge that they know which rooms
you can’t hear them in they should
install alarms,” said Graeme Mont-
gomery, another first-year student
who slept through an alarm.
The trend has been noted in a se-
mester abundant with false alarms
at Pitman Hall, many of which
most likely originated from either
technical difficulties or cooking ac-
cidents according to Jen Gonzales,
residence marketing and assign-
ments coordinator.
The prevalence of false alarms
has given rise to another disturb-
ing trend, with many students opt-
ing to remain in their rooms for
the duration of the drill instead of
exiting the residence as per code,
a move that could result in fines
from Toronto Fire and Emergency
Services.
“I know a lot of people who
sleep through theirs, or decide to
sleep through theirs, or decide to
not go down just because it gets so
annoying,” said a student in Pit-
man who chose to remain anony-
mous.
“Our message is very clear for
all fire alarms, everyone should
leave a building immediately or
follow building announcements
if any, upon becoming aware of
an alarm,” said Tanya Fermin-
Poppleton, manager security and
emergency services, via email.
The Eyeopener investigates:
The Student Campus Centre audit reveals a mismanagement of money.
PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS
This leaves the Ryer-
son student centre
with $12,939 in avail-
able cash at April 30
4 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
EDITORIAL
Editor-in-Chief
Sean “Candy Crush” Tepper
News
Angela “Sweetie” Hennessy
Jackie “Sum 41” Hong
Associate News
Ramisha “Hugs” Farooq
Features
Sean “Voiceless Racists” Wetselaar
Biz and Tech
Alfea “Big Eyes” Donato
Arts and Life
Luc “Sicky-pooh” Rinaldi
Sports
Harlan “50 Shades of Blue”
Nemerofsky
Communities
Nicole “Lies“ Schmidt
Photo
Natalia “DJ” Balcerzak
Jess “is alive!” Tsang
Associate Photo
Charles “EIC’s sexual desire” Vanegas
Copy Editor
Dasha “Poisoned” Zolota

Fun
Jake “Not Jelly” Scott

Media
Susana “NuTuna” Gomez Baez
Online
Lindsay “Nose Poker” Boeckl
John “Loveable Asshole” Shmuel
General Manager
Liane “Bubble Girl” McLarty
Advertising Manager
Chris “Fucking” Roberts
Design Director
J.D. “Volcano Cake” Mowat
Intern Army
Roderick “The Rod” Fitzgerald
Solanaa “Woop“ Luhtala
Luke “De“ Peters
Jacob “Do“ Dalfen-Brown
Contributors
Alvina “Boo” Siddiqui
Badri “MIA” Murali
Sissi “Diplo” Wang
Aj “mike” McDowell
Alannah “Sulley” Kavanagh
Farnia “Charles Who?” Fekri
Carol “Foregn Correspondant”
Kan
Robert “Better than Be” Foreman
Dylan “Bert” Freeman-Grist
Sierra “Ernie” Bein
Zoe “Elmo” Yve
Anna “Big Bird” Chorazyczewski
Behdad “Cookie Monster”
Mahichi
Cat “Oscar” Machado
Yara “Snuffleupagas” Kashlan
Daniel “Colorado” Rocchi
Devin “Chipper” Jones
William “Charlie” Brown
Daniel “Grande” Moran
Michael “Amazing” Grace-Dacosta
Josh “Benafinger” Beneteau
Tiffany “Sweet Tooth” Crawford
Lara “Spring Breakers” Onayak
Mackenzie “Maps!” Davidson
Monia “HOV” Sidhu
Tamara “Trooper” Sestanj
Leah “Delegate” Hansen
The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s largest
and only independent student news-
paper. It is owned and operated by
Rye Eye Publishing Inc., a non-profit
corporation owned by the students
of Ryerson. Our offices are on the
second floor of the Student Campus
Centre. You can reach us at 416-979-
5262, at theeyeopener.com or on
Twitter at @theeyeopener.
Ah, the last issue of the term. A
sweet, nostalgic time of psychosis,
bitchiness and whining. The Annoying
Talking Coffee Mug has had enough
of you all. So get the fuck out! Go
home, get some sleep, eat well, hang
with your family and friends.
Replenish yourselves my beloved
Masthead and Volunteers!
In a shocking admission in court,
Tuesday, Eyeopener Associate
News Editor, Ramisha Farooq,
admitted to murdering several
members of masthead, including
former partners Angela Hennessy
and Jackie Hong.
Emergency crews were first
called to the scene Saturday, to find
the Eyeopener offices a bloody,
gruesome mess. Jackie Hong, the
first victim, was found splayed
out in front of the door, choked to
death with her own hip-chains, the
coroner’s office reports. Former
Arts and Life Editor Luc Rinaldi
was found murdered in a similar
manner, but he was hung from the
ceiling with guitar strings.
