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Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 1












Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report
Tarena Ruff
Georgia Southern University












Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 2



Executive Summary
The Language Learning and Technology Support Center is a technology facility located
on the Miami Dade College InterAmerican Campus in Miami, Florida. The center combines
three important functions to ensure the academic success of English for Academic Purposes
(EAP) students: student advisement, English speaking and listening instruction and tutoring.
The goals of the center are to foster the ability of English languages learners to
demonstrate knowledge and skills in the use of technology, assist English language learners in
using technology tools for the development of language skills, promote technology access for the
development of skills required to complete general education courses, and provide technology
training for EAP faculty and staff.
The center successfully meets its goal of providing a comfortable space for EAP students
to cultivate their English language learning abilities and adequate technology to support the
development of technological competencies. However, more professional development is needed
to implement effective technology integration within the curriculum. It is recommended that the
center maximize the available technology to enhance the technological competencies of its
participants. The students observed in this study could benefit from instructional workshops and
learning activities that require the utilization of productivity, multimedia development and
presentation software, as most students surveyed do not use technology for functions related to
academic functions or career preparation. To reinforce basic technology skills through lab
activities, the center could offer professional development workshops on a monthly basis to
strengthen the technology skills of the faculty, lab instructors and lab tutors.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 3



Organizational Chart
The organizational structure of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services
Center constitutes a three-prong approach that addresses student advisement, instructional and
lab maintenance needs.
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Method
Data was collected over a series of visits to observe the centers technology activities and
interview technology center personnel (see Appendix A). Visits to the center were conducted
over a course of three days during the 2013 fall term. Electronic surveys were distributed to 100
technology center participants (see Appendix B). Interviews were conducted with three of the



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 4



key technology center administrators: the discipline department chairperson and technology
center director, the academic advisor and the associate instructor. Each interview was conducted
face-to-face with the technology center evaluator, and in a private to semi-private location.
Additional information was obtained from the Miami Dade College Student Achievement
Initiatives website (http://www.mdc.edu/sai/about-us/default.aspx).
Center Context and Goals
History of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center. The
Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center officially launched on August 27,
2013. Formerly known simply as the Language Lab, the design of the Language Learning
Support and Technology Services Center was influenced by the Colleges Student Achievement
Initiatives. The Student Achievement Initiatives (SAI) are the result of the collaborative efforts
of faculty, staff and administrators that reflect upon the experience of academic personnel and
the needs of students.
Focus groups, town halls and planning retreats were held to delineate the key elements of
college student success. The key goals of the Student Achievement Initiatives are to increase
student retention, degree completion and course enrollment, while decreasing the time needed to
complete developmental educational courses generally taken by EAP students.
Using research from a Title V grant awarded to the College (2008 2013), a corpus-
informed, content-based language-learning curriculum was developed to tie English language
learning to content from common postsecondary general education courses. Content-based



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 5



instruction is defined as the concurrent teaching of academic subject matter and second language
skills (Brinton et al., 2003).
Based on course descriptions and the professional opinions of general education faculty
at the College, it was determined that basic technology literacy is a prerequisite for successful
completion of postsecondary general education courses. In a survey issued to EAP students,
69% of the respondents indicated that they rarely or had never performed mathematic
calculations using a spreadsheet application; 59% rarely, or had never accessed library resources
and services online; and 56% rarely or had never produced a multimedia project.
Language proficiency and technology literacy are intertwined skills that are prerequisites
to full participation in academic programs of study (TESOL Technology Standards, 2008;
Warschauer & Liaw, 2010). The TESOL Technology Standards (2008), gleaned from practice
and research, focus on how English language teachers, teacher educators, and administrators can
and should use technology in and out of the classroom. These standards build upon concepts
researched by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and the National
Educational Technology Standards (NETS); however, TESOL Technology Standards have a
strong focus on pedagogy specific to English language learning and teaching, and intends to
clarify the difference between simple use of technology and technology literacy. It is upon the
foundation of these research findings and technology standards that the Language Learning
Support and Technology Services Center was formed.
Mission of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center. The
Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center supports English for Academic



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 6



Purposes (EAP) students efforts in developing their linguistic abilities to perform various
academic tasks and use the technologies required to achieve these tasks. The center provides a
place for EAP students to practice audio-lingual and conversational skills with the use of audio,
video, and multimedia learning materials to improve speech and listening.
Goals of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center. The
Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center will successfully address the need
for language learning and technology literacy development by focusing on goals supported by
the TESOL Technology Standards for English language learners. The key stakeholders are
potential, new, and current EAP/ESL students, faculty, staff, potential employers, higher
education institutions and the Colleges administrative personnel (president, vice-president,
provost, discipline chairpersons).
Goal 1: Foster the ability of English language learners to demonstrate foundational
knowledge and skills in technology for a multilingual world.
Goal 2: Assist English language learners with the effective use of technology-based tools
as aids in the development of language learning competence as part of formal instruction
and for further learning.
Goal 3: Promote access to technology and/or technology tools that allow English
language learners to develop the academic English required for successful completion of
postsecondary general education courses.
Goal 4: Provide training in pedagogical technology use for EAP tutors, EAP lab
instructors, EAP faculty, and general education faculty and program staff.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 7



Key Personnel. The Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center is
operated by three full time staff members, who are under the leadership of the ESL/Foreign
Language Department Chairperson. Student assistants and English language tutors work on a
part-time basis. The operation of the center is implemented through a team approach, whereby
each function of the center is managed by the three full time staff members.
The Academic Advisor manages the academic advisement services to ESL/EAP students.
The Academic Advisor performs new student orientations, manages registration functions and
makes recommendations for additional tutoring services based on student performance
outcomes.
The Academic Lab Manager oversees the administrative functions of the center and
recommends technology hardware and software purchases and ensures that the computer
workstations and laptops are updated frequently.
The Associate Instructor manages English language instruction. The Associate Instructor
conducts speech-listening classes and assists students with performance-based learning activities.
Job Titles and Descriptions
Department Chairperson, ESL & Foreign Languages. The Department Chairperson
provides academic leadership to the ESL & Foreign Languages Department and serves as an
integral member of the administrative team. This individual facilitates learning, quality teaching,
scholarship, and services. The Department Chairperson also provides support and advice in the
collective bargaining process.




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 8



Minimum Requirements
Masters Degree in TESOL, Foreign Language or related discipline and five (5) years
of relevant work experience in higher education and/or teaching
Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Supervises the development and/or revision of curricula, and implements instructional
programs
Develops course schedules and faculty assignments
Hires, supervises, and evaluates personnel
Prepares and maintains departmental budgets
Ensures the effective implementation of the faculty advancement processes
Provides program information and ensures the availability of advisement services
Participates in the development and implementation of policies, procedures, and
guidelines
Resolves issues and problems that may arise with faculty, staff, and students
Provides training opportunities for employees
Maintains Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accreditation compliance
Teaches at least one (1) course within the discipline per academic year
Associate Instructor. The Associate Instructor provides academic and student service
assistance to students, faculty, and administrators in support of the operations of the ESL &
Foreign Languages department.




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 9



Minimum Requirements
Bachelors degree in Education and three (3) years of work experience in an
academic setting
Bilingual in Spanish/English
Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Supervises part-time support personnel
Facilitates faculty involvement with student support services functions
Serves as liaison to internal and external support service units (e.g. Testing, Outreach,
Admissions, Financial Aid, New Student Center, etc.)
Facilitates outreach and recruitment activities
Represents the department in relevant campus and college wide initiatives (e.g.
appeals, retention, petitions, etc.)
Coordinates and oversees general student services initiatives (i.e. registration,
advising, mentoring, and enrollment management)
Promotes and helps monitor the professional development of unit personnel
Enhances the units quality by consistently implementing best practices that promote
increased effectiveness and efficiency of the unit
Academic Lab Manager. The Academic Lab Manager manages and coordinates the day-
to-day operations, and supports the EAP lab curriculum competencies for speech, writing, and
language labs.




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 10



Minimum Requirements
Bachelors degree in a related field from a regionally accredited institution and four
(4) years of related experience; or Masters degree in a related field
Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Manages and coordinates the day-to-day operations
Hires and supervises part-time program personnel and lab instructors
Prepares payroll
Establishes instructional objectives, timeliness prescriptions, and assessments
Participates in the development and coordination of curriculum for EAP lab courses
for writing, grammar, speech, and accent reduction
Reviews purchased instructional software programs and hardware
Develops online learning opportunities
Tracks and evaluates student performance
Generates and maintains accurate inventory records of departmental textbooks,
faculty desk copies, instructional materials, and office supplies
Conducts on-going program review and research concerning products and
technological developments
Provides leadership in activities relating to the programs
Academic Advisor, EAP & Foreign Languages. The Academic Advisor, EAP & Foreign
Languages works with both new and continuing EAP and foreign language students by helping
them define and clarify their educational goals.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 11



Minimum Requirements
Bachelor's degree in related field and three (3) years of related experience to include
some experience advising students
Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Assists students with interpreting placement testing results and course selection
Recommends courses and programs of study for new, continuing and transferring
students
Conducts orientations and workshops
Registers students
Provides information about the college, including admission, registration, and special
programs of study
Refers students to appropriate departments for additional assistance as needed
Provides information about graduation and transfer requirements
Conducts follow-up activities such as classroom visits to provide early registration
assistance and general advisement in order to increase student success and retention
Lab Tutor. The Lab Tutor assists students in developing their written and spoken
communication skills. The Lab Tutor diagnoses students deficiencies in either or both of those
areas, address deficiencies pointed out by students instructors, and assists students in developing
their out-of-class assignments.





Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 12



Minimum Requirements
Bachelor's degree in related field and three (3) years of related experience to include
some experience tutoring ESL/EAP students
Bilingual in Spanish/English
Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Instructs students on how to correct major deficiencies in speech and writing
Assesses students with ESL and EAP attributed writing and speech difficulties and
formulates individualized plans for correcting them through instructor-student
sessions and online tutorials
Aids students in applying high order critical thinking skills to their speeches or essays
Modifies and assesses computer programs, handouts and supplemental materials
Keeps work area and lab presentable, and chairs organized at all times
Assists with equipment checkout responsibilities when necessary
Reorganizes, processes, creates and scans worksheets when asked
Student Assistant. The student assistant performs administrative work involving support
for the academic advisor and lab manager and provides assistance to new, prospective, and
continuing students in admissions, records and registration functions.
Minimum Requirements
Associates of Arts Degree in related field from a regionally accredited institution or
two (2) years of experience in responsible related clerical work, preferably in a large
office environment; or equivalent combination of experience and education



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 13



Essential Duties and Responsibilities
Assists students and with basic interpretation and explanation of complex college
policy, procedures, state rules and statutes
Meets with students, customers, or co-workers referred who are experiencing
problems or need to express complaints
Troubleshoots and assists students with problems or questions about web registration,
student account management, Internet resources for student information, printing of
class schedules, and resolves admissions and registration issues
Refers students to supervisors, departments, and program areas
Center Activities
The purpose of the Language Learning and Technology Support Services Center is to
implement authentic, communicative activities to facilitate the development of speaking/listening
skills and technology competency for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) students. To reach
the stated goals of retention, completion and reduced time in developmental education courses,
the following activities are offered by the Language Learning and Technology Support Services
Center.
Speech/Listening Lab Classes. EAP students must co-register for Speech/Listening
Lecture and Speech/Listening Lab classes. The Speech/Listening Lab classes are performed in
the center to further emphasize the skills learned in the lecture classes. Online battery lessons
deployed from a learning management system that support the development of pronunciation
skills can be accessed at the center or off-site. During lab time, students practice these speech



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 14



and listening skills with the lab instructor, and may receive tutoring and assistance with
technology tools from lab tutors for project-based learning activities, podcasting, social
networking and learning management systems.
Technology Literacy Workshops. Upon intake, EAP students new to the college will
receive New Student Orientation, where they are given instructions on navigating the electronic
registration system. Student who are unable to navigate the electronic registration system are
referred to a technology literacy workshop by the academic advisor. These workshops are
designed to measure students competencies in hardware and software usage. Students who need
guided support will receive instruction in basic technology, networking and Internet research at
the center.
Conversational Practice. The layout of the center provides an inviting and casual place
to practice conversational English. Any EAP student who wishes to spend time working on their
conversation skills can come to the center, check out laptops or use their mobile devices to
practice speech and listening skills. Students are able to access computer applications that help
with pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary.
Professional Development. In the near future, Professional Development Workshops will
be conducted at the Center for EAP faculty to enhance their technology skills and improve
technology integration within the curriculum.
Evaluation
The four stated goals of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center
are as follows:



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 15



Goal 1: Foster the ability of English language learners to demonstrate
foundational knowledge and skills in technology for a multilingual world.
Goal 2: Assist English language learners with the effective use of technology-
based tools as aids in the development of language learning competence as part of
formal instruction and for further learning.
Goal 3: Promote access to technology and/or technology tools that allow English
language learners to develop the academic English required for successful
completion of postsecondary general education courses.
Goal 4: Provide training in pedagogical technology use for EAP tutors, EAP lab
instructors, EAP faculty, and general education faculty and program staff.
The three-prong approach of combing advising, tutoring and instructional services in a
central location is the strength of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services
Center. The streamlined process of accessing students academic needs and providing the needed
instruction and tutoring is a successful one that increases the likelihood of student retention and
graduation. When key staff members are in close proximity, it makes communicating the needs
of the students, and prescribing the best course of action to improve learning outcomes more
effective. Staff can also observe students progress in developing English language and
technology skills.
The Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center successfully meets its
goal of providing a comfortable and inviting space for ESL/EAP students to foster their English
language learning abilities. According to the electronic survey issued to center participants, 82%



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 16



agree or strongly agree that the center is a relaxing place for study, and 89% agree or strongly
agree that they visit the center frequently to practice English speech (see Chart 1).

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Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 17



The center also meets its goal to promote access to technology and/or technology tools
that allow English language learners the opportunity to develop English language competency.
The center has the required technology components and support needed for EAP students to
complete assignments. Equipped with 20 PCs and 20 laptops loaded with the latest productivity
software (i.e. Microsoft Office Suite) and wireless Internet access (see Appendix D) to make
connecting with mobile devices effortless, 83% of EAP students surveyed agree or strongly
agree that the center has the technology needed to complete assignments. Eighty-two percent
(82.2%) of the EAP students surveyed frequently visit the center to work on assignments, and
92.3% agree or strongly agree that the lab staff is helpful.
Although the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center identifies
training and professional development in pedagogical technology use for EAP tutors, EAP lab
instructors, EAP faculty, and general education faculty and program staff as a goal, it was not
apparent by the observation of the center and the interview responses that this goal has been met.
Understandably, the center is still in its infancy stage, and is a work in progress. However, there
seems to be a slight disconnection between what the ESL/Foreign Language faculty and staff
members view as significant and valuable activities, and the technology competency needs of the
students served by the center. In a survey issued to ESL/Foreign Language faculty, advisors, and
lab instructors, 100% believed that conversation practice is the most important instructional
activity. Only 57.9% believe that technology workshops are important (see Chart 2).
Furthermore, only 1 respondent believes that the center should be used for project-based learning
activities that build students technology skills.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 18




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Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 19



The use of technology for academic-based functions is a skill that is lacking, based on the
survey issued to center participants. Although most students have access to computers, mobile
devices, and the Internet (either at home or at school), most students do not use technology for
functions related to education or career preparation. The top three daily tasks students perform
with computers are communicating through email (50.6%), using social media (34.1%) and
listening to music (27.8%). Sixty-nine percent (69.4%) of the students surveyed rarely or never
perform calculations using spreadsheets, 59% rarely or never produce multimedia projects, 56%
rarely or never use computers to access library services, 46% rarely or never use word-
processing software, and 40% rarely or never create presentations (see Chart 3).

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Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 20



It is vital that students begin to perform these basic computer tasks more frequently. In
order to meet the goal of assisting English language learners with the effective use of
technology-based tools as aids in the development of language learning competence as part of
formal instruction and for further learning, faculty and staff must be willing to integrate
technology use in the ESL/Foreign language curriculum more often and more effectively.
Recommendations
As a result of extensive observation, it is recommended that the Language Learning
Support and Technology Services Center maximize the available technology to enhance the
technological competencies of its participants by reinforcing basic technology skills through lab
activities. Lab instructors could also take advantage of the students knowledge and experience
with mobile devices, such as smart phones and tablets (see Chart 4), by recording lectures and
creating podcasts. Moreover, students would benefit from instructional workshops in the use of
productivity and multimedia development software, Web 2.0 applications and learning
management systems. Professional development workshops could be offered on a monthly basis
to strengthen the technology skills of the faculty, lab instructors and lab tutors.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 21





Additional recommendations include:
I. Language Learning Support and Technology Services Set-up
a. The facility should utilize its ergonomic seating and movable desks and tables
to enhance one-to-one tutoring and small group instruction using tablets.
II. Technology Workshops for Faculty and Students
83.1
82.8
64.4
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48.9
24.1
22.9
16.9
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33.4
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Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 22



a. Training and development of technology skills for faculty, staff and students
could include workshops and class projects using the following mobile
applications:
i. Prezi or Scrollshow for professional presentations
ii. VoiceThread for speech practice
iii. Book Creator for writing projects
b. Workshops should be centered on course material and the development of
computer skills.
c. Suggested activities for pedagogical technology use
i. Learning portfolios published as blogs using Blogsy
ii. Feedback on students written work using Notability
iii. Evaluation of and support with written works using Subtext
iv. Formative assessments during tutorial sessions using Socrative
v. Explain Everything for student-created and tutor-created
presentations
III. Virtual Lab Sessions
a. Similar to the concept of the flipped classroom, virtual lab sessions will
consist of face-to-face and distance learning components, with course
content being available on Edmodo, the Angel Learning Management
System, or any chosen LMS.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 23



b. Students can access the course material on their own time, review at their
own pace, and collaborate with peers and tutors.
c. If students need further clarification on a subject or concept, they will
have the ability to ask for assistance from lab tutors/instructors and their
peers onsite at the facility, or off-site via the chosen LMS.




















Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 24



Appendix A
Interview Questions
Q1.
Q2.
Q3.
Q4.
Q5.
Q6.

Q7.

Q8.

Q9.
What is the mission of the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center?
What are its goals?
What are the activities provided?
Who is the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center intended for?
What are the benefits to the students, staff and faculty?
What need(s) did the Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center
address?
Compared to the previous set-up, what are the pros and cons of the Language Learning
Support and Technology Services Center?
What do you like and/or dislike about the Language Learning Support and Technology
Services Center?
What needs improvement?





Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 25



Appendix B
Technology Use and Assessment Survey Results
The purpose of this survey is to identify the technology needs of EAP students and to determine
student satisfaction with the Language Learning and Technology Support Center. The feedback
provided will help the center deliver the best student services possible. The survey has thirteen
questions and should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
1. Do you have a computer at home?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Yes 93.9% 93
No 6.1% 6
answered question 99
skipped question 1

2. If you have a computer at home, is this computer connected to the Internet?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Yes 92.0% 92
No 6.0% 6
Not applicable 2.0% 2
answered question 100
skipped question 0

3. If you have Internet access at home, how do you connect to it?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Local Area Network (LAN) 29.5% 28
Broadband/High Speed/Cable Modem 46.3% 44
Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) 7.4% 7
Dial-Up 1.1% 1
I don't know 11.6% 11
Other (please specify) 4.2% 4
answered question 95
skipped question 5



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 26



4. When you use a computer with an Internet connection, where do you use it?
(Multiple answers allowed. Select all that apply.)
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Home 92.0% 92
Relative's Home 12.0% 12
Friend's Home 21.0% 21
School 61.0% 61
Library 20.0% 20
Work 23.0% 23
None available 0.0% 0
Not applicable 0.0% 0
answered question 100
skipped question 0

5. How often do you use a computer?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Never 0.0% 0
Rarely 4.0% 4
Monthly 1.0% 1
Weekly 14.0% 14
Everyday 81.0% 81
Not applicable 0.0% 0
answered question 100
skipped question 0

6. How long have you been using a computer?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Less than 1 year 1.0% 1
1 year 10.0% 10
5 years 46.0% 46
10 years 7.0% 7
More than 10 years 35.0% 35
Not applicable 1.0% 1
answered question 100
skipped question 0




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 27



7. How often do you use a computer to complete the following tasks?
Answer Options Daily
Almost
Daily
Weekly Monthly Rarely Never
Response
Count
Play Games 4 4 2 3 19 51 83
Watch movies & TV
shows
12 10 21 6 27 9 85
Listen to music 25 20 24 2 14 5 90
Communicate through
email
45 14 24 1 4 1 89
Use social media 31 24 10 2 15 9 91
Use chat rooms 10 11 8 8 21 27 85
Search for information
on the web
48 29 11 3 3 1 95
Create presentations 11 9 17 16 18 18 89
Produce multimedia
projects
9 8 11 7 25 27 87
Use a word processing
program
7 10 19 9 18 21 84
Perform calculations
with spreadsheets
4 7 12 3 22 37 85
Use tutorials/drill and
practice software
10 7 15 8 22 24 86
Take practice tests and
quizzes
9 12 36 11 15 8 91
Attend an online class 11 8 12 7 8 43 89
Access library services 7 10 9 11 26 22 85
answered question 100
skipped question 0

8. Do you have a portable computer device such as a laptop or tablet (i.e. iPad,
Chromebook, etc.)?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Yes 83.0% 78
No 14.9% 14
I don't know 2.1% 2
answered question 94
skipped question 6




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 28



9. How often do you use a portable computer device to complete the following tasks?
Answer
Options
Daily
Almost
Daily
Weekly Monthly Rarely Never
Response
Count
Play Games 4 4 5 3 18 49 83
Watch movies
& TV shows
17 11 12 6 21 18 85
Listen to music 25 11 16 8 9 12 81
Communicate
through email
40 17 16 5 5 6 89
Send and
receive text
messages
40 20 7 4 6 9 86
Use social
media
30 17 8 4 6 15 80
Search for
information on
the web
47 18 10 3 3 7 88
Create
presentations
11 8 7 10 24 23 83
Produce
multimedia
projects
7 6 12 3 22 31 81
Word process a
document
7 8 15 11 19 23 83
Perform
calculations
with
spreadsheets
5 3 10 5 23 31 77
Use
tutorials/drill
and practice
software
3 11 9 6 24 29 82
Take practice
tests and
quizzes
6 13 17 12 17 20 85
Attend an online
class
6 6 10 7 13 42 84
Access library
services
8 6 8 8 22 31 83
answered question 92
skipped question 8



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 29



10. Do you have a smart phone?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Yes 78.0% 71
No 22.0% 20
I don't know 0.0% 0
answered question 91
skipped question 9

11. How often do you use your smart phone to complete the following tasks?
Answer Options Daily
Almost
Daily
Weekly Monthly Rarely Never
Response
Count
Phone calls 74 4 0 0 1 10 89
Send/Receive texts 72 2 1 0 2 10 87
Communicate by
email
56 12 5 1 2 11 87
Post on
Twitter/Facebook
38 7 10 3 8 20 86
Take photos 43 16 12 3 4 10 88
Record a video 20 7 13 15 11 17 83
Play games 19 4 7 0 17 36 83
Watch movies &
TV shows
14 8 9 6 20 26 83
Listen to music 35 17 6 1 10 13 82
Search the web for
information
46 13 9 2 2 11 83
Other Interactive apps (please specify) 1
answered question 89
skipped question 11

12. Have you used the Language Learning and Technology Support Center this semester?
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Yes 92.5% 86
No 7.5% 7
answered question 93
skipped question 7



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 30



13. If you have been to the Language Learning and Technology Support Center please rate
your experience.
Answer Options
Strongly
Agree
Agree Neutral Disagree
Strongly
Disagree
Response
Count
I like the layout of the lab. 40 42 3 0 0 85
I visit the lab frequently to
work on assignments.
36 38 14 1 1 90
I visit the lab frequently to
practice my English
speech.
40 40 7 2 0 89
I visit the lab frequently to
get help with using
technology.
32 23 26 7 0 88
The lab is a relaxing place
for me to study.
45 30 12 4 0 91
The lab has the
technology I need to
complete assignments.
41 32 11 3 1 88
The lab staff is helpful. 50 33 6 1 0 90
The furniture is the lab is
comfortable.
53 27 5 1 1 87
I can concentrate on my
class assignments in the
lab.
43 32 8 4 0 87
answered question 93
skipped question 7











Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 31



Appendix C
Prioritizing Instructional, Tutoring and Advising Activities Survey Results
1. Please indicate your role in the department of ESL/FL.
Answer Options Response Percent Response Count
Faculty 66.7% 12
Advisor 5.6% 1
Lab instructor 5.6% 1
Administrator 22.2% 4
answered question 18
skipped question 1

2. Rate the importance of instructional activities that are (or could be) provided by the
Language Lab. Specifics regarding the alignment of lab instruction and lecture classes will
be planned at a future date.

Answer Options Important Neutral Unimportant
Rating
Average
Response
Count
Conversation practice 19 0 0 3.00 19
Oral proficiency
testing
14 5 0 2.74 19
Diagnostic testing 13 6 0 2.68 19
Learning outcomes
assessment
12 6 1 2.58 19
Small group (5-8) lab
instruction
18 1 0 2.95 19
Large group (20+)
lab instruction
4 10 3 2.06 17
Online lab modules 9 10 0 2.47 19
Practice presentations 12 4 2 2.56 18
Self-recording
(practice interviews,
presentations)
12 7 0 2.63 19
Writing lab 16 2 0 2.89 18
Other (please specify) 1
answered question 19
skipped question 0




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 32



3. Rate the importance of tutoring activities that are (or could be) provided by the
Language Lab.

Answer Options Important Neutral Unimportant
Rating
Average
Response
Count
Movie/TV viewing and
language practice
13 4 1 2.67 18
Practice presentations 12 5 1 2.61 18
Writing lab 17 2 0 2.89 19
Peer tutoring 9 8 1 2.44 18
1:1 tutoring 17 2 0 2.89 19
PERT orientation
workshops (prep is
offered by Computer
Courtyard)
15 2 2 2.68 19
Technology workshops 11 7 1 2.53 19
Other (please specify) 4
answered question 19
skipped question 0
4. Rate the importance of advising activities that are (or could be) provided in the
Language Lab.

Answer Options Important Neutral Unimportant
Rating
Average
Response
Count
1:1 Advising 16 1 2 2.74 19
Small group (5-8)
advising
16 1 2 2.74 19
Larger group (20+)
advising
4 8 5 1.94 17
Orientations 10 5 3 2.39 18
Registration 12 4 3 2.47 19
Other (please specify) 4
answered question 19
skipped question 0




Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 33



Appendix D

Technology Checklist

Hardware & Peripherals Yes No Comments
Are there adequate computer workstations available?
Is a printer available for student use?

Students are
referred to another
facility for this
function.
Is a copier available for student use?

Students are
referred to another
facility for this
function.
Is a scanner available for student use?

Students are
referred to another
facility for this
function.
Are computer workstations equipped with DVD/CD
players?


Are computer workstations equipped with DVD/CD
burners?


Does the center have adequate presentation tools
(Smart Board, projector, plasma screens, etc.)
Equipment has
been ordered, not
yet installed.
Software Yes No Comments
Are operating systems up to date?
Is productivity software (i.e. Microsoft Office Suite)
installed on all workstations?


Is language-learning software installed on all
workstations?

The department
chairperson is
evaluating new
software
applications.



Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 34



Is there other instructional software installed on all
workstations?

The department
chairperson is
evaluating new
software
applications.
Is the latest version of the most popular web
browsers (i.e. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google
Chrome, etc.) installed on all workstations?


Is the latest version of Internet plug-ins (Adobe
Flash, Java, RealPlayer etc.,) installed on all
workstations?


Network Connectivity Yes No Comments
Are all workstations connected to the Internet?
Is wireless Internet access available?
Is network access password-protected?







Running Head: Language Learning Support and Technology Services Center Report 35



References

Brinton, D., Snow, M. and Wesche, M. (2003). Content-based second language instruction. Ann
Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Healey, D., Hegelheimer, V., Hubbard, P., Ioannou-Georgiou, S., Kessler, G. and Ware, P.
(2008). TESOL technology standards framework. Alexandria, VA: Teachers of English
to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. Retrieved from
http://www.tesol.org/docs/books/bk_technologystandards_framework_721.pdf
Miami Dade College (2012). Student achievement initiatives. Retrieved from
http://www.mdc.edu/sai/about-us/
Warschauer, M. and Liaw, M-L. (2010). Emerging technologies in adult literacy and Language
Education. National Institute for Literacy, Washington, DC 2006. Retrieved from
https://lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/technology_paper_2010.pdf