Project Code: NWB 03  Client: Waterford Co.

 Council  Date: May 2009 

 

    N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3.  Final Report on Archaeological  Investigations at Site 34 in the townland of Newrath, Co. Kilkenny   Volume 3   
Appendix 9: Palaeoenvironmental Analyses Report, Site 34, Newrath Townland,  Co. Kilkenny 
    By: Dr Scott Timpany  (With contributions by Prof Simon Haslett, Dr Sue Dawson and Dr Jason Jordan)  Excavated under Licence: 04E0319  Director: Brendon Wilkins  Chainage: 670  NGR: 25921 11446

         

               
      Project Code: NWB 03  Client: Waterford Co. Council  Date: May 2009 

 

    N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3.  Final Report on  Archaeological Investigations at Site 34 in the townland of  Newrath, Co. Kilkenny   Volume 3   
Appendix 9: Palaeoenvironmental Analyses Report, Site 34, Newrath  Townland, Co. Kilkenny 
    By: Dr Scott Timpany  (With contributions by Prof Simon Haslett, Dr Sue Dawson and Dr Jason Jordan)  Excavated under Licence: 04E0319  Director: Brendon Wilkins  Chainage: 670  NGR: 25921 11446

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Contents 
  Abstract                Introduction                Methods                Pollen and non‐pollen palynomorphs        Microscopic charcoal analyses          Plant macrofossil analyses        Wood identification analyses        Loss on Ignition           Foraminifera              Diatoms              Results                  Radiocarbon dating          Stratigraphy            Loss on Ignition           Pollen              Plant macrofossils          Foraminifera             Diatoms              Discussion                Stratigraphy, Loss on Ignition and Sea‐level rise      Vegetational History and Human agency      Conclusion                  References                  Appendices                  Figures and Tables  Figure 1 –  Loss on Ignition Results      Figure 2 –  Monolith1 pollen diagram      Figure 3 –  Monolith 2 pollen diagram,      Figure 4 –  Monolith 1 plant macrofossil diagram  Figure 5 – Monolith 2 plant macrofossil diagram   Figure 6 – Reconstructed sea‐level curve for Newrath  Table 1 – Radiocarbon results from SUERC    Table 2 – Idealised stratigraphy for Area 1    Table 3 –  Evidence for Neolithic Agriculture in the   Waterford Area                                                   3  3  3  3  4  4  4  5  5  5  6  6  9  10  11  15  19  19  20  20  23  34   

 

35 

 

41 

                 

10  12  13  16  17  22  6  9  28 

2

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Abstract 
  The excavation of a former wetland area at Newrath, Co. Kilkenny as part of construction of the new  N25 Waterford Bypass has shown it to be an important multi‐period site with finds ranging from Bann  flakes  of  the  Later  Mesolithic,  to  scatters  of  brushwood  from  the  medieval  period.    Here  the  palaeoenvironmental  evidence  from  the  site  is  presented,  where  a  multi‐proxy  approach  was  taken  using pollen, non‐pollen  palynomorph, plant  macrofossil,  foraminifera  and diatom  analyses.    Results  show Newrath was an increasingly wet environment from the Neolithic onwards with a successional  sequence of dry land surface ‐ carr‐woodland – reedswamp – saltmarsh.  Analyses also show evidence  for agricultural practice in both the Neolithic and Bronze Age, with the former taking place during a  period of increased storminess.  Evidence has also been found for the presence of Trichuris sp, which  may be the first archaeological find within Ireland.   

Introduction 
  This report is a continuation of palaeoenvironmental work previously undertaken at Site 34  (NGR  14485/59125  and  Chainage  600‐710,  see  Timpany,  2006)  and  is  a  progression  of  the  work  from  that  assessment  phase,  based  on  the  recommendations  that  were  made.    Work  presented  here  is  concentrated  on  the  sedimentary  sequences  contained  within  Monoliths  1  and 2 taken from Area 1 of the site.  Following on from results gained during the assessment  it was decided that the analyses should focus on the bottom 1m part of the sequence, which  consists of primarily peat layers.  This conclusion was reached after pollen and stratigraphic  assessments showed high potential of sediment mixing and disturbance in the upper 1m part  of the sequence, which is dominated by estuarine silts.  The lower half of the sequence also  contains  the  stratigraphic  layers  where  the  majority  of  the  archaeological  features  from  the  site have been found within.    The  Monoliths  were  subject  to  a  suite  of  multi‐proxy  analyses  that  included  pollen,  non‐ pollen  palynomorph,  microscopic  charcoal,  plant  macrofossil,  wood  identification,  loss  on  ignition  (LOI),  diatom  and  foraminifera  analyses  together  with  further  accelerated  mass  spectrometry (AMS) dating.    This report aims to not only present that data, which has been collected from this study but  also to relate this back to the multi‐period archaeology present at the site (see Wilkins, main  report).    In  particular  discussion  will  be  focused  on  the  changing  environment  of  Newrath  and  the  Waterford  area,  palaeoenvironmental  evidence  for  the  presence  of  people  in  the  landscape, interaction of people with the landscape and other disturbance factors that can be  identified in the palaeoenvironmental record, in particular those relating to tidal influence in  relation to sea‐level rise.   

Methods 
 

Pollen and non‐pollen palynomorphs 
Pollen analysis was undertaken on samples of 1cm3 from the two monoliths.  Samples were  taken  at  intervals  of  approximately  2cm  to  8cm  from  both  monoliths.    Pollen  samples  were  prepared  using  standard  preparation  methods  (cf.  Barber,  1976).      A  counting  method  of  recording  500  pollen  grains  excluding  spores  and  obligate  aquatics  was  employed  for  the  assessment  of  the  pollen.    Plant  taxonomic  nomenclature  follows  the  order  of  Stace  (1997).  Cereal‐type pollen grains have been identified using the criteria given by Faegri et al (1989)  and  take  into  account  suggestions  of  Moore  et  al  (1991).    Non‐pollen  palynomorphs  (e.g. 

3

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

fungal  spores  and  testate  amoeba)  were  identified  using  illustrations  and  descriptions  in  publications including van Geel (1978, 1986), van Geel et al (2003) and Ellis and Ellis (1997).   All rare types are shown as a cross, where one cross denotes one grain/spore.       Pollen  diagrams  were  constructed  using  the  TILIA  and  TG  view;  versions  2.0.2  packages  (Grimm  2004),  and  have  been  zoned  using  the  CONISS  package.    The  pollen  diagrams  are  given in Figures 2 and 3.   

Microscopic charcoal analyses 
During  pollen  counting  microscopic  charcoal  was  identified  as  either  grass‐type  (to  include  Poaceae  and  Cyperaceae  charcoal)  or  wood  microscopic  charcoal,  where  enough  of  the  structure was complete to identify.  These counts have been added to the pollen diagrams as  total  number  counted  and  are  not  intended  to  show  all  microscopic  charcoal  present,  only  that which can be safely identified.  These counts have been added to aid in sighting trends  between the vegetational and microscopic charcoal records.      The  microscopic  charcoal  area  using  the  point  count  method  (Clark,  1982)  is  also  given  in  each  pollen  diagram,  as  this  shows  more  clearly  the  fire  history  of  the  site.    Microscopic  charcoal  was  counted  using  the  points  of  the  graticule  (200  points),  with  those  pieces  “touching”  the  graticule  point  being  added  to  the  count.    Generally  10  fields  of  view  were  recorded  per  traverse  of  the  slide,  at  a  magnification  of  x100.    Microscopic  charcoal  was  counted  until  50  Lycopodium  spores  were  recorded.      This  data  is  presented  in  the  pollen  diagrams shown in Figures 2 and 3.   

Plant macrofossil analyses 
The monoliths were sub‐sampled for plant macrofossil analysis at intervals of 4cm.  All of the  remaining sediment from each level (c. 50ml in volume) was removed for analyses following  sub‐sampling  for  other  analyses  such  as  pollen.    A  glass  vial  was  also  filled  with  sediment  from each level of approximately 10g, in case any further study is warranted.     Samples  were  washed  through  a  small  stack  of  sieves  with  1mm  and  500μm  meshes.    The  remains were sorted and identified using a binocular microscope at magnification of x10, and  x40  where  greater  magnification  was  needed  for  identification.    Identifications  were  confirmed  using  modern  reference  material  and  seed  atlases  including  Cappers  et  al  (2006).   Plant  taxonomic  nomenclature  used  in  the  table  follows  the  order  of  Stace  (1997).    Data  is  presented in diagram form using the TILIA package outlined above and are shown in Figures  4 and 5.   

Wood identification analyses 
Samples were thin sliced along radial, tangential and transverse sections using a razor blade  and  then  stained  using  bleach  before  being  mounted  on  a  slide  in  glycerol  and  examined  under  a  microscope  at  x100  and  x400  when  required.    Wood  sections  were  identified  using  features  described  by  Schweingruber  (1978,  1990)  and  IAWA  (1989).    The  identified  wood  fragments form part of the plant macrofossil analyses and are included within the diagrams  for each monolith.   

Radiocarbon dating 
Samples  were  washed  and  sorted  using  the  same  method  as  for  the  plant  macrofossil  analysis,  with  the  exception  of  distilled  water  being  used  to  wash  the  samples  through  the  sieves to avoid contamination.  Identified plant material was used for dating and was stored  in  glass  vials  in  distilled  water  in  a  refrigerator,  again  to  avoid  contamination  before  being 

4

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

sent  for  AMS  radiocarbon  dating  at  SUERC  (Scottish  Universities  Environmental  Research  Centre).    A  further  eight  samples  were  sent  for  dating  and  the  results  of  these  and  the  previous five (see Timpany, 2006) are presented in Table 1.   

Loss on Ignition 
Loss on ignition is used to assess the relative organic content of the samples, and thus detect  mineral inwash levels through the peat profile.   Dry samples are weighed before and after  prolonged heating: the difference in mass being taken as a measure of organic content.  The  method  employed  for  this  analysis  was  high  temperature  (800+°  C)  ignition,  to  allow  full  ignition of the relatively high organic content of the peat.  The samples were not thought to  contain  a  significant  carbonate  component,  so  it  was  not  necessary  to  use  low  temperature  ignition to avoid the decomposition of carbonates (Rowell 1994). 

  Foraminifera (Prof Simon Haslett) 
Twelve foraminifera samples were sub‐sampled from Monoliths 1 and 2 and sent to Professor  Simon Haslett at Bath University for analysis.  For details on method see separate report on  foraminifera given in Appendix I.   

Diatoms (Dr Jason Jordan) 
Twelve  diatom  samples  were  taken  from  Monoliths  1  and  2  and  sent  to  Dr  Jason  Jordan  at  Coventry University for analysis.  For details on method see separate report on diatoms given  in Appendix II. 

5

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Results  
  Radiocarbon dating 
The  radiocarbon  dating  results  are  presented  in  Table  1.    Radiocarbon  dates  have  been  calibrated using OxCal version 3.10 (Bronk Ramsay, 2005) to 95.4% probability.      Table 1 Radiocarbon results from SUERC  Monolith  Sample  Dating  Date BP Date  Radiocarbon determination no  depth  material  Calibrated  (cm)  1870±35BP 1  84‐85  Monocotyledon  1870±35  Cal AD  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 60‐240  10124) 
Atmospheric data from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

2100BP 2000BP 1900BP 1800BP 1700BP 1600BP

Radiocarbon determination

68.2% probability 80AD (57.5%) 170AD 190AD (10.7%) 210AD 95.4% probability 60AD (95.4%) 240AD

200CalBC

CalBC/CalAD

200CalAD Calibrated date

400CalAD

Atmo sp h eric d ata fro m Reimer et al (2 0 0 4 );Ox Cal v 3 .1 0 Bro n k Ramsey (2 0 0 5 ); cu b r:5 sd :1 2 p ro b u sp [ch ro n ]

Radiocarbon determination

99‐100 

Monocotyledon  1665±35  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 14680) 

Cal AD  250‐530 

1900BP 1800BP 1700BP 1600BP 1500BP 1400BP 1300BP

1665±35BP
68.2% probability 340AD (68.2%) 425AD 95.4% probability 250AD (91.1%) 440AD 480AD ( 4.3%) 530AD

CalBC/CalAD

200CalAD

400CalAD Calibrated date

600CalAD

Atmo sp h eric d ata fro m R eimer et al (2 0 0 4 );Ox Cal v 3 .1 0 Bro n k Ramsey (2 0 0 5 ); cu b r:5 sd :1 2 p ro b u sp [ch ro n ]

R adiocarbon determ ination

124‐125  Monocotyledon  1965±35  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 14681) 

50 Cal BC  to Cal AD  50 

2200BP 2100BP 2000BP 1900BP 1800BP 1700BP

1965±35BP
68.2% probability 20BC ( 0.9%) 10BC AD (67.3%) 75AD 95.4% probability 50BC (91.0%) 90AD 100AD ( 4.4%) 130AD

200CalBC

CalBC/CalAD Calibrated date

200CalAD

400CalAD

Radiocarbon determination

149‐150  Monocotyledon  2045±40  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 14682) 

170 Cal BC  to Cal AD  60 

Atmo sp h eric d ata fro m Reimer et al (2 0 0 4 );Ox Cal v 3 .1 0 Bro n k Ramsey (2 0 0 5 ); cu b r:5 sd :1 2 p ro b u sp [ch ro n ]

2400BP 2300BP 2200BP 2100BP 2000BP 1900BP 1800BP

2045±40BP
68.2% probability 150BC ( 1.9%) 140BC 110BC (66.3%) 10AD 95.4% probability 170BC (95.4%) 60AD

400CalBC

200CalBC

CalBC/CalAD

200CalAD

400CalAD

Calibrated date
Atmospheric data from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

Radiocarbon determination

168‐169  Rubus sp. Seeds 

4150±35  (SUERC‐ 10125) 

2880‐2620  Cal BC 

4400BP 4300BP 4200BP 4100BP 4000BP 3900BP

4150±35BP
68.2% probability 2870BC (14.7%) 2830BC 2820BC ( 5.7%) 2800BC 2780BC (47.8%) 2660BC 95.4% probability 2880BC (95.4%) 2620BC

3000CalBC

2800CalBC

2600CalBC

2400CalBC

Calibrated date

 

6

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Atmo sp h eric d ata fro m Reimer et al (2 0 0 4 );Ox Cal v 3 .1 0 Bro n k Ramsey (2 0 0 5 ); cu b r:5 sd :1 2 p ro b u sp [ch ro n ]

Radiocarbon determination

209‐210  Prunus  spinosa  4505±35  fruit stone  (SUERC‐ 14687) 

3360‐3090  Cal BC 

4800BP

4505±35BP
4700BP 4600BP 4500BP 4400BP 4300BP 4200BP 4100BP 68.2% probability 3340BC (11.3%) 3310BC 3300BC ( 7.6%) 3260BC 3240BC (49.4%) 3100BC 95.4% probability 3360BC (95.4%) 3090BC

3600CalBC

3400CalBC

3200CalBC Calibrated date

3000CalBC

2800CalBC

Radiocarbon determination

233‐234  Quercus  and  4850±35  Betula buds and  (SUERC‐ bud scales.  10126) 

3710‐3620  Cal BC 

Atmospheric data from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

5200BP 5100BP 5000BP 4900BP 4800BP 4700BP 4600BP 4500BP

4850±35BP
68.2% probability 3700BC ( 7.0%) 3680BC 3670BC (51.2%) 3630BC 3560BC ( 9.9%) 3540BC 95.4% probability 3710BC (73.7%) 3620BC 3580BC (21.7%) 3530BC

4000CalBC

3800CalBC

3600CalBC

3400CalBC

3200CalBC

Calibrated date

Radiocarbon determination

124‐125  Monocotyledon  2360±35  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 10127) 

540‐370  Cal BC 

Atmospheric data from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

2700BP 2600BP 2500BP 2400BP 2300BP 2200BP 2100BP

2360±35BP
68.2% probability 510BC (31.0%) 430BC 420BC (37.2%) 380BC 95.4% probability 720BC ( 2.1%) 690BC 540BC (93.3%) 370BC

800CalBC

600CalBC

400CalBC

200CalBC

Calibrated date

Radiocarbon determination

134‐135  Monocotyledon  2210±40  plant tissue  (SUERC‐ 14688) 

390‐180  Cal BC 

Atmospheric d ata from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

2500BP 2400BP 2300BP 2200BP 2100BP 2000BP 1900BP

2210±40BP
68.2% probability 360BC ( 8.5%) 340BC 330BC (59.7%) 200BC 95.4% probability 390BC (95.4%) 180BC

600CalBC

400CalBC

200CalBC Calibrated date

CalBC/CalAD

200CalAD

Radiocarbon determination

157‐158  Rubus  fruticosus  3935±35  fruits  (SUERC‐ 14689) 

2500‐2290  Cal BC 

Atmospheric d ata from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

4300BP 4200BP 4100BP 4000BP 3900BP 3800BP 3700BP

3935±35BP
68.2% probability 2490BC (68.2%) 2340BC 95.4% probability 2570BC ( 7.7%) 2520BC 2500BC (87.7%) 2290BC

3000CalBC

2800CalBC

2600CalBC

2400CalBC

2200CalBC

2000CalBC

Calibrated date

Radiocarbon determination

189‐190  Alnus  and  4540±40  Betula buds and  (SUERC‐ bud scales  14690) 

3370‐3090  Cal BC 

Atmospheric d ata from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

4540±40BP
4800BP 68.2% probability 3370BC (19.1%) 3320BC 3280BC ( 0.8%) 3260BC 3240BC (48.3%) 3110BC 95.4% probability 3370BC (95.4%) 3090BC

4600BP

4400BP

4200BP

3800CalBC

3600CalBC

3400CalBC

3200CalBC

3000CalBC

2800CalBC

Calibrated date

7

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Radiocarbon determination

200‐201  Quercus  and  4580±40  Betula buds and  (SUERC‐ bud scales  14691) 

3380‐3260  Cal BC 

Atmospheric d ata from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

4580±40BP
4800BP 68.2% probability 3500BC (12.5%) 3460BC 3380BC (32.3%) 3330BC 3220BC (12.3%) 3180BC 3160BC (11.1%) 3120BC 95.4% probability 3500BC (18.8%) 3430BC 3380BC (39.7%) 3260BC 3240BC (36.9%) 3100BC

4600BP

4400BP

4200BP

3800CalBC

3600CalBC

3400CalBC

3200CalBC

3000CalBC

2800CalBC

Calibrated date

Radiocarbon determination

211‐212  Quercus  and  4765±35  Betula buds and  (SUERC‐ bud scales.  10128) 

3640‐3380  Cal BC 

Atmospheric data from Reimer et al (2004);OxCal v3.10 Bronk Ramsey (2005); cub r:5 sd:12 prob usp[chron]

5000BP 4900BP 4800BP 4700BP 4600BP 4500BP

4765±35BP
68.2% probability 3640BC ( 8.7%) 3620BC 3610BC (59.5%) 3520BC 95.4% probability 3640BC (86.0%) 3500BC 3430BC ( 9.4%) 3380BC

3800CalBC

3600CalBC Calibrated date

3400CalBC

3200CalBC

 

8

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Stratigraphy 
The stratigraphic units from within the monoliths have been previously discussed during the  assessment stage but are returned to here briefly to present an addendum of that information,  particularly in  regard  to  the  added  radiocarbon  dates  (see  Table  1).    The  radiocarbon  dated  levels have been used as index points in the construction of a sea‐level curve for the site and  this is presented in Figure 6.     Table 2 Idealised stratigraphy for Area 1.   Unit   Stratigraphy description  Context  Dates Depth  numbers  (cm)  IX  VIII  Topsoil  Series  of  estuarine  silts  –  base  of  which  is  probable  erosion surface  34008  34001  34002  34003  34045  34035  Estuarine  silt/reed  peat  34034  transition  34013  34038  Modern    0‐10  10‐100 

Relevant  pollen  zone  ‐  ‐ 

VII 

Top: c. 1870±35 BP (GU‐ 13996; 60‐240 cal AD) 

100‐ 125/150 

VI 

Reed peat 

34033 B 

IV 

Reed/wood  peat  34004 B  transition  (possible  non‐ 34031  sequence here)  Wood  peat  –  with  34004 A  intercalated silts*  34003 A  34021*  34046 

Top;  2045±40  (SUERC‐14682; 125/150‐ 170  cal  BC  to  cal  AD  60)  to  160  2360±35  BP  (GU‐13999;  540‐ 370 cal BC)  Top:  3935±35  (SUERC‐14689;  160‐170  2500‐2290 cal BC)  Top:  4150±35  BP  (SUERC‐ 10125; 2880‐2620 cal BC)    Silt  layer:  4540±40  (SUERC‐ 14690;  3370‐3090  cal  BC)  to  4580±40 (SUERC‐14691; 3380‐ 3260 cal BC)    Base:  4765±35  BP  (GU‐14000;  3430‐3380 cal BC)  to 4850±35  BP  (SUERC‐10126;  3710‐3620  cal BC)  Late Mesolithic      170‐230 

NWB1f  NWB1e    NWB2f  NWB2e  NWB1e  NWB1d    NWB2d  NWB1c    NWB2c  NWB1c  NWB1b  NWB1a    NWB2c  NWB2b  NWB2a 

III  II  I   

Dryland surface  Glacial till   Bedrock? 

34100  34021  Not seen 

‐  235‐?  ‐ 

‐  ‐  ‐ 

         

9

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Loss on Ignition 
Results for the Loss on Ignition study are provided below in Figure 1.    Figure 1 ‐ Loss on Ignition Results   

% L.O.I. NWB Monolith 1
100.00 90.00 80.00 70.00 % L.O.I. 60.00 50.00 40.00 30.00 20.00 10.00 0.00 226 210 194 162 154 138 132 123 114 106 94 80 Depth (cm) %L.O.I.

% L.O.I. NWB Monolith 2
100.00 90.00 80.00 70.00 % L.O.I. 60.00 50.00 40.00 30.00 20.00 10.00 0.00 208 198 196 193 176 Depth (cm) 160 148 130 122 %L.O.I.

     

10

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

The  Loss  on  Ignition  study  shows  a  general  increase  in  organic  content  following  the  initiation  of  peat.    The  curve  for  Monolith  1  increases  sharply  from  20%  to  51%  as  peat  develops  and  then  begins  to  level  out  with  organic  content  remaining  high  within  the  50%  margin throughout the wood peat (Unit IV) and wood peat‐reed peat transition stage (Unit  V).    The  curve  for  Monolith  1  shows  an  initial  dip  after  peat  develops,  falling  from  30%  to  22%.  This dip ties in with a layer of silt being present within the wood peat and highlights  the  high  minerogenic  content  of  this  layer.    Following  this  initial  deposition  of  silts  organic  content  begins  to  rise  as  peat  accumulation  increases,  with  values  increasing  to  over  70%  within  Unit  V.    Organic  content  values  are  then  seen  to  decline  in  both  Monoliths  as  sediments change from being predominantly peat based to minerogenic based signalled by a  change in the stratigraphic record from reedswamp (Unit VI) to eventual estuarine conditions  (Unit VIII) as the site becomes inundated.  In Monolith 1 this change can be seen by a rapid  fall  in  values  from  50‐20%  and  then  levels  out  at  around  10%  as  the  site  is  submerged.   Monolith  2  also  shows  a  rapid  decline  in  values  of  organic  content  from  72‐28%,  however,  values  then  rise  to  54%  within  the  reedswamp‐estuarine  silts  transition  stage  (Unit  (VII),  highlighting  a  period  within  this  stage  of  high  organic  content,  possibly  of  renewed  peat  development.   

Pollen  
Results  of  pollen  analysis  for  both  monoliths  are  shown  in  the  pollen  diagrams  given  in  Figures 2 and 3.     

Monolith 1 
  Zone NWB1a (234‐210cm)  The pollen assemblage indicates that Quercus (oak) woodland dominated the landscape with  values  of  40‐60%  TLP  (Total  Land  Pollen).    Along  with  Quercus,  pollen  values  for  Alnus  glutinosa  (alder)  and  Corylus  avellana  (hazel)  are  also  high  at  10‐20%  TLP  indicating  they  formed  significant  parts  of  the  wooded  landscape.    Poaceae  (grasses)  and  Cyperaceae  (sedges)  are  present  at  around  10%  TLP  suggesting  they  formed  the  dominant  field  layer.   Small  peaks  in  herbaceous  species  such  as  Aster‐type  (michaelmas  daisies)  and  Plantago  lanceolata  (ribwort  plantain)  can  be  seen  together  with  the  appearance  of  Hordeum  group  (barely) pollen. Some background micro‐charcoal can also be seen     Zone NWB1b (210‐185cm)  Quercus pollen values remain high in this zone although fall slightly from the previous zone  to c.40% TLP.  Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana values gradually rise in this zone to form  approximately 20% TLP by the end of the zone.  A small peak in Ilex (holly) pollen occurs in  this zone.  Poaceae pollen values fall slightly to the end of the zone from around 10‐5% TLP.   A large peak can be seen in Filipendula (meadow sweet) pollen values of up to 15% TLP, while  smaller  peaks  occur  in  Aster‐type  and  Galium‐type  (bedstraws).    Micro‐charcoal  is  again  present  at  low  values.    No  pollen  was  recorded  on  slides  from  206‐208cm  indicating  high  minerogenic content of these levels.    Zone NWB1c (185‐160cm)  Alnus  glutinosa,  Quercus  and  Corylus  avellana  pollen  continue  to  dominate  the  arboreal  assemblage at between 17‐40% TLP.  There are small rises in the pollen of Salix (willow) and  Fraxinus  excelsior  (ash)  within  this  zone.    There  is  a  small  rise  also  in  Cyperaceae  pollen  to  c.17%  TLP,  Poaceae  values  remain  consistent  at  around  10%  TLP,  while  Filipendula  pollen  declines.  Micro‐charcoal levels increase slightly during this zone.   

11

Dates (BP)

1665±35

1965±35

2045±40

4150±35

4505±35

4850±35
Depth (cm)

95

100

120

115

110

105

150

145

140

135

130

125

170

165

160

155

190

185

180

175

220

215

210

205

200

195

235

230

225

Lithology

Pin u Ul s m Qu u s er c us

NWB03 Monolith1 pollen diagram (500 counts)

20 40 60
Be tu Aln la us g

20
Trees

lu t i

20 20 20 20 10 20 40 60 80 100
NWB1f NWB1c NWB1a NWB1b NWB1d NWB1e

Shrubs Dwarf shrubs Herbs

no sa Ti l ia Ile xa Fr q u ax ifo Co inu lium r yl s e us xce a v ls Sa ell io r lix an So a rb u Pu snu typ Pr s s e un p. Pr us s un p Cr us ino s a ta pa aVib eg d us typ ur n u s - typ e Vib u sp e ur n m o . He u pu d e m l lus Lo r a h a nt n e a Ca ice ra lix na ll Ra un a pe ric n v ly Ur un c u lg a m e t ic ula r is n u m ce My a ae r Ch ica g e a Ca no po le r d Ly yop h iace ch yl a Di nis lace e an - ty a Po t hu pe e in de ly st. Ru gon typ e m e um Hy x o - ty pe bt pe Ri ric usi be u m fo Ro s- ty sp liu s -ty sa p e . pe ce Ch r ys a e Fil os sp ip e p l . nd eni ula u m Po off ten ici Fa til na b a la leLo ce typ tu s ae e Tr -t y ind if o pe e t. Ly lium t hr -t Ap um ype ia s Er cea p . yn e An g iu thr m -t Ap isc ype ium ust Ci cu inu yp e Pe ta v nda uc iro tu m He e d sa- - t r ac a nu typ yp e Pla le m e nta um p al Pla go sp us nta ind h on t re t Pla g o c e t. dyliu ype n mPla ta g or o om n t yp nta op e Me g a r o l it im us l Ga am p anc a liu yr u e ol Va m- t m- at a ler yp typ e Su ia n e a c As cisa dio t er p r ica La -t y a te -t yp pe n s e c is La tu ca ctu e Ta ca ra s Ar xa c a tiva te m um - t An is - ty yp e the ia- t pe Cy m yp pe is- t e ra c yp ea e Po e ac ea e Po a Ho ce a r de e > M i um 3 5 u cr o g ro m -ch ar c up tr e oa es l sh ru dw a he r
Zone

bs rf s bs hr u b

s

Dates (BP)

1665±35

1965±35

2045±40

4150±35

4505±35

NWB03 Monolith1 pollen diagram (500 counts)

4850±35
Depth (cm)

95

130

125

120

115

110

105

100

145

140

135

200

195

190

185

180

175

170

165

160

155

150

215

210

205

235

230

225

220

Lithology

20 20 10 5 5 20 40 60 80 100
NWB1f NWB1c NWB1a NWB1b NWB1d NWB1e Zone

Aquatics Spores NPP's

Ny m N u ph ph aea M ar a yri s lba M oph p. en y St yan llum ra t h a Po tiot es lte t a es trif rnif T y mo alo olia lor p g id t u Eq ha l et on es a m uis atif Pt et oli er um a op Os sida m (m Ad un on o ian da Pi t u reg let e lul m a ) in ar ca lis H y ia de t. m g pillu en lob s Po ly p oph ulif -ve Pt od yll era ne ris er iu um idi m um Th ely D r pt yo eri Sp pt e s p ha ris alu T y gn st r pe um is Ty 2 p (G T y e 3B ela s p T y e 4 (Ple inos p (A o p T y e 7A nt h s po ora ra r p r T y e 8 (C h ost o s p etic u pe (A ae me p) lis po T y 10 -G) tom lla ra pe (C ium fue ) T y 11 on gia sp pe idi . ) na T y 14 a) ) pe `( T y 1 Me pe 6 lio la T y 19 cf . pe nie T y 20 pe ss lea T y 22 p na ) T y e 25 (H er pe (c po T y 27 f. C tric p h T y e 2 (T ill last iella pe 8 ( eti ero s T y 44 Sp a s sp pp pe (U erm ph ori ) T y 47 st a agn um uli top i) pe ca na ho T y 55 ri c de res pp A/ inu us o T y e 7 B (S m ta) f C ) pe 2 or (A d op T y 90 l ed on aria pe po a Ty 1 ru spp da pe 12 st i ) ) (C T y 11 ca er p ) 6 T y e 12 (C y cop pe 1 m he ati ra T y 12 os sp pe 5 ph . ) T y 14 ae pe 0 ra T y 14 ) pe 3 T y 16 (D i p 9 po ro Ty e 1 the 70 pe ca T y 20 (R pe 7 ivu rh iz o (G la T y 26 lom ria ph p 2 -t y ilia T y e 35 us p ) e) pe 7 cf . (P T y 35 u fas pe 9d c c cic T y 40 (B ini ula pe 6 ac a-t tum Ty 4 tro ype pe 94 de ) ) T y 52 sm p 7 ium T y e 70 be pe 7 tu (C T y 70 lic pe 8a ulc ola it a T y 70 ) lna pe 8b T y 72 ac pe 9 hr as Am 9 po 30 pa c ra Ba lli ) c tr fer Ba od ina c tr es la Sp od miu uri or es m T r os miu ob ich ch m o M uri is m ab v atu icr s - a o- ty p mi rupt m c h e ra um bil ar Fo co e al ra W min oo if Gr d m era as icr t re s m o-c h es ic ro ar -ch coa ar l co sh al ru bs dw ar fs hr he ub rb s s

D ates BP

2360±35

2210±40

3935±35

4540±40

4580±40

4765±35
D epth ( c m)

215 95

210

205

200

195

190

185

180

175

170

165

160

155

150

145

140

135

130

125

120

115

110

105

100

Lithology

P in u Ul s mu Qu s er cu s

NWB03 Monolith 2 pollen diagram (500 counts)

20 40 60
Be tu A ln l a us gl u tin os a

20 40
Trees

20 20 20 40 10 20 40 60 80 100
NWB2f NWB2c NWB2a NWB2b NWB2d NWB2e

Shrubs Dwarf shrubs Herbs

Ca rp Ti l i nus ia be Il e tul xa us qu Fr ax i fo Co i nus li um ry l ex us c e av l s io Sa ell li x an r a So rbu Ma s-t lu y p P u s -ty e p n P r us s e un p. P r us s un p Cr us p i nos at a aV ib aeg dus- ty pe urn us s ty p V ib um p. e u V ib rnum sp. u He rnum opul u d Ca era lant s l lu he an E m na li x a pe vul g Ra tr u ar is nu m nc Ur ti c u l a ce My a ae r ic Ch a g al e Ca nopo e r d S c y oph i ace le y a Ly rant ll ace e c h hu ae Ru nis - s -ty i nd me typ pe et. Hy x a e p c Ro er ic u etos sa m a-t Ch c ea s p. ype r e Fi l y sos s p. i pe pl Ru ndu eniu bu l a m o ff P o s- ty ic in ten pe al e Fa ti ll -ty ba a pe Lo cea tu e V ic s-ty i nde t. ia- pe Tr ty p ifo e Ly l ium thr -t A p um y pe s ia E r c ea p. yn e A p gi um iu Ci m in type cu u P e ta v n d a t uc i ros um He eda a- t - ty rac nu ype pe Lit le m ho um pa S y s pe sp lus t m r m ho re P la phy um ndy -ty p nta tum - ty p l ium e P la go of e -ty nta in fic in pe P la go det al e- t nta co . yp P la go ron e n ta m o p S c go ar it us r im Ga ophu lanc a l iu l ar eol V a m-t ia- ata ler y p ty p e S c i an e ab a d S u i os i oic cc a c a-t S e is a ol u ype rra pr a mb A s tula ten ari a te s La r- typ type is c e Ci tuc a ch e La ori u ctu m Ta c a i nch rax s a ub A r ac tiv a ustem um -ty ty Cy is i -ty p pe pe pe a-ty e ra ce pe Po ae ac ea e Po a A v c eae e Ho na-T >35u rd r m S e eumiti cum c Mi al e c grou grou c ro er p p -c h eal arc e g oa rou tre p l es sh ru bs dw arf sh ru he bs rbs

Zone

Dates BP

2360±35

2210±40

3935±35

4540±40

4580±40

4765±35
Depth (cm)

95

115

110

105

100

140

135

130

125

120

155

150

145

190

185

180

175

170

165

160

210

205

200

195

215

Lithology

NWB03 Monolith 2 pollen diagram (500 counts)

20 20 10 20 50 100
NWB2f NWB2c NWB2a NWB2b NWB2d NWB2e Zone

Aqautics Spores NPPs

Nu p Hy ha r dr o sp Ca co . litr tyle Ali ich sm e- vu lg St a- typ a ri s- t ra t typ e yp iot e Po e es tam a Ty o lo i ph ge d e Eq a la t on s ui ti Pt set u folia er o m ps id a Os (m mu on Ad n d ole ian a r t e) Po t u eg ind lyp m c alis et. Pt od ap er i iu illu d iu m s-v m en Th e ri e ly s Dr pte yo ri Sp pt er s p a is lus h t ris Ty a gn pe um Ty 1 pe (G Ty 2 ( elas pe G e sin Ty 3B las o s pe ( P ino po Ty 4 s ra l pe (A n eo sp po ra sp p Ty 7A th r o ra r e ) pe ( C os ti 8 ( h a to m spp ) cu lis Ty po pe A -G e to e l la r a) Ty 10 ) m iu fu p ( m eg Ty e 11 Con sp ia n id i pe .) a) a) Ty 14 pe ` (M Ty 16 eli ola p Ty e 19 cf. pe nie Ty 20 ss pe lea Ty 22 na pe ( H ) Ty 25 er pe ( c po Ty 27 f. C tr ich pe ( T la ie Ty 28 ille ster lla s pe ( S t ia os p p Ty 44 p e sp p or ) pe ( U r m hag ium Ty 47 stu a to ni) ca pe lin pho r ic a d re Ty 55 A inu eu s o pe /B m) sta f C Ty 61 (S op ) pe ( Z or d ed Ty 72 yg a r po m a ia pe ( A da sp Ty 90 lon t ac ) p) pe a r ea u s cf Ty 11 tic . g pe 2 a) r ac (C Ty 11 er c illim pe 6 (C o p a) Ty 12 pe 1 ym a he r tio a s Ty 12 sp p .) pe 5 ha Ty 14 er a pe 0 ) Ty 14 pe 3 Ty 16 (Dip pe 9 o ro Ty 17 the pe 0 ca Ty 20 (Riv rh i pe 7 ula zo ph Ty 26 (G lo r ia ilia pe 2 mu - ty pe ) Ty 35 sc ) p 3 f. f Ty e 35 A as pe 7 cic (P u la Ty 35 pe 9d ucc tu m Ty 40 ( B inia ) pe 6 act - ty ro d p e Ty 49 pe 4 es ) mi Ty 52 um pe 7 be Ty 56 t ul 9 pe ico Ty 70 la) pe 7 (C Ty 70 pe 8a ulci ta l Ty 70 na pe 8b ac Ty 72 hr a pe 9 sp An 93 or a tho 0c ) Am st om p Ba a llife e lla c r f Ba tr od in a o rm ctr esm la u osa ri Pe od zic esm iu m Pr ula iu ob o ot o liv m v Sp cr e ide ab r a tum or o a a up fa r t um Tr sc ich h i in o M i ur i sma sa cr o s-t -ch ype m ir a b il ar c e Fo oa r am l ini fe r W a oo dm Gr as ic tr e s m ro -c e s icr h a o- c r co sh ru ha a l bs rco dw al a rf he shr u r bs bs

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Zone NWB1d (160‐144cm)  Quercus  pollen  values  begin  to  fall  during  this  zone  to  c.20%  TLP,  while  pollen  values  of  Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana rise slightly from the previous zone.  Cyperaceae pollen  values remain at around 10‐20% within this zone, with Poaceae pollen rising to around 15%  TLP by the end of the zone.  Plantago lanceolata pollen values begins to rise towards the end of  this  zone  as  do  Pteridium  (bracken),  Pteropsida  (monolete)  indet  (ferns)  and  micro‐charcoal  values.    Zone NWB1e (144‐114cm)   Pollen values of Quercus and Alnus glutinosa decline slightly through this zone to around 17%  TLP and 15% TLP, respectively.  Corylus avellana values remain consistent through this zone,  while  small  increases  are  seen  in  the  pollen  values  of  Salix,  Fraxinus  excelsior  and  Betula.   Poaceae  pollen  now  dominates  the  herbaceous  assemblage  at  over  20%,  while  Cyperaceae  pollen  remains  level  at  around  10%  TLP  before  gradually  declining  to  the  end  of  the  zone.   Hordeum‐group  pollen  appears  in  this  zone,  wile  Plantago  lanceolata  and  Lactuca  sativa‐type  (lettuces)  become  more  consistent  through  the  zone.    A  large  increase  in  Pteridium  values  takes place as do micro‐charcoal values.    Zone NWB1f (114‐96cm)  A slight rise occurs in pollen values of Corylus avellana and Salix, while there is a very slight  decline in the values of Quercus and Alnus glutinosa to around 15% and 10% TLP, respectively.   Cyperaceae values also slightly fall to around 7% TLP, while Poaceae pollen remains high at  around  20%  TLP.    Chenopodiaceae  (goosefoot)  pollen  values  rise  slightly  in  this  zone,  while  Lactuca  sativa‐type  pollen also  remains at  around 2.5%  TLP.  Hordeum‐group pollen is again  present.    Pteropsida  (monolete)  indet  and  Pteridium  values  decline  during  this  zone  while  there is a large increase in micro‐charcoal.   

Monolith 2 
  Zone NWB2a (211‐205cm)  Quercus pollen dominates this zone with values of up to 50% TLP, while Alnus glutinosa and  Corylus  avellana  pollen  values  are  also  high  at  around  20%  TLP.    Pinus  (pine)  pollen  is  also  present at around 5% TLP.  Poaceae and Cyperaceae pollen values dominate the herbaceous  assemblage at around 10% TLP.  Micro‐charcoal is present in low values.    Zone NWB2b (205‐184cm)  Pollen values of Corylus avellana and Alnus glutinosa remain consistent at around 15‐20% TLP  during this zone, while Quercus pollen continues to dominate the assemblage at around 40%  TLP.  There are peaks in Ilex pollen during this zone at up to 10% TLP, together with smaller  peaks  in  Ulmus  (elm).    Poaceae  and  Cyperaceae  pollen  values  are  around  10%  TLP,  while  cereal  type  pollen  is  present  with  the  appearance  of  Hordeum‐group  and  Avena‐Triticum‐ group (oat‐wheat).  Peaks in Filipendula, Plantago lanceolata and Cicuta virosa‐type (cowbane)  pollen also occur in this zone.  There is a peak in micro‐charcoal in this zone.    Zone NWB2c (184‐160cm)  There is large increase in Alnus glutinosa pollen values in this zone, peaking at over 40% TLP,  while Quercus pollen values remain high at around 40% TLP, as do Corylus avellana values at  c.15%  TLP.    Cyperaceae  pollen  values  increase  slightly  in  this  zone  to  just  over  10%  TLP,  while  Poaceae  values  remain  consistent  at  around  5‐10%  TLP.    There  is  an  appearance  of  Avena‐Triticum‐group pollen in this zone, with small peaks in Ranunculaceae (buttercup) and 

14

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Potentilla‐type  (cinquefoils)  pollen,  while  Filipendula  pollen  is  consistently  present.    Micro‐ charcoal values also rise slightly towards the end of this zone.    Zone NWB2d (160‐146cm)  Alnus glutinosa and Quercus pollen values dominate the arboreal assemblage both at around  35% TLP.  Corylus avellana values continue to increase slightly up to around 17%, while there  are small peaks in Ulmus, Fraxinus excelsior and Salix.  Cyperaceae and Poaceae pollen values  rise  towards  the  end  of  the  zone,  while  there  are  appearances  of  Avena‐Triticum‐group  and  Secale  cereale‐group  (rye)  pollen.    There  are  also  small  peaks  of  Plantago  lanceolata  and  Heracleum sphondylium‐type (hogweed) towards the end of this zone.  Pteropsida (monolete)  indet values rise towards the end of the zone as do micro‐charcoal values.    Zone NWB2e (146‐120cm)  Quercus pollen values begin to decline slightly in this zone to around 20% TLP, while values  of Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana pollen continue to gradually rise to 40% and 20% TLP  respectively.    Pinus  values  also  rise  slightly  in  this  zone.    Poaceae  and  Cyperaceae  pollen  values continue to rise during this zone peaking at around 15% TLP; Hordeum‐group pollen  also  appears.    Pteridium  values  rise  rapidly  in  this  zone,  while  there  is  also  an  increase  in  Pteropsida (monolete) indet and micro‐charcoal values remain high.     Zone NWB2f (120‐96cm)  There  is  a  decline  in  the  pollen  of  Quercus  and  Alnus  glutinosa  in  this  zone  as  they  fall  to  around 15% and 10% respectively.  Corylus avellana values remain consistent at around 15%  TLP.    Poaceae  values  rise  sharply  in  this  zone  up  to  around  35%  TLP,  while  Cyperaceae  pollen values also rise to around 15% TLP.  There is a more consistent presence of Hordeum‐ group  pollen  in  this  zone,  together  with  rises  in  the  pollen  of  Plantago  lanceolata,  Aster‐type  (michaelmas  daisies),  Filipendula  and  Plantago  coronopus  (buck’s  horn  plantain).    Pteridium  values and Pteropsida (monolete) indet values remain high, while there is significant increase  in micro‐charcoal values.   

Plant macrofossils 
The plant macrofossil results are presented in Figures 4 and 5 and have been zoned using the  corresponding zones given in the pollen diagrams.    

Monolith 1 
  Zone NWB1a (234‐210cm)  Plant macrofossils of Quercus and Betula buds and scales dominate this zone with buds and  scales of Crataegus (hawthorn) also present.  A fruit stone of Prunus spinosa (blackthorn) was  also  recovered  alongside  herbaceous  plant  macrofossils  from  species  including  Rubus  fruticosus  (bramble),  Schoenoplectus  lacustris  (common  club‐rush)  and  Ranunculus  flammula  (lesser spearwort).  Some charcoal fragments are also present within this zone.    Zone NWB1b (210‐185cm)  There  is  a  decline  in  the  number  of  plant  macrofossils  of  Quercus  and  Betula  in  this  zone  compared to that previous.  Alnus glutinosa seeds ands buds appear in this zone as do seeds of  Carpinus betulus (hornbeam).  Fruit stones of Prunus spinosa and Prunus padus (bird cherry) are  more  prominent  within  this  zone,  while  there  are  also  increases  in  the  abundance  of  Ranunculus flammula and Rubus fruticosus.     

15

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Zone NWB1c (185‐160cm)  Plant  macrofossils  from  arboreal  species  are  seen  to  decline  within  this  zone  as  do  indeterminate  wood  fragments.    There  is  a  general  decline  to  in  herbaceous  macrofossils,  although  there  is  an  increase  in  the  fruits  of  Rubus  fruticosus  and  Rubus  sp.  (bramble  sp.)  during  this  zone  and  appearances  from  species  such  as  Polygonum  aviculare (knotgrass) and  Carex sylvatica (wood sedge).    Zone NWB1d (160‐144cm)  There  is  a  virtual  absence  of  plant  macrofossils  during  this  zone  with  only  fungal  sclerotia  present  in  any  numbers  and  a  single  Betula  sp  seed.    Monocotyledon  fragments  remain  at  high numbers with some small number of wood fragments indet also present.    Zone NWB1e (144‐114cm)   There  is  a  significant  increase  in  the  numbers  of  plant  macrofossil  present  within  this  zone  with particularly high representation of herbaceous species.  Ranunculaceae species are well  represented  with  high  numbers  of  Ranunculus  sceleratus  (celery‐leaved  buttercup)  present  together with Ranunculus flammula and Ranunculus aquatilis (common water crow‐foot).  Small  number  of  other  herbaceous  species  such  as  Carex  rostrata  (bottle  sedge),  Schoenoplectus  lacustris  and  Persicaria  minor  (small  water  pepper)  are  also  present.    Some  arboreal  taxa  are  also  represented  with  small  numbers  of  Betula  and  Alnus  glutinosa  seeds  also  recovered.   Some charcoal fragments are also present in this zone.    Zone NWB1f (114‐96cm)  Herbaceous macrofossils continue to dominate this zone, in particular the fruits of Ranunculus  sceleratus  with  Ranunculus  lingua  (greater  spearwort)  and  Ranunculus  aquatilis  fruits  also  present  from  this  family.      Smaller  numbers  of  other  taxa  such  as  Persicaria  minor,  Carex  aquatilis  and  Eleocharis  sp  (spike  rushes)  are  also  present,  together  with  a  small  number  of  Alnus glutinosa seeds.   

Monolith 2 
  Zone NWB2a (211‐205cm)  High  numbers  of  Betula  buds  and  bud  scales  dominate  this  zone,  particularly  towards  the  base  of  the  zone.    Other  arboreal  species  are  also  evidenced  as  being  present  with  the  recovery  of  Quercus,  Alnus  glutinosa  and  Viburnum  sp  (viburnums)  wood  fragments.    A  limited  number  of  herbaceous  species  are  present  in  the  form  of  Rubus  fruticosus  fruits  and  nutlets  of  Carex  sp  (sedges)  and  Carex  aquatilis  (water  sedge).      Charcoal  fragments  are  also  present in this zone.    Zone NWB2b (205‐184cm)  This  zone  sees  an  increase  in  the  numbers  of  plant  macrofossils  present  particularly  those  relating  to  arboreal  species  with  Quercus,  Betula,  Alnus  glutinosa,  Carpinus  betulus  and  Crataegus among those represented.  There is an increase to in the numbers of Rubus sp and  Rubus fruticosus fruits, with smaller numbers of herbaceous taxa such as Carex rostrata, Carex  acuta (slender tufted sedge) and Schoenoplectus lacustris present.    Zone NWB2c (184‐160cm)  Arboreal taxa continue to be well represented in this zone with a high presence of Quercus,  Betula and Alnus glutinosa in particular.  Other arboreal species represented include Viburnum  sp, Crataegus monogyna (midlands hawthorn), Prunus padus and Corylus avellana. Herbaceous  species are also well represented in this zone with Rubus fruticosus fruits present in significant 

18

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

numbers together with smaller numbers of Lychnis flos‐cuculi (ragged robin) seeds, Persicaria  minor fruits and Carex acuta nutlets.  Wood fragments are also prominent within this zone.    Zone NWB2d (160‐146cm)  There  is  a  gradual  decrease  in  the  number  of  arboreal  macrofossils  during  this  zone,  with  only  Alnus  glutinosa,  Betula  sp  and  Quercus  sp  present  in  any  number.    Outside  of  these  species Prunus spinosa and Salix are also represented.  There is a large increase in the fruits of  Rubus sp and Rubus fruticosus during this zone, together with nutlets of Carex species.  This  zone also sees a large peak in moss fragments.    Zone NWB2e (146‐120cm)  Arboreal species are now near absent in the plant macrofossil record during this zone, with  only  Betula,  Alnus  glutinosa,  Viburnum  and  Crataegus  monogyna  present  in  small  numbers.   Other  plant  macrofossils  are  also  sparse  throughout  this  zone  with  small  numbers  of  herbaceous species such as Carex rostrata and Ranunculus lingua present.  A significant decline  is  also  seen  in  the  numbers  of  Rubus  sp  and  Rubus  fruticosus  fruits.    A  large  peak  in  fungal  sclerotia, however, does take place in this zone.    Zone NWB2f (120‐96cm)  Plant  macrofossils  from  arboreal  taxa  are  again  sparse  during  this  zone  with  only  buds  of  Salix present in any volume.  There is a large increase in the numbers of Ranunculus sceleratus  during this zone and herbaceous species as a whole are better represented, with species such  as  Schoenoplectus  lacustris,  Carex  aquatilis  and  Ranunculus  flammula  also  present.    There  is  an  increase in the number of monocotyledon plant fragments also during this zone.   

Foraminifera (Prof Simon Haslett) 
An additional 12 samples were sent for foraminiferal analyses, following the results garnered  from the assessment report (see Haslett, 2006).  Only seven of all the samples sent for analyses  were found to contain foraminifera, all from Monolith 1 (samples 70, 82, 98, 110, 112, 142 and  190cm); no samples from Monolith 2 were found to contain foraminifera.  Samples 70, 82, 110  and 142cm contained only Jadamina marascens, which represents the monospecific assemblage  of  Haslett  et  al,  (2001),  which  inhabits  the  lower  part  of  the  tidal  zone  between  MHWST  (Mean High Water Spring Tide) and HAT (Highest Astronomical Tide).  Samples 98, 122 and  190cm  contained  the  most  diverse  range  of  foraminifera  containing  Trochammina  inflata,  Miliammina  fusca  and  Jadamina  marascens.    This  assemblage  is  typical  of  deposition  around  MHWST.  Although containing no foraminifera, samples 50, 118, 134, 147, 158, 209 and 230cm  (all  from  Monolith  1)  did  contain  sponge  spicules,  which  may  represent  a  non‐marine  depositional environment.  For further details see Appendix I.   

Diatoms (Dr Jason Jordan and Dr Sue Dawson) 
Twelve additional diatom samples were prepared for analysis from Monoliths 1 and 2 by Dr  Jason  Jordan.    Unfortunately  only  two  of  the  additional  samples  were  found  to  yield  any  diatoms; Sample 110cm from Monolith1 and Sample 128cm from Monolith 2.  Sample 110cm  contained only two diatoms both of which were Paralia sulcata, a marine diatom indicative of  storm  deposits.    Sample  128  was  fund  to  contain  only  a  single  diatom,  identified  as  Gramatophora serpentine a marine diatom indicative of marine waters and coastal deposits.    Of  the  first  twelve  samples  analysed  by  Dr  Sue  Dawson,  from  Monolith1  only  one  sample  (230cm)  was  found  to  contain  no  diatoms,  while  three  samples  (98,  118  and  122cm)  were  found  to  contain  abundant  numbers,  where  full  counts  of  300  diatom  valves  could  be  obtained.      The  remaining  seven  samples  (18,  34,  50,  70,  82,  142,  158  and  190cm)  contained 

19

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

sparse  numbers  of  diatoms.    The  diatoms  indicate  deposition  within  an  initial  freshwater  environment  through  species  such  as  Fragilaria  construens,  which  then  changes  to  a  high  intertidal  environment  highlighted  by  the  presence  of  species  including  Diploneis  interrupta.   There is then a gradual increase in marine waters, from freshwater through to brackish and  finally  deep,  marine  waters  by  the  upper  sediments  sampled,  signalled  by  the  presence  of  species  such  as  Podosira  stelliger  and  Cocconeis  scutellum.    For  further  details  on  both  sets  of  analyses see Appendix II.   

Discussion 
 

Stratigraphy, Loss on Ignition and Sea‐level rise 
  Below is a discussion of the stratigraphic sequence outlined in Table 2, together with the Loss  on  Ignition  data  and  the  reconstructed  sea‐level  curve  for  Newrath  based  on  radiocarbon  dated  index  points  from  within  the  monolith  sequences.    It  is  important  to  understand  the  sedimentary  history  of  the  site  in  order  to  be  able  to  interpret  the  vegetational  and  anthropogenic history of the site.    The  deepest  parts  of  the  stratigraphic  sequence  (Units  I  to  III)  are  not  present  within  the  studied monoliths and have been included here from recorded section drawings taken during  excavation  in  the  field.    The  dryland  surface  has  been  dated  from  the  finding  Bann  flakes  indicating  this  surface  was  present  until  at  least  the  later  Mesolithic  (Woodman  et  al,  1999).   This  report  focuses  on  those  organic  layers  overlying  these  units,  following  the  initiation of  peat development (Units IV to VII), the more minerogenic and modern units (VIII to IX) have  been  omitted  from  this  study  due  to  the  problems  of  sediment  mixing  and  disturbance  outlined in Timpany (2006).    At  approximately  4850±35  BP  (SUERC‐10126;  3710‐3620  Cal  BC)  wood  peat  (Unit  IV)  developed  on  the  dryland  surface  indicating  a  rise  in  ground  water  occurred  at  this  time.   This  elevation  in  ground  water  would  have  been  caused  by  rising  sea‐level,  which  can  be  seen  in  the  reconstructed  sea‐level  curve  shown  in  Figure  6.      Pollen  and  plant  macrofossil  evidence show that this peat was soon colonised by woodland species including Quercus and  Betula with Alnus glutinosa colonising at around 4500 BP.  This local woodland period lasts for  c. 600 years to approximately 4150±35 BP (SUERC‐10125; 2880‐2620 Cal BC).       Within this unit there is evidence for a possible marine incursion with a band of silt within  Monolith  2  at  190‐200cm.    This  band  has  been  radiocarbon  dated  to  have  been  deposited  between 4540±40 BP (SUERC‐14690; 3370‐3090 Cal BC) and 4580±40 BP (SUERC‐14691; 3380‐ 3260  Cal  BC).    This  narrow  date  range  suggests  a  rapid  period  of  deposition  likely  to  have  been  caused  by  a  short‐lived  event  such  as  a  tidal  surge.    Unfortunately  foraminifera  and  diatoms  proved  to  be  absent  from  samples  sent  to  specialists  from  these  levels  (see  above),  however,  some  foraminifera  were  observed  on  pollen  slides  from  corresponding  depths,  suggesting  some  evidence  of  tidal  deposition  (see  Figures  2  and  3).      Although  no  corresponding  silt  band  has  been  observed  in  Monolith  1  it  is  suggested  from  pollen  preservation as at around 4500 BP within this monolith pollen becomes sparse (between 208‐ 206cm  pollen  is  absent  from  the  slides)  indicating  increased  minerogenic  content.    This  increase  in  minerogenic  content  is  likely  to  be  part  of  the  same  event  as  that,  which  can  be  witnessed in Monolith 1.  Unfortunately this has not been picked up in the Loss on Ignition  results for Monolith 1, with this area of the monolith not having been sampled. However, the  Loss on Ignition curve for Monolith 2 (see Figure 1) does show a decrease in the amount of  organic content from the level of peat initiation (211cm) to when the minerogenic silt began to 

20

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

be  deposited  (c.  198cm)  from  30%  to  22%.    Organic  content  then  begins  to  increase  again  suggesting that the main period of deposition was at the base of this silt layer with organic  content  remaining  high  for  the  rest  of  this  unit  at  between  42‐58%  (see  Figure  1).  There  is  some foraminifera evidence for the site being affected by tidal events during this period with  species indicative of MHWST (Mean High Water Spring Tide) being found in Monolith 1 at  190cm.      From  approximately  4150±35  BP  (SUERC‐10125;  2880‐2620  cal  BC)  to  3935±35  BP  (SUERC‐ 14689; 2500‐2290 cal BC) a retrogressive succession begins to take place with the stratigraphic  evidence from wood peat (Unit IV) to a wood‐reed peat transition (Unit V).  This is signalled  in  the  sequence  by  a  change  within  the  peat  as  wood  fragments  decrease  within  this  layer,  which is also shown in the plant macrofossil records (see below).  This change is once more  thought  to  have  been  brought  on  by  rising  sea‐level  causing  the  backing  up  of  water  along  the  growing  estuarine  environment  and  heightening  the  watertable.    This  does  not  seem  to  have affected the organic content of the deposits, however, as it remains high at between 51‐ 72% (see Figure 1).    This change to reedswamp is shown in Unit VI and lasts from around 3935±35 BP (SUERC‐ 14689; 2500‐2290 cal BC) to between 2045±40 BP (SUERC‐14682; 170 cal BC to cal AD 60) and  2360±35 BP (GU‐13999; 540‐370 cal BC).  The sea‐level curve together with foraminifera and  diatom  evidence  shows  that  the  site  had  now  become  truly  intertidal  within  this  period,  placing  it  in  the  MHWST  tidal  window  (see  Figure  6).    The  corresponding  increase  in  minerogenic  sediments  being  brought  in  by  the  tide  can  be  seen  in  the  Loss  on  Ignition  results, where in Monolith 1 organic content can be seen to rapidly decline from 50% to 20%  (see Figure 1).    There is some evidence of sediment mixing within this layer seen from the radiocarbon dates  from this unit in Monolith 2, where a date from monocotyledon plant tissue from below the  date  from  the  top  of  this unit  (also  dated  from  monocotyledon  plant  tissue)  has  provided a  younger  date;  2210±40  BP  (SUERC‐14688;  390‐180  cal  BC).    Further  concern  is  raised  by  the  short depth of sediment for this unit in Monolith 1, where approximately 10cm of sediment is  banded  by  dates  of  4150±35  BP  (SUERC‐10125;  2880‐2620  cal  BC)  to  2045±40  BP  (SUERC‐ 14682; 170 cal BC to cal AD 60); in Monolith 2 where this unit has a depth of 35cm.  Despite  some  mixing  of  sediments  it  appears  likely  that  this  short  depth  of  sediment  for  this  layer  represents  a  period  where  sediment  deposition/accumulation  was  in  equilibrium  with  tidal  action thus the sea‐level curve can be seen to almost “flat‐line” during this period (see Figure  6),  leading  to  relatively  stable  conditions  for  the  area.    This  period  of  stability  also  sees  the  greatest  period  of  anthropogenic  activity  at  Newrath  as  preserved  in  the  archaeological  record,  with  people  accessing  and  utilising  this  reedswamp  environment,  evidenced  by  the  construction of trackways and platforms (see below).      Following  the  period  of  relative  stability  a  significant  environmental  change  takes  place,  evidenced  in  the  stratigraphic  record  from  a  change  from  reed  peat  (Unit  VI)  to  estuarine  silt/reed peat (Unit VII) as a rapid rise in sea‐level (see Figure 6) occurs, which inundated the  site.  This is shown in the Loss on Ignition data for Monolith 1 where organic content drops  further to 11‐10% (see Figure 1).  Again there is further evidence of sediment mixing within  this layer, likely to have been caused by tidal action.  This is shown in the radiocarbon dates  in Monolith 1, where again a younger date lies below an older date (again dated material was  monocotyledon plant tissue); 1665±35 BP (SUERC‐14680; cal AD 250‐530) underlying 1870±35  BP (SUERC‐10124; 60‐240 cal AD).  It is likely that this rapid increase in sea‐level led to the  abandonment of the area by people as the tidal action destroyed structures such as trackways  

21

Diatom 3 Study

Foraminifera Study

2
Estuarine Intertidal

Saltmarsh (Barren Zone) MHWST to HAT 1665+-35 1965+-35 1870+-35 2045+-40 2210+-40

2360+-35

1
Altitude m OD

Intertidal MHWST

3935+-35

4150+-35

Terrestrial

Freshwater Terrestrial

-1

-2 0 1000 2000 3000 4000
5000
6000

Radiocarbon Years BP (Uncalibrated)

4505+-35

0

MHWST

4540+-40 4580+-40 4765+-35 4850+-35

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

as the site was submerged.  The submergence of the site was complete by the deposition of  Unit VIII an estuarine silt layer, overlying this unit.  There is some Loss on Ignition data for  this  unit  within  Monolith  1,  which  again  shows  low  organic  content  at  around  12‐10%  (see  Figure 1).   

Vegetational history and human agency 
  The  following  part  of  the  discussion  focuses  on  the  vegetational  history  of  the  site  as  reconstructed through the pollen, non‐pollen palynomorph and plant macrofossil analyses.  It  will also focus on evidence for human agency discovered within these records together with  looking  at  the  archaeological  evidence  from  the  site  and  those  other  sites,  which  have  been  excavated from this part of the road scheme around Newrath and Waterford.  The discussion  will take place chronologically covering those periods represented in the study levels, namely  the Neolithic through to the Iron Age.   

The Neolithic period ‐ 4500‐2300 cal BC 
(Pollen Zones: NWB1a‐c, NWB2a‐c) 
  The palaeovegetational record for Newrath begins with the initiation of peat development at  approximately 4850±35 BP (SUERC‐10126; 3710‐3620 cal BC) (see Zones NWB1a and NWB2a).   The  pollen  and  plant  macrofossil  assemblages  show  that  the  peat  was  soon  colonised  by  vegetation.    Local  growth  of  plants  on  this  peat  surface  is  shown  in  the  plant  macrofossil  record with trees such as Betula and Quercus being early invaders into this forming wetland  environment.    Although  the  plant  macrofossil  data  has  been  unable  to  define  these  taxa  to  species level it is likely that they represent the more damp tolerant taxons of Betula pubescens  (downy birch) and Quercus robur (sessile oak), which are the more common species found in  wet woodlands (Clapham et al, 1962; Rodwell, 1991) .  The plant macrofossil assemblage also  shows  other  wet‐tolerant  tree  types  as  being  present  with  the  occurrence  of  Crataegus  monogyna  buds,  together  with  wood  fragments  of  Salix  and  Alnus  glutinosa.    The  plant  macrofossil  assemblage  suggests  that  this  zone  depicts  the  beginnings  of  carr‐woodland  formation with Betula, Alnus and Salix often among the first arboreal species to invade such  developing wetlands (Rodwell, 1991).  This is also reflected in the pollen record, albeit in low  values for Salix and Betula.  Salix is commonly underrepresented in pollen diagrams due to it  being  insect  pollinated  (Faegri  et  al,  1989),  therefore  having  its  pollen  dispersed  by  insects  rather than being wind dispersed.  The low value of Betula pollen, however, is likely to be a  result of the location of the sampling site.    The  location  of  Area  1  on  the  intermediate  area  between  the  dryland  and  wetland  (see  Wilkins,  main  report)  places  it  in  a  catchment  where  pollen  within  the  sediments  will  be  recruited  from  both  the  local  wetland  environment  and  the  surrounding  dryland  environment.    Therefore,  the  pollen  record  contains  information  about  both  environments,  with  the  plant  macrofossil  record  aiding  in  distinguishing  one  from  another.    The  wooded  environment of the Neolithic shown in both the pollen and plant macrofossil record also has  implications  for  the  taphonomy  of  the  site  and  interpretation  of  the  pollen  record.    The  density  of  the  woodland  canopy  will  have  an  impact  on  the  size  of  catchment  from  which  pollen can be expected to represent.  Dense woodland, with only minor interruptions in the  canopy space will provide a very local pollen signal (Mitchell, 1988, Brown 1997a), dominated  by  local  source  components,  often  leading  to  high  representation  of  arboreal  taxa  and  low  representation  of  herbaceous  taxa  (Tauber,  1965;  Delcourt  and  Delcourt,  1991;  Odgaard,  1999).  It is this high arboreal woodland signal that can be seen in the pollen diagrams.  For  Zones  NWB1a  and  NWB2a  it  is  the  dryland  woodland  signal,  which  dominates  the 

23

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

assemblage.  This is due to the woodland on the wetland only beginning to develop at this  time,  in  comparison  to  the  well‐established  woodland  of  the  dryland.    This  later  begins  to  change as woodland on the wetland further develops.    The  dryland  woodland  can  then  be  seen  to  be  dominated  by  Quercus  and  Corylus,  a  trend,  which  has  been  suggested  from  palaeoenvironmental  evidence  from  other  sites  in  the  area  such  as  Rathpatrick  (Site  17),  Granny  (Site  27)  and  the  pollen  study  at  Woodstown  (Farrell  and Coxon, 2004).  This woodland‐type also ties in well with that suggested by Bennett (1989)  for  this  part  of  the  southeast  of  Ireland  at  c.5000  BP  from  collated  pollen  studies.    Together  with these two taxa a number of other arboreal species can be seen in the pollen evidence to  have  been  part  of  the  composition  of  this  woodland  including  Pinus,  Ulmus,  Prunus  spinosa  and  Prunus  padus,  together  with  other  canopy  component  such  as  Hedera  helix  (ivy).    The  variety in species type within this woodland shows that it had a mosaic character with these  taxa either growing as integrated components of the woodland or as individual stands within  the  canopy.    It  is  likely  that  this  dryland  woodland  would  have  had  a  dense  canopy,  investigations  by  other  authors  into  the  character  of  this  woodland,  that  authors  such  as  Rackham  (2003)  and  Peterson  (1996)  have  termed  “Wildwood”  or  “Primeval”,  respectively  have leaned towards this view (e.g. Mitchell, 2005; Timpany, 2005; Bell, 2007), despite recent  posturing  that  it  was  a  more  open  environment  (e.g.  Vera,  200).      Openings,  within  this  woodland would have existed though, created through anthropogenic mechanisms, such as  woodland  clearance  together  with  natural  mechanisms,  such  as  storm  damage,  allowing  periods where more shade‐intolerant species could flourish and there is evidence for this in  the pollen record (see below).    In comparison to the dense nature of the dryland, the emerging woodland environment of the  wetland would have been much more open at this time as trees begin to colonise the forming  peat  surface.    The  wet  and  boggy  nature  of  this  surface  is  illustrated  by  the  presence  of  a  number of taxa in the plant macrofossil and pollen assemblages that inhabit wet places such  as  Ranunculus  flammula  fruits  together  with  Lotus‐type  (birds‐foot  trefoil),  Hypericum  sp  (St  John’s wort), Potentilla, and Galium‐type pollen (Clapham et al, 1962) (see Zones NWB1a and  NWB2a).    These  taxa,  together  with  Poaceae  and  Cyperaceae  pollen  are  indicative  of  the  formation of tall‐herb fen communities spreading across the wetland, which are likely to have  been similar to modern communities such as the S26 Phragmites australis‐Urtica dioica tall‐herb  fen (Rodwell, 1995).  Previous plant macrofossil analyses by Lyons (2006) also recovered taxa  indicative of tall herb fen such as Wahlenbergia hederaceae (ivy campanula).  Such communities  remain as field layer vegetation to present day carr‐woodland (Rodwell, 1991).  There are also  indicators of a stream nearby, which are likely to reflect the early River Suir, which as Carter  (2007) has observed would have been smaller in nature than the modern channel seen today.   Such indicators include Schoenoplectus lacustris and Carex aquatilis nutlets, which grow at the  margins  of  rivers  and  streams,  respectively  (Clapham  et  al,  1962).    Pooling  of  water  on  the  peat  surface  is  also  indicated  by  species  such  as  Apium  inundatum  (lesser  marshwort),  Potomegeton  (pond  weed)  and  Typha  latifolia  (bulrush)  together  with  Type  72  (zoological  remains of Alona rustica) (Clapham et al, 1962; van Geel, 1986).    At  around  4500  BP  (c.3240‐3100  Cal  BC)  Alnus  glutinosa  can  be  seen  to  spread  across  the  wetland, leading to the formation of Alnus carr‐woodland (see Zones NWB1b‐c and NWB2b‐ c).    This  rise  can  be  viewed  in  Alnus  pollen  values  and  the  increased  representation  of  this  species  in  the  plant  macrofossil  assemblages  with  numbers  of  seeds,  buds  and  wood  fragments all increasing.  The succession to Alnus carr‐woodland across wetland areas from  initial  tall‐herb  fen  communities  is  a  common  transition  and  has  been  observed  in  the  palaeoenvironmental  records  of  a  number  of  wetland  sites  (e.g.  Walker,  1970;  Smith  and 

24

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Morgan,  1989).    Other  arboreal  taxa  are  also  present  within  this  woodland  with  the  pollen  and  plant  macrofossil  assemblages  showing  the  continued  presence  of  Betula,  Salix  and  Crataegus  monogyna,  while  other  trees  such  as  Viburnum  opulus  (guilder  rose)  and  Fraxinus  excelsior,  which  will  also  grow  in  wet  woodlands  (Clapham  et  al,  1962;  Rodwell,  1991)  may  have been part of this community.  The plant macrofossil diagram indicates that Quercus and  Corylus avellana were both present locally from the occurrence of buds, wood fragments and  even  an  acorn.    Rodwell  (1991)  notes  that  both  of  these  species  may  grow  within  wet  woodland; their presence within Neolithic carr‐woodlands has been evidenced in places such  as the Severn Estuary (Timpany, 2005).   There is evidence also of the field layer component of  the vegetation, which is likely to have remained as a tall‐herb fen community through species  such as Lychnis flos‐cuculi, Urtica dioica (common nettle), Veronica sp (speedwell), Cicuta virosa‐ type,  Valeriana  dioica‐type  (marsh  valerian)  and  Ribes‐type  (black  current).    These  species  together with NPPs (Non‐Pollen Palynomorphs) such as Types 8 and 61 (Zygnamataceae cf.  gracillima) show that the ground within this woodland was boggy and wet with pooling of  water  occurring  on  the  pea  surface  (van  Geel,  1986).    While  the  high  number  of  Rubus  futicosus  fruits  in  the  macrofossil  assemblage  indicate  its  local  abundance,  sprawling  across  the mire surface.  It is suggested that this Alnus dominated carr‐woodland would have been  somewhat  similar  to  today’s  W5  Alnus  glutinosa‐Carex  paniculata  community,  with  many  of  the taxa present within the palaeovegetational assemblages occurring in these woodlands still  today.  This woodland type is known to succeed fen vegetation and develop across areas of  tall‐herb fen (Rodwell, 1991).  This period of Alnus carr‐woodland domination of the wetland  is  seen  to  last  some  400  years  until  declining  at  approximately  4150±35  BP  (SUERC  ‐10125;  2880‐2620  cal  BC).    This  phase  of  Alnus  carr‐woodland  is  also  seen  at  Woodstown,  where  Farrell  and  Coxon  (2004)  record  a  similar  period  of  such  wet  woodland,  which  is  seen  to  decline at 4300±35 BP (Beta‐19584; 3100‐2880 cal BC).      During  this  period  (Zones  NWB1b‐c  and  NWB2b‐c)  the  dryland  woodland  remains  dominated  by  Quercus  and  Corylus  avellana  and  is  seen  to  change  little  in  composition  from  that  described  above,  although  additional  species  are  more  represented  such  as  Sorbus‐type  (whitebeam),  Ilex  aquifolium  (holly)  and  Carpinus  betulus  (hornbeam).    The  local  presence  of  hornbeam during this period shown by the presence not only in the pollen record but also in  the plant macrofossil record with the finding of seeds and buds of this taxon is of particular  interest.    Carpinus  has  been  thought  of  as  not  migrating  into  Ireland  during  the  early  Holocene  (Huntley  and  Birks,  1983).    Its  representation  in  palaeoecological  records  from  across Ireland is so low that it is not even mentioned in recent studies of tree migration and  expansion  (e.g.  Mitchell,  2006).    However,  pollen  grains  of  Carpinus  have  been  recorded  in  studies from the early Holocene in the south of Ireland (Timpany, 2001) and in the Waterford  area  (Branch  and  Batchelor,  2007),  suggesting  it  was  present  in  southern  Ireland.    The  Carpinus seeds in the plant macrofossil assemblage of Monolith 1 clearly vindicate the pollen  evidence that it was growing in southern Ireland during the Neolithic.  Rackham (2003) has  noted  that  Carpinus  is  likely  to  have  been  present  in  the  British  Isles  during  the  Neolithic,  from  its  presence  in  pollen  diagrams  at  sites  such  as  Hockham  in  Norfolk  (Godwin,  1975),  expanding  in  distribution  during  this  period,  becoming  widespread  but  not  abundant.    In  terms of ecology it is likely that Carpinus would have been growing in pure stands within the  dryland woodland (Rackham, 2003).  Rodwell (1991) observes that Carpinus occurs in modern  Quercus  woodland  communities,  such  as  the  W10  Quercus  robur‐Pteridium  aquilinium‐Rubus  fruticosus woodland.  This woodland is common in the lowlands of England and Wales and  may be the closest present day comparative to the prehistoric Quercus woodlands (Timpany,  2005).  Openings in the canopy can be seen to have taken place, particularly in Zone NWB2b  indicating some disturbance to the woodland (see below), with fluctuations in the pollen of 

25

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Quercus, Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana and small peaks in the pollen of Ilex aquilinium  and Ulmus.  It is also during this period where cereal pollen appears in the pollen record.    This disturbance event seen in the pollen records takes place at levels in the sediment column  where  a  layer  of  silt  can  be  seen  to  have  been  deposited  in  the  Monolith  2  sequence.    This  deposit  has  been  interpreted  as  representing  deposition  of  estuarine  sediments  during  an  event  of  marine  transgression  such  as  a  storm  surge  (see  stratigraphic  discussion  above).   Foraminifera, although absent in the samples sent for specialist analysis have been observed  on  pollen  slides  from  the  Monolith  2  sequence  (see  Figure  3),  indicating  some  maritime  element to the deposit.      Radiocarbon dates from plant macrofossils within the peat stratified above and below the silt  deposit  show  deposition  took  place  between  4540±40  BP  (SUERC‐14690;  3370‐3090  cal  BC)  and 4580±40 BP (SUERC‐14691; 3380‐3260 cal BC).  While LOI data indicates initial inwash of  minerogenic silt took place at the earliest date of the two (see above).  The absence of pollen  on the slide from Monolith 1 from around 4500 BP also point to high minerogenic content of  sediments  during  this  period.    There  is  also  NPP  evidence  for  minerogenic  sediment  deposition,  in  particular  Type  707  (Culcitalna  achraspora)  has  been  linked  to  mudflat  and  saltmarsh  environs,  with  en  Bakker  and  van  Sneerdyke  (1981)  noting  its  presence  on  dead  wood fragments found in such locations.  It is interesting to note that the curve for Type 707  closely  follows  that  for  Foraminifera  seen  in  Monolith  2  and  may  further  indicate  re‐ deposition of sediments from this environment onto the wetland.  A rise in Type 207 (Glomus  cf.  fasciculatum),  is  also  seen,  which  has  been  linked  to  show  increases  in  inwashed  minerogenic  sediments  in  lake  deposits  (van  Geel  et  al,  1989).    Here  it  is  suggested  that  it  further represents minerogenic sediments being deposited on to the wetland.    It is following this initial deposition of silts in Monolith 2 that cereal pollen of Hordeum‐group  begins to appear at 198cm (Zone NWB2b).  The appearance of cereal pollen in Monolith 2 at  this level follows a sharp decline in Quercus pollen at 200cm when silts begin to be deposited.  It  is  noticeable  that  cereal  pollen  of  Hordeum‐group  and  Avena‐Triticum‐group  appears  consistently during the phase of silt deposition but disappear as [wood] peat again begins to  accumulate.  It is suggested that this period of agricultural activity and marine transgression  are  linked.    The  transgression  appears  to  have  made  an  impact  on  both  the  wetland  and  dryland woodlands, which can be seen in the fluctuating values of Alnus, Quercus and Corylus  pollen.  Dips in the pollen of dryland arboreal taxa (e.g. Quercus) are accompanied by peaks  in lesser represented species, such as Ulmus and Ilex aquilinium signalling an increase in trunk  space allowing for a rise in the representation of species further from the sampling location.   Declines  in  the  pollen  of  Alnus,  Salix  and  Betula  during  this  phase  signal  the  loss  of  trees  within the wetland woodland.  These falls in tree pollen of the wetland are accompanied by  peaks in herbaceous taxa such as Filipendula and Cicuta virosa‐type, indicating an increase in  openness  within  the  woodland  and  a  decrease  in  shade.    It  is  suggested  this  transgression  phase  represents  a  period  of  increased  storminess,  which  caused  the  potential  storm  surge  that deposited the silts and would have been accompanied by high winds leading to tree fall.   The  role  of  storms  in  palaeoenvironmental  records is  often underplayed  but as  Allen (1996,  1998) observes high winds can have a significant impact on woodlands causing the felling of  trees, which can often have a domino‐effect; the felling of one tree causing the felling of those  around it (Blackburn et al, 1988; Denslow et al, 1998).  It is such events, which are believed to  be being witnessed in this initial period of declines in arboreal taxa.    The  opening  of  the  woodland  particularly  on  the  dryland  is  soon  taken  advantage  of  by  Neolithic  people  as  space  for  agricultural  activity  to  commence.    This  is  seen  in  the  pollen 

26

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

diagram  of  Monolith  2,  with  the  presence  of  cereal  pollen  of  Hordeum‐group  and  Avena‐ Triticum‐group,  together  with  a  rise  in  Plantago  lanceolata  pollen,  which  is  often  linked  with  arable activity in the pollen record (e.g. Mighall et al, 2007).  Following the decline in arboreal  pollen and  the  appearance  of  cereal  pollen, a  peak  can  be  seen  in  the  micro‐charcoal  curve,  some  of  which  had  enough  surviving  structure  to  be  identified  as  wood  micro‐charcoal  (shown in the pollen diagram).  The increase in micro‐charcoal following the dip in arboreal  pollen is suggested to represent the burning of deadwood on the ground and dead standing  trees  damaged  by  the  storm  by  people  in  order  to  maintain  the  clearing,  which  was  being  used for arable land.  The burning of deadwood is indicated by the NPP assemblage, which  shows  declines  in  fungal  spores associated  with  decaying  wood at  this  level, such as  Types   55  A/B  (Sordaria  spp.),  and  359d  (Bactrodesmium  betullicola),  together  with  Bactrodesmium  obovatum  and  Bactrodesmium  abruptum  (van  Geel,  1978;  van  Geel  et  al,  1981  Ellis  and  Ellis,  1997).    Similar  trends  in  dips  in  tree  pollen  followed  by  increase  in  burning  (micro‐charcoal)  in  prehistoric contexts have been noted elsewhere (e.g. Brown, 1997b).  Such activities are often  more strongly linked to Mesolithic clearance episodes (e.g. Simmons and Innes, 1996) where  opportunistic  openings  in  the  tree  canopy  enabled  people  to  maintain  the  space  through  burning to promote open areas for the grazing and hunting of wild animals (Simmons, 1996).   The  evidence  at  Newrath  suggests  that  such  opportunism  was  also  seized  upon  in  the  Neolithic.    However,  it  is  debatable  as  to  whether  this  should  be  looked  upon  as  simple  opportunism  or  as  people  using  their  knowledge  of  the  environment  and  the  area  to  capitalise  on  natural  clearings.    The  effort  needed  to  use  and  maintain  such  clearings  being  less than that to create the clearing in the first place, especially given the absence of metallic  tools  during this  period (Brown, 1997b).   With  the  initiation  of wood  peat  once  more at  the  site, this phase of agricultural activity is seen to end.  The steady increase in arboreal pollen  also seen is likely to indicate the regeneration of woodland and abandonment of this part of  the Newrath area for arable use.  This phase of use and abandonment is similar to that seen  during  the  Neolithic in  other  parts  of  Ireland  (O’Connell and  Molloy,  2001) and  also  draws  comparisons with the traditional “landnam” clearance models.    Other  periods  of  possible  agricultural  activity  may  be  seen  earlier  and  later  in  the  pollen  records  from  Newrath.    Hordeum‐group  pollen  can  be  seen  to  occur  in  Monolith  1  at  approximately  4700  BP  (c.3440‐3370  Cal  BC)  within  pollen  Zone  NWB1a,  again  during  a  period where Quercus, Corylus avellana and Alnus glutinosa pollen is seen to decline.  This dip  in arboreal pollen is also preceded by a peak in Foraminifera seen on the pollen slides, which  again could indicate a period of storminess, leading to openings used for agriculture.  There  is also a further appearance of Avena‐Triticum‐group pollen in Monolith 2 at around 4400 BP  (c.3696‐3523 cal BC).  However, at this level arboreal pollen is rising and this together with the  absence  of  increases  in  pollen  types  indicative  of  arable  activity,  suggests  this  pollen  may  represent the remnants of previous agricultural crops still growing around the site.    The presence of cereal‐type pollen is frequently challenged as to whether on its own it should  be  representative  of  agricultural  activity  taking  place  (e.g.  O’Connell,  1987;  Behre,  2007;  Brown, 2007).  This is largely based around the difficulty of separating wild grass pollen from  cereal pollen (Edwards et al, 2005; Tweddle et al, 2005) and to the poor distribution of cereal  pollen;  it’s  large  size  being  non‐conducive  to  travelling  large  distances  (Hall  et  al,  1993).   However,  the  separation  of  cereal  from  wild  grass  pollen  is  possible  through  careful  measurement  of  the  grain  and  its  annulus  (Faegri  et  al,  1989)  allowing  the  ability  to  distinguish the two groups and this is shown in the pollen diagrams.  Recent work has also  questioned the long held paradigm of short distance of cereal pollen, suggesting it may travel 

27

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

further than was previously thought (e.g. Behre, 2007).  Thus the cereal pollen signal present  here could come from the dryland.  Perhaps the best and more readily accepted evidence of  agriculture  around  Newrath  during  the  Neolithic  is  the  presence  of  charred  cereal  grain  dating to this period found at Newrath (Site 35) and Granny (Site27).  The presence of both  cereal pollen and charred grain therefore provides definitive evidence for agricultural activity  at  Newrath  during  the  Neolithic.    The  dates  and  species  of  the  pollen and  cereal  grains  are  shown in Table 3.    Table 3 – Evidence for Neolithic Agriculture in the Waterford Area    Site Name  Evidence  Date BP Date Cal BC Site  27  Charred  grain  of  Triticum  dicoccum,  5054±38  (UB‐6315)  3977‐3728  to  Granny  Hordeum  vulgare  var  nudum  and  cf.  to  4776±39  (UB‐ 3645‐3383  Avena sp  6634)  Site  35  Charred grain of Triticum dicoccum  4827±39 (UB‐6639)  3695‐3523  Newrath  Site  34  Pollen  grain  of  Hordeum‐group  in  c.4700  c.3440‐3370  Newrath  Monolith 1  Site  34  Pollen  grain  of  Hordeum‐group  and  4580±40  (SUERC‐ 3380‐3260  to  Newrath  Avena‐Triticum‐group in Monolith 2  14691)  to  4540±40  3370‐3090  (SUERC‐14690)  Site  34  Pollen grain of Avena‐Triticum‐group in  c.4400  c.3696‐3523  Newrath  Monolith 2    The earliest evidence of agriculture can be seen to come from Granny (Site 27), where charred  grain of Triticum dicoccum (emmer wheat), Hordeum vulgare var nudum (naked barley) and cf.  Avena  sp  (possible  oat)  have  been  identified  from  samples  taken  within  two  buildings  a  possible  dwelling  (Structure  1)  and  the  second  (Structure  2),  a  potential  animal  shelter  (Gleeson, 2006a).  Although no radiocarbon dates are available for the grain their association  with  the  buildings,  which  have  been  dated  from  charcoal  to  between  5054±38  BP  (UB‐6315;  3977‐3728  cal  BC)  and  4776±39  BP  (UB‐6634;  3645‐3383  cal  BC)  indicates  an  early  Neolithic  date for the adoption of agriculture.  At Newrath (Site 35) charred grains of Triticum dicoccum  were  recovered  from  a  small  sub‐circular  pit,  which  also  contained  charred  Corylus  avellana  nutshell and charcoal fragments (unidentified) suggesting the pit was used for the disposal of  domestic food waste. The charred grain here was radiocarbon dated to 4827±39 BP (UB‐6639;  3695‐3523  cal  BC),  while  the  charred  nutshell  fragments,  also  from  the  pit  produced  a  near  identical  date  of  4821±38  BP  (UB‐6640;  3694‐3521  cal  BC)  indicating  the  contemporaneity  of  the material (Hughes, 2006a).    The  finding  of  charred  grain  from  Neolithic  sites  at  and  around  Newrath  helps  to  put  the  cereal pollen grains in context.  The identification of the majority of the charred cereal grains  as Triticum dicoccum and Hordeum vulgare var nudum suggests it is likely it is these species that  are being represented in the pollen record as Avena‐Triticum‐group and Hordeum‐group.  The  finding of possible Avena sp in the charred grain assemblage at Granny is of interest as oat is  more readily associated with a later prehistoric date, although oat from Balbridie in Scotland  has been dated to the Neolithic (Fairweather and Ralston, 1989), whereas Hordeum vulgare var  nudum  and  Triticum  dicoccum  are  known  from  Neolithic  assemblages  (e.g.  Monk,  1985/86).   The charred grain together with the pollen evidence indicate agricultural activity took place  throughout the Neolithic in this area of southeast Ireland, with pollen evidence indicating the  exploitation and maintaining of natural clearings used for agricultural land.  The dates of the  grain,  when  placed  in  comparison  with  recent  surveys  for  the  start  of  agriculture  in  the 

28

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Neolithic  (e.g.  Brown,  2007)  shows  them  to  be  among  the  earliest  dated  sites  in  Britain  and  Ireland.    Thus  adding  to  the  debate  of  where  agriculture  actually  began  in  the  British  Isles  and Ireland.    The presence of Neolithic people at Site 34 is also evidenced by the presence of the remains of  a  trackway  (Structure  341512),  which  has  been  dated  to  4068±35 BP  (UB‐6909;  2855‐2488  cal  BC).    Identifications  of  the  wood  used  to  construct  the  trackway  indicate  that  local  wet  woodland  resources  were  used,  with  Alnus  glutinosa,  Betula,  Salix  and  Fraxinus  excelsior  among the wood types used in its construction (see Lyons and O’Donnell, wood report).  The  use  of  a  trackway  across  the  wet  woodland  floor  would  have  enabled  easier  access  to  land  that  would  have  been  wet,  boggy  and  hard  to  traverse  (see  above).    The  presence  of  fruit  bearing  plants  known  to  have  been  growing  in  this  wetland  from  the  pollen  and  plant  macrofossil assemblages such as Rubus fruticosus suggests these access ways into the wetland  could  have  been  used  for  gathering  of  wild  food  resources  as  well  as  means  to  cross  the  wetland.    The  construction  of  such  trackways  was  soon  to  become  common  place  across  Newrath.     

The Bronze Age period ‐ 2300‐700 cal BC 
(Pollen Zones: NWB1c‐d, NWB2d) 
  In comparison to the Neolithic period within the sedimentary record when peat developed at  a  fairly  consistent  rate,  allowing  for  a  substantial  period  of  palaeobotanical  material  recruitment, the Bronze Age is somewhat under‐represented.  Due to the nature of sea‐level  rise and sediment accumulation during this period (see above) there is only around 10‐20cm  of sediment containing palaeoenvironmental information relating to this period.  Despite this,  the record shows the start of a significant change occurring in the local wetland environment  during  the  Bronze  Age  with  the  decline  of  Alnus  dominated  carr‐woodland  and  its  gradual  replacement with a reedswamp environment.    The  decline  of  the  carr‐woodland  on  the  wetland  can  be  seen  more  clearly  in  the  plant  macrofossil assemblage.  In Monolith2 (Zone NWB2d) macrofossils from arboreal species can  be  seen  to  decline  in  abundance,  particularly  Quercus,  with  declines  also  seen  in  the  representation of Betula, Alnus, Crataegus and Viburnum.  In Monolith 1 (top of Zone NWB1c  to  NWB1d)  a  sharp  decline  can  be  seen  in  all  arboreal  taxa,  with  only  a  small  number  of  Betula seeds present in Zone NWB1d.  The decline in local woodland is also shown clearly by  the gradual decline in wood fragments within the Monolith 1 sequence and to a lesser degree  in the Monolith 2 sequence.  These declines witnessed in the plant macrofossil assemblage are  not  as  clear  in  the  pollen  assemblages,  largely  due  to  trees  such  as  Alnus  being  such  large  pollen  producers  (Waller  et  al,  1999).    However,  a  small  dip  in  Alnus  pollen  can  be  seen  towards  the  top  of  Zone NWB2d at  the  same  point  where  macrofossils  of Alnus are  seen to  decline in the Monolith 2 macrofossil assemblage, which is likely to signal some local decline  of this taxon on the wetland.  A similar dip in Alnus pollen is seen in Monolith 1 toward the  top of Zone NWB1c and again corresponds with a decline in Alnus in the plant macrofossil  assemblage.    Small  dips  can  also  be  seen  in  the  pollen  and  plant  macrofossils  of  Quercus  in  both Monolith 1 and 2 (Zones NWB1d and NWB2d).  This decline in local wet woodland is  also  recorded  in  the  NPP  assemblage  with  a  decline  in  spores’  representative  of  decaying  wood,  such  as  Sporoschima  mirabile,  Bactrodesmium  obovatum,  Bactrodesmium  abruptum  and  Types 55 A/B (Sordaria sp) (van Geel, 1978; Ellis and Ellis, 1997).  However, peaks can be seen  in Type 44 (Ussulina deusta), which has been linked to growing on dead stumps and roots of 

29

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

deciduous trees (van Geel et al, 1986, 1989).  It is suggested here, that Type 44 may represent  the presence of dead standing trees on the wetland.    These changing conditions on the ground are also shown by the herbaceous taxa in the plant  macrofossil assemblages.  Large increases can be seen in the number of Rubus sp and Rubus  fruticosus  fruits,  Rodwell  (1991)  notes  that  R.  fruticosus  can  become  locally  abundant  within  Alnus carr‐woodland, particularly on areas of drier ground.   At Newrath this increase may  signal  the  colonisation  of  Rubus  over  areas  once  inhabited  by  trees  such  as  over  the  raised  sedge  tussocks  as  light  and  space  increase  across  the  wetland  following  the  demise  of  the  trees.  A large increase can also be seen in the number of fungal sclerotia during this period  further  indicating  changing  local  conditions  as  fungi  produce  large  numbers  of  sclerotia  in  order to survive.  Fungi produce sclerotia (a hardened mass of mycelium stored with reserve  food material), which lay dormant within soil until favourable conditions occur in order for  the  fungi  to  grow  once  more.    It  is  suggested  this  mass  of  sclerotia  production  signals  the  change from a woodland peat to reedswamp peat and this can be seen when comparing the  peaks  in  sclerotia  to  the  lithology  column  (see  Figures  3  and  4).    That  the  ground  became  wetter during this period can also be seen through the increased appearance of Carex aquatilis,  Carex acuta and Carex rostrata nutlets, signaling increasing water level at the site (Clapham et  al,  1962).    This  is  also  suggested  by  an  increased  representation  of  Potamogeton  (pondweed)  and  Typha  latifolia  (bulrush)  in  Zone  NWB2d,  with  the  latter  in  particular  suggestive  of  reedswamp  (Clapham  at  al,  1962).    A  steady  increase  can  also  be  seen  in  the  numbers  of  monocotyledon fragments through these zones suggesting an increase in the local presence of  Phragmites  australis  (common  reed)  also  on  the  wetland.    A  peak  in  Type  121,  which  is  associated with lake deposits (Pals et al, 1980) further indicates the change to a higher water  level.    The rising water level at Newrath is evidenced by the sea‐level curve, which can be seen to  gradually rise during this period (see Figure 6 and above).  Diatom evidence from these levels  also shows the area is becoming wetter with the deposition of species such Fragalia construens  and Pinnularia microstauron (see Dawson, this report).  These species are terrestrial in nature  and show that although the area had become wetter it had yet to become fully intertidal.  This  is also shown by the absence of Foraminifera from these levels.    The changes seen in the local environment with the dying back of the Alnus carr‐woodland  and the emerging reedswamp environment would have led to the wetland becoming much  more  of  an  open  space.    The  exploitation  and  movement  of  this  newly  forming  wetland  environment  by  early  Bronze  Age  people  is  witnessed  by  the  construction  of  a  number  of  wooden platforms and trackways across the wetland (see Wilkins, this report).  Radiocarbon  dates  from  wood  within  the  trackways  show  they  were  constructed  and  used  between  3702±34 BP (UB‐6908; 2200‐1980 cal BC) and 3119±32 BP (UB‐6905; 1488‐1309 cal BC).  These  structures  were  built  on  the  wetland  using  local,  close‐at‐hand  resources,  which  has  been  shown by wood identification analyses with Alnus glutinosa dominating the make‐up of the  construction  materials.    Other  arboreal  taxa  shown  to  have  been  used  in  their  construction  include  Betula,  Corylus  avellana,  Salix,  Fraxinus  excelsior,  Quercus  and  Cornus  sanguinea  (dogwood), which is absent in the pollen and plant macrofossil assemblages (see Lyons and  O’Donnell, wood report).  Analyses of the wood used in the construction of these trackways  has also shown that they were largely built using small roundwoods, the majority of which  are aged between 6‐15 years old and largely of alder.  These narrow age‐ranges of the timbers  are  suggestive  of  woodland  management  through  coppicing.    The  identification  also  of  coppiced  heels  within  the  wood  assemblages  of  these  trackways  provides  more  substantive  evidence  for  such  activities  (see  Lyons  and  O’Donnell,  wood  report).    The  practice  of 

30

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

coppicing and exploitation of wet woodland is well known from prehistoric sites across the  British  Isles  and  Ireland  in  trackway  construction  (e.g.  Coles  and  Coles,  1986;  O’Sullivan,  2001)  and  would  have  provided  people  with  the  raw  materials  they  needed  locally  rather  than tackling the larger trees of the dryland.  As Rackham (2003) notes the vast size of these  trees would have required considerable effort to fell and cut to size and it may have been the  case of using the smallest tree to do the job.  This may also explain the low number of Quercus  (and Corylus) timbers seen used in trackway construction.    The  trackways  and  platforms  would  have  provided  access  across  the  wetland,  which  no  doubt  would  have  increased  the  mobility  of  people  across  this  wet  ground  but  also  gave  greater access to the available wetland resources.  Fishing and fowling are often referred to in  relation  to  resources  offered  by  wetland  sites  (e.g.  O’Sullivan,  2001;  Bell,  2007)  and  indeed  would have been important in terms of getting protein for dietary requirements with fish also  a  good  source  of  minerals,  vitamins  A  and  D,  together  with  essential  fatty  acids.    Often  under‐valued though are the rich plant resources these wetlands offer.  Phragmites australis for  example, can provide both a dietary resource, its rhizomes (below ground root) being edible,  and  a  construction  resource  for  example  being  used  as  thatch  (Law,  1998).    Rodwell  (1995)  also notes that sedge species such as Cladium mariscus (great fen sedge) may also be used for  thatch.  Although there is somewhat limited evidence for C. mariscus at Newrath, peaks can  be  seen  in  Type  4  (Anthostomella  cf.  fuegiana)  in  the  NPP  assemblage,  which  grows  on  this  species  (van  Geel  and  Aptroot,  2006).    Other  edible  plants  present  in  the  palaeobotanical  record  likely  to  have  been  growing  in  the  wetland  during  this  period  include  Menyanthes  trifoliata (bog bean), Typha latifolia both of whose rhizomes are also edible, together with Vicia‐ type (vetches) whose seeds are edible, Urtica dioica whose leaves are edible and the fruits of  Rubus fruticosus (Price, 1989).   Together with the wild plant, fish and bird food resources there is also some suggestion that  large grazing animals were present.  Fungal spores linked to animal dung such as Types 16,  112 (Cercophera sp) and 170 (Rivularia sp) can all be seen to occur during this period (van Geel,  1978; van Geel and Aptroot, 2006).  Although it cannot be stated for certain as to whether the  presence of these spores represents wild or domesticated animals.  Another indicator of dung  of  particular  interest  is  the  appearance  of  Trichuris‐type  (whipworm)  eggs  in  Zone  NWB2d  during  this  period.    Trichuris‐type  is  one  of  the  commonest  human  intestinal  parasites  that  inhabit  the  large  intestine,  the  eggs  of  which  are  passed  into  the  faeces  of  the  host  (Dark,  2004).    As  well  as  humans  Trichuris  sp  infect  a  variety  of  other  mammals  including  cattle,  sheep,  pigs  and  dogs.    It  is  possible  to  differentiate  the  species  of  Trichuris  from  careful  measurement  of  the  eggs;  however,  there  is  some  overlap  between  the  eggs  of  Trichuris  trichiura the species which infects humans and Trichuris suis, which infects pigs (Beer, 1976).   Measurement of the eggs from Newrath, indicate they closely resemble those of T. trichiura,  being smaller in size than those of T. suis.  However, with the problem of the size overlap it  may  not  be  possible  to  completely  rule  out  the  possibility  of  the  eggs  representing  T.  suis.   Nevertheless,  this  is  the  first  known  recording  of  Trichuris‐type  eggs  from  archaeological  sediments  in  Ireland.    The  possibility  of  the  eggs  representing  human  faeces  also  has  social  implications.    Dark  (2004)  has  suggested  the  finding  of  Trichuris‐type  eggs  from  prehistoric  wetlands  may  represent  the  contamination  of  food  or  water  from  areas  where  people  and  animals  congregated;  indicating  the  shared  nature  of  resources  in  such  places.    Thus  this  finding  serves  as  a  reminder  that  although  abundant  in  resources  wetlands  were  also  complicated  landscapes  to  exploit  and  hardships  endured.    The  finding  of  Trichuris  eggs  at  the Mesolithic camp of Goldcliff East was believed to represent a peripheral area of the site  used  for  defecation  (Bell,  2007).    Within  Monolith2  Trichuris‐type  can  be  seen  to  occur  at  approximately 3935±35 BP (SUERC‐14689; 2500‐2290 cal BC), indicating its deposition prior to 

31

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

the  phase  of  trackway  construction  at  the  site  and  therefore  at  a  time  when  this  area  of  Newrath may indeed have been peripheral to other activities.    Despite  the  wetland  being  perhaps  the  main  focus  of  activities  during  the  Bronze  Age  at  Newrath, activities were also taking place on the dryland.  The pollen assemblage indicates  that  the  dryland  is  still  largely  wooded  during  this  period,  with  Quercus‐Corylus  woodland  still  dominant  around  Newrath  and  across  the  area;  evidenced  at  Woodstown  (Farrell  and  Coxon, 2004) and Ballynamona (Branch and Batchelor, 2007).  Other arboreal species seen to  form  lesser  constituents  of  this  woodland  include  Pinus,  Ulmus,  Ilex  aquifolium,  Malus  sylvestris  (crab  apple)  and  Prunus  padus.    There  is  some  slight  evidence  of  woodland  disturbance  at  around  154cm  in  Monolith  2  where  dips  can  be  seen  in  the  pollen  of  Ulmus,  Pinus and Ilex.  At this level there is also an appearance of cereal pollen with grains of Avena‐ Triticum‐group  and  Secale  cereale‐group  (rye)  present,  suggesting  some  perhaps  small‐scale  agriculture  taking  place.    At  Woodstown,  there  is  more  definitive  evidence  of  woodland  disturbance  with  larger‐scale  clearance  of  trees  taking  place  indicated  by  declines  in  the  pollen  of  both  Quercus  and  Corylus  with  Quercus  in  particular  becoming  virtually  absent  in  the pollen record.  This removal of woodland has been to 3440±40 BP (Beta‐195833; 1890‐1680  cal BC).  LOI data shows an increase in minerogenic sediments deposited on the sites during  this  phase,  indicating  an  increase  in  the  volume  of  colluvium  (hillwash)  entering  the  valley  basin due to the removal of trees on the valley slopes.  Prior to this woodland clearance cereal  pollen types begin to appear in the pollen record together with an increased representation of  herbaceous  taxa  associated  with  arable  activity,  such  as  Poaceae  sp,  Plantago  sp  and  Ranunculaceae sp.  Therefore, the assemblage indicates woodland clearance was taking place  to  obtain  land  for  the  cultivation  of  cereals  (Farrell  and  Coxon,  2004).    Evidence  for  agriculture  across  the  Waterford  area  during  the  Bronze  Age  has  been  recorded  from  a  number  of  sites  where  charred  grain,  including  Triticum  dicoccum  and  Hordeum  vulgare  var  nudum.    Such  sites  include  Adamstown  (Site  3),  Granny  (sites  1,  21  and  22)  together  with  Newrath (Site 37) itself (Gleeson, 2006a, 2006b, 2006c; Hughes 2006b; Russell and Ginn, 2007).   This  increase  in  the  level  of  agriculture  and  woodland  clearance  across  the  Newrath/Waterford  area  during  the  Bronze  Age  is  suggestive  of  increased  population  size  leading to an increased demand for resources, which saw both the wetland and dryland areas  exploited.     

The Iron Age period (700 cal BC to cal AD 43) 
(Pollen Zones: NWB1d‐f, NWB2e‐f) 
  It is during this period that dynamic changes are seen in the vegetation records for Site 34 and  are seen to be largely driven by sea‐level change.  The sea‐level curve for the area, shows that  during this period a rapid rise in sea‐level took place, submerging the site, which is likely to  have began in  the late Bronze Age from the decline in archaeological features dated to this  period  (see  below).    The  foraminifera  and  diatom  evidence  show  that  the  site  became  intertidal  during  this  time  (see  above)  and  by  sometime  in  the  following  period  was  a  true  estuarine saltmarsh environment.    The pollen and plant macrofossil assemblage show this change in sea‐level had a huge impact  on  the  vegetation.    On  the  wetland  these  local  changes  can  be  seen  by  an  increase  in  the  representation  of  aquatic  and  submerged  vegetation,  particularly  Ranunculus  sceleratus  with  Ranunculus aquatilis (common water crowfoot), Carex aquatilis, Lycopus europeaus (gypsywort)  and  Schoenoplectus  lacustris  also  represented  (Clapham  et  al,  1962).    This  increase  in  aquatic 

32

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

species is also shown in the pollen assemblages where an increased representation in aquatic  (and  floating)  taxa  can  be  observed,  particularly  for  Potamogeton,  while  other  species  including  Myriophyllum  alterniflorum  (alternate  water‐milfoil),  Nymphaeae  alba  (white  water  lily),  Callitriche‐type  (water  starworts)  and  Hydrocotyle  vulagaris  (marsh  pennywort)  also  appear.  These species are indicative of lake and riverine locations (Clapham et al, 1962; Stace,  1997) and together with the plant macrofossil assemblage show how the site had now become  submerged  from  the  enlargement  of  the  River  Suir  during  this  period  as  it  became  more  tidally  (marine)  influenced.      The  large  increase  in  Poaceae  pollen  seen  during  this  period  show  the  domination  of  reedswamp  communities  across  the  wetland,  accompanied  by  declines  in  arboreal  species  particularly  Alnus  glutinosa.    Increases  can  also  be  seen  in  the  values of Pteridium (bracken) and Pteropsida (ferns), which are again suggestive of more open  conditions.  This development of reedswamp communities is mirrored in the pollen records  from  Woodstown  (Farrell  and  Coxon,  2004).    Towards  the  end  of  the  zone  developing  saltmarsh communities can be seen with the increased representation of species such as Aster‐ type,  Plantago  maritima  (sea  plantain),  Chenopodiaceae  and  Artemisia‐type  (mugworts)  (Clapham et al, 1962; Rodwell, 2000).    There is sporadic evidence for trees still being present on the wetland with occasional plant  macrofossils of Alnus glutinosa, Salix sp and Betula sp present.  It is likely these plant remains  represent  some  trees  still  growing  on  the  wetland  edge  fringing  the  reedswamp  and  from  within the reedswamp itself.  Rodwell (1995) notes that saplings of Alnus glutinosa and Salix  cinerea (grey willow) can occur within Phragmites fen communities, which is probably what is  being  shown  in  the  macrofossil  assemblage.    This  continued  representation  of  trees  in  and  around  the  wetland  is  also  noted  in  the  pollen  records  where  although  declining,  pollen  of  Alnus  glutinosa  is  still  present  and  again  indicates  continued  carr‐woodland  fringing  the  developing reedswamp.  Pollen of Salix, Betula and Fraxinus excelsior also suggest these taxa  were  growing  within  this  diminishing  carr‐woodland  environment.    The  local  presence  of  these  species  is  also  shown  by  their  identification  within  wood  identification  assemblages  from  two  trackway/platforms,  which  date  to  this  period.    These  wooden  structures  date  to  between  2116±32 BP (UB‐6901;  210‐40  cal BC) and 2029±33 BP (UB‐6463; 158‐54  cal BC) and  include timbers from other species, such as Corylus, Pomoidiaceae, Sambucus and Quercus (see  Lyons and O’Donnell, wood report).  The limited number of wooden structures dating to this  period  and  indeed  the  absence  of  structures  dating  to  the  late  Bronze  Age  highlights  the  impact  rising  sea‐level  had  on  the  wetland,  causing  the  abandonment  of  the  site  as  rising  waters submerged the area.    This  landscape  change  was  not  just  confined  to  the  wetland  during  this  period.    Pollen  evidence  shows  also  a  decline  in  the  pollen  of  Quercus  throughout  this  period  suggesting  changes occurring in the dryland woodland.  There is little doubt that some of the losses in  Quercus trees shown in the pollen record would have been due to loss of habitat as the River  Suir flooded the area, effectively drowning trees on and near to the wetland.  However, this  decline  coupled  with  the  rise  in  Corylus  avellana  pollen  suggests  that  some  small‐scale  clearances on the dryland were occurring.  The rise also seen in the pollen of ruderals such as  Plantago lanceolata, Lactuca sativa‐type (lettuces), Taraxacum‐type (dandelions) and Anthriscus‐ type  (chervils)  is  also  indicative  of  arable  activity  (Clapham  et  al,  1962;  Stace,  1997).    The  presence of Hordeum‐group pollen in Zones NWB1e‐f and NWB2e‐f suggests that such arable  activity  is  the  cultivation  of  Hordeum.    Further  evidence  for  agriculture,  as  in  previous  periods, comes from the recovery of charred cereal grains from excavated sites; although not  as abundant as seen in the previous period.  The charred grain assemblage at Mullinabro (Site  4)  consists  largely  of  Avena  sp  (Wren  2006),  which  differs  to  the  pollen  evidence  from  Newrath.    The  grains  from  Mullinabro  (Site  4)  have  been  dated  from  charcoal  fragments  in 

33

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

the same context to between 2017±36 BP (UB‐6493; 153 cal BC‐cal AD 67) and 1992±35 BP (UB‐ 6492; 89 cal BC‐cal AD 81).      Together  with  the  evidence  for  arable  activity  at  Site  34,  there  is  again  some  evidence  for  grazing  within  the  NPP  assemblages.    Increases  in  Types  16  and  170  and  the  presence  of  Trichuris‐type  during  this  period  indicate  dung  at  the  site  (van  Geel  et  al,  1983,  1989;  Dark,  2004).    It  is  possible  much  of  this  represents  animals  grazing  on  the  reedswamp  of  the  wetland or within the reedswamp/saltmarsh area.  The presence again of Trichuris‐type may  represent  human  faeces  (see  above),  but  further  measurement  of  these  eggs  is  needed  to  discriminate against animal faeces.  The possibility of using the reedswamp area for grazing  during this period is suggested not only by the trackways built across the wetland (see above)  allowing access to this area but also from the microscopic charcoal record.  Large increases in  the  amount  of  micro‐charcoal  can  be  seen  occurring  in  this  period  indicating  local  burning  taking place (Clark and Hussey, 1996; Clark et al, 1998).  The presence on the pollen slides of  microscopic  charcoal  fragments  still  retaining  enough  structure  to  identify  them  as  either  deriving from the burning of wood or grasses from these levels adds to the fire information.   The  diagrams  show  initial  increase  in  burning  was  a  mixture  of  wood  and  grasses  being  burnt,  which  then  switches  to  the  burning  of  grasses.    This  pattern  of  burning  suggests  it  relates to the burning of the reedswamp environment, which initially would have contained  dead and decaying trees, killed by the flooding of the site by the expansion of the River Suir.   As the river waters became higher and the site began to change to saltmarsh it would have  been  largely  reeds  (grasses)  that  were  being  burnt.    The  management  of  a  reedswamp  by  people through burning has been evidenced throughout prehistory (e.g. Bell et al, 2002) and  can be used to control the height and the density of reed growth, together with limiting the  expansion of woody species into the reedswamp (Law, 1998).     

Conclusion 
  The palaeoenvironmental analyses from the Monolith sediments have provided evidence of a  dynamic  environment,  which  has  seen  changing  patterns  of  vegetational  communities  throughout  prehistory.    This  study  has  provided  the  backdrop  of  environmental  change  which  was  witnessed  by  the  people  who  lived  and  utilised  these  environments  in  the  past.   The archaeological evidence from wooden structures within the wetland have shown people  knew how to exploit and traverse these areas, but the environmental evidence has been able  to  provide  some  information  on  the  resources  they  were  exploiting.    This  study  has  also  produced some firsts in the finding of seeds of Carpinus betulus a tree not necessarily thought  of  a  native  to  Ireland  and  in  the  discovery  of  Trichuris‐type  eggs,  which  are  not  known  to  have been discovered in other archaeological sediments in Ireland, although this may be from  a lack of not recognising them in pollen studies.   The application of non‐pollen palynomorph  assessment  has  been  useful  in  providing  data  on  local  environmental  conditions  together  with the possibilities of animals being brought to the site.  The use of a multi‐proxy approach  has  reconstructed  a  palimpsest  of  environmental  change  at  Newrath  and  this  together  with  other  studies  has  shown  the  importance  of  this  site  in  relation  to  changing  hypotheses  and  shifting paradigms on life and settlement within prehistoric Ireland.     

34

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

References 
  Allen J.R.L. (1996) Windblown trees as a palaeoclimate indicator: the character and role of  gusts.  Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 121 1‐12.    Allen J.R.L. (1998) Windblown trees as a palaeoclimate indicator: regional consistency of a  mid‐Holocene wind field.  Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 144 175‐181.    Allen  J.R.L.  (2000)  Late  Flandrian  (Holocene)  tidal  palaeochannels,  Gwent  Levels  (Severn  Estuary), SW Britain: character, evolution and relation to shore.  Marine Geology 162 353‐380.    Barber  K.E.  (1976)  History  of  vegetation,  in  Chapman  S.B.  (ed.)  Methods  in  Plant  Ecology  (Oxford, Blackwell) 5‐83.    Beer  R.J.S.  (1976)  The  relationship  between  Trichuris  trichiura  (Linneau  1758)  of  Man  and  Trichuris suis (Schrank 1788) of the pig.  Research in Veterinary Science 20 47‐54.    Behre  K‐E.  (2007)  Evidence  for  Mesolithic  agriculture  in  and  around  central  Europe?  Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 16 (203‐219).    Bell M. (ed.) (2007) Prehistoric coastal communities; the Mesolithic in western Britain CBA research  report 149.    Bell M., Allen J.R.L., Buckley S., Dark P. and Haslett S.K. (2002) Mesolithic to Neolithic coastal  environmental change: excavations at Goldcliff East, 2002. Archaeology in the Severn Estuary 12  27‐53.    Bennett  K.D.  (1989)  A  provisional  map  of  forest  types  for  the  British  Isles  5000  years  ago.   Journal of Quaternary Science 4, 2 141‐144.    Bennett  K.D.,  Whittington  G.  and  Edwards  K.J.  (1994)  Recent  plant  nomenclature  changes  and pollen morphology in the British Isles.  Quaternary Newsletter 73 1‐6.    Blackburn P., Petty J.A. and Miller F. (1988) An assessment of the static and dynamic factors  involved in windthrow.  Forestry 61 1 29‐43.    Branch N.P. and Batchelor C.R. (2007) Ballymona, County Kilkenny, Site 5, N25 Waterford Bypass  project: Pollen‐Stratigraphical Assessment.  ArchaeoScape, Unpublished client report.    Bronk Ramsay C. (2005) Radiocarbon Program OxCal, Version 3.1.    Brown  A.  (2007)  Dating  the  onset  of  cereal  cultivation  in  Britain  and  Ireland:  the  evidence  from charred cereal grains.  Antiquity 81 1042‐1052.    Brown  A.G.  (1997a)  Alluvial  Geoarchaeology:  Floodplain  archaeology  and  environmental  change  (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    Brown  A.G.  (1997b)  Clearances  and  clearings:  deforestation  in  Mesolithic/Neolithic  Britain.  Oxford Journal of Archaeology 16 2 133‐146.   

35

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Carter  S.C.  (2007)  Environmental  archaeology:  two  examples  from  the  N25  Waterford  City  Bypass  and  the  N7  Limerick  Southern  Ring  Road  (Phase  II).    New  Routes  to  the  Past,  Archaeology and the National Roads Authority Monograph Series 4 47‐60.    Clapham  A.R.,  Tutin  T.G.  and  Warburg  E.F.  (1962)  Flora  of  the  British  Isles  (2nd  Edition)  (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    Clark  J.S.  and  Hussey  T.C.  (1996)  Estimating  the  mass  flux  of  charcoal  from  sedimentary  records: effects of particle size, morphology and orientation.  The Holocene 6 2 129‐144.    Clark  J.S.,  Lynch  J.,  Stocks  B.J.,  and  Goldammer  J.G.  (1998)  Relationships  between  charcoal  particles in air and sediments in west‐central Siberia.  The Holocene 8 1 19‐29.    Clark R.L. (1982) Point count estimation of charcoal in pollen preparations and thin sections  of sediments.  Pollen et Spores 24 523‐535.    Coles B. and Coles J. (1986) Sweet Track to Glastonbury, the Somerset levels in Prehistory (Butler  and Tanner Ltd, London).    Dark P (2004) New evidence for the antiquity of the intestinal parasite Trichuris (whipworm)  in Europe. Antiquity 78 676‐681.    Dark  P.  And  Allen  J.R.L.  (2005)  Seasonal  deposition  of  Holocene  banded  sediments  in  the  Severn  Estuary  Levels  (southwest  Britain):  palynological  and  sedimentological  evidence.   Quaternary Science Reviews 24 11‐33.    Delcourt  H.R.  and  Delcourt  P.A.  (1991)  The  palaeoecological  perspective,  in  Delcourt  H.R.  and Delcourt P.A. (eds.) Quaternary Ecology: A palaeoecological Perspective (Chapman and Hall,  London) 3‐22.    Denslow  J.S.,  Ellison  A.M.  and  Sanford  R.E.  (1998)  Treefall  gap  size  effects  on  above‐  and  below‐ground processes in a tropical wet forest.  Journal of Ecology 86 597‐609.    Edwards  K.J.,  Whittington  G.,  Robinson  M.  and  Richter  D.  (2005)  Palaeoenvironments,  the  archaeological  record  and  cereal  detection  at  Clickimin,  Shetland,  Scotland.    Journal  of  Archaeological Science 32 1741‐1756.    Ellis M.B. and Ellis J.P. (1997) Microfungi on land plants: an identification handbook. (Richmond  Publishing Company, Slough).    en Bakker M. and van Sneerdyke D.G. (1982) Een palaeoecologische studie van het Ilperveld  over  de  laatste  5000  jaar.    Interne  rapporten  van  het  Hugo  de  Vries  Laboratorium,  Universiteit  Amsterdam 100.    Faegri K., Kaland P.E. and Krzywinski K. (1989) Textbook of Pollen Analysis (4th Edition). (The  Blackburn Press, New Jersey).  Fairweather A.D. and Ralston I.B.M. (1993) The Neolithic timber hall at Balbridie, Grampian  Region, Scotland: the building, the date, the plant macrofossils.  Antiquity 67 313‐323.   

36

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Farrell  and  Coxon  (2004)  N25  Waterford  Bypass:  Sedimentological  and  Palaeoenvironmental  Investigation  of  Wetland  Area  adjacent  to  Woodstown.  Unpublished  assessment  report,  Trinity  College Dublin.    Gleeson  C.  (2006a)  Final  Report  on  Archaeological  Excavations  at  Site  21,  in  the  townland  of  Granny, Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.    Gleeson  C.  (2006b)  Final  Report  on  Archaeological  Excavations  at  Site  22,  in  the  townland  of  Granny, Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.    Gleeson C. (2006c) Final Report on Archaeological Excavations at Site 1, in the townland of Granny,  Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.    Godwin  H.  (1975)  History  of  the  British  Flora  (2nd  Edition)  (Cambridge  University  Press,  Cambridge).    Grimm, E. C. (2004): TGView Version 2.0.2, Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL.    Hall V.A., Pilcher J.R. and Bowler M. (1993) Pre‐elm decline cereal‐size pollen: evaluating its  recruitment  to  fossil  deposits  using  modern  pollen  rain  studies.    Bioilogy  and  Environment:  Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 93B 1 1‐4.    Haslett S.K., Strawbridge F., Martin N.A. and Davies C.F.C (2001) Vertical saltmarsh accretion  and  its  relationship  to  sea‐level  in  the  Severn  Estuary,  UK:  an  investigation  using  foraminifera as tidal indicators.  Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 52 143‐153.    Hughes  J.  (2006a)  Final  Report  on  Archaeological  Excavations  at  Site  35,  in  the  townland  of  Newrath, Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.    Hughes  J.  (2006b)  Final  Report  on  Archaeological  Excavations  at  Sites  36‐37,  in  the  townland  of  Newrath, Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.    Huntley,  B.  and  Birks,  H.  J.  B.  (1983)  An  Atlas  of  Past  and  Present  Pollen  Maps  for  Europe,  0– 13,000 years ago (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    IAWA Committee, EA Wheeler, P Bass and PE Gasson (eds.) 1989, IAWA List of Microscopic  Features  for  Hardwood  Identification,  Published  for  the  International  Association  of  Wood  Anatomists.    Law C. (1998) The uses and fire‐ecology of reedswamp vegetation, in Mellars P. and Dark P.  (eds.)  Star  Carr  in  context:  new  archaeological  and  palaeoecological  investigations  at  the  early  Mesolithic  site  of  Star  Carr,  North  Yorkshire  McDonald  Institute  Monographs  (Oxbow  Books,  Oxford) 197‐206.    Mighall T.M., Timpany S., Blackford J.J., Innes J.B., O’Brien C.E., O’Brien W.B. and Harrison  S.E.  (2007)  Vegetation  change  during  the  Mesolithic  and  Neolithic  on  the  Mizen  Peninsula,  Co. Cork, south‐west Ireland.  Vegetation History and Archaeobotany published first online.    Mitchell  F.J.G.  (1988)  The  vegetational  history  of  the  Killarney  oak‐woods,  SW  Ireland:  evidence from fine spatial resolution pollen analysis.  Journal of Ecology 76 416‐436.   

37

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Mitchell F.J.G. (2005) How open were European primeval forests?  Hypothesis testing using  palaeoecological data.   Journal of Ecology 93 168‐177.    Mitchell  F.J.G.  (2006)  Where  did  Ireland’s  trees  come  from?    Biology  and  Environment:  Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 106B 3 251‐259.    Monk,  M.A  (1985/86).  Evidence  from  macroscopic  plant  remains  for  crop  husbandry  in  prehistoric and early historic Ireland: A review.  Journal of Irish Archaeology III, 31‐36.    Moore  P.D.,  Webb  J.A.  and  Collinson  M.E.  (1991)  Pollen  Analysis  (2nd  Edition)  (Blackwell  Science, Oxford).     O’Connell M. (1987) Early cereal‐type pollen records from Connemara, western Ireland and  their possible significance.  .Pollen et Spores 19 207‐224.    O’Connell M. and Molloy K. (2001) Farming and woodland dynamics in Ireland during the  Neolithic.  Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 101 1‐2 99‐128.    Odgaard B.V. (1999) Fossil pollen as a record of past biodiversity.  Journal of Biogeography 26 1,  7‐17.    Pals  J.P.,  van  Geel  B.  and  Delfos  A.  (1980)  Palaeoecological  studies  in  Klokkeweel  bog  near  Hoogkarspel (Noord Holland).  Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 30 371‐418.    Peterken  G.F.  (1996)  Natural  woodland  ecology  and  conservation  in  Northern  Temperate  regions  (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    Price  T.D.  (1989)  The  reconstruction  of  Mesolithic  diets,  in  Bonsall  C.  (ed.)  The  Mesolithic  in  Europe (john MacDonald, Edinburgh) 48‐59.    Rackham  O.  (2003)  Ancient  woodland  its  history,  vegetation  and  uses  in  England  (Arnold,  London).    Rodwell  J.S.  (ed.)  (1991)  British  Plant  Communities  Volume  1:  Woods  and  scrub  (Cambridge  University Press, Cambridge).    Rodwell J.S. (ed.) (1995) British Plant Communities Volume 4: Aquatic communities, swamps and  tall‐herb fens (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    Rodwell J.S. (ed.) (2000) British Plant Communities Volume 5: Maritime communitie and vegetation  of open habitats (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).    Rowell, DL (1994) Soil Science: Methods and Applications (Longman, London).    Russell  I.  and  Ginn  V.  (2007)  Preliminary  Report  on  Archaeological  Excavations  at  Site  3,  in  the  townland  of  Adamstown,  Co.  Waterford  Archaeological  Consultancy  Services  Limited  Unpublished Client Report.    Schweingruber F. H. (1978) Microscopic Wood Anatomy: Structural Variability of Stems and Twigs  in Recent and Subfossil Woods from Central Europe. Kommissionsverlag Zücher AG, Zug   

38

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Schweingruber F.H. (1990) Microscopic wood anatomy (3rd edition) Birmensdorf.    Simmons I.G. (1996) The environmental impact of Later Mesolithic cultures: the creation of moorland  landscape in England and Wales (Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh).    Simmons  I.G.  and  Innes  J.B.  (1996)  Disturbances  in  the  Mid‐Holocene  vegetation  at  North  Gill, North York Moors: Form and Process.  Journal of Archaeological Science 23 183‐191.    Smith A.G. and Morgan L.A. (1989) A succession to ombrotrophic bog in the Gwent Levels,  and it’s demise: a Welsh parallel to the Somerset Levels.  New Phytologist 112 145‐167.    Stace  C.  (1997)  New  flora  of  the  British  Isles  (2nd  Edition)  (Cambridge  University  Press,  Cambridge).    Tauber  H.  (1965)  Differential  pollen  dispersal  and  the  interpretation  of  pollen  diagrams.  Danmarks Geologiske. Undersølgelse 89 1‐69.    Timpany S. (2001) Palaeoecological changes during the Holocene on the Mizen Peninsula, southwest  Ireland. Unpublished MSc Thesis, Coventry University.    Timpany S. (2005) A multi‐proxy palaeoecological investigation of submerged forests and intertidal  peats, Severn Estuary, UK.  Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Reading.      Tweddle  J.C.,  Edwards  K.J.  and  Fieller  N.R.J.  (2005)  Multivariate  statistical  and  other  approaches  for  the  separation  of  cereal  from  wild Poaceae  pollen  using a  Holocene  dataset.   Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 14 15‐30.    van Geel B. (1978) A palynological study of Holocene peat bog section in Germany and the  Netherlands.  Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 25 1‐120.    van  Geel  B.  (1986)  A  palaeoecological  study  of  Holocene  peat  bog  sections  based  on  the  analysis  of  pollen, spores and macro‐ and microscopic remains of fungi, algae, cormophytes and animals (Gebroen  le Amsterdam, Amsterdam).    Van Geel, B. and Aptroot A. (2006) Fossil ascomycetes in Quaternary deposits. Nova Hedwigia  82 13‐329.    van  Geel  B.,    Bohnke  S.J.P.  and  Dee  H.  (1981)  A  palaeoecological  study  of  an  upper  Late  Glacial  and  Holocene  sequence  from  “De  Borchet”,  the  Netherlands.    Review  of  Palaeobotany  and Palynology 31 367‐448.    van Geel B., Hallewas D.P. and Pals J.P. (1983) A late Holocene deposit under the Westfriese  Zeedijk,  near  Enkhuizen  (Prov.  of  N‐Holland,  The  Netherlands):  palaeoecological  and  archaeological aspects.  Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 38 269‐335.    van  Geel  B.,  Coope  G.R.  and  van  der  Hammen  T.  (1989)  Palaeoecology  and  stratigraphy  of  the Late‐glacial type section at Usselo (the Netherlands).  Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology  60 25‐129.    van Geel B., Klink A.G., Pals J.P. and Wiegers J. (1986) An Upper Eemian lake deposit from  Twente, eastern Netherlands.  Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 47 31‐61. 

39

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

  van  Geel  B.,  Buurman,  J.  Brinkkemper,  O.,  Schelvis,  J.,  Aptroot,  A.,  van  Reenen,  G.    and  Hakbijl,  T.,  (2003)  Environmental  reconstruction  of  a  Roman  Period  settlement  site  in  Uitgeest  (The  Netherlands),  with  special  reference  to  coprophilous  fungi.  Journal  of  Archaeological Science 30 873‐883.    Vera F.W.M. (2000) Grazing ecology and forest history (CABI Publishing, Oxon).    Walker D. (1970) Direction and rate in some British post‐glacial hydroseres, in Walker D. and  West R.G. (eds.) Studies in the vegetation history of the British Isles (Cambridge University Press,  Cambridge).     Waller  M.P.,  Long  A.J.,  Long  D.  and  Innes  J.B.  (1999)  Patterns  and  processes  in  the  development of coastal mire vegetation: multi‐site investigations from Walland Marsh, south‐ east England.  Quaternary Science Reviews 18 1419‐1444.    Woodman  P.,  Anderson  E.  and  N.  Finlay  (1999)  Excavations  at  Ferriter’s  Cove  1983‐1995:  last  foragers, first farmers in the Dingle Peninsula (Wordwell Ltd, Bray).    Wren J. (2006) Final Report on Archaeological Excavations at Site 4, in the townland of Mullinabro,  Co. Kilkenny Headland Archaeology Unpublished Client Report.       

40

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

APPENDICES 

41

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

 APPENDIX I    (Foraminifera Report) 

42

FORAMINIFERAL ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES SUPPLIED BY HEADLAND ARCHAEOLOGY
Professor Simon K. Haslett, Quaternary Research Centre, Dept. of Geography, School of Science and the Environment, Bath Spa University College, Newton Park, Bath, BA2 9BN, UK. August 2007 Introduction An additional 12 samples were supplied by Headland Archaeology in addition to samples supplied by the University of Reading to the author in 2006 for analysis of their foraminifera content, with a view to establish their abundance, preservation and usefulness as marine palaeoenvironmental indicators in these Holocene sediments. This report describes the method employed to separate foraminifera from the sediment samples, presents the integrated results obtained, and suggests an interpretation of the results. Foraminiferal analysis is now a well-established technique for assigning tidal level and depositional environment information to Holocene sediments (see Allen and Haslett, 2002, for a review). Haslett et al. (1997) provide distributional data for foraminifera living on the modern salt marshes of the Severn Estuary, and it is this dataset, with updates (Haslett, 2000; Haslett et al., 2001; Allen and Haslett, 2002), that enables the calibration of fossil data.

Method Bulk samples for foraminiferal analysis were initially weighed wet and then air-dried and then weighed (dry bulk weight, g). Samples were then soaked in distilled water for 24 hours, then wet-sieved at 63µm, with the >63µm fraction being retained and weighed (g) after drying. Aliquots of the 125-500µm fraction of each sample were dry sieved and examined using reflected light microscopy for foraminifera (Knudsen and Austin, 1996; Bell et al., 2002). Foraminifera specimens were counted and identified from known aliquots of a sample, from which an estimate of the number of test per sample could be made if the aliquot examined was less than the entire sample. In addition, other

-1-

components of the samples were also noted and include coleoptera, ostracods, plant remains (including seeds), iron pyrite crystals, and siliceous sponge spicules.

Results and Discussion Results are shown in Tables 1 and 2 for samples from monoliths 1 and 2 respectively. Only 7 of the integrated samples yielded foraminifera, with variable but generally low abundance ranging from 1 to 18 specimens per gram. Preservation of foraminifera tests is generally good with little indication of post-mortem alteration. All foraminifera species recovered are agglutinating and typical of high intertidal estuarine environments (salt marshes) where they live in situ. No calcareous foraminifera species, that occupy lower intertidal surfaces, were found. Monolith 1 samples 70, 82, 110 and 142cm yield only Jadammina macrescens which represents the monospecific assemblage of Haslett et al. (2001) that inhabits the lower part of the zone between Mean High Water Spring Tides (MHWST) and Highest Astronomical Tides (HAT). Monolith 1 samples 18, 34 and 102cm although lack foraminifera do contain marine sponge spicules and, therefore, may represent deposition high in the zone between MHWST-HAT equating with the ‘barren zone’ of Haslett et al’s (1997, 2001) salt marsh foraminifera zonation. Monolith 1 samples 50, 118, 134, 147, 158, 209 and 230cm lack both foraminifera and sponge spicules and, therefore, may represent a non-marine depositional environment. This is particularly true of samples 158, 209 and 230cm which appear to contain freshwater/terrestrial beetles (coleopteran). Samples 50, 118, 134 and 147cm however, lack any additional determinant so may represent freshwater/terrestrial deposition or deposition high in the zone between MHWST-HAT. Monolith 1 samples 98, 122, and 190cm yield the most diverse of the foraminifera assemblages containing Trochammina inflata, Miliammina fusca as well as Jadammina macrescens. This assemblage is typical of deposition around MHWST. In monolith 1, the variation in abundance in the number of tests per gram from 1 to 18 was considered in the previous report, which suggested that low test abundance is perhaps linked to high sedimentation rates of other material (peat, silt, etc), effectively diluting the contribution made by the foraminiferal standing crop to the sediment analysed, as in a salt
-2-

marsh setting abundance variation is much more likely to be this factor rather than test dissolution or sorting. All samples from monolith 2 were found to be organic-rich and barren of foraminifera, and other determinants, except for plant fragments. This may represent freshwater/terrestrial deposition or deposition high in the zone between MHWST-HAT. Quartz grains are also common, but tend to be angular in nature rather than rounded, so may indicate a terrestrial, rather than marine, source.

Concluding Remark The foraminifera recovered are generally well-preserved and diagnostic of particular high intertidal palaeoenvironments above MHWST. Samples that lack foraminifera may have been deposited either close to HAT or in a freshwater/terrestrial setting. The variable abundance observed may be due to a sediment dilution effect, rather than test dissolution, and/or sediment sorting.

References Allen, J. R. L., 2001. Late Quaternary stratigraphy in the Gwent Levels (southeast Wales): the subsurface evidence. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, 112, 289-315. Allen, J. R. L. and Haslett, S. K., 2002. Buried salt-marsh edges and tide-level cycles in the mid-Holocene of the Caldicot Level (Gwent), South Wales, UK. The Holocene, 12, 303-324. Bell, M., Allen, J. R. L., Buckley, S., Dark, P. and Haslett, S. K., 2002. Mesolithic to Neolithic coastal environmental change: excavations at Goldcliff East, 2002. Archaeology in the Severn Estuary, 13, 1-29. Haslett, S. K., 1997. An Ipswichian foraminiferal assemblage from the Gwent Levels (Severn Estuary, UK). Journal of Micropalaeontology, 16, 136. Haslett, S.K., 2000. Coastal Systems. Routledge, London, 240pp. Haslett, S. K., Davies, P. and Strawbridge, F., 1997. Reconstructing Holocene sea-level change in the Severn Estuary and Somerset Levels: the foraminifera connection. Archaeology in the Severn Estuary, 8, 29-40. Haslett, S.K., Strawbridge, F., Martin, N. A. and Davies, C. F. C., 2001. Vertical saltmarsh accretion and its relationship to sea-level in the Severn Estuary, UK: an investigation using foraminifera as tidal indicators. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 52, 143153. Knudsen, K. L. and Austin, W. E. N., 1996. Late Glacial foraminifera. In Andrews, J. T., Austin, W. E. N., Bergsten, H. and Jennings, A. E. (eds) Late Quaternary Palaeoceanography of the North Atlantic Margins. Geological Society Special Publication No. 111, pp. 7-10.
-3-

-4-

Headland Archaeology: NWB03, Site 34 Palaeoenvironmental Analyses APPENDIX II    (Diatom Reports) 

47

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Newrath – Diatom Report Prepared by Dr. Jason Jordan

Page 1. Introduction 2. Methodology and Techniques 3. Results 4. Interpretation 5. References 1 1 2 3 3

1. Introduction A total of 12 sediment samples from the Newrath site were prepared and assessed for diatom analysis. The aim of the analysis was to determine the provenance of the depositional environments. The expected outcome was that the samples would show that the site had initially been inundated by the sea, with marine and brackish water environments dominating the sedimentary basin. Depending on preservation and occurrence, diatom analysis of the samples would show any changes to the salinity of the depositional environment quite clearly.

2. Methodology and Techniques The sediment samples were prepared according to standard laboratory techniques (Barber and Haworth, 1981) involving distillation on a hotplate with Hydrogen peroxide to remove any organic matter and then a series of washes with distilled water to concentrate the diatoms and reduce the amount of clay and silt particulate matter. A pipette of the suspension was then placed onto a glass cover-slip and mounted onto microscope slides with Naphrax, a high refractive index, to illustrate the possible species preserved.

Diatom species identification is carried out with reference to Hartley et al. (1996), Hendey (1964) and Van der Werf and Huls (1957-74). Diatom nomenclature follows Hartley (1996) and salinity and lifeform classification is based upon Van Dam et al. (1994), Vos and de Wolf (1993) and Denys (1991/2).

48

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

3. Results Samples were examined for their diatom preservation potential and the major species contained within each sample. This would give a broad indication of the depositional environment in conjunction with other microfossil analyses and any other lithostratigraphy/sedimentary analysis that has been carried out.

Of the twelve samples prepared, only two had any diatoms preserved in them at all, and these were far too sparse in terms of their concentration to allow full counts to be conducted. Diatom taphonomy is quite well understood and in marsh environments it is likely that either extreme acidity or extreme alkalinity are usually to blame for the loss of biogenic silica from the deposited sediment. Diatoms can survive in fairly harsh conditions but the mobility of biogenic silica controls their fossilisation. It would appear that the Newrath site has a poor preservation potential for diatom silica, something which is not unusual for a marsh/fen location. The changes in pH associated with vegetation growth and decay in this type of environment mean that diatom preservation is dependent on very localised conditions, pre and post deposition. Where diatoms were present, the preservation was extremely poor but the species encountered are given below.

Newrath Diatom Samples

Sample Monolith 1 210cm 1 – no species present. 147cm 2 – no species present. 134cm 3 – no species present. 110cm 4 – only two individual species were encountered, both of which were Paralia sulcata, a marine diatom indicative of storm deposits. 102cm 5 – no species present.

Monolith 2 198cm 6 – no species present. 196cm 7 – no species present. 193cm 8 – no species present. 49

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

190cm 9 – no species present. 160cm 10 – no species present. 137cm 11 – no species present. 128cm 12 – only one single specimen was identified, Gramatophora serpentine, a marine diatom indicative of marine water and coastal depsoits.

4. Interpretation The underlying brief for this analysis was not realised from the samples provided. There is no clear indication of the depositional environments as the samples do not contain any diatoms, however, the two samples that had the few diatom furstules present are indeed marine species. This is not enough to allow a reconstruction to take place but the indication is that the two identified samples have indeed been depositied in and around a former shoreline.

5. References Barber, H. and Haworth, E.Y. 1981. A guide to the morphology of the diatom frustule, with a key to the British Freshwater Genera, Ambleside. Freshwater Biological Association, 109pp.

Denys, L. 1991/2.A check-list of the diatoms in the Holocene coastal deposits of the western Belgian Coastal Plain with a survey of their apparent ecological requirements 1. Professional Paper No. 246.Geological Survey of Belgium, 41pp.

Hartley, B., Barber, H. G., Carter, J. R. and Sims, P. A. 1996. An Atlas of British Diatoms. Biopress, Bristol, 601pp.

Hendey, N.I. 1964. An introductory account of the smaller algae of the British Coastal Waters, Part V: Bacillariophyceae (diatoms). London, HMSO, 317pp.

Van Dam, H., Mertens, A. and Sinkeldam, J. 1994. A coded checklist and ecological indicator values of freshwater diatoms from the Netherlands. Netherlands Journal of Aquatic Ecology, 28 (1), 117-133.

50

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Van der Werf, A. and Hils, H. 1957-74. Diatomienflore Van Nederland, 8Parts, Koenigstein. Otto Koeltz Science Publishers.

Vos, P.C. and de Wolf, H. 1993. Diatoms as a tool for reconstructing sedimentary environments in coastal wetlands; methodological aspects. Hydrobiologia, 269/270, 285-296.

51

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Waterford Monolith 1: Diatom analysis  

Report prepared by Dr Sue Dawson

For Headland Archaeology (Scott Timpany)

1.Introduction Twelve silt-clay and peat samples from monolith 1 were sub-sampled and subject to preparation for diatom analysis. The aim of the analysis was to determine the environment of deposition of the silt-clays and peats and whether the sediments retained information relating to the former presence of marine sediments, and thus information regarding the former relative sea level history of the site.

2. Methodology and Techniques   The  twelve  sediment  samples  were  prepared  according  to  standard  laboratory  techniques  (Barber  and Haworth,  1981)  involving distillation  on  a  hotplate  with  Hydrogen  peroxide  to  remove any organic matter and then a series of washes with distilled water to concentrate the  diatoms  and  reduce  the  amount  of  clay  and  silt  particulate  matter.  A  pipette  of  the  suspension was then placed onto a glass cover‐slip and mounted onto microscope slides with  Naphrax, a high refractive index, to illustrate the possible species preserved.     Diatom species were identified with reference to Hendey (1964) and Van der Werf and Huls,  1957‐74). Diatom nomenclature follows Hartley (1986) and salinity and lifeform classification  is  based  upon  Vos  and  de  Wolf  (1993)  and  Denys  (1991/2).  In  general,  Polyhalobous  and  mesohalobous  diatom  classes  broadly  reflect  marine  and  brackish  conditions  whilst  oligohalobous and halophilics classes reflect freshwater and terrestrial environments.            Results 

Samples  were  examined  for  their  diatom  preservation  potential  and  the  major  species  contained  in  each  sample.  This  would  give  a  broad  indication  of  the  provenance of the sediments in conjunction with other microfossil analyses and the  lithostratigraphy.  

Of all 12 prepared, 3 samples had sufficient species to undertake a full count to 300 diatom valves; 7 samples were sparse and 1 sample did not contain any diatoms. 52

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Where samples were fossiliferous; diatom preservation was good and an assessment of depositional environment was possible. Where samples were sparse and full counts not able to be undertaken, an overall assessment of the likely mode of deposition was possible in all but one sample.

Sample 1 (cm) 

(18cm depth) – green-grey silt The sample of silt is sparse. However, there are sufficient species to determine the sedimentary provenance. Marine species including Paralia sulcata, Podosira stelliger, together with the marine-brackish Cocconeis scutellum indicate deposition within marine waters. The presence of Diploneis interrupta attest to more brackish conditions. The limited number of species suggest deposition within an estuarine environment within the intertidal zone.

Sample 2 (34 cm)- green-grey silt The silt is sparse in microfossils. The main species within the silt is the brackish Diploneis interrupta. Polyhalobous species are represented by Paralia sulcata.. The limited number of species indicate intertidal estuarine conditions.

Sample 3 (50 cm)- green-grey silt The silt has marine species Paralia sulcata, Podosira stelliger, and Rhaphoneis amphiceros (the latter which lives on sand/mud flats. Together with the brackish species Diploneis interrupta, the diatoms infer a mud/sand flat estuarine environent in the intertidal zone.

Sample 4 ( 70 cm)- silt The silt is sparse in diatoms but fragments of Paralia sulcata and sponge spicules attest to the presence of marine waters in the formation of the silt.

53

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Sample 5 (82 cm)- grey-brown silts with peat
The silt with some peats are very sparse in diatoms. However, fragments of Paralia sulcata  and Nitzschia punctata (marine‐brackish intertidal mudflats) suggest deposition in an  intertidal estuarine environment.    Sample 6 (98 cm)‐ dark grey‐brown silty peat 

The silty peat has abundant diatoms to allow a full assessment of environment of deposition. The following species together with the presence of Sponge spicules infer deposition within the intertidal zone: Marine species: Paralia sulcata, Podosira stelliger, Rhabdonema arcuatum, Rhabdonema minutum, Rhaphoneis amphiceros,
Brackish species: 

Nitzschia accuminata, Navicula peregrina, navicularis, Nitzschia punctata.

Diploneis

interrupta,

Nitzschia

Sample 7 (118 cm)- orange/brown peaty-silt The silty peat has abundant diatoms to allow a full assessment of environment of deposition. The following species infer deposition within the intertidal zone:
Marine species: 

Paralia sulcata, Cocconeis scutellum, Rhaphoneis amphiceros,
Brackish species: 

Diploneis didyma, Diploneis interrupta, Navicula digito-radiata, Nitzschia navicularis.

Sample 8 (122 cm)‐ orange/br peaty‐silt 

The silty peat has abundant diatoms to allow a full assessment of environment of deposition. The following species together with the presence of Sponge spicules infer deposition within the intertidal zone: Marine indicators: Sponge spicules, Paralia sulcata, Rhaphoneis amphiceros,
Brackish indicators: 

Nitzschia navicularis, Diploneis interrupta.

54

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

Sample 9 (142 cm)- orange/br silt Phragmites peat transition
The  silt  –peat  transition  is  sparse  in  diatoms.  However,  limited  numbers  of  Paralia  sulcata,  Diploneis didyma, and Diploneis interrupta indicate an upper intertidal estuarine environment. 

Sample 10 (158 cm)- br/black Phragmites peat with silt
The  peats  are  almost  barren  of  diatoms.  However,  the  following  freshwater  species  are  present in limited numbers; Fragilaria construens, Fragilaria construens var venter and Pinnularia  microstauron.  The  lack  of  brackish  and  marine  species  within  the  peats  attest  to  the  lack  of  marine waters in their formation.     Sample 11 (190 cm)‐ brown‐black wood peat  The peat is sparse, limited numbers of the freshwater species Eunotia arcus indicate a  terrestrial source. 

Sample 12 (230 cm)- brown Phragmites peat No diatoms present

4. Interpretation Diatom analyses from Monolith 1, Waterford display a variable preservation  of  diatom  within  the  sediment  sequences  analysed.  Many  of  the  peat  and  upper silt samples are sparse. The silty peat samples allow a full assessment  of deposition.    The lowermost sediments are peats and are poor in diatoms. This may reflect  the  possible  dissolution  of  any  species  due  to  the  acidic  nature  of  the  sediments.  However,  the  limited  numbers  of  Oligohalobous  (fresh)  species  indcate deposition away from marine influence. Within the peat‐silt transition  limited numbers of brackish species may suggest deposition within the upper  intertidal  zone,  although  without  full  counts  it  is  only  possible  to  infer  this  55

Headland Archaeology (Ireland) Ltd: N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3, Site 34 Final Report Volume 3 

interpretation. The silty peat and peaty silts between 82cm and 122cm depth  have  abundant  diatoms  species  and  allow  an  accurate  assessment  of  the  sediment  provenence.  The  sediment  sample  reflect  an  intertidal  estuarine  environment  characterised  by  a  brackish  influence,  with  Navicula  peregrina,  Nitzschia  puntata,  Nitzschia  navicularis  and  Diploneis  interrupta  in  most  abundance. This reflects  sedimentation  in  the upper reaches of the intertidal  zone. The upper silts (18cm to 70cm) are sparse, however the brackish‐marine  and  marine  species  including  Paralia  sulcata,  Podosira  stelliger  together  with  Coscinodiscus are planktonics and infer a more marine environment, although  still within an estuarine environment. 

5. Summary Diatoms analysed from samples within Monolith 1 indicate deposition within an intertidal estuarine environment. Initially, the assemblages suggest a high intertidal area around MHWST (Mean High Water Spring Tide) and the gradual increase in marine waters. The organic silts are indicative of an intertidal mudflat environment, with many of the brackish-marine species adapted to living on mud and sand flats. The upper silts are more marine and suggest slightly deeper waters, although the assemblages are still evidence of deposition within an intertidal estuarine environment.

The sediments and diatoms suggest an increasing marine influence at the monlith site. This could be further investigated, especially around the freshwater to brackishmarine transition to ascertain the depth at which the freshwater sediements are replaced by brackish sediments and more marine sediments.

56

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful