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Christopher Twede Fall 2013 Pipeline Project Introduction: The construction on our well in Vernal has finished; now

we need to build a pipeline to get the natural gas to our refinery. We have four options, each with their own benefits, for the path of the pipeline. Option 1: Run the pipeline directly east through the mountain and south to the refinery. This will add $240,000 for the study and $140,000 each month for the four months the study will delay us; in addition to the $1,200,000 cost for drilling through the mountain and the $500,000 for each mile of pipeline.

22 miles east and 8 miles south

The equation to determine the cost of this path is: ( ) ( ) The cost of this path would be $17,000,000. Option 2:

( )

Run the pipeline around the private property west to avoid the mountain, then south, and east to the refinery. This will cost $500,000 for each mile the pipeline runs.

3 miles west, 8 miles south, 25 miles east

The equation to determine the cost of this path is: ( ( The cost of this path would be $18,000,000.

)

)

Option 3: Run the pipeline the shortest distance through the private ground. This would cost an extra $350,000 for each mile of pipeline. So each mile will cost $850,000.

The equation to determine the cost of this path is: ( ) (√ (√ The cost of this path would be $19,897,989.85 )

)

Option 4: Run the pipeline through an optimized path through some private land and some BLM land. The cost to go through private land is $850,000 per mile and the

x=0

x=5.819

x=15

The equation to determine the cost of this path is:

(x being the distance towards the refinery from the point directly across the private land from the well and y being the length across the private land [√ )

( ( derivative function: set equal to zero: (
√ √

) ) )

( ) (√

)

√ ( )

( ⁄ ( Sign diagram: Loc. Min ↓ 5.819 ( + √ ⁄ ( )

) )

) (

( )

)

(√

)

y=√

x=0

x=5.819

x=15

cost= $17.8 million cost= $16.5 million cost= $18 million The optimal path has √ (9.8925) miles of private land and 225.81914374 ≈ 16.18 miles BLM land. The optimal path’s cost is $16,499,090.83. Cost function for any given configuration: ( ) ( ) ( ) (√ )

Conclusion: As you can see Mr. CEO, the fourth, optimized, option of going through some private land and some BLM land is the most economical for our company; at a cost of a minimal $16,499,090.83. Another benefit of this option is that we can work on it immediately with no delay for environmental study. Reflection: Many of the skills I have learned in calculus will apply to the real world for me since I am going into engineering, mainly for the physics aspect. Both integrals and derivatives become important when applied to physics. The derivative will be crucial for issues relating to rates of change, even in chemistry. Integrals will be used to find such things as distances traveled in physics. I know I will use the fundamentals learned in calculus in my future physics, chemistry, and calculus courses; and eventually my career as a materials science engineer.