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WEDNESDAY
NoviVnin 27, 2013
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SERVING NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA SINCE 1905
Air Fares ........... E2
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Comics ......... D6,7
Crosswords .... D6
Editorial ..........A14
Horoscope .....C10
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Obituaries ......A12
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Inside today’s Tulsa World Follow the World online
• Breaking news at tulsaworld.com
• facebook.com/tulsaworld
• twitter.com/tulsaworld
Today High 35, Low 24
Sunny, cold. More weather on B8
Get more weather coverage and check out
our weather blog at tulsaworld.com/weather
Business: Small firms
embracing the rush. E1
Scene: Tips to tame
turkey troubles. D1
Get a jump start on
Black Friday sales
Black Friday sales are almost here, and the
Tulsa World will have an early edition to help
you make plans for the big shopping days.
An early edition of the Thanksgiving Day
newspaper will be available at most retail
outlets by late Wednesday afternoon, and
all stores will have their Thanksgiving Day
newspapers with all Black Friday inserts by 8
p.m. Wednesday.
“Buy your copy the night before Thanks-
giving and make your shopping plan for the
best deals,” said Bill Masterson Jr., president
and publisher of Tulsa World Media Co.
The Thanksgiving Day Tulsa World will
include 57 advertising inserts in addition to
the local ads throughout the paper.
For a list of store hours for Black Friday sales,
see page E2.
TOBACCO: SETTLEMENT SHOWING RESULTS
Creating a smokeless habit
BY GINNIE GRAHAM
World Staf Writer
Oklahoma’s decision to ac-
cept a settlement with big to-
bacco 15 years ago has led to
big bucks.
More than $1 billion so far.
Earnings from the endow-
ment that was started with
those payments will continue
as long as tobacco is in use and
most likely long after.
This year at least $35 million
will be spent among 67 pro-
grams in nearly every county to
prevent and end tobacco use,
promote health and wellness
and continue research.
Grants will help pay for a
smoking cessation helpline,
sidewalks in Collinsville, a
physical health lab at Jenks
schools and materials for the
annual Great American Smoke-
out cessation campaign.
Oklahoma is the only state
with a constitutionally protect-
ed trust for tobacco settlement
funds.
Former Oklahoma Attorney
General Drew Edmondson was
one of eight state attorneys
general charged with negotiat-
ing the then-largest settlement
in the nation’s history.
“When the state attorneys
general band together in a par-
ticular cause, it can be very ef-
fective in stopping improper
While work still needs to be done, numbers improve
Corey Love (right), with the Tulsa Health Department, hands out an information packet on the Great American Smokeout last week to
parent Tony Cantu as he picks up his children at ECDC Bunche. Oklahoma is marking the 15th anniversary of the tobacco settlement, which
funds smoking cessation and wellness programs. Photos by JAMES GIBBARD/Tulsa World
Tobacco
control
programs
49.9%
Research
21.9%
Nutrition and
wellness
18%
Conference
sponsorships .1%
Unsolicited 1.9%
Disaster funding 2.5% Incentive grants 2.6%
Administration 3.2%
Where the money goes
How proceeds from the tobacco trust
fund will be spent in 2014settlement
(Figures have been rounded)
Source: Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust
DAVID HOUSH/Tulsa World
Students gather around Deedra Bryant, who is with the Tulsa
Health Department, dressed as a cigarette to promote the
‘Great American Smoke Out’ outside ECDC Bunche school in
Tulsa on Nov. 19.
SEE HABIT A4
Oklahoma tobacco facts
• Ranked 39th last year in
tobacco use, up from 47th in
2011.
• 23 percent of Oklahomans are
lighting up, compared to 19 per-
cent of adults nationally.
• 28.7 percent of Oklahomans
smoked in 2001, reducing the
number of smokers by more
than 100,000.
• About $1.16 billion in medi-
cal costs are associated with
smoking.
• More than 250,000 people
have been served since 2003
through the state’s cessation
Helpline, which provides items
and support to quit tobacco
use.
• A record 38,732 people con-
tacted the Helpline last year.
• 6,085 Tulsa County residents
were served through Helpline
last year.
• More than 40 percent of
Helpline callers have no health
insurance, and more than 60
percent of callers have an
income of less than $20,000
a year.
• An estimated $18 million in
direct costs from tobacco use
have been saved through the
Helpline program.
Source: Tobacco Settlement Endowment
Trust
DHS takes
custody of
6 kids after
homicides
BY JARREL WADE
World Staf Writer
Six children who had been living with
their grandparents in a Tulsa home where
four people were killed Saturday stayed with
neighbors until Tuesday, when state ofcials
removed them from that home.
The children range in age from 2 months
to 8 years old. Sgt. Dave Walker said the chil-
dren’s mother took
custody of them from
their grandparents’
home, where four
people were shot to
death Saturday and
a fifth was seriously
wounded.
The mother later
took them to Chris-
tinea McMinn, who
lives down the street,
McMinn said.
She and her adult
son welcomed the
children into their
home with open
arms, but they didn’t
have the resources to
feed or bathe them,
she said. The house
has no gas and no
running water, and
they have little food,
McMinn said.
Department of
Human Services of-
ficials became in-
volved Tuesday,
DHS spokeswoman
Sheree Powell said.
DHS ofcials were
not involved with the placement of the chil-
dren at the neighbor’s home, she said, adding
that she could not discuss additional details
about the case.
Jordan Rufng, McMinn’s son, said he and
his mother were having a hard time financially
Schools mull high court impact
BY BILL SHERMAN
World Religion Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court’s
decision to hear a case in-
volving Hobby Lobby’s law-
suit to opt out of certain pro-
visions of the Afordable Care
Act likely will afect lawsuits
filed by four Oklahoma uni-
versities.
But only the Supreme
Court ruling itself, expected
in late June, will determine
what that efect might be.
That’s the word from Matt
Bowman, an attorney with
the Alliance Defending Free-
dom, which is representing
the four Oklahoma universi-
ties.
Hobby Lobby sued the fed-
eral government over a provi-
sion of the new health-care
law that requires the com-
pany to provide its employees
with insurance that pays for
certain contraceptives, in-
cluding some the company’s
owners say induce abortion.
The Oklahoma-based
company, whose owners are
Christians, said the provision
violates their religious rights.
Four Oklahoma Christian
universities sued the federal
government over the same
issue in September, joining
dozens of similar suits across
the country.
They are Southern Naza-
rene University, which is in
Bethany and also has a Tulsa
campus; Oklahoma Wes-
leyan University in Bartles-
FOUNDER
David Green:
Hobby Lobby’s
CEOsaid he is
“encouraged”
that the Supreme
Court will take
up his firm’s
challenge to the
Afordable Care
Act.
Supreme Court takes up
Hobby Lobby ACA case
BY CHRIS CASTEEL
The Oklahoman
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Su-
preme Court agreed Tuesday to de-
termine whether Hobby Lobby and
a Pennsylvania furniture company
can deny their employees federally
required birth-control insurance
coverage that violates the religious
beliefs of the company owners.
The high court justices accepted
cases that have received conflicting
decisions in federal appeals courts.
Through the cases, the justices
could determine whether the for-
profit companies have the constitu-
tional right and leeway under a fed-
eral law to reject the birth-control
Information
sought
Anyone with
information about
the homicides can
call detectives on the
Homicide Tip Line
at 918-798-8477 or
send an email to ho-
micide@cityoftulsa.
org.
Those with
information can also
contact Crime Stop-
pers anonymously
and be eligible for a
reward for informa-
tion leading to an ar-
rest. Crime Stoppers
can be reached by
phone at 918-596-
2677, online at bit.ly/
crimestopperstips, or
by sending a text to
CRIMES and begin-
ning your message
with Tip918.
TULSAWORLD.COM
Get the background
Read previous stories and find informa-
tion about insurance plans available
through the Afordable Care Act.
tulsaworld.com/healthcarelaw
SEE IMPACT A7
• A ruling on Hobby
Lobby’s lawsuit
might not resolve
suits by four schools.
• They were living with their
grandparents in the home
where the 4 slayings occurred.
SEE DHS A7
SEE COURT A7