Susana Gómez Báez and Charles
Vanegas, media and photo edi-
tors, were found engaged in what
appeared to have been a heated
argument, but shot to death with
a high-calibre rifle usually used
for hunting elephants. It is not
clear where Farooq obtained an
elephant gun.
“They deserved what they got,”
Farooq said in her confession. “I
copy-edited them straight to hell
with absolutely no mistakes.”
Farooq continued her maniacal
spree by stabbing the Biz and Tech
editor Alfea Donato to death with
her own spectacles. Then, turning
her sights on Harlan Nemerof-
sky, Sports Editor, and smashing
his face into a computer monitor
while screaming, “Just log the
fuck out and this would never
have happened!” Evidence shows
that Nermerofsky was unaware of
the massacre because he was too
distracted by the Leafs, who were
tragically losing.
Head Copy Editor, Dasha Zo-
lota, who may have tried to inter-
vene at this point, was found near
Nemerofsky’s corpse, bludgeoned
to death with a nearby CP style
guide.
It was then that Angela Hen-
nessy was reported to have entered
the office. Upon seeing a blood-
covered Farooq, Hennessy tried
to defend herself. Witnesses report
Hennessy yelled, “Fuck this noise,
I’m not going out like this.” Hen-
nessy charged Farooq with a near-
by kitchen knife. Farooq then took
two pens and jammed them into
her eyes. Before she passed, Hen-
nessy’s reported last words were,
“Sierra will uphold my legacy.
This is only the beginning.”
“I just snapped,” Farooq said.
“You don’t work there. You don’t
know how much abuse I’ve taken,
how many times I’ve been punched
or kicked or had my whole Face-
book page converted into Pikachu.
I mean come on, Pikachu? That’s
just kicking a news editor while
they’re down.”
The jury is still deliberating, but
a fairly mild sentence is expected if
Farooq is found guilty.
“After all,” her lawyer, Fun Edi-
tor Jake Scott, said. “They had it
coming.”
*some events fabricated by Jake
Scott
By Sean
Wetselaar,
Veteran
Court
Reporter
“They deserved what
they got”
Eyeopener editor admits to shocking mass murder
The last recorded image of deceased members of masthead.
PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI AND NATALIA BALCERZAK
www.parl.gc.ca/guides
SUMMER
JOB 2014
Become a Parliamentary Guide
Give guided
tours of the
Parliament
of Canada
Interviews across
Canada in a city
near you
Travel costs
covered
Competitive
hourly wage
and living
allowance
Apply online!
Deadline: Wednesday,
January 15, 2014
5 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
NEWS
Rye students upset
about TTC fare hike
Students will have to start shelling out more for tokens
and metropasses in 2014
A TTC token is set to cost five
cents more come 2014.
The TTC board approved the
increase Nov. 20 bringing the
$2.65 token up to $2.70, but
leaving the individual $3 fare un-
touched.
Students are not free from the
change and the monthly post-sec-
ondary metropass is set to go up
$2 from $106 to $108.
Some students are irritated
about the price hike.
“We are students, so it is too
much to pay an extra $2 every
[month],” said first-year indus-
trial engineering student Ibrahim
Tayyar. “It’s going to be raised
again, more and more, so it’s not
good for the students.”
The price hike was triggered
because of a $6-million-shortage
in subsidies this year. The TTC
will only be receiving $428 mil-
lion from the government to help
cover its $1.5 billion operating
budget.
“If they need to hike it up, [then
they should] continue to provide
better services, but I haven’t seen
that happen,” said fourth-year
radio and television arts student
Trevor Coll.
Coll compared the TTC to the
public transportation system in
Montreal, where fare is signifi-
cantly cheaper — a student me-
tropass in Montreal is $77.
“The whole point of having a
student price is so that students
can afford it. We’re already pay-
ing so much for school,” said
first-year professional communi-
cation student, Joyce Chan.
“It’s a daily thing and it adds
up.”
Brad Ross, excutive director
and corporate communications
for the TTC, said the cost of op-
erating goes up as ridership in-
creases.
“So next year, we are going to
see a record ridership of 540 mil-
lion trips, up from 528 million
that we will see this year,” said
Ross.
The fare hike is expected to
bring in an extra $30 million to
help cover the TTC’s operating
budget.
Even with the fare increase,
Ross said that the extra revenue
will not cover all costs but hopes
the city will pitch in.
“The TTC is a transit service
and their number one priority is
meeting the needs of riders,” said
Ross.
By Zoe Yve
Therapy dogs were back on Nov. 26 to help stressed-out students relax.
PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI
Fuzzy cuddles to the rescue
Although students will still be receiving discount metropasses, the fare hike will
increase the overall cost by $2, effective in the new year.
PHOTO: FARNIA FEKRI
Commuters say they have it the
worst. “They’ve been increasing
for consecutive years but there’s
nothing we can do about it,” said
Simona Chang, a second-year
business technology manage-
ment student. Chang is a Rich-
mond Hill resident who travels
to downtown Toronto five times
a week.
Chang also said she finds it dif-
ficult to manage the TTC’s price
increase combined with other
daily living expenses.
“How fair is it to not give ex-
ceptions for students for fare
hikes?” said second-year en-
gineering student, Bryan Chu.
“The TTC sucks.”
THIS WEEK AT THE MAC
MATTAMYAC
RYERSONRAMS
MATTAMYATHLETICCENTRE.CA
HOME OF THE
WOMEN’S HOCKEY
▶ Saturday, Nov. 30 vs Nipissing, 7:30 PM
▶ Sunday, Dec. 1 vs Laurentian, 2:30 PM
MEN’S HOCKEY
▶ Friday, Nov. 29 vs UQTR, 7:30 PM
▶ Saturday, Nov. 30 vs Concordia, 2:30 PM
FREE FOR ALL RYERSON STUDENTS WITH YOUR ONECARD
MEN’S BASKETBALL
▶ Saturday, Nov. 30 vs Toronto, 4:00 PM
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
NOTRE DAME vs DUQUESNE
▶ Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013 2:00 PM















PLEASE JOIN
the
Oakham House Choir
of Ryerson University

on SATURDAY NOVEMBER 30, 2013
7:30 p.m.

HYMN of PRAISE
music by Mendelssohn and Rutter
and Carol sing-along

Matthew Jaskiewicz, music director
Calvin Presbyterian Church, 26 Delisle Ave., Toronto
$30, advance $25, students $15, under 12 free
| www.oakhamchoir.ca | 416-960-5551

SHOPPERS
DRUG MART
WOULD LIKE
TO WISH THE
RYERSON
COMMUNITY
A VERY HAPPY
HOLIDAY.
6 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
NEWS
News By the Numbers
The mechanical room that services
the elevator in the interior design
building overheated and set off
sprinklers and fire alarms around
11 p.m. on Nov. 21. There were no
smoke or flames, but the building
was evacuated. The elevator is cur-
rently out of service and access to
the basement was restricted until
the morning of Nov. 25.
11
The times interior design’s
mechanical room overheated
The Filipino Canadian Associa-
tion of Ryerson (FCAR) is host-
ing Filipino Awareness at Ryerson
Week between Nov. 25 and 29 to
raise money for Typhoon Yolanda
relief efforts. Some events include
food sales, a karaoke night and
a talent show. More details are
available on Facebook.
7,000
The number of dead or
missing from Typhoon Yolanda
Ryerson University opened the
Centre for Urban Research and
Land Development (CURLD) on
Nov. 20. The centre’s goal is to
study the economic impact of ur-
ban policies on the “Greater Gold-
en Horseshoe Area.” To date, $2
million have been raised to further
develop the research centre.
2
The amount in millions raised
for an urban research centre
A man approached a female stu-
dent on Nov. 22 and started talking
about pregnancy. He then produced
a capped hypodermic syringe and
said he would give her an epidu-
ral. After she told him to stop, he
touched her face, making sexual
comments. Security later arrested
the man, saying he’s a “known tres-
passer.” Photos are available online.
4:11
The time (p.m.) a student was
approached and assaulted
Rye lands law practice program
A new alternative to the traditional one-year articling
program is coming to campus September 2014
Ryerson University announced
that it will be providing a new
Law Practice Program (LPP), the
first of its kind in Canada, last
Thursday, to start next September.
The program will be an alter-
native to the traditional articling
program, a 10-month placement
in a law firm after law school.
“The Law Practice Program
opens up a whole bunch of oppor-
tunity, especially for people who
don’t want to practice in a big law
firm,” said Avner Levin, chair of
the law and business department
at the Ted Rogers School of Man-
agement.
“Articling is a familiar and es-
tablished way to get into the in-
dustry,” said Levin.
“Essentially we are transition-
ing law students into law profes-
sionals [in a new way].”
The Law Society of Upper Can-
ada (LSUC) chose Ryerson to host
the program based on its leader-
ship in innovation and entrepre-
neurship.
Doug Downey, chair of the LPP
committee and the Ontario Bar As-
sociation’s (OBA) Treasurer noted
Ryerson was chosen as its “strong
digital and media presence [will]
provide a cutting-edgexperience.”
We are transitioning
law students into law
professionals
The program took school man-
agement about six months to put
together.
“We are very excited of the
technology that is going to be
used. We plan on using a lot of
virtual technology, not tradition-
al lectures,” said Levin.
Technologies that will be used
By
Yara
Kashlan
include interactive and web-
based learning with the purpose
of simulating virtual law firms.
The program, part of a three-
year pilot project, will help in-
dustry hopefuls overcome the
shortage of articling jobs.
“There is pressure on people
coming out of law school not be-
ing able to complete their journey
to be full lawyers,” said Downy.
The program will run for eight
months. Four months will be in-
class education, and four months
will be a work placement, avail-
able across the province.
Downey said that the four-
month class time is a structured
way to give a skill-set to new
lawyers.
“The [LPP] will change how
students become members of the
law society.”
As part of the program, practis-
ing lawyers will serve as “coaches
and mentors to [the] students,”
according to Janet Minor, elect-
ed bencher of the LSUC and the
chair of the professional develop-
ment and competence committee.
The program will feature place-
ments in areas such as family and
criminal law practices
“I anticipate [that] we are go-
ing to find, in time, that people
will prefer this route,” said
Downey.
Ryerson president Sheldon
Levy said that a law school could
be a possibility in university’s
future, although it’s not coming
any time soon.
“I do think that as our city
grows, there will be an interest
from the community for another
law school,” said Levy.
Ryerson grad Rubina Quadri has received a $27,000 Ryerson Social
Enterprise Fellowship Federal Development Grant to develop a pro-
totype of Talking Buttons, a toucphad technology able to help autis-
tic children communicate better. The Alternative and Augmentative
Communication (AAC) technology helps support or replace speech
and writing for those with impairments. Talking Buttons is a wearable
device for children ages four to six who have speech impediments. The
$27,000 grant will help develop the prototype and stage early testing of
the touchpad at test environments, such as daycares.
The amount in dollars a Ryerson grad received in funding for
her adaptive reprogrammable touchpad
27,000
FROM RETAIL MANAGEMENT
TO LOGISTICS: THIS PROGRAM
OFFERS THE UNIQUE SKILLS YOU
WILL NEED TO LAUNCH YOUR
CAREER AS A FASHION BUYER,
BRAND MANAGER, PRODUCT
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER,
VISUAL MERCHANDISER
AND MANY OTHER EXCITING
CAREER OPTIONS.
APPLY NOW!
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATES
business.humber.ca/postgrad
AT ITS VERY BEST
POSTGRADUATE
CERTIFICATE
7 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
NEWS
Freeland wins Toronto Centre
Liberals maintain downtown Toronto riding with 49 per cent of the vote in Monday’s byelection
By
Sierra
Bein
The battle for the Toronto Centre
riding is over. Liberal representa-
tive Chrystia Freeland has won
with 49 per cent of the vote.
Candidates have been vying for
the downtown Toronto seat lead-
ing up to the byelection on Mon-
day Nov. 25 to replace outgoing
Liberal MP Bob Rae. There had
been a battle between Freeland
and NDP representative Linda
McQuaig, both front-runners in
early polls. Even though the New
Democratic Party lost the Toronto
Centre byelection, the party re-
ceived more votes than it had ever
in the past.
Freeland received 17,081 votes,
compared to McQuaig’s 12,643.
The Conservative Party’s can-
didate, Geoff Pollock, snagged
3,024 votes while the Green Par-
ty’s John Deverell received 1,027.
“I think it’s a substantial victory
for us that we’ve done better in
this election and this riding than
we’ve ever done before,” Freeland
said in her victory speech. She also
thanked federal Liberal leader Jus-
tin Trudeau for making multiple
public appearances to support her
election campaign.
Freeland’s prominent campaign-
ing points included combatting the
rise of income inequality as well as
how to improve public housing
and public transit.
Freeland and her supporters
were awaiting the election results
at the Jack Astor’s in the 10 Dun-
das building. Rae, who quit his
position after 20 years in federal
politics to focus on First Nations
issues, The Toronto byelection
was one of four that took place
across the country.
Freeland is a former award-win-
ning journalist who has worked
as deputy editor of the Globe and
Mail, managing editor at the Fi-
nancial Times, and was the global
editor-at-large of Thomas Reuters.
Freeland is also an award-win-
ning author, best known for her
book Plutocrats: The Rise of the
New Global Super-Rich and the
Fall of Everyone Else.
Campus stress on high alert
Medically-related calls to Rye security double as exams near
Ryerson emergency services were called 51 times over course of the last month.
PHOTO COURTESY TORONTO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
With exams close to a week away,
students are sure to be feeling the
end-of-semester stress.
According to Ryerson security,
the amount of calls made to emer-
gency services on campus doubles
prior to exams because students
start buckling under school-related
pressure.
There were 51 medical calls
made over the last month of the
fall semester. Nineteen of those
calls were from the first week of
November, during midterms.
“I get almost an anxiety attack
before the exam. It’s hard to fo-
cus,” said first-year biology stu-
dent, Victoria Weisz.
Dr. Dana Millstein, a psycholo-
gist at Ryerson, said that one way
to handle stress is to break things
down into manageable chunks.
“The more risk factors there are
in someone’s life the more likely it
is for them to have stress,” she said.
There are two factors that affect
someone’s level of stress: protective
factors and risk factors.
Protective factors decrease vul-
nerability to stress and include
things like healthy relationships,
spirituality, curiosity and finding
meaning in life.
The risk factors that encourage
stress include lack of social sup-
port, negativity and introversion,
including hermit-like tendencies.
According to Millstein, time
management is an effective protec-
tive factor.
“I think I’m taking it easy be-
cause I began studying way in ad-
vance. There’s no real easy way out
of it and if you do it at the last min-
ute you’re just going to be stuck,”
said first-year computer engineer-
ing student, Vreti Vaghla.
But it is not just the students who
feel the shift in the atmosphere on
campus during this time of year.
“We see a spike in the need for
access to computers, printing, and
access to study space — all key to
students getting their assignments
completed, and preparing for ex-
ams,” said Cecile Farnum, Ryer-
son’s communications and liaison
librarian.
“When there are problems ac-
cessing these services, [for] ex-
ample no available computers, no
study space, printers out of service,
etc., this can be frustrating to stu-
dents facing time crunches, leading
to stress and anxiety.”
Millstein believes that part of
the journey as a student is to fig-
ure out what works best for each
individual.
“I think we’re not born knowing
how to face challenges with confi-
dence or productivity. As we move
through life we try to learn ways
to cope and take on challenges but
sometimes the ways we learn to
cope aren’t as effective, and some-
times they are even harmful,” said
Millstein.
By Cat Machado
Newly-elected Liberal MP Chrystia Freeland at Jack Astor’s after learning she won.
PHOTOS BY JACKIE HONG
Outgoing Liberal MP Bob Rae was at
Jack Astor’s in support of Freeland.
CHOOSE YOUR
CERTIFICATE
ADVERTISING – MEDIA MANAGEMENT
ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
EVENT MANAGEMENT
FASHION MANAGEMENT & PROMOTIONS
FINANCIAL PLANNING
GLOBAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
MARKETING MANAGEMENT
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
APPLY NOW!
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATES
business.humber.ca/postgrad
AT ITS VERY BEST
8 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
COMMUNITIES
Boy by day, mad scientist by night
Jordan Hilkowitz was born with autism, but that hasn’t
stopped him from taking the internet by storm
A new perspective
Dressed in a white lab coat and
safety goggles, Jordan Hilkowitz
looks into the camera and greets
his viewers.
“Hello everyone, it’s Dr. Mad
Science here and this film is used
with milk and soap!”
He picks up a glass of milk and
pours it into a bowl, instructing
his viewers to wait until the milk
bubbles have popped before they
proceed.
Next, he squeezes as much food
colouring as he can into the milk,
dips a Q-tip in soap and then plac-
es it in the centre of the bowl. The
colours displace and mix together,
creating a tie-dye like effect.
This wraps up yet another ex-
periment for Dr. Mad Science.
Hilkowitz was diagnosed with
autism when he was 18-months-
old. Still, this hasn’t stopped the
now 11-year-old from pursuing his
love for science. Twenty-seven vid-
eos and over six million views later,
he has become an internet star.
“It’s just all cool, all the chemi-
cal reactions household products
form,” he said.
As he began to try other at-home
experiments, he discovered what
would later become his YouTube
alter ego — Dr. Mad Science. With
the help of longtime babysitter
Tracy Leparulo, a recent Ryerson
graduate, Jordan started a channel.
“Jordan always had a passion for
science since the day I met him,”
said Leparulo. “We went online
and we noticed that most science
experiments required really com-
plicated chemicals, so we decided,
why don’t we make our own vid-
eos that use household products?”
Hilkowitz’s favourite experiment
is mixing Coca-Cola and Mentos,
which causes an explosion.
It was through Leparulo that
Hilkowitz became involved in the
Ryerson community. She was the
former president of her chapter of
Students in Free Enterprise, now re-
named Enactus. Enactus is a group
of Ryerson student business leaders
that help budding entrepreneurs.
Since Hilkowitz posted his first
video nearly two years ago, the chan-
nel has earned him over $12,000.
It’s his dream to study at Ryerson
once he graduates high school.
Jordan met with Ryerson presi-
dent, Sheldon Levy, while doing a
demonstration at a science fair to
chat about his YouTube career and
future endeavours.
Stacey Hilkowitz, Jordan’s
mother, said that their family has
been very blessed by the Ryerson
community.
“It’s kind of our home, we
wouldn’t be strong like we are now
without the support from Ryer-
son,” said Stacey.
Dr. Mad Science has given Jor-
dan a following. He gets invited
to street festivals around Toronto,
where he does experiments and
holds meet-and-greets.
Stacey said that before the chan-
nel, Jordan had a stuttering prob-
lem but now he speaks clearer and
his confidence has gone up.
“He has made friends because
he tells people about his channel. It
By
Alannah
Kavanagh
Jordan Hilkowitz, a.k.a Dr. Mad Science, performing one of his experiments.
PHOTO COURTESY OF STACEY HILKOWITZ
Rye student’s film sheds a light on childhood cancer
Simon Paluck and his team on set during the filming of Emma.
PHOTO COURTESY OF SIMON PALUCK
Simon Paluck thought of the plot
for Emma while writing a play in
his first year of high school. Now
in his last year at Ryerson, he has
brought the idea back to life for his
final project. Emma is a fictional
story, but the inspiration has come
from his real experiences.
While working on transitioning
the script from speech to film, one
of his close friends was diagnosed
with cancer.
“[It] pulled me into the world
of childhood cancer and the story
kind of shaped itself from there,”
said Paluck. “I was kind of like a
sponge soaking up this new world
that I’d never been exposed to.”
Emma closely follows the life
of depressed 17-year-old Jayson.
Jayson joins the school newspaper
and is sent to expose a classmate’s
rumored pregnancy, but instead,
finds out she has cancer. As the
plot unfolds, the two characters
become friends and discover the
importance of love and friendship.
While most movies about can-
cer venture into the dark realities
of the disease, Paluck’s film takes
a different approach. He said
that although treatment seemed
to have its ups and downs, in the
grand scheme of things, it wasn’t
all negative.
“It’s supposed to be a happy
film because it’s about life and
love and letting go,” said Paluck.
“Even in that environment, there’s
still life, there’s still love, there’s
still friendship, there’s still all
those wonderful things that other
people don’t think are there.”
But Emma has become
more than just a project. The per-
sonal connection Paluck has to
the film drove him and his team
to hold a fundraiser for the Make-
A-Wish Foundation. They raised
$6,000.
“I’m super lucky to have an
amazing group of students work-
ing on this. The support has been
amazing - both inside and outside
the program,” said Paluck.
By
Aj
McDowell
really takes the pressure off when
kids come to him,” she said.
Stacey knows that many adults
don’t understand the challenges of
raising an autistic child. There was
a poem written by Emily Perl King-
sley called “Welcome to Holland”
that Stacey uses to explain what
it’s like. It’s about the journey of a
pregnant woman who plans to go
to Italy, but upon giving birth the
nurse says “Welcome to Holland.”
“You argue and say, ‘No I’m go-
ing to Italy,’” Stacey says. “But,
the nurse insists you’re in Holland.
Once you aren’t angry anymore,
you realize Holland is a beautiful
place.”
FROM MEDIA PLANNING AND
MANAGEMENT TO ACCOUNT
COORDINATION AND SALES,
THIS PROGRAM OFFERS THE
UNIQUE SKILLS YOU WILL NEED
TO LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
AS ACCOUNT COORDINATOR,
MEDIA SALES REPRESENTATIVE,
MEDIA BUYER, MEDIA PLANNER,
AND MANY OTHER EXCITING
CAREER OPTIONS.
APPLY NOW!
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATES
business.humber.ca/postgrad
AT ITS VERY BEST
POSTGRADUATE
CERTIFICATE
TOP 10 INNOVATORS
From the DMZ to fashion studios, boardrooms to drawing boards,
Ryerson University is a hub for creativity. Its brightest students
— pioneers, community leaders, tech whizzes and visionaries —
are redefning their felds before even leaving the classroom.
For the frst time ever, Te Eyeopener is recognizing their innovation.
Meet 10 students who are bringing Ryerson into the future.
Pno1ocnnvnv
N B
J T
C V
C K
MnNnc:Nc Eo:1on
L R
CoN1n:nc1:Nc Dvs:cNvn
L H
Vote for your favourite innovator online at theeyeopener.com. Te top three will receive prizes of up to $500.
PHOTO AND ILLUSTRATION: NATALIA BALCERZAK
10 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Munira Abukar
By Tiffany Crawford
Imagine sharing a small home in a less-than-desirable Etobicoke neighbourhood with your Somali-born parents and eight siblings.
Tis has been Munira Abukar’s reality for 21 years, and it’s what inspired her to become an activist for social housing, community
rights, youth safety and anti-racism.
“It’s the community that raised me, and it’s the community that I have to give back to,” she says.
Te spunky fourth-year criminal justice student is part of several groups, including Ryerson’s Faculty of Arts student advisory,
the Creative Institute for Toronto’s Young Leaders Program and the Canadian Council for Refugees, a non-proft organization
that fghts for the rights of refugees in Canada. In 2011, she was one of Chatelaine’s Women of the Year.
At age 18, Abukar had the opportunity to be a part of the Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC) board but was initially
hesitant. “I didn’t think that my voice mattered on a board of very corporate men,” she says.
Despite her doubts, Abukar’s outspoken nature won her a spot on the committee, making her its youngest member ever. Now she and
12 others are responsible for the TCHC’s fnancial and stafng decisions. She hopes that her voice will help change the structure of
Toronto’s boards.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
In her spare time, Abukar plays the trumpet or violin and
bakes delicious treats for the Sweet Tooth Booth, a small
catering business she runs with one of her younger sisters.
“I’m an intelligent, insightful person despite my age, gender,
race and religion. I’m someone who can make competent
decisions and I can change the world.”
11 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Christina Tachtampa
By Lara Onayak
Born and raised on a farm in Kalamata, Greece,
Christina Tachtampa developed a passion for cultures and their
history at a young age.
Now 24, she’s living out that passion. She has travelled through
Europe and volunteered abroad in Vietnam, Kenya and Ghana with
Alternative Spring Breakers (ASB).
Inspired by a high school teacher and her family’s own journey, she
came to Ryerson to pursue a history major.
“I see myself as a historian,” says the fourth-year student.
“Having a background of history in any profession is so important,
especially when travelling, to know the story behind attractions
and landscapes.”
Tachtampa has been a member of ASB since she was a
frst-year student.
“It feels great [volunteering]. I love every aspect of it,” says
Tachtampa. “It’s also a great learning
process because you always think, ‘I’m
going to teach them so much,’ when,
really, they’re teaching me.”
While volunteering overseas, Tachtampa
experienced the diferent lifestyles and
customs of each community.
“It’s not another resume builder,”
she says. “You’re interacting with a
community and putting yourself in
people’s everyday lives.”
Tis summer, Tachtampa will lead a
group of 16 students from
various faculties on an ASB trip to
Villa Maria, Uganda.
“Giving your time voluntarily is the most rewarding thing you
can do,” says Tachtampa. “You get hooked. When you do one, you
want to continue.”
PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK
12 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Muhammad Butt
By Mackenzie Davidson
Muhammad Atif Butt is more ambitious than he might make
you believe.
Originally from Lahore, Pakistan, the calm and sofspoken
Butt is careful with his words. But he has four masters
degrees to his name and is in the last year of his PhD in
Geographic Information Systems. “You could say I’ve
been in school for a long time,” he says.
Butt is the creator and developer of GeoMeeting,
an ambitious take on traditional online meeting
sofware with real-time map-sharing functionality.
Te platform allows decision-makers to
share and edit maps in real time. Tink
Google Maps with the functionality of
Google Drive, all on top of GoToMeeting
video conferencing. In short, it’s a
wildly ambitious project for just one
person.
Originally designed to allow people
to share geographic data, the concept
expanded rapidly as more uses
were found. “It has applications in
urban planning, public health, and
much more,” Butt says.
“Everytime I get those Ryerson
Security Watch emails I think,
‘Wouldn’t it be useful if students
could get a heat map of where
these incidents occur, and have
it updated in real-time?’”
If you’re the one in charge of
those emails, you should get
in touch with Butt. Soon, this
tech innovator is going to be
too busy revolutionizing urban
planning to help you out.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
13 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Danielle D’Costa
By Meggie Hoegler
Meet Danielle D’Costa, a third-year Ryerson fashion
design student and entrepreneur who is giving Ryerson
students a chance to become fashion entrepreneurs of their
own.
D’Costa is the director of Fashion Zone, an incubator
program housed in the Digital Media Zone that ofers
Ryerson students from all programs a chance to get their
foot in the industry’s door.
“Fashion Zone is a place for students to create and
innovate,” says D’Costa, who lives in Mississauga.
Te program currently hosts eight companies and
22 student participants. “We’ve had students start
their own brands, fashion shows...you name it.”
Fashion Zone’s companies include Man
Up Today, a men’s cosmetics company and
UrbanNativeMag.com, a prospective Native
Canadian magazine publication.
D’Costa combined her fashion know-
how with a passion for environmentally
friendly products by starting Urban
Revolution, an annual fashion show that
showcases environmentally friendly
collections from emerging Toronto
designers.
“Fashion tends to have
this negative connotation,
which I frmly believe is
wrong,” D’Costa says. “You
live your life in fashion. It
is everywhere. I want to
prove that it can be applied
positively to improve our
world.”
She encourages other budding minds
to get involved with entrepreneur
programs, such as Enactus Ryerson,
and to take advantage of other opportunities
around campus.
“As a fashion entrepreneur myself, the most valuable
education I’ve received so far was the real-time learning
experience at Ryerson,” D’Costa says. “You have to
combine your skills, experience, talent and creativity.
Tat’s what employers look for nowadays.
“And always say yes to opportunities. One of them could
change your life.”
PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS
14 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Carlos Wong
By Daniel Melfi
Last summer, Carlos Wong lef on an all-American road trip as a curious
student. He returned to Toronto with an unexpected design internship to
his name and one of the best experiences of his life.
Afer working in Venice Beach, California, the third-year interior design
student is back at Ryerson, where he is putting that experience to good
use with his new project, a 3D design plan that would redefne the ofce
workspace.
“To design a space for a collaborative work culture means looking beyond
the confnes of the repetitive ofce cubicle,” he says. Tat includes creating
private and shared work spaces, adopting non-standardized furniture and
turning wall surfaces into large drawing boards. “Te emphasis is on granting
users freedom to roam, to choose and customize their own
workspace.”
Afer emigrating from Hong Kong in 1999, Wong began life in
Canada through art. “I was always drawing,” he says. “I always
expressed myself through art.” While pursuing that passion was a
serious consideration, Wong says, “I wanted to be involved with
something functional as well.”
Wong is inspired by Italian architect Paolo Soleri, who coined
the term “arcology,” the intersection of architecture and
ecology. “With my project, I would like to achieve the benefts
ofsustainability without sacrifcing comfort,” Wong says.
“Tat’s not easy.”
Ala Roushon, one of Wong’s instructors, commends not only
Wong’s ideas, but the way he expresses them. “Carlos has a
talent for articulating these ambitions through compelling
digital visualizations and models,” she says. A combination
of theory and advanced tools, she says, allows Wong to
“step beyond the expectations of the curriculum.”
While Wong says he is interested in working for a larger
frm in the future, he’s also open to paths outside visual
design. “In the end,” he says, “there are so many doors
this could lead to.”
PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK
15 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Heather Norris
By Isabelle Docto
For Heather Norris, a 54-year-old part-
time nurse, going back to school opened up
opportunities to do research on a topic that was
important to her.
Now a fourth-year student in Ryerson’s School
of Disability Studies, Norris is wrapping up
her research on the housing experiences of
disabled aboriginal women in an urban setting.
Te project is funded by the Undergraduate
Research Opportunity Scholars program.
“I’m looking towards understanding how
these experiences have been impacted by the
intersection of race, gender, disability and
colonial power,” says Norris.
Norris’ Algonquin First Nations ancestry and
personal experiences raising a daughter with
Apert syndrome (which afects the growth of
bones) serve as inspiration for her research.
“Because of [my daughter] and because of my
own ancestry, I wanted to study the oppression
of individuals, families and communities from a
critical disabilities perspective,” she says.
Disability studies professor Dr. Esther Ignagni,
Norris’ faculty advisor for the project, says that
Norris’ work has great value.
“It’s such trail-blazing research because there
is very little that exists around the experiences
of aboriginal women with disabilities,” says
Ignagni. “Her work is really poised to make a
contribution.”
Norris says she was surprised when she was
asked to be a part of Te Eyeopener’s innovators
package.
“It feels weird to be getting all of this attention,”
she says. “But I really appreciate... people
becoming more aware of my research.”
PHOTO: CAROL KAN
16 Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013
INNOVATORS
Sumaya Ugas
By Mackenzie Patterson
Growing up in Northern Etobicoke, Sumaya Ugas and her
family weren’t always treated well by the authorities, whether
it was because of their race, their religion or where they lived.
Now a fourth-year criminal justice student, Ugas is raising
awareness of racial profling and working to bridge the
gap between the Toronto Police Service and marginalized
youth in Toronto.
In cooperation with police, she is helping to train
disadvantaged youth with criminal records to dispute
issues that would normally go unnoticed, giving them
a voice.
“I think a lot of issues confate with me personally
because I am black and Muslim and I was raised in
social housing,” Ugas says, “Te treatment we received
from the people intended to protect us has been below
anything I ever would expect from them.”
Two years ago, Ugas received the Undergraduate
Research Opportunities Scholarship, allowing her
to work with faculty to research the issue of racial
profling of Somali women in the criminal justice
system. “Te stories from these women are very
disheartening,” she says. “Some light needs to be shed
on them to spread advocacy.”
Ugas also co-developed a program called Vantage,
a youth-mentorship program for Somali children
and teens who are struggling with schoolwork or
suspensions.
“I found [it] rewarding to be able to see people
in your own community progress and go
through that journey with them,” Ugas says.
“I will never let go of that experience.”
PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK