www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 88
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
By Carla K. Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — The Obama administration
is delaying yet another aspect of the health
care law, putting off until next November
the launch of an online portal to the health
insurance marketplace for small businesses.
The move, announced Wednesday, was
needed because repairs are still underway to
the troubled HealthCare.gov website, which
is the primary way for individuals to apply
for insurance, and that has priority, federal
officials said.
In a conference call with reporters,
administration officials said employers who
want to buy marketplace plans for their
workers now will need to go through an
agent, broker or insurance company this
year, instead of using the government web-
site. The administration said the plan will
still allow small businesses to buy cover-
age but avoid slowing technical repairs to
the hobbled federal online site.
Under the law, most small businesses do
not have to provide coverage. But firms
with 50 or more employees face a mandate
to offer insurance or risk fines from the gov-
ernment in 2015.
The HealthCare.gov site, where individu-
als without employer-sponsored health care
can shop for insurance, is now smoothly
handling 25,000 users at the same time and
is on track to meet its goal of handling
50,000 simultaneous users by Saturday, said
administration spokeswoman Julie
Bataille. “We have a lot of work left to do in
the next few days,” she said.
More health care law delays
Health insurance marketplace for small businesses to launch next year
More than just a
traditional meal
Two cousins open their restaurant for
free Thanksgivingdinner in San Carlos
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Bridging the gap between cultures, sharing a meal and
being thankful for what one has is a theme cousins Kemal
and Ilker Kurt know well.
They’re inviting the community to come and share a free
extensive Thanksgiving spread at their Spasso Ristorante
and Wine Bar in San Carlos today.
“I think it’s a great thing to get families together. That’s
the reason we’re doing it, because a lot of the people that
come don’t have family, don’t have money, and we want to
share with them,” Kemal Kurt said.
Although they didn’t grow up celebrating Thanksgiving,
there is a Turkish holiday that revolves around giving back
and sharing food with those less fortunate, Ilker Kurt said.
The desire to assist people who may not have relatives near-
by or be able to afford food is a cross-cultural tradition, Ilker
Kurt said.
The kitchen has been working overtime since Tuesday
preparing 90 turkeys and enough stuffing, mashed potatoes
School molestation defendant
settles case for 27 years prison
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The man accused of molesting and
snatching a 9-year-old girl from a San
Mateo school bathroom last fall and try-
ing to photograph four young female stu-
dents using the bathroom on a Daly City
campus accepted a plea deal Wednesday
that will send him to prison for more
than 27 years rather than potentially
life.
Bradley Mrozek, 26, pleaded no contest to one count of
kidnapping, two counts of forcibly committing a lewd act
on a child under 14 and one count of attempted child pornog-
Bradley Mrozek
See MROZEK, Page 20
See DINNER, Page 8
See DELAYS, Page 20
TERU TAKAHASHI
The Peninsula Youth Ballet will be performing The Nutcracker at the San Mateo Performing Arts Center 2 p.m. Nov. 30, Dec.
7 and Dec. 8 and there is a 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. show on Dec. 1.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
To welcome in the holidays, the Peninsula Youth Ballet
will open its fine-tuned presentation of The Nutcracker at
the newly redeveloped San Mateo Performing Arts Center
Saturday.
About 109 dancers, including students ranging from 8 to
18 years old and professionals, will participate in Ayako
Takahashi’s rendition of the timeless ballet. Since the PYB
company first began its festive performance in 1994, its
choreography has changed little by little each year until it
Holiday ballet performance
Local youth ballet company performs Nutcracker in San Mateo
See BALLET, Page 8
Teen hurt in alleged
hate crime leaving hospital
OAKLAND — An 18-year-old
Northern California boy who was set
on fire on a public bus in what author-
ities are calling a hate crime was
expected to leave the hospital.
Sasha Fleischman’s father, Karl,
told KNTV in San Jose that his son
should be home from St. Francis
Memorial Hospital in San Francisco
by Wednesday.
Sasha suffered second and third-
degree burns when the skirt he was
wearing was set on fire earlier this
month on a bus in Oakland.
Prosecutors have charged 16-year-
old Richard Thomas, of Oakland, as an
adult with hate crimes in the attack.
Police say Thomas told investigators
he was homophobic.
Sasha’s family and friends say Sasha
identifies as neither male nor female.
Thomas’s attorney, William Du
Bois, has said his client is not homo-
phobic and engaged in a prank that
went wrong.
Space hosts busy
Thanksgiving with launch, comet
FIRST COURSE:
Comet ISON, which was discovered
a year ago, is making its first spin
around the sun and will come the clos-
est to the super-hot solar surface at
1:37 p.m. EST. It may take a few hours
before astronomers know if the comet
survived its brush with the sun. If it
survives, and maybe even if it doesn’t ,
people in the Northern Hemisphere
will have a good chance of seeing the
comet — or its remains — in the first
two weeks of December just before
sunrise and after sunset. It won’t be
visible with the naked eye on
Thursday, but NASAhas a fleet of tele-
scopes trained on ISON.
SECOND COURSE:
For the six people on board the
International Space Station — includ-
ing American astronauts Mike
Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio — it’s
time for a traditional Thanksgiving
feast. But don’t expect them to be
carving a succulent bird. In a video
from space, the two astronauts showed
off their menu, all in small sealed
packets: irradiated smoked turkey,
thermostabilized yams, cornbread
dressing, potatoes, freeze-dried
asparagus, baked beans, bread, cob-
bler and what Hopkins called his
favorite dehydrated green bean casse-
role. It comes with a view from space
that is juicier than any turkey on
Earth. “Though we miss our families,
it’s great to be in space,” Hopkins said
from 260 miles above Earth in a taped
message.
DESSERT:
Residents of Florida’s Space Coast
may get to see a rocket thunder
through the sky around dinner time if
all goes well. Private firm SpaceX of
Hawthorne, Calif., will try again to
launch its Falcon-9 rocket between
5:38 p.m. and 6:44 p.m. EST from
Cape Canaveral Air Station. The large
rocket didn’t launch in a first attempt
Monday because of a technical glitch.
The rocket is carrying a 7,055-pound
telecommunications satellite for a
Luxembourg firm. This is part of a
growing trend of newer rocket firms —
SpaceX is headed by PayPal founder
Elon Musk — launching more and
signing up non-government cus-
tomers, said Harvard astronomer
Jonathan McDowell, who catalogues
launches worldwide.
Ruling on hot sauce
factory raises job worries
IRWINDALE — Ajudge has ordered a
plant that produces the popular
Sriracha chili sauce to stop emitting
annoying odors in a ruling that left
some nearby residents worried about a
possible loss of jobs at the factory.
Judge Robert H. O’Brien on Tuesday
ruled in favor of the city of Irwindale,
where Sriracha recently relocated, say-
ing sauce maker Huy Fong Foods must
stop any operations that could be
causing the odors and make unspeci-
fied changes to mitigate them.
The company had no immediate
comment, but a few neighbors inter-
viewed Wednesday dismissed the com-
plaints and worried that jobs might be
lost if the plant is forced to close.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Ed Harris is
63.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1942
Nearly 500 people died in a fire that
destroyed the Cocoanut Grove night-
club in Boston.
“Great minds have
purposes; others have wishes.”
— Washington Irving, American author (1783-1859)
“Late Show”
orchestra leader
Paul Shaffer is 64.
Rapper
Chamillionaire is
34.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A car drives past a wave breaking on Havana’s seafront boulevard ‘El Malecon,’ Cuba.
Thanksgi vi ng Day: Mostly cloudy.
Highs around 60. Southeast winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming west in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Mostly cloudy in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest winds
around 5 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs around 60. North
winds around 5 mph... Becoming southwest in the afternoon.
Local Weather Forecast
The article “New car sharing company opens shop in
Millbrae” in the Nov. 26 edition of the Daily Journal needs
clarification. FlightCar is still operating but had its special
use permit revoked by the Millbrae City Council.
Clarification
I n 1520, Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan reached
the Pacific Ocean after passing through the South American
strait that now bears his name.
I n 1861, the Confederate Congress admitted Missouri as
the 12th state of the Confederacy after Missouri’s disputed
secession from the Union.
I n 1919, American-born Lady Astor was elected the first
female member of the British Parliament.
I n 1922, Captain Cyril Turner of the Royal Air Force gave
the first public skywriting exhibition, spelling out, “Hello
USA. Call Vanderbilt 7200” over New York’s Times Square;
about 47,000 calls in less than three hours resulted.
I n 1943, President Roosevelt, British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin began con-
ferring in Tehran during World War II.
I n 1961, President John F. Kennedy dedicated the original
permanent headquarters of the Central Intelligence Agency
in Langley, Va. Ernie Davis of Syracuse University became
the first African-American to be named winner of the
Heisman Trophy.
I n 1961, Ernie Davis of Syracuse University became the
first African-American football player to be named winner of
the Heisman Trophy.
I n 1964, the United States launched the space probe
Mariner 4 on a course to Mars.
I n 1979, an Air New Zealand DC-10 en route to the South
Pole crashed into a mountain in Antarctica, killing all 257
people aboard.
I n 1987, a South African Airways Boeing 747 crashed into
the Indian Ocean with the loss of all 159 people aboard.
I n 2001, Officials recovered the body of CIA officer
Johnny “Mike” Spann from a prison compound in Mazar-e-
Sharif, Afghanistan, after northern alliance rebels backed
by U.S. airstrikes and special forces quelled an uprising by
Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
DRAFT HYENA SMOKER PULPIT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The finale of the bowling tournament was so
exciting that you could — HEAR A PIN DROP
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MULPB
HUBMT
TENCIE
RADNOG
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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p
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A:
Recording executive Berry Gordy Jr. is 84. Former Sen.
Gary Hart, D-Colo., is 77. Singer-songwriter Bruce Channel
is 73. Singer Randy Newman is 70. CBS News correspondent
Susan Spencer is 67. Movie director Joe Dante is 66. Former
NASA teacher in space Barbara Morgan is 62. Actress S.
Epatha (eh-PAY’-thah) Merkerson is 61. Former Homeland
Security Secretary Michael Chertoff is 60. Country singer
Kristine Arnold (Sweethearts of the Rodeo) is 57. Actor Judd
Nelson is 54. Movie director Alfonso Cuaron is 52. Rock
musician Matt Cameron is 51. Actress Jane Sibbett is 51.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place; and Whirl Win, No. 6, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:48.42.
8 8 6
27 44 59 74 75 3
Mega number
Nov. 26 Mega Millions
5 12 43 52 55 10
Powerball
Nov. 23 Powerball
3 14 21 34 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 4 6 1
Daily Four
2 9 0
Daily three evening
9 17 22 32 47 3
Mega number
Nov. 23 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
FOSTER CITY
Vandalism. An unknown person smashed an
overhead light in a hall on Chess Drive
before 2:34 a.m., Sunday, Nov. 24.
Ani mal cal l s. Animal control picked up an
injured cat on East Hillsdale Boulevard before
2:19 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 23.
Public accident. Abicyclists and a pedes-
trian required assistance in an accident that
occurred on Port Royal Avenue before 7:55
a.m. Saturday, Nov. 23.
Suspi ci ous person. Police were called to
check on a man who was trying to get into a
building but he turned out to be a legitimate
moving company worker who got lost on
Beach Park Boulevard before 11:51 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 23.
REDWOOD CITY
Burglary. A backpack containing paper-
work was stolen from a vehicle on Walnut
Street via smashing a window before 7:24
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Disturbance. Six people were loitering,
drinking and breaking glass on Broadway
before 1:05 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Pet t y t hef t . A wallet was stolen on
Middlefield Road before 11:26 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 26.
Petty theft. A man stole beer on Main
Street before 9:36 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Vandalism. Akiosk window was broken on
Broadway before 9:03 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Police reports
What does that look like?
A person reported a woman in a white
shirt appeared to be looking for her
pimp on Broadway in Redwood City
before 12:25 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 17.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two Burlingame High School sopho-
mores want to help feed the less fortunate
with a program they started this summer
that gets girls involved in helping a partic-
ular cause.
Eleni Rally and Gracie Brand launched
their nonprofit Camp for a Cause in August
raising more than $2,100 for their first
cause, Alzheimer’s disease research and
care. Their second camp, a Thanksgiving
session, began Sunday and runs until tomor-
row. The cause this time is InnVi si on
Shelter Network in San Mateo. The eight
campers, age 10-12, are baking bread for
the cause, learning and performing dances
and volunteering as a camp on
Thanksgiving morning to help prepare the
Thanksgiving meal.
“Our idea for this organization was to cre-
ate a way to do meaningful community serv-
ice, and have fun while doing so,” they
wrote in a statement. “We decided to gather a
group of campers to help us with our cause,
by means of a common passion — dance.
We knew that our first cause would be
Alzheimer’s, in that we both have had
friends and family suffer from or die from
this disease.”
The girls are starting out small and local,
but hope to expand their work to help many
other causes that are important in the world.
“We hope that we can raise awareness and
teach others that doing charity and service
is very fulfilling and fun too,” they wrote.
What do the two like about running the
camp?
“We love that we can dance and work with
young girls, because it is always fun and
exciting,” they wrote. “The campers get so
into learning the dances, performing and
raising money, it is very touching. The work
is all so worth it knowing that at the end of
the day, we will have made a difference
through our fundraising and volunteering.”
For this Thanksgiving event, they hope
to raise close to $1,000. The camp is volun-
teering at First Step for Families in San
Mateo from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on
Thanksgiving morning and they are donat-
ing dozens of pumpkin bread loaves to
Shelter Network to give to its residents and
donors.
Over summer vacation, the two girls plan
to have at least two weeks of camp, but the
causes they will be supporting are still
undetermined, as well as the dates.
For more information or to make a dona-
tion to their cause, visit
campsforacause.org. The camp will perform
11 a.m. tomorrow at the Burlingame Avenue
train station. Camp for a Cause baked more
than 100 loaves of homemade pumpkin
bread. Sixty were donated to the Vendome
Hotel in San Mateo and the rest will be sold
by the campers to raise money for the
Shelter Network.
Burlingame girls run nonprofit camp
Eleni Rally and Gracie Brand choose different cause each session
Eleni Rally, left, and Gracie Brand, right, deliver loaves of pumpkin bread to Healthcare for the
Homeless case manager Alisha Carter.
4
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Truck drivers and their sup-
porters picketed at the Port of Oakland on
Wednesday over an impending deadline to
upgrade their trucks to meet clean air stan-
dards and what they said were long wait
times to pick up loads.
Television news footage showed
Oakland police keeping dozens of protest-
ers away from the entrance to one of the
port’s terminals in the morning. Six peo-
ple were cited for creating a hazard in a
roadway, but no one was arrested, accord-
ing to Oakland police spokeswoman
Johnna Watson.
Port officials said operations were not
disrupted.
The demonstration was organized by the
Port of Oakland Truckers Association, a
group of San Francisco Bay Area truck
owners and contract drivers. The group was
protesting a California Air Resources
Board rule requiring all drivers hauling
cargo at major seaports and rail yards in
the state to have trucks with 2007 or newer
model year engines by Jan. 1, 2014.
The truckers say the requirement is a
financial burden, especially when they
have already spent thousands of dollars
installing new air filters to meet clean-air
standards.
They want CARB to extend the deadline
and make grant money available again.
The Air Resources Board said it has made
more than $65 million in grants for truck
upgrades available to Oakland port truck-
ers, and more than 85 percent of truck own-
ers have upgraded to a newer, compliant
truck.
“Extending the deadline beyond Jan. 1
would essentially penalize that 85 percent
who have invested in cleaner trucks,” the
board said in a statement.
Truckers protest outside Port of Oakland
5
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Strong-arm robbery in San Mateo Central Park
Police are on the lookout for a man who robbed a 24-year-
old woman near San Mateo Central Park’s rose garden
Tuesday evening.
At approximately 6:20 p.m., the woman was walking her
dog through the park when a man approached her, struck her
with an unknown object and fled toward the Japanese Tea
Garden. He is described as dark-skinned, in his 20s, about 5
feet 10 inches, 160 pounds and wearing a green jacket and
black flat-billed hat, according to San Mateo police.
The victim suffered a non life-threatening injury during
this incident, and was treated by paramedics at the scene,
according to police.
Police are coordinating with San Mateo park rangers and
providing increased patrols in Central Park both to provide
additional safety and to continue to look for the suspect, as
detectives continue to investigate the crime and search for
connections to other crimes and suspects.
Man arrested for trying to rent car with fake ID
ASan Francisco man is in custody after he tried to rent a
vehicle at SFO with fake identification and credit cards
Monday night, according to the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
At approximately 10:44 p.m., officers
assigned to the San Francisco
International Airport Bureau were dis-
patched to the rental car facility on the
fraud report. Officers located the man,
later identified as James Gracey, 31, and
found him in possession of fraudulent
credit/debit cards and a methampheta-
mine. It was later determined he had two
outstanding felony warrants in the system totaling $40,000
for burglary and ID theft. Since his arrest, police identified
six additional/potential victims of identity theft, according
to police.
He was booked into San Mateo County Jail and his bail
was set at $140,000.
Man arrested after allegedly
swinging baseball bat at father
A20-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of assault in
South San Francisco last week after he allegedly swung a
baseball bat at his father, police said.
At about 5:10 p.m. Friday, officers responded to reports of
a fight involving a man and his son at a home in the 500
block of Keoncrest Drive, police said.
During the fight, Austin Jensen allegedly grabbed a metal
baseball bat and swung it at his father’s head, narrowly
missing, police said.
When his father tried to call police, Jensen allegedly hit
the phone with the bat, police said. The father was able to
complete the call, and Jensen left before officers arrived.
He was contacted later that day and taken into custody,
police said.
Jensen has been charged with assault with a deadly
weapon and disabling a phone, San Mateo County District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said.
He posted $25,000 bail and is scheduled to be arraigned
on Dec. 31, Wagstaffe said.
Local briefs
James Gracey
By Michelle R. Smith and Jason Keyser
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Awet and blustery storm along the
East Coast made driving hazardous and tangled up hundreds
of flights Wednesday but didn’t cause the all-out gridlock
many Thanksgiving travelers had feared.
Many travelers marveled at how orderly and anxiety-free
the airports were during what is typically one of the busiest
days of the year.
One big question lingered in New York: Will high winds
ground Snoopy and the other giant cartoon-character bal-
loons at the Macy’s parade on Thanksgiving Day?
The storm for the most part unleashed wind-driven rain
along the Northeast’s heavily populated Interstate 95 corri-
dor from Richmond, Va., to the tip of Maine.
Emerging from the weather gantlet was Katie Fleisher,
who made it by car from Portsmouth, N.H., through rain and
fog to Boston’s Logan Airport with little trouble and dis-
covered to her amazement that the panicked, cranky crowds
she expected were nonexistent.
“We thought it would be busier here. But there’ve been no
lines, and it has been really quiet all morning,” said
Fleisher, whose plan was to fly to Pittsburgh.
“Our flight is still on time, but we are checking the app
every couple minutes,” she said. “We are nervous, as we are
traveling with two 1-year-olds, and any extra time on a
plane would be horrible.”
The storm was expected to drop around 6 inches of snow
in parts of West Virginia and western Pennsylvania and up
to a foot in a pocket of upstate New York.
Damaging winds gusting up to 60 mph were expected to
rip through Boston and other coastal areas.
Those winds could prevent the giant balloons from taking
flight this year at the Macy’s parade. Safety rules that spec-
ify wind speeds were enacted in New York after a spectator
was killed in 1997 in an accident involving an out-of-con-
trol balloon.
Flight cancellations piled up at East Coast hubs. By mid-
day Wednesday, around 250 flights had been canceled,
according to the tracking website FlightAware.com.
But that was a tiny fraction of the nearly 32,000 flights
that were scheduled to, from or within the U.S. on
Wednesday, the site said. And the weather in many places
was improving as the day wore on.
Rain and snow hit East during
the Thanksgiving travel rush
REUTERS
Travelers wait to board a bus in New York.
6
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
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I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s
By Lauran Neergaard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — An experimental device
is letting paralyzed people drive wheel-
chairs simply by flicking their tongue in
the right direction.
Key to this wireless system: Users get
their tongue pierced with a magnetic stud
that resembles jewelry and acts like a joy-
stick, in hopes of offering them more
mobility and independence.
Researchers reported Wednesday that 11
people paralyzed from the neck down rapid-
ly learned to use the tongue device to pilot
their wheelchairs through an obstacle
course full of twists and turns, and to oper-
ate a computer, too.
“It’s really powerful because it’s so intu-
itive,” said Jason DiSanto, 39, of Atlanta,
who was among the first spinal cord-injured
patients to get his tongue pierced for sci-
ence and try out the system. “The first time
I did it, people thought I was driving for,
like, years.”
The team of researchers in Atlanta and
Chicago put the Tongue Drive System to the
test against one of the most widely used
assistive technologies, called sip-and-puff,
that users operate by breathing into a straw.
Using the tongue, patients operated their
wheelchairs a bit faster but just as accurate-
ly — and on average, they performed about
three times better on video game-like com-
puter tests, said lead researcher Maysam
Ghovanloo, director of Georgia Tech’s
bionics lab.
The research, reported in the journal
Science Translational Medicine, is an early
step that allowed use of the device only
inside laboratories. Larger studies in real-
world conditions are required before the
device ever could be sold. And the tongue
piercing may be a turn-off for some poten-
tial users, the researchers acknowledge.
But the work is attracting attention from
specialists who say there’s a big need for
more assistive technologies so they can
customize care for the severely disabled.
“For people who have very limited abili-
ty to control a power wheelchair, there
aren’t that many options,” said Dr. Brad
Dicianno, a rehabilitation specialist at the
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
who wasn’t involved with the new research.
“There is some interesting promise for this
tongue control.”
Here’s how the system works: A headset
detects the tongue’s position when the user
flicks that magnetic stud. Touch a spot on
the right bottom tooth to go right, for
example. The headset wirelessly beams that
information to a smartphone the user car-
ries. An app then sends the command to
move the wheelchair or the computer cursor.
Why the tongue? “It’s unobstrusive, easy
to use and flexible,” said Ghovanloo, a bio-
medical engineer who created the system
and has started a company that is working
with Georgia Tech to commercialize it.
Most people with spinal cord injuries —
or neurologic diseases that also can para-
lyze — still can move the tongue. It doesn’t
require special concentration. The tongue is
pretty tireless. And the amount of real estate
the brain’s motor cortex dedicates to the
tongue and mouth rivals that of the fingers
and hand, offering multiple complex move-
ments, Ghovanloo said. He led the team of
researchers from Atlanta’s Shepherd Center
for spinal injuries, the Rehabilitation
Institute of Chicago and Northwestern
University.
DiSanto, an electrical engineer who
became paralyzed from the neck down in a
2009 diving accident, said the headset is
less intrusive than the sip-and-puff device
that he normally uses, which requires a
straw-like tube to be worn in front of his
face. More important, he said, the tongue
drive gave him more control, allowing him
to move diagonally, for example.
As for the piercing, “there is some get-
ting used to it,” said DiSanto, who got his
in 2011. It took about a week to heal, and
speaking and eating felt funny initially but
he got used to the sensation.
It’s not for everyone. The current study
tested the device in 23 able-bodied partici-
pants and 11 paralyzed volunteers. By
study’s end, all of the disabled volunteers
preferred the tongue system to their regular
assistive device, said co-author Joy Bruce,
who heads the Shepherd Center’s spinal
cord injury lab.
Tongue pierce lets the paralyzed drive wheelchairs
REUTERS
Paralyzed patient Jason Disanto pilots a wheelchair using the Tongue Drive System at the
Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Ga.
NATION 7
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Pen Voice
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
An anti-deportation protester,center,in the audience shouts against Barack Obama,stopping
him temporarily from delivering remarks during an event on immigration reform.
By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Advocates are demand-
ing that President Barack Obama use his
powers as chief executive to stop deporta-
tions of more people among the estimated
11 million immigrants living here illegal-
l y. The president is obliging, but in a bit-
by-bit way that doesn’t satisfy groups
frustrated by Republicans’ slow-walking
of immigration legislation in the House.
Obama last year acted on his own to halt
deportations for some young immigrants
living in the country illegally who arrived
as children. So far more than 550,000
young immigrants have been allowed to
stay under the program, which also lets the
immigrants get work permits good for two
years.
Republicans pushed a bill through the
House earlier this year to resume those
deportations, but the Senate never acted on
it and Obama’s directive is still in place.
Still, the vote was a clear sign of
Republican opposition to what some law-
makers have called “backdoor amnesty”
through Obama’s unilateral executive
actions.
Similar limited actions by the White
House have just whetted the appetite of
immigration advocates for more of them,
now that wide-ranging immigration legis-
lation that would offer eventual citizen-
ship to some immigrants living here ille-
gally is stalled in the House.
“Executive order” was the rallying cry of
hecklers at an Obama Democratic fundrais-
er Monday in San Francisco.
“Stop deportations! Stop deportations!”
audience members shouted at a separate
event after Obama was interrupted mid-
speech by a young man who said his fami-
ly has been separated for 19 months. Both
events underscored dissatisfaction with
the Democratic president, not only over
the stalled immigration overhaul but the
administration’s policies.
Obama responded with a brief lesson on
the constitutional limits on his power.
“If, in fact, I could solve all these prob-
lems without passing laws in Congress,
then I would do so,” Obama told the first
group. “But we’re also a nation of laws.
That’s part of our tradition. And so the
easy way out is to try to yell and pretend
like I can do something by violating our
laws.”
Advocates press Obama
for fewer deportations
By Matthew Pennington
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — While the Obama admin-
istration is making diplomatic progress on
some of the Mideast’s thorniest security
issues, problems are piling up in Asia, a
region that President Barack Obama had want-
ed to play a bigger part in American foreign
policy.
Despite efforts to forge deeper ties with
China to make East Asia more stable,
Beijing’s declaration of a maritime air
defense zone has escalated its territorial dis-
pute with U.S. ally Japan. The U.S. respond-
ed by flying B-52 bombers through the zone
on a training mission Tuesday without
informing Beijing.
Analysts say the risk of a military clash
between the Asian powers has gone up a
notch — a serious concern for the U.S.
because its treaty obligations mean it could
be drawn in to help Japan.
Meantime, relations between America’s
core allies in the region, Japan and South
Korea, have deteriorated. South Korea is bit-
ter over Japan’s attitude toward its colonial
past and wants more contrition from Tokyo
for Japan’s use of Korean sex slaves in World
War II.
That complicates the strategic picture for
the Obama administration as it looks to
advance its so-called pivot to Asia and
strengthen not just its own alliances, but get
its partners in the region to collaborate more.
“The region is moving in a very problemat-
ic direction,” said Evans Revere, a former sen-
ior U.S. diplomat and East Asia specialist.
“That’s the result of territorial disputes, his-
torical issues, long-standing rivalries and the
inability of countries to put history behind
them and move forward in improving rela-
tions.”
Adding to this witches’brew of bickering in
the region, Washington is grappling with the
threat posed by an unpredictable North Korea.
The deal the U.S. orchestrated with Iran to
temporarily freeze its nuclear program,
despite three decades of animosity, is a stark
reminder of the impasse in negotiations with
Pyongyang.
Unlike Iran, North Korea already has a
nuclear bomb, and there’s worrying evidence
it is pressing ahead with weapons develop-
ment.
Vice President Joe Biden will broach these
issues when he travels to Japan, China and
South Korea next week — a trip to demon-
strate that the top level of the administration
remains focused on Asia.
The administration said that in Beijing,
Biden will meet with Chinese leaders includ-
ing President Xi Jinping and will voice con-
cern about what it calls an emerging pattern
of behavior by China that is unsettling to its
neighbors. The vice president will also make
clear the firm U.S. commitment to its allies
and its desire for a lowering of tensions
between China and Japan, the world’s second-
and third-largest economies.
Secretary of State John Kerry hasn’t neg-
lected the region, but his primary focus is on
the Mideast and is likely to remain that way as
he strives for the distant goals of an end to
Syria’s civil war, peace between Israelis and
Palestinians and a comprehensive nuclear
agreement with Iran after the current pact
expires in six months.
Problems pile up in Asia
for U.S. policymakers
LOCAL/NATION 8
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Taxi
reached its current state of perfection, said
Takahashi, artistic director of PYB.
Takahashi began her career as dancer in
Japan and treasures putting on the tradition-
al Christmas show because it’s cross-cultur-
al, she said.
“The Nutcracker is good for all ages, even
for those who don’t care about the ballet.
It’s a fun and easy story to understand.
There’s so many colorful and different coun-
tries and ethnic dances and characters,”
Takahashi said.
Takahashi is thrilled to spotlight PYB at
the San Mateo Performing Arts Center after
its $28 million renovation. The three-story
acoustically precise center at the San Mateo
High School reopened in September.
“We’re the first ballet performance in the
new theater so we’re very lucky. We waited
for a long time and it’s so beautiful there,”
Takahashi said.
Takahashi also runs a ballet school, how-
ever, she said students and company per-
formers have to be chosen for a part in The
Nutcracker.
“I think because they know it’s a public
show and not a recital, they have to perform
like a professional. … They really disci-
pline themselves to be in good condition
by the show,” Takahashi said.
The children have been diligently prepar-
ing for the show by eating healthy, getting
enough sleep and building strength through
rehearsals; but the most important thing to
becoming a skilled ballet dancer is passion,
Takahashi said.
“They must enjoy it. I can tell; if their
eyes are sparkling, then they progress much
faster. They have to love it. Most of our
dancers really do, so I’m glad because I
think they’re having a great time,”
Takahashi said.
There are 60 dancers in the PYB company
and about 300 students as young as 4 years
old at the Ayako School of Ballet. PYB per-
formances provide students with an oppor-
tunity to learn from their peers.
“The professionals are giving tips and
teaching at the same time, even in rehearsal
… we’re very fortunate to have dancers who
are nice to the kids,” Takahashi said.
The handful of professional dancers cho-
sen to perform with the PYB for The
Nutcracker are always surprised at the
amount of talent within the company,
Takahashi said. This year, her teaching
skills will truly shine as several of her for-
mer students have returned.
“It’s nice to hire former students as pro-
fessional dancers,” Takahashi said. “It’s
nice to watch how [they’ve] progressed
when they return to perform.”
The PYB Nutcracker runs 2 p.m. Nov. 30,
Dec. 7 and Dec. 8. There is a 2 p.m. and 7
p.m. show on Dec. 1. Tickets range from
$45 to $75. For more information visit
pyb.org.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
BALLET
and gravy to feed more than 300 people,
Ilker Kurt said. From 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., they
will provide the traditional meal for free to
instill a sense of warmth to the less fortu-
nate, Kemal Kurt said.
Kemal and Ilker Kurt worked in various
restaurants, including their uncle’s, since
moving to the United States. They started
with their uncle who began the tradition of
opening his restaurant during the holiday
and providing a free meal. Now that they
have their own restaurant from which to
serve, they want to give back as well,
Kemal Kurt said.
“We are very lucky to have a great busi-
ness. My kids go to a good school. Our
business is 99 percent regular customers and
we appreciate what we have and want to
share that with other people,” Kemal Kurt
said.
Kemal Kurt’s children go to school next
to the St. Charles Parish in San Carlos.
After mentioning his family’s plans at the
restaurant, he’s received a lot of support and
people have volunteered to help in their
endeavor, Kemal Kurt said.
Kemal Kurt wanted to move to the United
States and open up his own restaurant since
he was young; he started washes dishes at
13 years old, became a chef when he was 16
and worked as a janitor at a private English
school so he could take classes, Kemal Kurt
said.
Now that he’s been in the United States
for 20 years and his dreams have come true,
he feels fortunate to be able to provide one
of the simplest, yet most important things
he can offer; a warm meal and a social envi-
ronment, Kemal Kurt said.
Spasso Ristorante and Wine Bar is located
at 769 Laurel St. in San Carlos.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DINNER
By Stacy A. Anderson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama is continuing an annual family tra-
dition by helping to pack bags of food and
distribute them to the needy on
Thanksgiving eve.
Obama, his wife, Michelle, daughters
Malia and Sasha and his mother-in-law,
Marian Robinson, dropped in on the
Capital Area Food Bank, one of the largest
serving the Washington area.
They dropped bundles of sweet pota-
toes, onions, carrots and apples into
reusable bags people held open as they
walked by.
They also handed out small white boxes
stamped with the presidential seal that
contain M&M’s candy.
Obama wished people a “Happy
Thanksgiving,” and Malia shook their
hands.
It’s the third straight Thanksgiving that
Obama and his family have helped out at
this particular food bank.
Obama was spending the holiday at the
White House.
Obama helps hand out Thanksgiving fixings to needy
WORLD 9
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Nicole Winfield and Colleen Barry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROME — Three-time former Premier
Silvio Berlusconi was ousted from
Parliament on Wednesday after two decades
as a lawmaker, defiantly calling it “a day of
mourning for democracy” and pledging to
continue in politics.
After weeks of maneuvering, appeals and
even an attempt to bring down the govern-
ment, Berlusconi’s delay tactics ran their
course when the Senate voted to kick him out
of the chamber due to a tax fraud conviction.
Ever a populist, the 77-year-old billion-
aire chose the piazza over the Senate floor,
addressing a crowd of cheering supporters
outside his Roman palazzo as the vote was
under way just a short walk away.
“We are here on a bitter day, a day of
mourning for democracy,” Berlusconi
declared. He said his political enemies —
including the judiciary he accuses of mount-
ing a campaign against him — were “toast-
ing” his demise.
‘’They are actually euphoric,” he said.
Berlusconi pledged to remain in politics
— effectively launching a campaign in
which he won’t be able to stand for office —
noting that other political leaders are not
lawmakers.
He cited Beppe Grillo, the former comic
and founder of the anti-establishment 5 Star
Movement, and Matteo Renzi, the Florence
mayor who is a Democratic Party star widely
tipped as a future premier candidate.
The Senate vote bars Berlusconi from run-
ning or holding office for at least six years
under a 2012 law applied to anyone sen-
tenced to more than two years in prison.
Berlusconi was sentenced to four years on
a tax fraud conviction relating to the pur-
chase of TV rights to U.S. films on his
Mediaset network, charges he continues to
deny. The sentence was automatically reduced
to one year by a general amnesty, which he
will serve either under house arrest or doing
public service.
In the last election, Berlusconi’s now-
defunct and splintered People of Freedom
Party garnered 7.3 million votes, or 21.5
percent of the vote. Berlusconi’s charisma
remains compelling to many Italians despite
his ongoing judicial woes.
U.S. says it’s working with
Cuba to solve banking issue
HAVANA — Washington said Wednesday
it is working with Cuba to find a new bank
for its diplomatic accounts in the United
States, after a banking cutoff forced the
Caribbean nation to halt nearly all U.S.
consular services just ahead of the busy hol-
iday travel season.
The U.S. State Department said in an
emailed communique that the U.S. bank
which had handled Cuba’s accounts severed
the relationship due to a “business deci-
sion,” and that the government does not
have the power to interfere or order any
bank to handle a foreign mission’s account.
It added that Cuba’s situation is not
unique, saying the closure of embassy
accounts can hurt operations at other diplo-
matic outposts.
China says it monitored
defiant U.S. bomber flights
BEIJING — China acknowledged
Wednesday it let two American B-52
bombers fly unhindered through its newly
declared air defense zone in the East China
Sea despite its earlier threat to take defen-
sive measures against unidentified foreign
aircraft.
The U.S. flights, which tested the
Chinese zone for the first time since it was
declared over the weekend, raised questions
about Beijing’s determination to enforce its
requirement that foreign aircraft identify
themselves and accept Chinese instruc-
tions.
Pakistani activists accuse
outed U.S. spy of murder
ISLAMABAD — Rising anger over deadly
drone attacks spurred a Pakistani political
party Wednesday to reveal the secret identi-
ty of what it said was the top U.S. spy in the
country. It demanded he be tried for murder,
another blow to already jagged relations
between the two nations.
A pair of U.S. missile strikes in recent
weeks — including one that killed the
Pakistani Taliban’s leader as the govern-
ment prepared to invite him to hold peace
talks — has increased simmering tensions
between Washington and Islamabad after
years of public fury over the covert
attacks.
The apparent disclosure of the top CIA
officer’s name will almost certainly strain
the fragile diplomacy that the U.S. is rely-
ing upon to help negotiate an end to the
war in neighboring Afghanistan.
Italy Senate expels three-time ex-Premier Berlusconi
REUTERS
Former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi delivers a speech from the stage in downtown Rome,
Italy.
Around the world
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Being
there
is why
I’mhere.
Dow 16,097.33 +24.53 10-Yr Bond 2.736 +0.04
Nasdaq 4,044.75 +27.00 Oil (per barrel) 92.31
S&P 500 1,807.23 +4.48 Gold 1,237.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Hewlett-Packard Co., up $2.27 to $27.36
The second-largest maker of PCs topped Wall Street’s quarterly
expectations for revenue and posted a $1.4 billion profit.
Valero Energy Corp., up $1.62 to $45.97
Oil refiners may be more relieved that anyone to see the falling price of
crude, which can mean fatter profit margins.
Tilly’s Inc., down $3.88 to $12
The retailer reported disappointing quarterly sales and painted a bleak
picture for its holiday shopping season.
Infoblox Inc., down $12.88 to $32.08
The network equipment maker issued a disappointing outlook despite
better-than-expected quarterly net income and revenue.
Nasdaq
Crocs Inc., up 30 cents to $13.84
The shoe company is reportedly in discussions with buyout firms to sell
off a minority stake and turn the company around.
Analog Devices Inc., down $1.38 to $48.54
A seasonal slowdown could cut into revenue, the chipmaker warned,
sending shares down despite a surprisingly strong quarter.
Tivo Inc., down 58 cents to $12.66
The digital recording service’s net income guidance for the current quarter
disappointed some on Wall Street and it was downgraded by Evercore.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Technology compa-
nies lifted the stock market Wednesday,
keeping major indexes at record levels.
Hewlett-Packard surged, leading the
gains for tech companies, after it post-
ed a $1.4 billion profit for its latest
quarter. The world’s second-largest
maker of PCs also issued a strong prof-
it forecast for its current quarter.
Stocks also got a boost from some
encouraging news about the U.S. econ-
omy.
In a sign that workers are in less dan-
ger of being laid off, the number of
Americans seeking unemployment
benefits dropped 10,000 last week to
a seasonally adjusted 316,000,
according to the U.S. Labor
Department. In another bit of good
news, consumer confidence rose in
November, according to a private sur-
vey by the University of Michigan
and financial data company Thomson
Reuters.
“Today’s economic news was gener-
ally favorable,” said Terry Sandven,
chief equity strategist for U.S. Bank
Wealth Management. “In the absence
of bad news, the path of least resist-
ance for equities is up.”
The stock market has surged this year
on a combination of solid corporate
earnings, a slowly recovering econo-
my and easy-money policies from the
Federal Reserve. The Fed is buying $85
billion in bonds every month to keep
long-term interest rates low, making
stocks more attractive than bonds for
investors.
On Wednesday, the Standard & Poor’s
500 index climbed four points, or 0.3
percent, to close at an all-time high of
1,807.23.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 24 points, or 0.2 percent, to close
at its own record high of 16,097.33.
The blue-chip index finished higher for
a fifth straight day, its longest winning
streak since March.
The Nasdaq composite advanced 27
points, or 0.7 percent, to 4,044.75.
The index closed above 4,000 for the
first time in 13 years Tuesday.
The S&P 500 has risen 26.7 percent
this year, putting it on course for its
best annual performance since 1998.
Much of the gain has come because
investors have been willing to pay
more for a company’s stock in relation
to its earnings.
The price-earnings ratio for S&P 500
companies has climbed to 15.1 from
12.6 at the start of the year. But it is
still below the average ratio of 16.5 for
the last 20 years.
“When times are good, you have to
ask if it’s a sign that things are about to
become bad,” said Art Steinmetz,
President & Chief Investment Officer at
Oppenheimer Funds. But Steinmetz
feels reasonably hopeful that stock
valuations “are not overstretched.”
In other corporate news, Analog
Devices fell $1.38, or 3 percent, to
$48.54 after the chipmaker reported
sales late Tuesday that missed Wall
Street estimates. The Norwood, Mass.,
company expects a seasonal slowdown
to hurt revenue during the holidays.
Trading volumes were lower than
average ahead of Thursday’s
Thanksgiving holiday, when financial
markets will be closed. The New York
Stock exchange and the Nasdaq will
also close early on Friday.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note rose to 2.74 percent, up from 2.71
percent on Tuesday.
The price of oil dropped to its lowest
level in six months as the U.S. govern-
ment reported the 10th straight weekly
increase in crude supplies. Oil dropped
$1.38, or 2 percent, to $92.30 a barrel.
Exxon Mobil and Chevron, both
members of the 30-company Dow,
declined. Exxon Mobil fell 47 cents, or
0.5 percent, to $93.80. Chevron fell
36 cents, or 0.4 percent, to $122.42.
Stocks climb after HP advances on earnings
Lower gas prices lifting
hopes for holiday sales
By Josh Oak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — No one begs Santa Claus for cheaper
gasoline. Yet falling gas prices are shaping up as an unex-
pected gift for drivers — and for people on their holiday
shopping lists.
The average price of gasoline has tumbled 49 cents from its
peak this year to $3.29 a gallon, putting it on track for the
lowest average since 2010, according to AAA. Because many
Americans have had no pay raises, whatever money they’re
saving on gas has freed up a bit more for other purchases.
And history shows that when gas prices drop, consumers
become more likely to splurge on dinners out. Impulse buys
at the mall seem like less of a stretch. More people buy a gas-
station gift card after fueling up.
Many retail analysts have forecast a ho-hum sales gain of
around 2 percent this year; others predict an increase of up to
3.9 percent. But steadily cheaper gas could send holiday sales
shooting above 5.4 percent, analysts say.
“Every little thing moves the needle at this point,” said
Carl Riccadonna, senior U.S. economist at Deutsche Bank.
“The benefit at this time of the year certainly helps retailers,
since it is not spread evenly throughout the year.”
Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst at the Oil Information
Service, foresees the average price drifting down, as it typi-
cally does this time of year, to as low as $3.05 by year’s end.
For retailers, the best-case scenario would be for the
national average to breach $3 a gallon, a psychological bar-
rier that could help accelerate spending.
Cheaper gas could help build on the momentum of 2 mil-
lion more Americans finding jobs this year. It might also
help shore up consumers’ fragile confidence in an economic
recovery that’s lumbered along for 4 1/2 years.
Riccadonna estimates that breaking $3 gas would lead the
average shopper to spend $47 more over the holidays. That
figure would translate into $15 billion worth of extra shop-
ping — possibly the difference between lukewarm and red-
hot sales growth.
By Mae Anderson
and Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — This holiday shop-
ping season, it’s Amazon vs. everyone
else.
The online giant has attracted cus-
tomers from big store chains like Wal-
Mart and Best Buy with low prices and
convenient shipping. Now, stores are
fighting to get customers back during
the busiest shopping period of the
year.
Stores are doing things like match-
ing the lower prices on Amazon.com
and offering the same discounts in
stores as on their websites. For its
part, Amazon is giving customers the
option to pick up items at physical
locations and adding Sunday delivery.
The two sides are dueling over shop-
pers like Jessica Danielle, a speech-
writer who plans to do the bulk of her
Christmas shopping on Amazon. “All
the time spent going to brick-and-
mortar stores, is it worth my time?”
said Danielle, 31, who lives in
Washington, D.C. “I don’t think so.”
There’s a lot at stake for both sides.
Amazon has built a following, but
wants to grow its business globally.
Meanwhile, brick-and-mortar retailers
struggle to keep shoppers from using
their stores as showrooms to test out
and try on items before buying them
for less on Amazon.
The holiday season ups the ante.
Both online and brick-and-mortar
retailers can make up to 40 percent of
their annual revenue in November and
December. And this year, they’re com-
peting for the growing number of
shoppers who are as comfortable buy-
ing online as in stores.
Holiday sales are expected to rise 3.9
percent to $602.1 billion, according
to The National Retail Federation. Of
that, about $78.7 billion is expected
to be online, up 15 percent from last
year, according to Forrester Research.
Battle for holiday shoppers heats up
By Joseph Pisani
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Want to check your
credit score? It might be included on
your next credit card statement.
The FICO score, which is widely used
by lenders to gauge your financial
health, should be checked before
applying for a car loan or a mortgage.
But it can cost as much as $20 to do so.
Now three credit card issuers —
Discover, Barclaycard US and First
Bankcard — have signed up to allow
some 35 million cardholders to check
their FICO scores every month at no
cost. Besides those three credit card
companies, more lenders are expected
to sign up.
“I think it’s fantastic,” says Ted
Sarenski, a certified public accountant
and financial planner at Blue Ocean
Strategic Capital. “People should be
watching that score and asking how
they could improve it.”
The move is an initiative by Fair
Isaac Corp., the company that devel-
oped the FICO score, to enable more
people to see their score for free and
get its brand in front of consumers. It
comes after websites, such as
Credit.com, CreditSesame.com and
CreditKarma.com, have offered free
credit scores for years. Those scores
are derived differently from FICO’s, but
offer a similar three-digit score.
The FICO score ranges from 300 to
850. The higher the score the better.
People with higher scores are offered
lower interest rates from lenders and
credit card companies. Most lenders
pay Fair Isaac to see the scores of
potential borrowers when determining
if they will approve an application.
What has changed is that Fair Issac has
agreed to let some lenders share the
scores with customers. It’s not charg-
ing the lenders more to do so.
Credit card companies offer free credit scores
REUTERS
A United States postal employee pumps gas into his mail
delivery truck from a public gas station in San Diego.
<<<Page 13, Whitner takes
verbal shot at Drew Brees
Thursday, Nov. 28, 2013
WARRIORS: DALLAS HOLDS OFF THE GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS >> PAGE 12
VanDerveer fifth women’s coach with 900 wins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUERTO VALLARTA, Mexico
— Tara VanDerveer became nos-
talgic after reaching another
major coaching milestone.
VanDerveer became the fifth
women’s coach to reach 900 vic-
tories with No. 6 Stanford’s 83-
59 win over Florida Gulf Coast
on Wednesday night, and she
was grateful for the support she
had over the years.
“It goes fast,” the Hall of
Famer said. “I can remember my
first game and different games in
different places. Obviously
some really big games, it goes
really fast. I’m very thankful for
the places I coached, the assis-
tants I worked with, the athletic
directors I worked for. The out-
standing players I coached. The
fabulous fans at Idaho, Ohio
State and Stanford. I live a
blessed life.”
The 60-year-old VanDerveer,
who is 900-204 in her career,
joined Pat Summitt, Sylvia
Hatchell, C. Vivian Stringer and
Jody Conradt with the milestone
win. The Hall of Fame coach was
presented with a game ball after
the final buzzer and the players
held up signs with “900” written
on them.
Chiney Ogwumike led the
Cardinal (6-1) with 27 points
and 13 rebounds. Mikaela Ruef
added 14 points and 12
rebounds. Both were on the team
when VanDerveer won No. 800
in 2010.
“We played really well because
we not only wanted to play well,
but we wanted to play well for
Tara so she’d have a good memo-
ry of the game,” Ogwumike said.
“She said in the locker room that
anytime she’ll think about her
900th win she’ll think about
how well we played. Glad we
made her proud. She’s a very
humble person. We’re excited to
put a smile on her face.”
VanDerveer is 748-153 at
Stanford after spending two sea-
sons at Idaho, her first time as a
head coach, then five at Ohio
State. She started coaching by
tutoring her younger sister,
Marie, per her father’s request if
she wanted to keep living at
home.
See 900, Page 14
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Just as the
passing game has started to click
for the San Francisco 49ers at last,
here comes Michael Crabtree.
The team’s top wide receiver
from 2012 is back on the active
roster six months after Achilles
tendon surgery and poised to make
his season debut Sunday against
St. Louis if all goes as hoped dur-
ing practice this week.
“There’s things he does that he’s
the best in football at, and that
certainly bodes well for us and
we’re excited about it,” coach Jim
Harbaugh said Wednesday.
“Catching the ball, there’s routes
that he runs, tackles he breaks,
plays that he makes. There’s evi-
dence there.”
Adding Crabtree to the mix for
the 49ers (7-4) would provide a big
boost to a receiving corps that
made significant strides in a 27-6
win at Washington on Monday
night. Crabtree became Colin
Kaepernick’s top target last year
and had career bests of 85 recep-
tions for 1,105 yards and nine
touchdowns.
“I’m good,” Crabtree said but he
wouldn’t elaborate. He was acti-
vated from the physically unable
to perform list Tuesday to the 53-
man active roster.
Harbaugh won’t tip his hand too
early in the week, while also not-
ing that everything depends on
Crabtree prepares for
possible season debut
SPORTS FILE
49ers wide receiver is active for
Sunday’s game against St. Louis.
See 49ERS, Page 13
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAO PAULO — Part of the stadi-
um that will host the 2014 World
Cup opener collapsed Wednesday,
killing two workers and aggravat-
ing already urgent concerns Brazil
won’t be ready for soccer’s signa-
ture tournament.
The accident at the Arena
Corinthians, known locally as the
Itaquerao, could hardly have come
at a worse time — just a week
ahead of the draw that will deter-
mine the tournament’s schedule
and with the top names in soccer
all descending on Brazil.
Preparations have been plagued
by setbacks including cost over-
runs, stadium delays, accidents,
labor strife and huge street
protests in the run-up to the June
tournament, once envisioned as a
coming out party for South
America’s largest nation, which is
also scheduled to host the 2016
Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Already, public prosecutors and
Brazil under pressure after
collapse at 2014 WCup venue
See STADIUM, Page 14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — The
Dallas Cowboys and Oakland
Raiders need the same short mem-
ory during a short week, for differ-
ent reasons.
The Cowboys have to move on
from a last-play win over the New
York Giants to stay in position to
end a three-year playoff drought.
The Raiders must forget a last-
minute loss to Tennessee that dam-
aged hopes for their first postsea-
son trip since 2002.
“Maybe being a short week you
just know you can’t think about
it,” said quarterback Tony Romo,
who has directed winning fourth-
quarter drives in the past two
Dallas victories. “I mean really,
this game comes so fast you’re
immersed in the study and just
looking at the opponent and real-
ly wearing yourself out to get all
of the looks to find out what you
think is the best way to attack
them. And by
the end of the
week you feel
comfortable.”
Romo won’t
be the only
undrafted start-
ing quarterback
T h u r s d a y .
Oakland’s Matt
McGloin makes
his third career
start on a big Thanksgiving stage
two weeks after his debut in Texas
with a victory over Houston.
McGloin became the fourth quar-
terback since the NFL merger in
1970 to throw three touchdown
passes without an interception in
his first start against the Texans.
Cowboys and Raiders need
short memories in short week
See RAIDERS, Page 14
Matt McGloin
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Mavericks hold off Golden State 103-99
Thornton lifts Sharks over Kings
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored 22
points to offset a rough night for playmak-
ing partner Monta Ellis, and the Dallas
Mavericks held off a late charge from
Golden State for a 103-99 victory over the
Warriors on Wednesday night.
Nowitzki was 11 of 19 from the field and
added three assists and matched the team
high with two steals.
Ellis finished with a season-low four
points on 2-of-16 shooting, but he had 10
assists, including one to get Samuel
Dalembert a dunk and push Dallas’ dwin-
dling lead to six at 101-95 with 1:21
remaining.
Stephen Curry led Golden State with 29
points as the Warriors stayed close a night
after a tough one-point win in New Orleans.
Klay Thompson and David Lee had 20
points each, while Lee had 12 rebounds and
Thompson 10 boards.
The Warriors rallied from 17 down midway
through the fourth quarter, but never got
closer than four. Thompson shot an air ball
on a 3-point attempt in one trip, and
Dalembert blocked a shot from long range
by Draymond Green with 9.4 seconds left.
Golden State kept the ball after the block,
but the Warriors missed twice in a mad
scramble to the final buzzer.
With Ellis’ game off the mark, rookie
point guard Shane Larkin gave Dallas a
spark off the bench. The biggest boost was
a running shot off one foot just before the
third-quarter buzzer that put Dallas up by 11.
Dallas coach Rick Carlisle broke his rota-
tion and put Larkin back in to try to stem a
Golden State rally late in the fourth. He fin-
ished with seven points and six assists.
The Mavericks were in control at 99-82
with about 5 minutes left when the Warriors
ran off 13 straight points to make it close.
Thompson started the run with a 3-point-
er, and it really got going when DeJuan
Blair was called for a foul in the backcourt
and Ellis was given a technical for an out-
burst after the whistle.
Curry hit the free throw, Thompson hit
another from long range and Curry dribbled
between two defenders coming off a screen
and hit the jumper to get the Warriors with-
in 99-95.
Thompson had a chance to make it a one-
point lead, but shot an air ball on a 3-point
attempt from the right wing.
The Warriors were down six in the third
when Larkin and Blair started a 12-1 run
with one of several tag-team plays — a
short bank shot from Blair on a feed from
Larkin. Blair had 11 points and nine
rebounds, including seven offensive
boards.
Larkin and Draymond Green collided chas-
ing a loose ball on Golden State’s end, and
Jae Crowder ended up with the ball and a
three-point play after he was fouled on a
layup by Nemanja Nedovic.
Dallas’ Wayne Ellington matched his sea-
son high in the first half with six points,
including a soaring one-handed dunk on a
backdoor cut to give the Mavericks their
biggest lead at 47-31 midway through the
second quarter.
NOTES: A night after getting season
highs in points, rebounds and minutes in
his first start, Warriors F Jermaine O’Neal
had six points and seven rebounds. ...
Warriors C Andrew Bogut returned from a
one-game suspension for his role in a scuf-
fle with Portland and had eight points and
10 boards. ... A fan swished a half-court
shot to win a 70-inch TV.
San Francisco
defeats Sonoma State 96-73
SAN FRANCISCO — Cole Dickerson
scored a game-high 23 points to lead four
players in double digits as San Francisco
defeated Division II Sonoma State 96-73 to
open the Golden Gate Challenge tourna-
ment on Wednesday night.
Dickerson was 8 of 10 from the field and
hit 2 of 2 3-pointers. He also led the Dons
(4-3) in rebounds with 10. Tim Derksen had
19 points, including a pair of 3-pointers,
Matt Glover had 16 points and four
rebounds and Kruize Pikins chipped in with
12 points. The Dons also had nine steals in
the game.
San Francisco led by 19 points at the
break and never had to look back, hitting
54.5 percent overall from the field and sink-
ing 71.4 percent of its free throws.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Joe Thornton scored his first
shootout goal since 2007 in the eighth
round and the San Jose Sharks beat the Los
Angeles Kings 3-2 Wednesday night to
extend the home-team dominance in this
California rivalry.
Thornton and Joe Pavelski scored in regu-
lation for the Sharks, who have won nine
straight at home against the Kings includ-
ing the postseason. In all, the home team
has won the last 14 matchups, including all
seven in last spring’s playoff series won by
Los Angeles.
Jeff Carter and Drew Doughty scored for
the Kings, who tied a franchise record by
earning a point in their 11th straight game.
They also did that in 1973-74 and 2010-11.
Ben Scrivens made 38 saves.
After each team scored three times in the
first seven rounds, Thornton got his first
shootout attempt since the 2009-10 season
and stuffed a backhand past Scrivens. It was
his first shootout goal since Dec. 16 2007,
against Anaheim.
Antti Niemi then stopped Tyler Toffoli to
seal it. Niemi made 38 saves as San Jose
opened a difficult stretch of three games in
four days against top-five teams with a win.
The game was played with the high inten-
sity expected from two fierce rivals with a
recent playoff history who are at the top of
their games. These teams have met twice in
the past three postseasons, with each win-
ning once, including Los Angeles’ triumph
in the second round last spring.
Each benefited from a fluky goal, with San
Jose taking a 2-1 lead late in the second
period when Thornton took the puck from
Willie Mitchell behind the net and then
Scrivens kicked in a loose puck.
The Kings got the fortunate bounce early
in the third to tie the game when Doughty’s
centering pass hit defenseman Scott
Hannan’s skate and deflected past Niemi for
the equalizer.
Maddux, Glavine,
Thomas on Hall of Fame ballot
NEWYORK — Four-time Cy Young Award
winner Greg Maddux, two-time winner Tom
Glavine and two-time AL MVP Frank
Thomas are among 19 newcomers on this
year’s Hall of Fame ballot, joining steroid-
tainted holdovers Barry Bonds, Roger
Clemens, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa.
Mike Mussina, Hideo Nomo, Kenny
Rogers, Jeff Kent, Moises Alou and Luis
Gonzalez also are among the players eligi-
ble to be voted on for the first time by the
Baseball Writers’ Association of America.
The 36-player ballot will include
Armando Benitez, Sean Casey, Ray Durham,
Eric Gagne, Jacque Jones, Todd Jones, Paul
Lo Duca, Richie Sexson, J.T. Snow and
Mike Timlin, the Hall said Tuesday.
Voters are the approximately 600 writers
who have been members of the BBWAA for
10 consecutive years at any point. Ballots
are due by Dec. 31, and results will be
announced Jan. 8.
Players elected along with choices
announced Dec. 9 by the expansion era
committee (1973 and later) will be inducted
July 27 at Cooperstown. Among those on
the committee ballot are retired managers
Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa and Joe Torre;
late Yankees owner George Steinbrenner.
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
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Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
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how Crabtree gets through practice.
“Good meetings this morning. Good ses-
sions there. Bright-eyed and ready to go,”
Harbaugh said before the team practiced
Wednesday. “Optimistic like I said the other
day. Hope for the best and we’ll have a plan
if he’s not able to go. It’s pretty much that
simple.”
Mario Manningham continues to impress
playing opposite Anquan Boldin after three
games back following knee surgery last
year. Manningham hopes his unit can build
off a strong performance and develop some
consistency.
“We’ve just got to do it every week. We
can’t be inconsistent,” Manningham said.
“We’ve got to come out like that every
week.”
Manningham and tight end Vernon Davis
each made four catches at Washington,
while Boldin had five receptions and a pair
of touchdowns.
Now, if Crabtree is back in the mix,
defenses will have a harder time double-
teaming Davis downfield.
“It will be great to have Crab back. He’s a
great talent,” left tackle Joe Staley said.
“Everybody knows what he can do and is
excited to see him back out there. I know
he’s excited to get back out there, the way he
competes and all the hard work he’s put in to
get back.”
Kaepernick isn’t ready to guess whether
he might be throwing passes Crabtree’s way
again this weekend.
“That’s going to be his call 100 percent,”
Kaepernick said.
Crabtree has made steady progress back
from his injury. He tore his right Achilles
tendon during 7-on-7 drills in an organized
team activity May 21 then had surgery. The
NFC champion Niners said from the begin-
ning they thought he would return this sea-
son after Crabtree was a huge reason the
franchise reached the Super Bowl again for
the first time in 18 years.
Rams coach Jeff Fisher is preparing his
defense as if Crabtree will be on the field,
and prepare for a variety of ways Crabtree
might be utilized. He noted “it’s hard for us
to predict.”
“It gives them an additional weapon.
Michael’s an outstanding player. Hope he
might wait another week,” Fisher said.
“We’re expecting him to play. You go back
and look before the injury and what he did
for them, and we’re familiar with that.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — San Francisco safety
Donte Whitner is challenging Drew Brees to
come beat the 49ers fair and square — and
Whitner hopes that happens in a playoff
date in January.
Whitner is still irked
that officials called line-
backer Ahmad Brooks for
a personal foul on Brees
late in a 23-20 loss at
New Orleans on Nov. 17,
and on Wednesday he
called for the NFL to take
a stand on replay for
some illegal hit penal-
ties.
“We look at him as being one of the
greats, but come and beat us, come and win a
football game, don’t take that one,”
Whitner said Wednesday. “They didn’t earn
that football game. We felt like we had an
opportunity to win it, we felt like we out-
played them and we felt like we should have
won. Hopefully, we’ll see them again. ...
Drew Brees and those guys are over there
celebrating. We kind of have a formula
against those guys and hopefully we’ll see
them again in the playoffs.”
What would have been a lost fumble
instead kept the ball in the Saints’ posses-
sion, and they soon kicked two late field
goals to win the game.
Brooks, who has repeatedly denied any
wrongdoing on the play, was fined $15,570
by the league last week and appealed.
Whitner insists Brees “can’t take a hit”
and that the call cost his team the game.
“I knew it was going to cost us a game at
some point. And it’s going to cost another
team a game when it really matters,”
Whitner said. “And it might be the playoffs.
It could be the Super Bowl. We really need to
get something done about that — replay,
something — so it doesn’t cost us football
games. Because we really deserved to win
that game.”
Brees, whose chin was bloodied when
Brooks clobbered him, called it a clothes-
line tackle. Brees was unavailable to
respond to Whitner’s remarks Wednesday as
the Saints were off.
“We’re out there working for nothing.
There’s no explanation,” Whitner said.
“There’s nobody to actually sit down and
tell you what’s right and what’s wrong. It’s
like, ‘OK, take this fine.’ And then you take
this fine and that’s it. So that’s not right
because he did everything that he was sup-
posed to do. It’s not his fault that Drew
Brees is a little guy and can’t really take a
hit.”
Asked to clarify, Whitner said, “I’m not
questioning his toughness (but) his
stature.”
Whitner said he believes he won his
appeal of a $21,000 fine for a hit in the end
zone on Rams wideout Chris Givens with
just less than six minutes remaining in a 35-
11 Week 4 win at St. Louis. He would just
like to hear a formal answer from the NFL,
which has yet to take his money.
“I did everything correct. I actually felt
like I put myself in harm’s way, turning my
neck and not really doing what I’m sup-
posed to do,” Whitner said.
Whitner says QB Drew
Brees ’can’t take a hit’
Donte Whitner
Sports Brief
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
At the beginning, VanDerveer sent letters to the top 20
college programs in the country. She wound up at Ohio
State as a volunteer coach of the junior varsity team. Those
Buckeyes went 8-0, which she counts as one of her two
undefeated teams along with the 1996 American Olympic
gold medalists.
There have been many more winning teams since, though
the Cardinal haven’t captured a national championship
since 1992 despite five recent trips to the Final Four, a run
that ended last season.
“When I started coaching it never enters your mind win-
ning any games. I live in the moment for that game, that
season. I’m not a bean counter,” VanDerveer said.
No. 900 wasn’t in doubt much after the start. The Cardinal
jumped out to a quick lead scoring 13 of the first 19 points.
It didn’t get any better for Florida Gulf Coast as Stanford
extended the advantage to 34-12 with just under 8 minutes
left in the first half. Ogwumike had 16 of Stanford’s points
at that point.
The Eagles (3-3) only baskets to that point came on 3-
pointers as they missed 17 of their first 21 shots.
Florida Gulf Coast got within 12 in the second half before
Stanford pulled away.
Continued from page 11
900
Sports Brief
Cal QB Jared Goff has shoulder surgery
BERKELEY— California quarterback Jared Goff is
expected to be ready for spring practice after undergoing
surgery on his right shoulder.
The school said Goff had surgery Wednesday. He separat-
ed his throwing shoulder in the second quarter of Cal’s 63-
13 loss at Stanford on Saturday after taking a hard hit from
linebacker Shayne Skov.
Goff started all 12 games for the Golden Bears (1-11) as a
freshman this season. He broke Cal’s single-season
records for yards passing (3,508), total offense (3,446),
passes completed (320) and passes attempted (531).
Cal coach Sonny Dykes said he’s “pleased that Jared is
expected to make a full recovery and be back on the field for
spring ball. We have confidence he can build on the prom-
ising campaign he had in his first season at Cal.”
U.S. soccer tabs Altidore, Wambach AOYs
CHICAGO — Jozy Altidore and Abby Wambach were
honored as the men’s and women’s athletes of the year by
U.S. soccer.
The men’s Athlete of the Year honor is the first for
Altidore. He becomes the 22nd player to earn the award
since its inception in 1984.
Altidore set a U.S. men’s national team record by scoring
a goal in five consecutive matches from June 2 to Aug. 14. a workers union in Sao Paulo were
demanding an investigation into con-
ditions at the venue, saying work
shouldn’t resume until authorities
deem the stadium safe.
Ricardo Trade, CEO of the local
World Cup organizing committee, said
authorities would determine if there is
a need to suspend construction.
“There are seven months till the
World Cup, not 10 days, so I don’t
believe this is going to cause delays.
But there is absolutely no guarantee
on this,” Trade said in a telephone
interview.
The accident could lead to recrimina-
tions between local organizers and
world soccer’s organization FIFA,
which has set a December deadline for
all 12 World Cup stadiums to be ready.
The tournament begins June 12.
“I don’t want to know about FIFA
right now; we are worried about the
families of the victims,” said Andres
Sanchez, former president of the Sao
Paulo soccer club Corinthians, which
is building the stadium. The club said
workers will not return before a three-
day mourning period.
The stadium was nearly finished
before the collapse, which occurred
when a construction crane crashed into
a 500-ton metal structure. That struc-
ture then cut through the outer walls of
the venue, destroying part of the out-
side of the building and slamming into
a giant LED panel that runs across the
stadium’s facade.
Sanchez said it appeared the struc-
ture of the stadium was not compro-
mised, meaning there should be
enough time to recover before the
World Cup.
“Structurally very little was affect-
ed,” he said.
Six stadiums have already been
declared ready for the games. But
Brazil is racing against time to deliver
the other six, and there is particular
concern that the stadiums in Cuiaba,
Manaus and Curitiba may not be ready
by the end of December.
FIFAhas said it would not accept the
same delays that plagued stadium con-
struction before soccer’s
Confederations Cup earlier this year,
for which only two stadiums were
ready on time.
Continued from page 11
STADIUM
He then put the Raiders in position
to beat the Titans with a fourth-quarter
drive that Tennessee answered on a TD
with 10 seconds remaining for a 23-
19 win.
The rookie from Penn State got his
chance after Terrelle Pryor injured a
knee, and now coach Dennis Allen
isn’t hesitating to call him the
starter.
“It’s never been too big for Matt,”
Allen said. “Last week it wasn’t
always pretty early in the game, but
in the second half he really got going
in the passing game. Everybody’s
told him he can’t do it, but he’s con-
tinued to prove people wrong and so
far he’s been able to do that in the two
starts he’s had.”
A few things to consider as the
Cowboys meet the Raiders for a sec-
ond straight time on Thanksgiving.
Dallas won the last meeting 24-7 in
2009.
DUAL HOMECOMING: Allen,
the youngest head coach in the
league, is coming home, and so are
the Cowboys. For Allen, that means
coaching in front of family and
friends just a few miles from where he
grew up (suburb of Hurst) and played
high school football (L.D. Bell).
Allen also was a graduate assistant at
Texas A&M, where he played safety.
“It’ll be fun,” he said. “Unfortunately,
we don’t get a lot of time to hang out
and visit. I won’t be having
Thanksgiving dinner with the family.
I’ll be in, get the job done and then
get back out.”
For the Cowboys, it means playing
at their $1.2 billion stadium for just
the second time in seven weeks.
They had four road games and a bye
in that span.
POSTSEASON PICTURE: The
Cowboys (6-5) are tied with
Philadelphia atop the NFC East lead
and created some separation for the
division leaders with last week’s 24-
21 win over the Giants.
Dallas has played winner-take-all
finales against division rivals the
past two seasons, and the possibility
looms again with the Eagles visiting
to wrap up the regular season.
The Raiders (4-7) are last in the AFC
West and have virtually no chance to
win the division, but a wild-card berth
isn’t unrealistic if they get on a roll.
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
vs.Ducks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/30
vs.Devils
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/23
vs.L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/27
vs. St.Louis
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/29
@Penguins
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/5
@Toronto
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/3
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/27
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN/ESPN
11/22
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/23
@Pelicans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/26
@Kings
3p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/1
@OKC
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/29
@Carolina
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/6
vs.Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/3
Playoffs
Playoffs
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 6 8 .429 —
Philadelphia 6 10 .375 1
Boston 6 11 .353 1 1/2
Brooklyn 4 11 .267 2 1/2
New York 3 11 .214 3
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 12 3 .800 —
Atlanta 8 8 .500 4 1/2
Washington 7 8 .467 5
Charlotte 7 9 .438 5 1/2
Orlando 6 9 .400 6
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 14 1 .933 —
Chicago 7 7 .500 6 1/2
Detroit 6 9 .400 8
Cleveland 4 11 .267 10
Milwaukee 2 12 .143 1 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 13 2 .867 —
Houston 11 5 .688 2 1/2
Dallas 10 6 .625 3 1/2
Memphis 8 7 .533 5
New Orleans 6 8 .429 6 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 13 3 .813 —
Oklahoma City 10 3 .769 1 1/2
Denver 8 6 .571 4
Minnesota 8 9 .471 5 1/2
Utah 2 14 .125 11
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 11 5 .688 —
Golden State 9 7 .563 2
Phoenix 8 7 .533 2 1/2
L.A. Lakers 8 8 .500 3
Sacramento 4 9 .308 5 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Washington 116, L.A. Lakers 111
Brooklyn 102,Toronto 100
Orlando 109, Atlanta 92
Golden State 102, New Orleans 101
Wednesday’sGames
Orlando 105, Philadelphia 94
Indiana 99, Charlotte 74
L.A. Lakers 99, Brooklyn 94
Memphis 100, Boston 93
Miami 95, Cleveland 84
Chicago 99, Detroit 79
Denver 117, Minnesota 110
Houston 113, Atlanta 84
Oklahoma City 94, San Antonio 88
Washington 100, Milwaukee 92, OT
Dallas 103, Golden State 99
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 25 16 7 2 34 69 52
Tampa Bay 25 16 8 1 33 76 63
Detroit 26 12 7 7 31 69 71
Montreal 25 14 9 2 30 67 52
Toronto 25 14 9 2 30 71 66
Ottawa 25 10 11 4 24 74 81
Florida 26 7 14 5 19 58 86
Buffalo 26 5 20 1 11 45 82
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 26 16 9 1 33 78 63
N.Y. Rangers 25 13 12 0 26 53 61
Washington 25 12 11 2 26 76 74
Carolina 25 10 10 5 25 53 70
New Jersey 25 9 11 5 23 53 62
Philadelphia 24 10 12 2 22 52 60
Columbus 25 9 13 3 21 62 75
N.Y. Islanders 25 8 14 3 19 70 85
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 26 18 4 4 40 95 73
St. Louis 24 18 3 3 39 86 51
Colorado 23 17 6 0 34 70 49
Minnesota 26 15 7 4 34 65 61
Nashville 25 13 10 2 28 60 69
Winnipeg 27 12 11 4 28 72 78
Dallas 23 12 9 2 26 67 68
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 24 16 3 5 37 82 54
Anaheim 27 17 7 3 37 83 71
Los Angeles 26 16 6 4 36 69 56
Phoenix 25 15 6 4 34 83 79
Vancouver 26 12 9 5 29 67 68
Calgary 24 8 12 4 20 66 87
Edmonton 25 7 16 2 16 65 89
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
Dallas 6, Anaheim 3
Wednesday’sGames
Pittsburgh 6,Toronto 5, SO
San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, SO
Montreal 3, Buffalo 1
Carolina 4, New Jersey 3
Winnipeg 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Ottawa 6,Washington 4
Nashville 4, Columbus 0
Detroit 6, Boston 1
Tampa Bay 4, Philadelphia 2
N.Y. Rangers 5, Florida 2
Phoenix 3, Minnesota 1
St. Louis 4, Colorado 1
Chicago 3, Calgary 2
Thursday’sGames
Vancouver at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 6 5 0 .545 298 279
Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260
N.Y. Giants 4 7 0 .364 213 280
Washington 3 8 0 .273 252 338
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196
Carolina 7 3 0 .700 238 135
Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237
Atlanta 2 9 0 .182 227 309
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253
Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267
Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239
Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179
San Francisco 7 4 0 .636 274 184
Arizona 7 4 0 .636 254 223
St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 266 255
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 3 0 .700 256 199
N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268
Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276
Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245
Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212
Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255
Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232 138
Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246
San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222
Thursday, Nov. 28
Green Bay at Detroit, 9:30 a.m.
Oakland at Dallas, 1:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 1
Chicago at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
New England at Houston, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
NFL GLANCE
FRIDAY
Football
CCSsemifinals
DivisionII
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (8-3) at No. 2 Los Gatos (8-
3), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 5 St. Ignatius (3-8) at No. 1 Burlingame (11-0), 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
CCSsemifinals
OpenDivision
No. 6 Bellarmine (8-3) vs. No. 2 Serra (9-2), 7 p.m. at
Independence
Division IV
No.5 Monterey (8-3) at No.1 Sacred Heart Prep (10-
1), 1 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DENVER BRONCOS — Placed DT Kevin Vickerson
on the injured reserve list. Signed DT Sione Fua.
DETROIT LIONS — Signed G Rodney Austin from
the practice squad. Released DE Austen Lane.
GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed LB Victor Aiyewa
from the practice squad. Placed RB Johnathan
Franklin on the injured reserve list.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DT Sealver
Siliga from the practice squad. Signed TE D.J.
Williams. Signed OT Patrick Ford to the practice
squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed DB Ross Weaver to
the practice squad.
NEW YORK JETS — Signed TE Chris Pantale from
thepracticesquad.SignedWRMichael Campbell to
the practice squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — Activated OT Jared Veld-
heer from the injured reserve-return list. Waived
QB Tyler Wilson.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed QB McLeod
Bethel-Thompson to the practice squad. Released
LB D’Aundre Reed from the practice squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released CB Perrish Cox.
Signed CB Deshawn Shead From the practice
squad. Signed CB Akeem Auguste to the practice
squad.
TENNNESSEETITANS—SignedSShannSchillinger.
Signed OL Tyler Horn to the practice squad.Waived
OL Oscar Johnson from the practice squad.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS—SignedTEKyleAdams.
Placed TE Tom Crabtree on the injured reserve list.
BASEBALL
American League
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with
RHPJoeSmithonathree-year contract.Designated
RHP Juan Gutierrez for assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed OF Rafael Ortega off
waivers from Colorado. National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Claimed LHP Jose De-
Paula off waivers from San Diego.Agreed to terms
with RHP Erik Cordier. Designated C Johnny Mon-
ell and OF Francisco Peguero for assignment.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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All day shopping frenzy on Thanksgiving?
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Last Thanksgiving Day, Kimberly Mudge
Via’s mother, sister and nieces left in the middle of their
meals to head for the mall.
Now, Via says she’ll never host Thanksgiving dinner for
her relatives again.
“They barely finished,” says the 28-year-old who lives in
Boone, N.C. “They thanked me and left their plates on the
counter. ”
That scene could become more common in homes across
the country. Black Friday shopping, the annual rite of pas-
sage on the day after Thanksgiving, continues to creep fur-
ther into the holiday as more stores open their doors a day
early.
It’s a break with tradition. Black Friday, which typically
is the year’s biggest shopping day, for a decade has been
considered the official start to the busy holiday buying sea-
son. Stores open in the wee hours of the morning with spe-
cial deals called doorbusters and stay open late into the
evening. Meanwhile, Thanksgiving and Christmas
remained the only two days a year that stores were closed.
Now Thanksgiving is slowly becoming just another
shopping day. Over the past few years, major retailers,
including Target and Toys R Us, slowly have pushed open-
ing times into Thanksgiving night to one-up each other and
compete for holiday dollars. Some initially resisted, saying
that they wanted their employees to be able to spend time
with their families.
This year, more than a dozen major retailers are opening
on Thanksgiving, including a handful like Macy’s, J.C.
Penney and Staples that are doing it for the first time. The
Gap, which operates its Old Navy, Gap and Banana
Republic, is opening half of its stores on Thanksgiving
morning.
Roger Beahm, professor of marketing at the Wake Forest
University School of Business in Winston-Salem, N.C.,
expects that it’s just a matter of time — he estimates five
years — before most chains open all day on Thanksgiving.
As for Christmas, he says that day is still sacred among
shoppers.
“The floodgates have opened,” Beahm says. “People will
turn Thanksgiving Day shopping into a tradition as they
historically have on the day after Thanksgiving ... And
stores don’t want to be left behind.”
Indeed, retailers say they’re just doing what shoppers
want. And they know that opening earlier gives them a
chance to be the first to grab shoppers’ dollars. That’s an
important opportunity for chains, which can make up to 40
percent of their annual revenue during the last two months
of the year.
But so far, it’s unclear whether opening on Thanksgiving
boosts retailers’ top line or simply pushes forward sales
from Friday. Last year, it was the latter: Sales on
Thanksgiving were $810 million last year, an increase of
55 percent from the previous year as more stores opened on
the holiday, according to Chicago research firm
ShopperTrak.
But business dropped 1.8 percent to $11.2 billion on
REUTERS
A woman shops at a Toy “R”Us store in Carle Place, N.Y., in this Nov.23, 2012, file photo.
See SHOPPING, Page 18
18
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
Black Friday, though it still was the biggest
shopping day last year. That day accounted
for about 4.3 percent of holiday sales last
year.
“Customers clearly showed that they
wanted to be out shopping much earlier on
Thanksgiving,” Amy von Walter, a spokes-
woman for Best Buy, which moved up its
opening this year to 6 p.m. on
Thanksgiving from midnight on Black
Friday in 2012. “Our plan this holiday is a
direct result of that feedback.”
To be sure, the issue is divisive among
shoppers. Some believe that the holiday
should remain sacred and that store employ-
ees should not have to work. Some even
have threatened on retailers’ Facebook
pages that they will boycott stores that
open on Thanksgiving.
Jennifer Gillis, 49, refused to shop during
the holidays at Sears and Kmart last year
because she believes Thanksgiving should
not be commercialized. This year, she’s
adding Macy’s to the list.
“I think it’s turning into a day of greed —
for shoppers and stores,” Gillis, who lives
in Hawaii, says.
Given the controversy, opening on
Thanksgiving can be a difficult decision for
retailers to make.
For instance, last year, Macy’s and J.C.
Penney didn’t open on Thanksgiving
evening as competitors did. Both chains
say they wanted to honor their workers’
time with their families. But this year, they
changed their tune.
Tony Bartlett, executive vice president of
Penney’s stores, says the company decided
to open at 8 p.m. on Thanksgiving this year
because of customer feedback. He also says
Penney store employees wanted to open on
Thanksgiving so they could get the chance
to better compete with rivals.
“Obviously, we were one of the last to
open,” last year, says Bartlett, referring to
the chain’s 6 a.m. opening in 2012. But he
says this year, “We’re all in.”
Not every store is opening on turkey day,
though. A couple of retailers even put out
statements specifically noting that they
won’t be opening on Thanksgiving so that
their employees won’t have to work.
“We believe it is important for our team
members to be able to spend this time with
their loved ones,” Travis Smith, CEO and
president of Jo Ann Fabric and Craft Stores,
says in a statement. The retailer plans to
open at 6 a.m. on Black Friday.
B.J.’s Wholesale Club also says it will
not open on Thanksgiving. “Once again,
BJ’s is bucking the trend of putting sales on
Thanksgiving above family time,” BJ’s
says in a statement in which it announced
that it would open stores at 7 a.m. on Black
Friday.
Continued from page 17
SHOPPING
“Customers clearly showed that they
wanted to be out shopping much earlier on Thanksgiving.
... Our plan this holiday is a direct result of that feedback.”
— Amy von Walter, a spokeswoman for Best Buy
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
Most gardeners are keenly aware of the
season’s first hard frost.
I live at the base of small hill, and since
cold air sinks, my garden is inevitably one
of the first in the area to get hit with frost.
For me, that first foray out into a garden
blanketed in white crystals is a bit eerie.
Frost only settles when the air is still, and
frosted plants seem to exist in a state of sus-
pended animation.
At first glance they show no signs any
damage has occurred. Tender leaves held in
place by a thin veil of ice crystals look as if
they had been lightly sprinkled with con-
fectioner’s sugar.
Once the sun is high enough in the sky to
melt the frost, a different picture emerges.
Slowly the same plants that were standing
upright moments before begin to sag.
Leaves change from green to pale olive
brown, or sometimes black, and it is clear
in an instant that the growing season is
over.
I admit, I am usually saddened at the first
hard frost, but once I am done cleaning up
the aftermath I am over it and ready to think
ahead to winter.
The first frost acts as a real wake-up call
for me from a gardening perspective. It
reminds me that it is time to get the last of
my fall chores completed before the snow
flies.
One of the first things I do after a hard
frost is prepare my dahlias for winter stor-
age. Dahlias form tubers just beneath the
soil, much like potatoes. These tubers can
be dug up and easily stored over the winter
in a cool but frost-free location. They can
be planted out in the garden again next
spring, to put on another command per-
formance.
Digging dahlias is easy, but is best done
after a hard frost has killed the top of the
plant. Start by cutting off the plant’s main
stem, but leave about 4 to 6 inches above
the soil line.
Next, carefully dig around the plant’s
roots lifting them out of the ground in one
entire clump. I use a long-handled garden
fork with thick tines for this chore. Some
people prefer a spade, but experience has
taught me that runs the risk of cutting
through the tubers.
Next, I label the clumps before I forget
which plants are which. I have several beds
of dahlias, and I have learned that not label-
ing tubers when they come out of the ground
leads to a lot of head scratching about which
colors are which when it comes time to
replant in the spring.
I have stored my dahlias many different
ways over the years. I used to shake off all
the soil clinging to the tubers as I dug them,
let them dry in the sun and then packed them
away in vermiculite for the winter.
Several years ago, I tried a different
method with better results. I now lift the
tubers out of the ground but don’t shake off
any of the soil.
Next, I set the clumps on top of the gar-
den for several days until the soil around the
root ball has hardened and is dry. Be sure to
check your local forecast prior to digging to
make sure you will have a few days in a row
without rain.
Once the clumps are dry, I place them into
milk crates lined with plastic garbage bags
and stack the crates in my basement where
the temperature is about 50 degrees. The
plastic bags prevent any crumbling dirt
from slipping through the walls of the milk
crate and making a mess of the basement
floor.
I keep the tops of the crates open for good
air circulation. The dried soil provides a nat-
ural barrier for the tubers, preventing them
from drying out over the winter.
Other garden favorites, such as cannas,
gladiola bulbs and oxalis pips, can be
stored the same way, but be sure the soil
around the roots is thoroughly dry before
storing.
Frost signals that it’s time to store the dahlias
After the first frost, it’s time to dig and store dahlias for winter.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, NOV. 28
Dojo Canned Food Drive and
TaeBoTurkeyWorkOFF. 8:30 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. Dojo USA World Training
Center, 731 Kains Ave., San Bruno.
Bring a canned food donation as
your ticket in.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 29
Portola Art Gallery Presents After-
Thanksgiving Shopping Event
and ‘Small Works ... Great Values’
Group Show. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Portola Art Gallery at Allied Arts
Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
Prices vary. For more information go
to portilaartgallery.com.
The Great Escape. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Los Trancos Open Space Preserve,
Palo Alto. Put the gridlock of the
year’s busiest shopping day behind
you and walk a 3-mile loop beneath
forest canopies. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
www.openspace.org/activities.
Holiday Tree Lighting, Crafts and
Games. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Serramonte
Center, 3 Serramonte Center, Daly
City. There will be a special tree light-
ing celebration, festive music, games
and crafts for children.
Salsa Spot — Appreciation Night.
8 p.m. November 29. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. No cover
after 10 p.m. For more information
call (877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
SATURDAY, NOV. 30
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. The American
Legion San Bruno Post No. 409, 757
San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon,
ham or sausage and French toast
will be served. There will also be
juice, coffee and tea. $8 for adults
and $5 for children under 10. For
more information call 583-1740.
Autumn in the Watershed. 10 a.m.
to noon. Picchetti Ranch Open Space
Preserve. Leisurely 3-mile stroll
through the Stevens Creek
Watershed. Learn about the interac-
tions between water, plants, animals,
geology and soils during the fall.
Free. For more information go to
www.openspace.org/activities.
Make Your Own Gifts and Cards.
10 a.m. Reach And Teach, 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
www.reachandteach.com.
San Bruno Education Foundation
Bookfair. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Barnes &
Noble at Tanforan, San Bruno. Your
purchase of books, gifts, music, toys,
games, electronics and Starbucks
food earn money for San Bruno
schools. You can also order online
from Nov. 30 to Dec. 5 using our
code, 11234028 at BN.com/book-
fairs. For more information go to
www.sanbrunoedfound.org.
Author Talks and Book Signing.
11:45 a.m. Reach And Teach — 144
W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 759-3784.
Scout’s Fund Holiday Gathering.
Noon to 2 p.m. Peninsula Humane
Society and SPCA, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. Enjoy holiday treats for
you and your pet. $50 suggested
donation. For more information
admin@scoutsfund.org.
Free Scottish Holiday Concert. 3
p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 415
El Camino Real, Burlingame. The
Stewart Tartan Pipes and Drums will
perform. For more information con-
tact phil@lenihan.org.
Author Talks and Book Signing.
5:30 p.m. Reach And Teach — 144 W.
25th Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 759-3784.
The Fab Four-The Ultimate
Tribute. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. For more
information go to foxrwe.com.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
SUNDAY, DEC. 1
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
$5. For more information call 616-
7150.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 2
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
32nd Annual Classical Piano Fest.
4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach House, 307
Miranda Road, Half Moon Bay. Mack
McCray of the San Francisco
Conservatory joins South Korean
award winning pianist Yoonie Han
and Jeffrey LaDeur, founding mem-
ber of the San Francisco based
Delphi Trio, for three individual 35
minute sets on the 9-foot Steinway.
$35, $30 for 12 and under. Tickets at
www.bachddsoc.org. For more infor-
mation call 726-2020.
MONDAY, DEC. 2
December meeting for Hearing
Loss of the Peninsula. 1 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Free holiday party with activities and
food. Open to the public. For more
information, call publicity chairman
Cora Jean Kleppe at 345-4551.
Maker Monday: Make Crafts. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Ages 12 to
19. For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
Celebrate Hanukkah, Festival of
Lights. 4 p.m. Stanford Hospital
Atrium, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford.
A light snack will be served. For more
information contact lallen@stan-
fordmed.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Ron Borelli Trio. Free dance les-
sons, 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m.; open dance 7
p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame Woman’s
Club, 241 Park Road, Burlingame. Fun
evening of dance and camaraderie.
Admission is $8 members, $10
guests. Male dance hosts get free
admission. For more information call
342-2221.
TUESDAY, DEC. 3
American Red Cross Northern
California Region Mobile Blood
Drive. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Ritz
Carlton, 1 Miramontes Point Road,
Half Moon Bay. Open to the public.
For more information go to red-
crossblood.org.
Fourth Annual Public Outdoor
Hanukkah Festival. 5:15 p.m. to
6:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
Broadway, Redwood City. This takes
place on the seventh night of the
eight-day holiday. For more informa-
tion call 232-0995.
Lecture: Maintaining Immune
Health through the Flu Season. 6
p.m. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas St. New Leaf wellness lecture
by Dr. Tobi Schmidt, Ph.D. For more
information call 726-3110 ext. 101.
Ari Shavit. 7 p.m. Cubberley
Community Theatre, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Join
Shavit as he discusses why and how
Israel came to be. $20. For more
information call (800) 847-7730.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4
Free Job Search Assistance. 10 a.m.
to noon. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information email jcowan@jvs.org.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. All books, CDs, tapes and
DVDs are 20 to 50 percent off.
Facebook information session.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Previous computer basics suggest-
ed. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
The small business marketplace,
also called SHOP, was supposed to
provide employers a new way to shop
for coverage. The website was to
make comparison shopping easier
while promoting competition and
keeping premiums down. The delay,
which doesn’t affect states running
their own marketplaces, was met with
frustration.
“It’s disappointing that the online
portion of the federal small business
marketplace through Healthcare.gov
will be delayed, and it’s important it
get up and running as soon as possi-
ble,” said John Arensmeyer, CEO of
Small Business Majority, an advoca-
cy group that supports the health care
law. “However, it doesn’t change the
fact that the marketplace can offer the
most competitive combination of
price and quality for small businesses
purchasing health insurance.”
The National Retail Federation,
which has been working to ease the
law’s requirements for its members,
was less generous.
“If the law is so burdensome for the
administration to implement, just
think how hard it is for small busi-
nesses, which are focused on growing
a company, hiring new employees
and assisting customers,” said Neil
Trautwein, the group’s top health
policy official, in a statement.
Ohio’s insurance director, Mary
Taylor, a Republican who is also lieu-
tenant governor, said in a written
statement that the delay adds to the
struggles of small businesses and
“only further complicates an already
chaotic insurance market.”
Small businesses buying coverage
will still be eligible for tax credits
to bring down the cost, according to
the administration. Starting next
year, small businesses can claim a
credit of up to 50 percent of their
contributions to premiums for insur-
ance purchased through the SHOP,
and the administration is telling
business owners that buying market-
place plans through brokers, agents
and insurers will count for that tax
credit.
Wednesday’s setback was the latest
in a stream of missed deadlines,
including a postponement for a
Spanish-language sign-up tool
announced this week. The administra-
tion also recently pushed back the
enrollment deadline for individuals:
People who sign up by Dec. 23 can
get coverage that starts on Jan. 1. In
an earlier delay, businesses with more
than 50 workers were given until
2015 to meet the requirement to pro-
vide health insurance without paying
a penalty. And the deadline date for
individuals to avoid penalties for
failing to get coverage was pushed
back six weeks.
Last week, the administration also
announced a schedule change in next
year’s open enrollment season. It
will start on Nov. 15, 2014, a month
later than originally scheduled, and
finish on Jan. 15, 2015, about five
weeks later than originally sched-
uled. The midterm congressional
elections are Nov. 4, and congres-
sional Republicans accused the
administration of shifting the dates
for political reasons, to hide any
spike in 2015 premiums.
The administration earlier had
announced it will allow insurance
companies to extend for another year
coverage under individual policies
that don’t meet new coverage require-
ments. That move was a response to
anger over a wave of more than 4 mil-
lion policy cancellations.
The series of delays was seized
upon by Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo.,
chairman of the House Small
Business Committee.
“In the midst of the angst and
uncertainty that small businesses and
Americans feel about Obamacare,
today’s news of yet another last-
minute delay is just more proof that
the law is unworkable and bad for
small businesses,” Graves said in a
statement.
Continued from page 1
DELAYS
raphy possession. In return, prosecu-
tors dropped a charge of kidnapping
for sexual molestation purposes which
carries a seven years to life term and
agreed to a straight sentence of 27
years and four months in prison.
Mrozek will also have to register as
a sex offender and submit to AIDS test-
ing. He will be formally sentenced
Jan. 8 after the court receives a report
on his likelihood to reoffend.
The deal came just ahead of Mrozek’s
scheduled Dec. 2 jury trial on the orig-
inal charges of committing a sexual
act with a child under 10, kidnapping,
assault and trespassing on school
grounds in the original case plus
felony charges of burglary and
attempted possession of child pornog-
raphy and four misdemeanor counts
each of child annoyance and disorderly
conduct involving loitering at a rest-
room in the Daly City incident. He is
also charged with child annoyance and
offering alcohol to a minor for
allegedly harassing four preteens the
same day prosecutors say he took the
girl from Parkside Elementary School
in San Mateo.
Prosecutors say Mrozek groped the
girl and covered her mouth with his
hand before carting her off campus just
before 2:45 p.m. Sept. 21, 2012. A
short distance away, the girl escaped
by kicking her attacker and throwing a
rock at him before running back to the
school where she reported the inci-
dent, according to San Mateo police.
Mrozek is also accused of offering
vodka to two 12-year-old boys; ver-
bally harassing two girls at Bayside
STEM Academy; and was escorted off
the Horrall Elementary School campus
by a suspicious administrator. Both
schools are in San Mateo.
After reading of Mrozek’s arrest, an
official at George Washington
Elementary School in Daly City con-
tacted authorities about a March 2012
incident in which four 9-year-old girls
reported seeing a flash from under the
bathroom stall as they used the facili-
ties. The girls fetched a teacher who
tried forcing the man from the stall. He
finally ran from the bathroom and fled.
Prosecutors removed the one kidnap-
ping charge from the case as part of the
plea deal and because of proof issues
based on inconsistencies from the vic-
tim, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Mrozek remains in custody without
bail pending sentencing.
But while Mrozek’s criminal case is
essentially settled, his legal battles
are not. The family of the girl are suing
Mrozek and the San Mateo-Foster City
School District for battery, sexual bat-
tery, child abuse, dangerous condition
on public property, emotional distress
and negligent supervision. Prior to the
lawsuit, the school district denied a
similar claim from the family in April.
After grabbing the girl from the
school bathroom and taking her to a
nearby residence on Taylor Street
where he assaulted her, Mrozek told her
he “would badly hurt her,” according to
the lawsuit.
The suit argues the school district
knew or should have known Parkside
was an open campus with no complete
fencing and that what fences and gat-
ing it had was in need of repair. The
district should also have known the
school had no buddy system or other
safety system in place for students
going to the bathroom, the suit stated.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
MROZEK
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
COMICS/GAMES
11-28-13
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Come to
6 Pleasure boat
11 Rose Bowl feature
12 Morning eye-opener
13 Citrus tree
14 Soothed
15 Ms. Lauder
16 Blarney Stone locale
17 Con game
19 “The Thin Man” pooch
23 Scientist’s question
26 Major airports
28 Promptly
29 Toy dog
31 Madrid art gallery
33 Not snug
34 Kind of tire
35 Wapiti
36 Diamond Head site
39 Foxy
40 Helper, for short
42 Greek salad topper
44 Sport
46 Faucet
51 Tent dwellers
54 Urban nuisance
55 Pluto, once
56 Fissures
57 Sit on the throne
58 Try a mouthful
DOWN
1 Treaties end them
2 Trapped like —
3 Renowned “Citizen”
4 Sidles past
5 Before marriage
6 Part of BYOB
7 Wouldn’t hurt — —
8 Grey Cup org.
9 Half a bray
10 Turner or Koppel
11 “The Raven” poet
12 Shinny
16 — Claire, Wis.
18 Ernesto Guevara
20 Slow mover
21 The present
22 MP prey
23 Cashmere and angora
24 Snares
25 Fabric meas.
27 Workout locale
29 Petition
30 Tolstoy’s name
32 Hwys.
34 Groove
37 Pull — — one
38 That girl
41 Nasal accent
43 St. Teresa’s town
45 Perfect place
47 Long periods
48 Departed
49 Go to the polls
50 USN officer
51 “Fresh Air” airer
52 Pamplona cheer
53 — tai
54 Interest amt.
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Professional
decisions will lead to a better position. Don’t divulge
personal information when dealing with emotional
matters. Adaptability will put you ahead of any
competition you face.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You will have
difficulties with foreigners or while traveling or taking
part in cultural events. Concentrate on whatever
job you’ve been given and refuse to let last-minute
changes upset you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Pitch in and help,
and you will avoid complaints. Size up your financial
situation and look for a way to turn what you have to
offer into a lucrative endeavor.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Do your best to
encourage someone you care about to get involved in
whatever you pursue. Working alongside someone you
know you can count on will lead to greater success.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Use your creative talent
to get ahead. You’ll surprise someone with your ability
to work with whatever you are given and come out on
top. Don’t let emotions interfere with your productivity.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Use all your attributes
to get ahead. You’ll learn a lesson from someone who
is putting pressure on you. Stand up for your rights
and follow through with your plans.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Truth will make a
difference to the outcome of a situation. A change
in the way you do things will allow you to offer your
skills to a wider variety of end users.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Socializing with friends
or peers will introduce you to hobbies or activities that
will help you grow mentally or spiritually. Travel and
communication will improve personal relationships.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Don’t let what’s happening
in your personal life discourage you. Protect what you
have worked so hard to acquire. Use unusual tactics
when it comes to dealing with money matters.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Let others know how
you feel and what you want. You will get a good
response. Encourage someone to join in and help you
reach your goals. Love is on the rise.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Size up your situation
at home and at work, but don’t make a fuss or start
a feud over something that is best left to fizzle out.
Emotions must be controlled.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Put more into your
appearance and hone your creative skills. Love will
highlight your day if you show affection and offer
romance to someone you fancy.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
Work is Sweet!
We are NOW INTERVIEWING
for SEASONAL POSITIONS in See's Candy Factory
APPLY IN PERSON
Monday - Friday
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
210 El Camino Real
South San Francisco
(report to Guard Station at parking lot entrance
on Spruce Street)
Requirements for all positions include physical
ability to carry out the essential functions of the
job, including standing or walking the entire shift
and lifting 30 to 50 pounds frequently; work
overtime as required.
Various positions open.
Rate of pay $8.10/hr - $9.92/hr
Work locations: South San Francisco & Daly City
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)921-2071
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258371
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hero International, 1375 Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Onyx Style, Inc, DE. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Adil Waliuddin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258314
The following person is doing business
as: Veggiebellie.com, 137 15th Ave. SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary McInnis,
same address and Maggie Foard, 265
Portola St. Pk. Rd., La Honda, CA 94020
. The business is conducted by a Gener-
al Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/30/13.
/s/ Mary McInnis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
23 Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
ÅCASE# CIV 524921
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya
Proposed name: Alfred Tio
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
20, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/04/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/31/2013
(Published, 11/14/13, 11/21/2013,
11/28/2013, 12/05/2013)
CASE# CIV 525114
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Forest Arthur Darrenougue
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Forest Darrenougue filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
a) Present name: Forest Arthur Darre-
nougue
a) Propsed Name: Forest Arthur Darren
b) Present name: Annette Michelle Dar-
renougue
b) Propsed Name: Annette Michelle Dar-
ren
c) Present name: Nataliya Darrenougue
c) Propsed Name: Natalie Darren
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 16,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/21/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/18/2013
(Published, 11/28/13, 12/05/2013,
12/12/2013, 12/19/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257966
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Lolita, 650 El Camino Real, #B,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Lolita,
650 El Camino Real, #B, MENLO PARK,
CA 94025. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258092
The following person is doing business
as: Tokyo Sushi & Bar, 2278 Westbor-
ough Blvd, Ste. 201B, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: New
Shanghai Restaurant, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Cindy Zhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258368
The following person is doing business
as: Green Acres Express Market and
Produce, 3800 El Camino Real, 3800 El
Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary and Evlin, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Gabriel Kholry/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258184
The following person is doing business
as: Diva Chic Salon, 4060 S. El Camino
Real, Ste A, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Melissa B. Dunlap, 304 Castilian Way,
San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Melissa B. Dunlap /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258401
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Realty World, 2) Gold Leaf Real
Estate, 724 B Linden Ave., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Linda D. Lowe,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Linda D. Lowe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258119
The following person is doing business
as: Alana’s Cafe, 1408 Burlingame Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Too Tarts,
LLC. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/05/2002.
/s/ Teresa Lindhartsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258490
The following person is doing business
as: Rodriguez Auto Mechanic, 1034 S.
Claremont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Arsenio I. Rodriguez, 2727 Edi-
son St., Apt. 217, San Mateo, CA 94403.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
11/13/2013.
/s/ Arsenio I. Rodriguez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258254
The following person is doing business
as: Changes in Latitude Travel, 780 Sea
Spray Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michelle Smith-Ong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Michelle Smith-Ong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258255
The following person is doing business
as: Cardinal Associates/ Larson Tax
Service, 1799 Bayshore Hwy., Ste. 200,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Christo-
pher Ong, 780 Sea Spray Ln., #312,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94010. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Christopher Ong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258423
The following person is doing business
as:Burlingame Orthodontics, 500 Prim-
rose Rd., Ste #1, OAKLAND, CA 94611
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Victor S. Lee, DDS, Inc., same
address. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 11/06/2013.
/s/ VictorLee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258489
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Chiropractic Neurology,
177 Bovet Road, Suite 150, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Katherine McDer-
mont, 2359 Clipper Street, San Mateo
94403. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
10/16/2013.
/s/ Katherine R. McDermont /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258435
The following person is doing business
as: 1.) Nobleme, 2.) Poetic Justus, 134
Channing Road, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Designing A Difference, LLC,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN.
/s/Rebecca Cahia/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258597
The following person is doing business
as: Numgaway Carpet Cleaning & Jani-
tora, 110 Arroyo Ave., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Nemorio
Numgaway and Luz Marina Nungaway,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Nemorio Numgaway /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258529
The following person is doing business
as: House of Color San Bruno, 471 El
Camino Real, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: M & LMD Cerda Incorporated,
CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Cerda /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258526
The following person is doing business
as: Fitness 1119, 1119 South B St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Thomas Werbe
and Carlynn, 1850 Parkwood Dr., San
Mateo, CA 94402. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Thomas Werbe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258475
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Creative Touch Catering, 2495
S. Delaware, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
San Mateo County Exposition and Fair
Association, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ Chris Carpenter /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/28/13, 12/05/13, 12/12/13, 12/19/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Nov. 15, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
FARE RESTAURANT GROUP, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1480 El Camino Real
BELMONT, CA 94002-3910
Type of license applied for:
41-On Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 21, 28, December 5, 2013
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ512083
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Jean P Barba, aka Jean Z
Barba, aka Jean Paul, an Individual; and
Does 1-100 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
203 Public Notices
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748, Edit
Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) Feb. 24, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 14, 21, 28, December 5,
2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ507553
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Leslie M. Murphy, aka
Maureen Murphy Leslie, aka Leslie M
Guttentag, an Individual; and Does 1-100
inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
203 Public Notices
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748, Edit
Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(818)534-3100
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 9, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 28 December 5, 12, 19, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both SOLD!
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both SOLD!
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
24
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
302 Antiques
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 SOLD!
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
304 Furniture
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258246
The following person is doing business
as: Empowered Presence Coaching, 221
S. Fremont St.,Apt 312,SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lauri Smith, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN om
09/21/2010.
/s/ Lauri Smith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $350 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
306 Housewares
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, SOLD!
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
310 Misc. For Sale
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm (650)348-6428
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 (650)348-6428
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
25 Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Nature
photographer’s
lens
6 __ facie
11 Dells, at times
14 Steer clear of
15 Charged
16 Impressed
reaction
17 Wright
20 “Far out!”
21 Begins
22 Soothing
application
23 Dupes
26 One getting a
share
27 Rite
33 North Carolina’s
__ Banks
34 “America” soloist
in “West Side
Story”
35 Hardy heroine
36 They may be
dusted
37 Indication of
freshness?
41 Weasel relative
42 Feudal lord
43 Right
47 Theater
sweepings
48 Drops from the
staff
49 Like most pets
50 Showy neckwear
54 Actress Carrere
57 Write
61 End of a texter’s
amusing
comment,
perhaps
62 Paramount
output
63 Mazda two-
seater
64 Cornerstone
abbr.
65 Comets, long ago
66 With 12-Down,
exile site
DOWN
1 Bryn __ College
2 Reebok rival
3 Ham at a party,
say
4 Tease
5 Norfolk, Va.,
campus
6 Phone in a play,
e.g.
7 Uncommon
8 Privy to
9 Rover’s turf
10 Four-wheeler,
briefly
11 Common
allergen
12 See 66-Across
13 Sleep on it
18 __ Hashanah
19 “Othello” villain
24 Metal bearers
25 Big name in ATMs
26 Doc bloc
27 Sleep on it
28 Peach or plum
29 __-loading
30 Name on a
historic bomber
31 Closer to being
harvested
32 Little green men
36 “Cash __”: TV
game show
37 Set of Web pages
38 Under
39 Scotch bottle
datum
40 Soup veggie
41 Many AARP
members: Abbr.
42 Loose
43 John of
“Necessary
Roughness”
44 Turbulence
45 52-Down victim
46 Computer input
47 Stone marker
50 Bit that can be
split
51 Cantabria-born
golfer, familiarly
52 Slayer of 45-
Down
53 Till fill
55 Kappa preceder
56 Shrinking sea
58 Latin trio word
59 Worker at
home
60 Haberdashery
item
By David W. Cromer
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/28/13
11/28/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
318 Sports Equipment
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. Please call
(650)283-6997
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY
SEPT 30
8am-1pm
1750 GUM
STREET
SAN MATEO
Vintage items, lots of glass
ware, and much more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252 SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each (650)365-5530
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
513 Investment Property
REAL PROPERTY EXCHANGE - Owner
of an 8-unit apartment building with
swimming pool and on-site laundry in
quiet Gridley, California, will trade for
property in San Mateo County. All 8 of
these 2Bed/2Bath apartments are re-
cently remodeled, and provide steady in-
come. Contact (650)726-4140.
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
27 Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
28
Thursday • Nov. 28, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR

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