Login  |  Register

About

Contact

Site Policies

Donate

Bookmark

Branford Eagle

Crime Log

Search New Haven Independent

Sections
choose

“No Snitching” Code Confronted
BY Kendra Baker | SEP 20, 2013 1:06 PM

Thu Nov 28, 2013 7:00am – 8:00am

Neighborhoods
choose

(8) Comments | Commenting has been closed | E­mail the Author

THANKSGIVING DAY FITNESS BOOT CAMP TO FEED THE HUNGRY
Women may attend Fitness Boot Camp...

view event details »
Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:00am

Features
choose

Healing and Power
Macedonia COGIC 151 Newhall St is...

view event details »

view the full calendar »

Found white poodle mix without tags at 110 Canner
Address: 88­104 Canner Street New Haven, CT 06511, USA Rating: 3 Scf user Julie, just called the office to ask if anyone lost or reported lost a...

Follow Us

more » Traffic/Road Safety
Address: 360 State Street New Haven, CT 06511, USA Rating: 1 An ambulance hit a civilian car and we have 4 cop cars, a fire truck, 3 ambulances,...

Alderman Brian Wingate, Alderwoman Angela Russell, police Sgt. Robert Lawlor, Jr., and police Sgt. Renee Forte.

Days after a manager was shot during a robbery at Burger King on Whalley Avenue, nearly 100

more »

NHI Newsletter

neighbors got together with police to tackle a difficult question: Why are people afraid to talk to police? The meeting took place Thursday evening, four days after a 19­year­old Burger King manager was shot in the legs by two armed men at the fast food joint at 1329 Whalley Ave., in the Amity section of

Flyerboard

Legal Notices
AGENCY ON AGING ALDERMEN HOUSING AUTHORITY CITY CLERK PROBATE COURT

town. The perpetrators remain at large. Upper Westville Alderwoman Angela Russell and police Sgt. Renee Forte, the neighborhood’s top cop, convened the meeting in the cafeteria of the Mauro­Sheridan School at 191 Fountain St.  Neighbors and police discussed how to end a “no­snitching” code—and a distrust of police—that deters some people from calling the cops. Some audience members said they are reluctant to call the police after being harassed and disrespected by officers in the past.

Some Favorite Sites
At Risk for HD barista Branford Eagle Business NH Chris Volpe Photography Crosscut CT Capitol Report CT Enviro Headlines CT Local Politics CT Mirror CT News Junkie CT Watchdog Design New Haven Gotham Gazette I Love New Haven Josiah Brown Karman Turn La Voz Hispana Laurel Club Media Nation Middletown Eye MinnPost My Left Nutmeg NH Register NH Review of Books NHV.org OneWorld Only In Bridgeport Oral History Project Reddit NH See Click Fix Smartpill Design St. Louis Beacon

“People like myself tend to not want to call the police because if we call you, sometimes we get the harassment from you guys,” said one woman. “They need to know how to respect us as people, and respect our feelings and our values [and] what we have going on in our community—not take it and abuse their power of authority.” Forte apologized. “Just like the people of the city of New Haven, there are some bad apples, but not everyone is bad,” she said. “There are several officers that I’m sure you have dealt with who could have been a bit more respectful, a little bit more empathetic. If it matters to you, then it should always matter to us as officers,” said Forte. She also mentioned that there are outlets for people to report bad experiences with law enforcement, such as the Civilian Review Board and the internal affairs office. “We’re not aware of the officers because that officer isn’t going to be that way with us. We need to be aware not only with the problems in your community, but we need to be aware of the problems with other officers so that we can address it. I’m sure you’ve had a wonderful experience with somebody [from the department]—we want all of our officers to give you that same wonderful experience.”

Taste Of NH Tom Ficklin Valley Independent Sentinel Voice of SD VT Digger WTNH Yale Daily News

One African­American woman shared experiences of alleged racial profiling by police. One time, as the landlord of the building, she called police to report criminal activity. When officers arrived, she said, they automatically walked up to a white person, assuming the person was the landlord. She also said that shortly after her husband got a new car, he was stopped twice by police, which she believes was because he was black. “There are things that the police need to be aware of. Somebody needs to educate them a lot more in sensitivity and on how to work with people who are not of the same skin color they might be,” said the woman. If police treated people better, then neighbors would be more willing to share what they know about criminal activities in the area. One man said a majority of people in the community are scared to tell police what they know about criminal activity because “it’s not like it used to be.”

Government/ Community Links
Advocate Calendar Agency on Aging All Our Kin Animal Shelter Volunteers Arte Inc. Arts Council Artspace Beth El Keser Israel Bike New Haven Boys & Girls Club Cancer Support Chabad of Westville Chamber of Commerce Children’s Museum Christian Community Action City of New Haven CitySeed Citywide Youth Columbus House Community Action Agency Community Loan Fund Community Mediation ConnCAN Creative Arts Workshop CT BAEO CT Best Restaurants CT Tech Council Dariba Referrals Data Haven Elm City Cycling Elmseed Empower NH Friends Of Wooster Sq. GAVA GNH Community Chorus Habitat For Humanity Info New Haven IRIS Jazz Haven Jewish Federation Job Finder Junta Labor History LEAP Legal Aid Network Life Haven Literacy Coalition Magrisso Forte Mary Wade Music Haven Neighborhood Music School New Haven 828 New Haven Chorale New Haven Reads New Life Corp. NH Bulletin NH Home Recovery NH Land Trust NH Symphony NH/Leon Sister City NHS

“People nowadays say, ‘I don’t want to get involved, I don’t want to be bothered. If it’s not happening to me, I don’t want to know who’s involved’,” he said. Sgt. Robert Lawlor, Jr. said that has to be stopped. “Just like the Burger King [incident], there’s somebody who knows who did that, and they’re not coming forward to tell us,” said Lawlor. “The police has to do a better job at things, but so does the community. We need to take a stand and say we’re not going to put up with this.” One man stood up and said the problem is that people don’t want to be labeled as a “snitch.” “I’ve heard the word ‘snitch’ quite a bit, and I think a lot of people are confused about what exactly ‘snitch’ means. It seems like these days, a snitch means if you see someone abusing an old lady on the street and you report it—but that makes you a whistleblower, not a snitch,” said the man, adding that he would rather be labeled a snitch than be scared to do the right thing. “I’d rather be a snitch than a chicken.”

[ Flyers by PaperG ]

News Feeds
N.H.I. RSS 2.0 Feed N.H.I. Atom Feed

Sponsors

Orchard Street Shul Orchestra NE PAR Parents Available to Help Pat Dillon Peace News PechaKucha Planned Parenthood Police Promoting Enduring Peace Public Allies CT Public Library Public Schools Public Works Rainbow Girls Register Calendar REX ROOF SAMA SCSU Events Share Our Voices Shubert Solar Youth Soul­O­Ettes Squash Haven United Way Urban Design League Urban Resources Initiative Ward 25 Blog Ward 26 Blog Westville Renaissance Westville Synagogue Workforce Alliance Yale Events Yeshiva NH Shul Yeshiva Of NH Youth Continuum Forte explained that once ShotSpotter picks up the gunshots, the message has to be processed through the 911 dispatch center before officers are sent to the scene. “So there’s not going to be someone immediately,” said Forte, “but ShotSpotter is getting us there faster and more to the specific area.” Forte said although the system is helpful, it is important that people from the community call in to report what they know because “if a sensor is down or if you’re just beyond our field of range, we need you to call as well because we won’t know that there are gunshots.” “If the public isn’t participating in the policing, it’s not going to work,” said Lawlor. “We can be the best police force in the world and have four times as many people as we’re supposed to have, but it’s not going to work without the community.” Alderwoman Russell said next month is violence prevention month. She encouraged anyone interested in putting together a community safety plan to speak with her after the meeting. “It’s not me, it’s not the police department, it’s not one entity—it’s all of us, and it’s not just talking about it,” she said. “It takes everybody, it takes time, it takes talent, and it probably will take treasure. You get out of this what you put into it.”
Share this story with others.

N.H.I. Site Design & Development
People asked the panel if there are any trends found in crimes committed in the city. One man asked if most crimes are committed by juveniles. A woman asked if kids seem to be committing crimes out of boredom and suggested the formation of youth programs to help divert children from criminal activity. “There is a large majority that is juvenile­related, but not all of it,” replied Lawlor. He added that some people—regardless of their age group—will do something they shouldn’t when they become “bored and antsy.” Forte said that programs targeted at juveniles could potentially prevent children from growing up to be adult criminals. “If we stop the crime at a younger level, we [will] hopefully stop the adult who’s addicted to drugs now, who as a child was involved in crime—they’ve just moved up,” said Forte. “It’s definitely a trend we can see, so if we know it’s starting with children and we start there, we might, in the future, help the whole gamut of things.” Clifford Guy, district manager for the Burger King on Whalley Avenue, urged businesses in the area to “band together” to help make their businesses and employees safe. “We should just come together,” said Guy. “It wouldn’t solve the problem, but it would help.” Guy said he had just moved here from Georgia. Sunday, when the armed robbery took place, was his first day on the job. One woman with a store renovation company, explained how she initially had reservations about the people in the neighborhood. Later, she said, she got to know them, and concluded that if people make an effort to get to know the people around them, it can help prevent them from becoming victims of crimes. “Whether it’s across the street, next to you, or around the corner,” she said, “once you get to know the people in your community, it’s not as bad as it could have been.” One man expressed concern about the city’s ShotSpotter gunshot location system and police response time. Shotspotter is a network of sensors that listen for the sounds of gunshots and relay that information to police. “What’s the response time?” the man asked. “Five minutes later [after the crime has been committed], you hear the cars coming, but by that time, the [culprit] is already gone. The preference of the sensor is to pick it up [quickly] and get the response.”

Recommend

37 people recommend this. Sign Up to see what your friends recommend.

Share |

Post a Comment Comments
posted by: Threefifths on September 20, 2013  3:06pm
Exposing the Myth of Black­on­Black Crime By: Jamelle Bouie |  Posted: July 21, 2013 at 4:45 PM http://www.theroot.com/buzz/exposing­myth­black­black­crime The Trayvon Martin Killing and the Myth of Black­on­Black Crime  by Jamelle Bouie Jul 15, 2013 4:45 AM EDT Crime is driven by proximity and opportunity, writes Jamelle Bouie—which is why 86 percent of white victims were killed by white offenders.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/07/15/the­trayvon­martin­killing­and­the­myth­of­black­on­ black­crime.html

posted by: Trustme on September 20, 2013  5:44pm
I’m not once again understanding your comment Threefifths, I read the websites you posted but still clueless? What does Trayvon Martin’s tragedy have to do with this?

posted by: Threefifths on September 21, 2013  1:48pm
posted by: Trustme on September 20, 2013 6:44pm I’m not once again understanding your comment Threefifths, I read the websites you posted but still clueless? What does Trayvon Martin’s tragedy have to do with this? It is talking about the Myth of Black­on­Black Crime.When we talk about the No Snitching Code.How about the Blue Code of Silence.Which is an unwritten rule among police officers in the United States not to report on a colleague’s errors, misconducts, or crimes.

posted by: Edward_H on September 22, 2013  1:31pm
I am MORE confused after your explanation 3/5’s

posted by: LadyERT on September 23, 2013  7:33am
Rather that turning this into a racial issue, I am happy to see people in the community coming together in search of a solution instead of just sitting around whining about the problem. One thing I would like to point out is, when these types of forums are going to take place all communities should be notified in order for higher participation rates. I live not far from that Burger King and I had no idea this type of meeting was being held or I would have shown up. I know for sure, there are other parents in my community that would have attended had we known this was going to take place. The local news stations really should help to make these nofitications wide spread.

posted by: elmcityresident on September 23, 2013  8:50am
the main reason alot of people dont’ want to “snitch” is because officers investigating the case will give up the “telling” persons name..alot of the time the officer or officers will not protect the “witness”,officers will also threaten the witness to get what they want..and this is from experience..i had detectives come up to my job on the floor i worked and told my manager that i was involved in a murder case..which toltally embarressed me when i was brought into the office and my employer Legal Department called me and questioned me!I feel if you want help from the public there should be a way the officer or detective show some type of respect to the witness.

posted by: Threefifths on September 23, 2013  6:08pm
posted by: Edward_H on September 22, 2013 2:31pm I am MORE confused after your explanation 3/5’s Can help you on that.but would you say there is a Blue Code of Silence.Which is an unwritten rule among police officers in the United States not to report on a colleague’s errors, misconducts, or crimes.

posted by: Trustme on September 24, 2013  7:14pm
3/5’s, I believe for the most part NO, I see lots of officers jamming themselves up, if its either on­duty or off­duty. Officers are paying a price for their misconduct and its definitely showing.  Lots of movie watching 3/5’s.

©2005 – 2013 New Haven Independent  | site: smartpilldesign

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful