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Seasons Lab Stations Station 1: Lamp, globe, and remote thermometers Make sure that each person has

a chance to operate the surface thermometer.

1. What temperature did you get while the laser was pointed at the Equator?

2. What temperature did you get at the North Pole? At the South Pole?

3. How do the temperatures compare?

4. Explain the differences in temperatures based on how the light hits those places on the globe.

5. Which area receives the most direct sunlight? What evidence do you have?

6. What happens to the temperature as the sunlight is more indirect?

Station 2: Sun Angle and Surface Temperature Make sure each person is involved with the sun angle apparatus. Place your paper underneath the apparatus to trace.
1. Draw the circle that is created by the 90O sun angle.

2. Draw the circle/oval that is created by the 60O sun angle.

3. Draw the circle/oval that is created by the 30O sun angle.

4. How do the three areas compare?

5. Which angle might represent how the sun strikes the Equator?

6. Which angle might represent how the sun strikes the poles?

7. Based on Stations 1 & 2 (answer after youve completed both), which hypothesis is correct (circle the statement): -1. sun angle has no effect on surface temperatures -2. sun angle causes surface temperatures to be warmer at the equator than at the poles -3. sun angle causes surface temperatures to be warmer at the poles than at the equator -4. Its not the sun angle that is important, but rather the distance between the sun and the earth.

Explain using your evidence why that choice is the most accurate.

Station 3: Seasons Globe 1. Turn the globe using the dial. Turn it so that the months going in order. Which direction does Earth rotate (spin on its axis-clockwise or counterclockwise)?

2. Turn the dial so that the date is on June 21. Turn the globe so that Iowa is facing you. This is summer in Iowa; which hemisphere is tilted toward you-the Northern or Southern?

3. Turn the dial so that the date is on December 21. Turn the globe so that Iowa is facing you. This is winter in Iowa; which hemisphere is tilted toward you-the Northern or Southern?

4. Turn the dial so that the date is on March 21. Turn the globe so that Iowa is facing you. This is spring in Iowa; which

hemisphere is tilted toward you-the Northern, Southern, or neither?

5. Turn the dial so that the date is on September 21. Turn the globe so that Iowa is facing you. This is spring in Iowa; which hemisphere is tilted toward you-the Northern, Southern, or neither?

6. Label the seasons below based on your findings. Remember, you represent the sun.

7. What appears to be the cause of seasons? Explain using your evidence from all three stations.

Class Seasons Globe Demo:


Postville will be lined up on the left edge of the box. That represents 6:00 am. Each longitude line represents on hour. As the globe is turned, we can stop it so it is the current time by counting time that passes through the right side. 1. If the date is set at Dec. 21, what time does it get dark?

2. What countries (states, etc.) during this time appear to have 24 hours of darkness?

3. If the date is set to June 21, what time does it get dark?

4. What countries (states, etc.) during this time appear to have 24 hours of daylight?

5. How does the amount of daylight change as we go from winter to summer?

6. How does the tilt of the Earth affect this?