www.smdailyjournal.

com
DID ISON SURVIVE?
NATION PAGE 7
PANTHERS’
SEASON ENDS
SPORTS PAGE 11
ELBA MAKES
‘MANDELA’
WEEKEND PAGE 17
INITIALLY DECLARED DEAD, COMET MAY BE OUT THERE
REUTERS
Shoppers line up with television sets on discount at the Target retail store in Chicago, Ill.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LUKE FAMILY
Durning the Luke family’s year trip around the world, their
adventure included a safari, a tour of the highlands, beaches
and tea plantations.
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The holiday shopping season started
as a marathon, not a sprint.
More than a dozen major U.S. retail-
ers stayed open for 24 hours or more
on Thanksgiving Day through Black
Friday, and crowds formed early and
often over the two days.
About 15,000 people waited for the
flagship Macy’s in New York to open
at 8 p.m. on Thanksgiving. Long
checkout lines formed at the Target in
Colma, Calif., on Friday morning.
And by the time Jessica Astalos was
leaving North Point Mall in
Alpharetta, Ga., after a six-hour buy-
ing binge that started on
Thanksgiving, another wave of shop-
pers was coming in about 5:30 a.m. on
Friday.
“You just have to be out in the midst
of all of it,” said Ricki Moss, who hit
stores near Portland, Ore., at 5:30 a.m.
on Friday. “It’s exciting.”
This year may cement the transfor-
mation of the start of the holiday
shopping season into a two-day affair.
For nearly a decade, Black Friday had
been the official start of the shopping
season between Thanksgiving and
Christmas. It was originally named
Black Friday because it was when
retailers turned a profit, or moved out
of the red and into the black. Retailers
opened early and offered deep dis-
counts.
But in the past few years, store
Shopping marathon
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Shoppers flocked to Hillsdale Shopping Center in San Mateo for Black Friday deals.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Local retail stores joined the
nationwide holiday shift from Black
Friday to Gray Thursday but that did-
n’t keep consumers from also enjoy-
ing the allure of the traditional post-
Thanksgiving Day shopping day.
Stores like Ann Taylor, Express,
Forever 21, Macy’s, Sears and
Starbucks opened at 8 p.m. on
Thanksgiving at Hillsdale Shopping
Center in San Mateo. By Friday, the
‘Gray Thursday’ draws
customers to mall early
A break from
the daily grind
San Carlos family takes year
trip to go around the world
By Kevin Thomas
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
It took a leap of faith for Gigi Luke of San Carlos, her hus-
band Bob Luke and their two boys Jordan and Justin to break
the monotony of the daily grind, reconnect with family and
to live out their dream of traveling around the world in a
year.
Gigi Luke worked for a high-tech company as a senior
manager for 15 years, and Bob Luke was a teacher and
school administrator for 30 years, so they both lived life by
a schedule. Taking care of two boys ages 10 and 14 also
added extra responsibility. Family has always been para-
mount for the Lukes, so when Bob Luke lost his mother to a
stroke in 2010 and Gigi Luke’s mother’s health began to
taper off from Alzheimer’s disease, the couple felt com-
pelled to seize the opportunity and embark on an adventure
because they recognized that life is too short.
They were hardly remembering everything with which
their days were filled, and their kids were growing up before
Resource Area For Teaching’s
executive director retiring
Mary Simon led education center for 20 years
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After 20 years running an organization
that provides hands-on learning
resources to educators looking for cre-
ative ways to inspire their students and
foster critical-thinking skills, Executive
Director Mary Simon is retiring.
The English born and raised Simon Mary Simon
See SIMON, Page 20
See LUKE, Page 8
See SHOPPING, Page 20 See MARATHON, Page 20
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 90
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Singer Billy Idol is
58.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1782
The United States and Britain signed
preliminary peace articles in Paris,
ending the Revolutionary War.
“Facts are stubborn things,
but statistics are more pliable.”
— Mark Twain (1835-1910)
Movie director
Ridley Scott is 76.
Actor-director Ben
Stiller is 48.
Birthdays
REUTERS
An amateur spider keeper, Yegor Konkin, 24, dressed as Santa Claus, watches a venomous Phormictopus antillensis spider
on his head as he prepares for Christmas and New Year performances in Minusinsk, Russia.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. Northeast winds around 5
mph...Becoming west in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the 40s. Light winds.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds around 5 mph in the
morning...Becoming light.
Sunday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid to upper
40s. Northwest winds around 5 mph in the
evening...Becoming light.
Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs around 60.
Monday ni ght: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of rain.
Lows in the 40s.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Aslight chance of showers. Highs
in the lower 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1803, Spain completed the process of ceding Louisiana
to France, which had sold it to the United States.
In 1835, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as
Mark Twain, was born in Florida, Missouri.
I n 1874, British statesman Sir Winston Churchill was born
at Blenheim Palace.
I n 1900, Irish writer Oscar Wilde died in Paris at age 46.
I n 1936, London’s famed Crystal Palace, constructed for
the Great Exhibition of 1851, was destroyed in a fire.
In 1939, the Russo-Finnish War began as Soviet troops
invaded Finland.
In 1962, U Thant of Burma, who had been acting secretary-
general of the United Nations following the death of Dag
Hammarskjold the year before, was elected to a four-year
term.
In 1966, the former British colony of Barbados became
independent.
I n 1981, the United States and the Soviet Union opened
negotiations in Geneva aimed at reducing nuclear weapons in
Europe.
In 1982, the Michael Jackson album “Thriller” was released
by Epic Records.
I n 1988, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co. was declared the
winner of the corporate free-for-all to take over RJR Nabisco
Inc. with a bid of $24.53 billion.
Ten years ago: U.S. soldiers in Iraq fought back coordi-
nated attacks throughout the northern city of Samarra. Two
South Korean contractors were killed in a roadside ambush.
Nathaniel Jones, a black man, died during a fight with
Cincinnati police in a case that heightened racial tensions.
Walt Disney Co. vice chairman Roy E. Disney stepped down
from the board of directors. Mark Philippoussis gave
Australia its 28th Davis Cup title, beating Spain’s Juan
Carlos Ferrero 7-5, 6-3, 1-6, 2-6, 6-0.
Y
o-yo means “come back” in
Tagalog, the native language of
the Philippines. The yo-yo was
a weapon in the Philippines around
1500.
***
Can you name the colors on each side
of an original Rubik’s cube? See
answer at end.
***
The first creatures launched into space
by the United States were mice. Mice
went to space for the first time on Aug.
31, 1950.
***
The buffalo nickel was minted from
1913 to 1938. The coin’s designer was
James Fraser. He thought the buffalo
symbolized the “winning of the
West.” There is a Native American
chief on the opposite side of the coin.
***
The old-fashioned bicycles with the
large front wheel and a tiny rear wheel
are called “penny-farthing” bicycles.
They became popular in the 1870s.
The front wheel was as much as three
times larger in diameter than the rear
wheel. The “safety bicycle,” a bicycle
with both wheels the same size,
replaced the penny-farthing bicycle at
the turn of the century.
***
A maple tree is usually at least 45
years old and 12 inches in diameter
before it is tapped for sap. It takes 10
gallons of sap to make one quart of
maple syrup. A gallon of Pure Maple
Syrup weighs 11 pounds.
***
Many of the sweaters worn by Mr.
Rogers on his television show, Mr.
Rogers’ Neighborhood, were knit by
his real mother.
***
Bubble solution is the best-selling
toy in the world. Make your own bub-
ble solution by mixing equal amounts
of water and liquid dish detergent.
***
Radio Flyer, the company that makes
toy wagons, was named because of the
founder’s fascination with the newly
invented radio and the wonder of
flight. By 1930, Radio Flyer was the
world’s largest producer of wagons.
***
The term “homo sapiens” comes from
the Latin words meaning “wise man.”
***
Out of all possible injuries, profes-
sional football players are most likely
to injure their knees.
***
The white of an egg is called the albu-
men.
***
An average, hen lays 300 to 325 eggs
a year. Ahen starts laying eggs at 19
weeks of age.
***
Walter Matthau (1920-2000) was 6
feet tall at age 11. He began his stage
career at the same age playing bit parts
in Yiddish theater.
***
New Jersey has a spoon museum fea-
turing over 5,400 spoons from every
state and almost every country.
***
La-Z-Boy introduced their first uphol-
stered recliner in 1929.
***
Fred and Barney made a new friend in
the last season of “The Flintstones”
(1960-1966). The Great Gazoo was a
green alien that crashed his UFO in the
town of Bedrock. Gazoo was from the
planet Zetox.
***
Unprosperousness is the longest word
in which every letter occurs at least
twice.
***
The “sixth sick sheik’s sixth sheep’s
sick” is said to be the toughest tongue
twister in the English language.
***
Answer: The original Rubik’s Cube
has sides of red, green, yellow, white,
orange and blue. The whole cube is
made up of six center cubes, eight cor-
ner cubes and 12 edge cubes.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
UPPED STASH SONATA SEESAW
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The oceanography class consisted of —
“SEA” STUDENTS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MULAQ
VELLE
NATLEG
RICNOM
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
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llp
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Print your
answer here:
Lotto
Wednesday:The Daily Derby race winners Hot Shot,
No.3,in first place; Gold Rush,No.1,in second place;
and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:43.44.
3 8 6
27 44 59 74 75 3
Mega number
Nov. 26 Mega Millions
18 25 50 55 57 17
Powerball
Nov. 27 Powerball
8 14 21 34 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 0 1 3
Daily Four
0 8 5
Daily three evening
6 7 30 41 43 11
Mega number
Nov. 27 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Efrem Zimbalist Jr. is 95. Actor Robert Guillaume is
86. Radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy is 83. Country
singer-recording executive Jimmy Bowen is 76. Movie writer-
director Terrence Malick is 70. Rock musician Roger Glover
(Deep Purple) is 68. Playwright David Mamet is 66. Actress
Margaret Whitton is 63. Actor Mandy Patinkin is 61.
Musician Shuggie Otis is 60. Country singer Jeannie Kendall
is 59. Historian Michael Beschloss is 58. Rock musician
John Ashton (The Psychedelic Furs) is 56. Comedian Colin
Mochrie is 56. Former football and baseball player Bo
Jackson is 51. Rapper Jalil (Whodini) is 50.
3
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Everything’s coming up roses in down-
town San Carlos.
Actually, more like impatiens, petunias
and some yet-to-be determined flora.
Thanks to two community-driven efforts
in the last weeks, the city’s hanging bas-
kets and planters are filled with flowers,
greenery and bulbs ready to bring a little
beauty to downtown visitors.
In mid-November, the group San Carlos
Together collected plants and donations to
keep the Laurel Street hanging baskets
blooming all year long between San Carlos
Avenue and Arroyo Street. They have an
internal water drip system but planting and
maintenance are left to volunteers.
Former mayor Tom Davids said the group
recently raised $2,000 which is sufficient to
get through this year’s plantings —
although he said more donations are always
welcome.
“We wouldn’t turn anyone back,” he said.
To call Davids hands-on in the effort is an
understatement. He watches over the 82 bas-
kets, tends to about 40 in his backyard as
need be and replaces them as necessary.
“That’s what happens when you raise your
hand at the right time,” he joked.
As soon as Christmas is over, he’ll be at
it rotating them again.
The Civic Garden Club of San Carlos also
added color to the four planters at Cherry and
Laurel streets as part of its quarterly change-
out, Davids said.
Bulbs planted now mean flowers in the
spring and summer, he said.
The real surprise, he said, is what those
flowers will turn out to be.
Along with the violas and pansies,
Davids said one volunteer offered up 50
unidentified bulbs for planting.
“We have no idea what they are, so it will
be a surprise,” he said.
Joanne Daniels, of the 40-plus member
club, said the bulb’s owner suggested there
might be daffodils but that she and the oth-
ers are looking forward to finding out.
Both planting campaigns are completely
community supported by volunteers and pri-
vate donations. The effort may have started
with the city paying for the first budget but
the onus shifted, Davids said.
“I think they decided if the community
likes it, they are going to pay for it and now
we’ve got a good run and it keeps building,”
he said.
Giving back to the community and creat-
ing something beautiful just makes you feel
good, not to mention helping get the word
out about the clubs, Daniels said.
“We are the City of Good Living and one
of our goals as a club is to contribute and add
enjoyment to the residents and visitors,”
she said. “We’re helping and having a good
time doing it.”
The garden club is even starting plants
that can be later transferred into the baskets
maintained by San Carlos Together.
The group wants to add more baskets and
Davids feels the more, the merrier.
“People really respond. You go out early
in the morning and see people coming by
enjoying it,” he said. “It’s really a commu-
nity project.”
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
All a-bloom in San Carlos
SAN MATEO
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for being under
the influence of a controlled substance on
the 900 block of Cedar Street Monday, Nov.
25.
Petty theft. Asuitcase with jewelry and a
Social Security card was stolen on the first
block of Dennison Creek Road before 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Nov. 24.
Theft. The theft of $100 worth of trading
cards was reported on the 1700 block of
South Delaware Street before 11:26 a.m.
Sunday, Nov. 24.
Mal i ci ous mi s chi ef . Approximately
$500 worth of damage was done to a vehicle
on the 700 block of Sierra Street before 9
a.m. Sunday, Nov. 24.
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle left unlocked
with the keys inside was stolen on the 600
block of Buena Vista Street before 8 a.m.
Sunday, Nov. 24.
SAN BRUNO
Vandalism. Aresidence on the 1600 block
of Jenevein Avenue was egged before 10:52
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Assaul t. Two men were fighting on the 900
block of Sneath Lane before 1:29 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 26.
Petty theft. Awallet was stolen at a store
on the 1100 block of El Camino Real before
8:42 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
Police reports
I smell a rat
Two bottles of perfume were stolen on
the 1100 block of El Camino Real in
San Bruno before 8:34 p.m. Monday,
Nov. 25.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM DAVIDS
From left,Olga Erlichman,Donna Williamson,Helen Calhoun,Joanne Daniels and Barry Daniels
helped fill San Carlos’ hanging baskets and planters with flowers, greenery and bulbs ready
to bring a little beauty to downtown visitors.
4
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Grand
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5
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Taxi
Police seek suspect in Central Park mugging
Investigators are asking for the public’s help in identi-
fying a suspect wanted in connection with a mugging in
San Mateo’s Central Park on Tuesday, police said.
At about 6:15 p.m. Tuesday, a 24-year-old woman was
walking her dog near the rose garden in Central Park when
the suspect approached and struck the victim with an
unknown object, according to police.
The suspect stole the woman’s purse and fled toward the
Japanese Tea Garden, police said.
He is described as a dark-skinned man in his 20s, stand-
ing about 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighing about 160
pounds. He was wearing a green jacket and a black hat at
the time of the mugging, police said.
The victim suffered injuries not considered life-threat-
ening. She was treated by paramedics at the scene, accord-
ing to police.
Officers searched the area but were unable to locate the
suspect or witnesses.
Anyone with information about the mugging is asked to
contact police at 522-7654 or the secret witness hotline
at 522-7676.
Local brief
By Julia Cheever
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Wildlife advocates, a state senator
and the mayor of Half Moon Bay will
gather Sunday to celebrate a new law
that protects mountain lions and cubs
that wander into human territory but
pose no imminent threat to human life.
SB 132, authored by Sen. Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo, requires state wildlife
wardens to use non-lethal measures,
such as capture, anesthetizing or
removal, when a mountain lion does
not endanger public health or safety.
The law goes into effect on Jan. 1.
As before, animals that do jeopardize
human life can be shot by state
Department of Fish and Wildlife war-
dens or local officers authorized by the
department.
The new law also allows wardens to
call on veterinarians, scientists, other
government agen-
cies, zoos and non-
profit groups to aid
in carrying out an
alternative to killing
a wandering moun-
tain lion.
“It’s a humane
solution to a poten-
tial community
problem,” Hill said
this week.
Hill will be joined by Half Moon Bay
Mayor Rick Kowalcyzk, representa-
tives of the Sacramento-based
Mountain Lion Foundation and other
supporters in the celebration at 11 a.m.
Sunday at Mac Dutra Park in Half Moon
Bay.
The Dec. 1 date for the event was
intentionally chosen, Hill said, to
coincide with the anniversary of the
shooting by wardens of two mountain
lion kittens that were hiding under the
deck of a house on the outskirts of Half
Moon Bay on Dec. 1, 2012.
The state wardens were summoned
after citizens notified the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office that the kittens
were spotted in various locations
beginning on Nov. 30.
At the time they were shot, the kit-
tens, which could not be seen clearly in
the darkness under the deck, were
believed by the wardens to be about
nine or 10 months old and weighing 25
to 30 pounds each.
A Department of Fish and Wildlife
spokeswoman said department staff
believed the animals’ behavior, which
included having seemingly “blank
stares” and remaining immobile when
the wardens and a sheriff’s deputy tried
to shoo them away with strobe lights,
was abnormal and therefore threaten-
ing.
Mountain lion protection law celebration Sunday
Jerry Hill
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Encrypted email,
secure instant messaging and other
privacy services are booming in the
wake of the National Security
Agency’s recently revealed surveil-
lance programs. But the flood of new
computer security services is of vari-
able quality, and much of it, experts
say, can bog down computers and isn’t
likely to keep out spies.
In the end, the new geek wars —
between tech industry programmers on
the one side and government spooks,
fraudsters and hacktivists on the
other— may leave people’s PCs and
businesses’ computer systems
encrypted to the teeth but no better
protected from hordes of savvy code
crackers.
“Every time a situation like this
erupts you’re going to have a frenzy of
snake oil sellers who are going to
throw their products into the street,”
says Carson Sweet, CEO of San
Francisco-based data storage security
firm CloudPassage. “It’s quite a
quandary for the consumer. ”
Encryption isn’t meant to keep out
hackers, but when it’s designed and
implemented correctly, it alters the
way messages look. Intruders who
don’t have a decryption key see only
gobbledygook.
Techies vs.NSA: Encryption arms race escalates
Decision set for Monday
on state election recount
SACRAMENTO — A candidate who
narrowly lost a special legislative
election said Friday that she is analyz-
ing the final tally and will decide
Monday whether to seek a recount.
The official canvass shows
Republican Susan Shelley trailing
Democrat Matt Dababneh by 329
votes in last week’s election to fill the
vacant Assembly District 45 seat. The
district includes parts of the San
Fernando Valley and a small part of
Ventura County.
Her deadline to seek a recount nor-
mally would be Friday.
Around the state
6
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Winter Holiday Promotions
Beauty & Skin Care
- Slgnature lydratlng laclal $38/90min (Reg:$68)
- lydra0ermabraslon lull Jreatment (lncludes eyes,
neck 8 shoulders) $69/90min (Reg.$138 50% of)
Spa Packages
- Aroma laclal (60mln) 8 Aromatherapy Vassage (60mln)
$88/120min (Reg.$146)
- le Juln ßody Salt Scrub (30 mln) Vud wraps (30mln) 8
Vassage (60mln) $99/120mln (Reg.$198 50% of)
We carry SOSKIN (Made in France)
Skin Care Products for Holidays on Sale 20% Of
Daniel Victor Armenta
Daniel Victor Armenta, late of
Millbrae, died Nov. 25, 2013.
Husband of Doris Armenta for 27
years. Father of Marty and Danny.
Brother of Loretta Armenta Ragan
(her husband Michael and son
Gregory Bologna). Also survived
by mother-in-law Ida Marinaro;
aunt Maria Caputo; in-laws (nieces
and nephews) Felipe Rodriguez
and Nicole “Floka” Caruso (Giana
and Mia), Frank and Peggy
Marinaro (Sophie and Mitchell),
Ralph and Joy Marinaro (Tara and
Jenna), Kristi Bulnes and Freddy
Oropeza, Karli and Sean Mullane,
Cheylo and Nathan Ilasa (Levani);
along with family members Katie
Torres, Jeff and David Moreno,
Diane Bulnes and Bobby Murphy,
Rich and Liz Salvini, Regina
Puccinelli, Kathy Toland and
Frank Hern.
A native of San Francisco, age
63.
Apassionate San Francisco fire-
man for 31 years; former San
Francisco International Airport
police officer; volunteered during
9/11 at ground zero.
The funeral mass is 11 a.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3 at Saint Dunstan
Catholic Church in Millbrae.
Committal at Italian Cemetery.
Visitation Monday after 6 p.m.
until 8 p.m. at Saint Dunstan’s ,
with a vigil service beginning at 7
p.m.
Condolences can be sent to his
family c/o Chapel of the
Highlands in Millbrae.
Donations preferred to the SF
Firefighters Cancer Prevention
Foundation (www.sffcpf.org).
As a public service, the Daily
Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date
of the family’s choosing. To sub-
mit obituaries, email information
along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
T
he San Mateo-Foster
Ci ty El ementary
School Di st ri ct will
hold its annual Transi t i onal
Kindergarten and
Kindergarten Informati on
Ni ght 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Dec. 4 at
the Bayside Performing Art s
Center, 2025 Kehoe Ave. in San
Mateo.
Class notes is a column dedicated to
school news. It is compiled by education
reporter Angela Swartz. You can contact
her at (650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
angela@smdailyjournal.com.
CHRISTINA WADE
Around 100 students from Burlingame and Aragon high schools
participated in a hackathon Nov. 25 at Burlingame High School.
LOCAL/NATION/WORLD 7
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Are You Healthy?
Are Your Health Insurance Premiums
Going Up As A Result Of ObamaCare?
If you answered Yes to both questions, I may be
able to help, but you need to call now.
1608 Laurel Street, San Carlos
(650) 620-9960
Fax: (650) 620-9964
rcduggan@sbcglobal.net
License #0E82947 * Restrictions apply
I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carlos Economic
Devel opment Advi sory
Commi ssi on will consider recom-
mending the Ci ty Counci l con-
tract with the Chamber o f
Commerce for economic develop-
ment services. The $40,000 con-
tract proposal calls for $20,000 for street pole banners,
$10,000 for street tree lights and $10,000 for the 2014
home improvement marketplace event.
The EDAC meets 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3 at City Hall,
Second Floor, Room 207, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
• The Redwood Ci ty Pl anni ng Commi ssi on will
consider two requests for historic landmark designation
and preservation agreements which give homeowners tax
breaks to offset maintenance costs. The first property is
1052 Edgewood Road and the second is 842 Edgewood
Road.
At the same meeting, the commission will hear a staff
presentation on the Housing Element Update as part of the
public workshop.
The Planning Commission meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec.
3 at City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Police helicopter crashes into Glasgow pub roof
LONDON — A police helicopter crashed Friday night
through the roof of a popular pub in Glasgow, sending injured
revelers fleeing through a cloud of dust in what witnesses
called a scene of horror. Scotland’s leader warned that fatalities
are likely.
Images on local television showed what appeared to be the
helicopter’s propeller sticking out of the pub’s roof. Rescue
workers swarmed the scene. First Minister Alex Salmond con-
firmed that a police chopper was involved in the crash at The
Clutha pub in the city’s center.
Egypt Islamists rally to defy protest law
CAIRO — Egyptian security forces firing tear gas and water
cannons on Friday broke up anti-government demonstrations
by Islamists defying a draconian new law restricting protests.
Authorities are seeking to put down unrest by both
Islamists and secular activists as a government-appointed
assembly tries to finish a final draft on an amended constitu-
tion by early next week. The draft has raised criticism from
democracy advocates for increasing powers of the military and
president.
Around the world
By Karl Ritter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM — A comet that
gained an earthly following because of
its bright tail visible from space was
initially declared dead after grazing the
sun. Now, there is a sliver of hope that
Comet ISON may have survived.
New images being analyzed Friday
showed a streak of light moving away
from the sun that some said could indi-
cate it wasn’t game over just yet.
“It certainly appears as if there is an
object there that is emitting material,”
said Alan Fitzsimmons, an astronomer
at Queens University in Belfast,
Northern Ireland.
Basically a dirty snowball from the
fringes of the solar system, scientists
had pronounced Comet ISON (EYE’-
sahn) dead when it came within 1 mil-
lion miles (1.6 million kilometers) of
the sun Thursday.
Some sky gazers speculated early on
that it might become the comet of the
century because of its brightness,
although expectations dimmed over
time. But it wouldn’t be all bad news if
the 4.5-billion-year-old space rock
broke up into pieces, because some
scientists say they might be able to
study them and learn more about
comets.
The European Space Agency, which
had declared ISON’s death on Twitter
late Thursday, was backtracking early
Friday, saying the comet “continues to
surprise.”
Comet ISON was first spotted by a
Russian telescope in September last
year, and became something of celes-
tial flash in the pan this week for its
vivid tail — visible by the naked eye
— and compelling backstory of
impending doom.
Did Comet ISON survive? Scientists see tiny hope
REUTERS
Comet ISON is pictured in this Nov. 19 handout photo by NASA.
LOCAL 8
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
their eyes. They agreed it was time to take a
breather and recognize what life hds to offer.
“I don’t want to have any regrets,” said Gigi
Luke. “I don’t want to get older and wish that
I had done these things with my kids when I
was younger.”
The couple’s goal was to inspire their chil-
dren through this experience by witnessing
the cultural and historical connections of the
world.
It took two years for the actual idea to
develop into a plan. On a Sunday night, the
couple was watching a program about surfers
finding the best wave, when they both talked
about life issues and loss. They yearned for an
escape. Gigi Luke remembers saying to her
husband, “Wouldn’t it be fun to not have a
care in the world, and to do whatever your
heart says to do?”
He replied, “Yeah, it would.”
From that moment, the couple agreed to fig-
ure out the adventure. That idea emerged into a
nomadic tactic in which they would move
from place to place. They knew that they
would like to fly into a country that was acces-
sible to London because they wanted to attend
the 2012 Olympics, which was a lifetime
dream. Gigi Luke soon found a flight to
Sweden which seemed to be a good choice,
because Bob Luke knew a family there from
when he was an exchange student. They con-
tacted the family in Sweden to ask if they
could visit, and the family said absolutely.
Gigi Luke then booked a one way ticket to
Stockholm, Sweden, and tickets to the
Olympics to see Taekwondo, tennis at
Wimbledon and men’s volleyball. The Lukes
began to create a preliminary itinerary and
flexible budget. They wanted to live like
locals and tour without relying on travel
guides, just themselves and the small network
of friends overseas.
Managing reality
Before the Lukes could turn their dream into
reality, they had to manage their reality. What
would they do with their kids and school,
their house for a whole year and their pets?
These were serious questions that actually
motivated them to come up with immediate
solutions. The Lukes ended up renting out
their house and left pets with friends. Taking
their children out of school seemed like a
larger challenge, but Gigi Luke had confi-
dence in her husband, a former teacher. He
would be able to guide the boys academically.
They could also rely on online resources for
math, social studies and grammar. The couple
also felt every day of their adventure would
create a distinct curriculum for their sons to
learn, a hands-on perspective of the world for
an entire year. On June 26, 2012, The Lukes
left San Carlos, content on creating lasting
memories for their family and broadening
their sons’ horizons.
Departure
The Lukes first destination was Stockholm,
Sweden, where they connected with old
friends. From there, they traveled to Norway
for eight days and saw the famous fjords. The
youth hostels in Norway provided adequate
accommodations for the family while sight-
seeing. They returned back to Sweden and
enjoyed fishing and waterskiing on the Baltic
Sea. After Sweden, the family flew to London
for 10 days for the Olympics.
Gigi Luke used to work in London and was
able to arrange a place to stay with close
friends. They attended a folk festival along
the coast, along with the patriotic celebra-
tion of the 2012 Olympics where they attend-
ed some of their favorite events. England pro-
vided their children with literature, history
and art lessons. They read e-books and studied
some of the authors, artists and musicians
from the places they visited. They even read
Shakespeare and saw a Shakespeare play in
Stratford-Upon-Avon. They stayed in
Cotswold at Gigi Luke’s friend’s house for
three weeks, and connected with history at
Stonehenge.
Next stop Paris
After enjoying London, the Luke family
took the Eurostar train to Paris. They were
fortunate enough to stay with friends for four
months. France became home base where
they lived as part of the community, even put-
ting their children into soccer and tennis
camps. France was another destination where
their family could connect with history. They
learned about medieval history and art in the
caves of the Vezere Valley, along with art
from Vincent van Gogh in the nearby gal-
leries and museums. Their son Jordan, a musi-
cian and athlete, even had the opportunity to
play his guitar on the streets in France.
Jordan and Justin also enjoyed running on the
beaches of Normandy while learning about
World War II.
“We really wanted our children to under-
stand history and connect our history as
Americans, but also to the cultures that we
were visiting,” said Gigi Luke.
On to Italy, Germany and Amsterdam
From France, The Lukes traveled to Austria
where they stayed for a week. They enjoyed
skiing and relaxing before they embarked on
their trek to Italy. In Italy, they traveled from
the north to the south to Positano and the
Amalfi coast. In Lucca, they stopped at an
Agriturismo where they learned about the
environment and how to make pasta, pick
olives and press them into oil. They reached
Rome and visited several museums and the
ruins in Pompeii, following the path of the
Romans from France to Italy.
The Lukes’ network of friends continued to
contribute to their adventure, as they traveled
to Germany. Fortunately, Bob Luke was an
exchange student some 30 years ago and kept
in touch with the family that hosted him. That
family still owns a dairy farm and welcomed
the Lukes with open arms. Holland was the
next destination where they stayed in
Amsterdam. The Lukes were trying to parallel
their traveling course with what they were
studying and teaching their children about
World War II and its impact. They also visited
the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam which
correlated with the events of D-Day.
“We wanted to show our sons how small the
world really is in history,” said Gigi Luke.
Leaving Europe, on
to Asia, then back home
They left Holland and headed back to Paris
in the winter for a brief stay to visit friends
that had traveled from California. Their flexi-
ble and fluid adventure continued as they flew
from London to Singapore.
Gigi Luke had a friend from California liv-
ing in Singapore which became their home
base in Asia. It was spring, so the host fami-
ly along with their children had time off.
Both families coordinated a trip to Sri Lanka
where they stayed for eight days. Here, the
accommodations were a bit more exotic. They
slept in mud huts, tree houses and a colonial
house that was owned by a tea plantation
owner. Their adventure included a safari, a tour
of the highlands, beaches and tea planta-
tions.
After Sri Lanka, the Lukes went back to
Singapore for a few days and then flew to Bali
for three and a half weeks. They stayed in sev-
eral different locations, but their favorite
place to stay was outside of Ubud, which is
the spiritual center of Bali. Here, the family
found a bed in breakfast to stay at located in a
rice field. While in Bali, The Lukes met a cou-
ple, Wayan and Putri, who became their
hosts. Their hosts invited them to a village
temple ceremony honoring 220 days. The
Lukes wore traditional saris and colorful, dec-
orative hats becoming completely immersed
in the culture.
“We were honored. It was very spiritual. We
didn’t take this as a tourist thing,” said Gigi
Luke.
They were the only non-Balinese family in
attendance. The host family took them to
lunch and also gave them a tour of the rice
fields. The Lukes also visited the Green
School in Bali, a holistic learning center that
celebrates the Earth. The Lukes asked their
host Wayan if there was anywhere that Jordan
and Justin could learn about local art. He took
them to the local carvers and a master carver
taught the children how to carve masks which
are used in ceremonies and also sold to
tourists. The next day, the Lukes were asked if
they wanted to go to the silver town where
they make silver jewelry. Here, Jordan and
Justin were taught by a master silversmith
how to smith silver. That day was a special
experience for the children and the family
because the skills they learned weren’t from a
class. These skills were taught by individuals
who were willing to lend their expertise.
After the adventures in Bali, they went back
to Singapore for two weeks. At this point of
their journey they were trying to figure out the
Continued from page 1
LUKE
See TRAVEL, Page 19
OPINION 9
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Keep Michaels Arts
and Crafts in San Mateo
Editor,
I recently learned that the Delaware
Avenue Michaels is seeking to move
to the old Borders location at 2925 S.
El Camino Real in San Mateo.
As a Burlingame resident and avid
paper-crafter, I wholeheartedly sup-
port the move. I shop at Michaels
about once a week, and when big
projects come up, sometimes more
often. I know many friends who do
the same, and would find it very
inconvenient to drive to Redwood
City or Colma for our crafting and
baking needs. There is no other store
in the mid-Peninsula that provides
the variety and prices that Michaels
does.
I am hopeful that the San Mateo
City Council will approve the new
Michaels location at 2925 S. El
Camino Real.
Esther Hou
Burlingame
Coveredca.com will save me
more than $100 per month
Editor,
I signed up for 2014 health insur-
ance today on California’s market-
place, coveredca.com, on behalf of
myself, my wife and my two children.
No tax credits, but I will save over
$100 per month by switching to a
different insurance company.
Such a switch would have been all
but impossible without guaranteed
issue, which for decades has been the
norm for employer-provided insur-
ance and Medicare (and AWOL from
the individual marketplace). Thanks,
Obamacare!
Bob Sawyer
Woodside
Immigration reform
Editor,
I admire Christopher P. Conway’s
courageous letter about the illegal
guy heckling President Obama in San
Francisco last week (letter to the edi-
tor, “Oh no he didn’t” in the Nov. 27
edition of the Daily Journal). It was
offending to see our president being
heckled and having to justify the law-
ful proceedings he is trying to follow.
Oscar Lopez-Guerra
San Mateo
District Five
Editor,
Sue Lempert’s column “Let’s
Celebrate Election Day” (Nov. 4 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal) sees three
years into the future. Unfazed by for-
midable statistics in District Five of
San Mateo County, she predicts that
the winner of the 2016 supervisor’s
seat will be David Canepa.
Her analysis weighs the prospects
of three future candidates and their
chances to succeed Adrienne Tissier.
They are David Canepa, Michael
Guingona and Sal Torres — all incum-
bent Daly City councilmen. Guingona
is Filipino American, Torres is
Mexican American, Canepa is white.
The racial makeup of the district’s
population is 52 percent Asian, 18
percent Hispanic, 23 percent white
and 4 percent black. The vast majori-
ty of the Asians are Filipino
Americans.
Ms. Lempert concludes that despite
the puny 23 percent share of the pop-
ulation, whites will be able to elect
Canepa as District Five supervisor to
succeed Tissier. That conclusion is
based on past experience that shows
the apathy of minorities toward the
electoral processes. But past perform-
ance does not guarantee the same
results for the future. The winds of
change have come with the victory of
Measure B.
As the result of the 2010 census,
the racial minorities of San Mateo
County became aware that they com-
prise 58 percent of the county’s popu-
lation. Measure B won 58.5 percent
of the votes despite the vehement
opposition of four incumbent super-
visors and U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier,
D-San Mateo. Is that a statistical
fluke or an indication that minorities
have finally awakened?
Measure B got on the ballot
because of a lawsuit against the coun-
ty contending violations of the
California Civil Rights Act.
Guy M. Guerrero
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
Los Angeles Times
A
s it does each year, a bill to
ban plastic bags in
California will almost cer-
tainly come before the Legislature in
the next session. Each year, under
heavy lobbying by the makers of
such bags — who say the bill will
kill jobs and wreak other forms of
havoc — the Legislature has folded.
State Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Pacoima,
whose bill in the most recent session
failed by a narrow margin, has indi-
cated that he plans to try again.
California has a chance to do things
differently this time, without the end-
less back and forth about whether the
bans effectively reduce the trash that
finds its way into giant patches of
floating plastic in the oceans, and
without disputed claims that
California companies will go under.
Because this time, it has the opportu-
nity to replace conjecture with facts.
Close to 90 cities and counties in
California have passed bans on plas-
tic bags. Once the ban takes effect in
the city of Los Angeles, at the start of
the new year, such bans will cover a
third of the state’s population.
Usually, the bans allow customers to
purchase a paper bag for 10 cents or
so; Padilla’s bill would have done that
as well. This means that there is now
enough information to study, in
robust and real-life ways, whether
fewer bags are found on the beaches,
an indicator of how many make their
way into the ocean. Have cities and
counties lost any jobs as a result of
bag bans? How many?
We actually prefer fees on both
plastic and paper bags. They have
proved effective where they have been
tried — there’s simply a mental barri-
er to paying a nickel for a bag — and
they give consumers more conven-
ience and choice. But a ban on plastic
bags appears to be the next best
choice. It has been our belief that
banning the flimsy carryout bags with
handles will reduce the environmental
toll on the ocean without significant-
ly harming employment. (Other plas-
tic bags, such as those used for pro-
duce or the ones that protect newspa-
pers from rain, would not be affected.)
But we are willing to be persuaded
otherwise by conclusive data that
show plastic bag bans do more harm
than good. So should industry. Most
important, so should lawmakers in
Sacramento.
A chance to settle plastic bag ban debate
Hospital consortiums
drive health care costs
By Tony Favero
I
n 2009, President Obama stated “There have been
reports just over the last couple of days of insurance
companies’ making record profits, right now,” and
“At a time when everybody’s getting hammered, they’re
[insurers] making record profits, and premiums are going
up. What’s the constraint on that?” Such are the prevail-
ing political diatribes directed toward a convenient scape-
goat, the health insurance industry,
which succeeds only in shooting the
proverbial messenger. Example: Blue
Cross executives understood quite clear-
ly those politicians demonize insurers
and venerate hospitals as Blue Cross
Blue Shield of Massachusetts unsuc-
cessfully fought raising rates by a
newly merged hospital entity. Profit s
for health insurance companies have
remained relatively stable at around 5 percent for numer-
ous decades, while newly merged hospital monopolies
increase fees with escalating profit s.
The average U.S. hospital stay of five days costs
$18,142, whereas in the developed world the cost is
$6,222. The supposition here is that the extra monies
provide for high-tech advantages not utilized in Europe.
Studies reveal this as incorrect; American hospitals sim-
ply charge higher sums because they can. MD Anderson
Cancer Center in Houston charged an uninsured patient
$283 for a chest X-ray it would have billed Medicare $20,
$15,000 for blood tests that cost a few hundred dollars and
so on. Hospitals expect no payment of such overcharges
but claim unpaid balances for PR and tax purposes. This
cancer center in 2010 recorded a profit of $531 million.
Hospital consortiums remain unmotivated to develop
free-market solutions encouraging lower costs, as normal
businesses would; but instead besiege Congress with lob-
byists to escalate government subsidies. It is no revela-
tion that the American Hospital Association fervently
supported Obamacare. These hospitals will be the single
largest recipient of the trillions in new spending resulting
from Obamacare. Increasing taxes proved politically easi-
er than confronting the AHA, which spent nearly $300
million since 1998 on lobbying alone.
To promote leverage against private insurers, hospitals
utilize consolidation to create regional monopolies. In
disparate sectors of the economy, antitrust laws are usual-
ly employed to restrain such monopolistic formations.
Such market concentration is measured by regulators by
means of the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, or HHI. HHI is
determined by calculating market share of all players in a
given market, squaring each market share percentage and
adding up the total. Example: Amarket of three airlines,
two with 40 percent each and one with 20 percent yields
an HHI of 3,600 (twice 1,600 plus 400). U.S. Department
of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission guidelines
deem any HHI above 2,500 to be “highly concentrated”
and subject to regulatory investigation. From 1993 to
2008, no hospital merger was prohibited despite an aver-
age HHI of 3,261. Such elevated HHI indexed hospitals
outcharged their below average HHI brethren by 44 per-
cent.
Most hospitals are “nonprofit” establishments, but such
status only impedes distribution of earnings to owners or
shareholders; while allowing executives to receive gener-
ous salaries and stockpile cash for expansion and
improvements. One McKinsey study revealed that the
nation’s 2,900 nonprofit hospitals exceed profit margins
of the 1,000 for-profit hospitals. Such hospital mergers
include acquisition of private physician practices to pro-
mote control and higher fees of patients with private
insurance. Obamacare effectively restrains free enterprise
solutions. Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act forbids
the building of new physician-owned hospitals if those
hospitals accept Medicare patients; a crucial restriction
exploited by Congress to acquire support of the AHAfor
Obamacare.
Apparent solutions to this burgeoning unrestrained
affair include antitrust proceedings against hospital merg-
ers, repealing Obamacare restrictions on physician-owned
hospitals and allowing Americans to be in charge of their
own health care dollars to lower costs opposed to third-
party payment.
Tony Favero is a freelance writer, media researcher and for-
mer math and science instructor and engineer. He lives in
Half Moon Bay.
Other voices
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,086.41 -10.92 10-Yr Bond 2.741 +0.005
Nasdaq 4,059.89 +15.14 Oil (per barrel) 93.01
S&P 500 1,805.81 -1.42 Gold 1,250.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., up 8 cents to $81.01
Before Black Friday even began,the world’s biggest retailer logged more
than 10 million register transactions in four hours.
Archer Daniels Midland Co., down $1.24 to $40.25
Australia rejected the conglomerate’s bid to acquire GrainCorp,saying the
sale would be contrary to national interests.
Pioneer Natural Resources Co., down $1.16 to $177.75
The exploration and production company is reporting that severe winter
weather “severely impacted”production in Texas.
Southwest Airlines Co., down 36 cents to $18.59
As U.S. oil production soars, there are murmurs about a production cut
from OPEC, which could lead to higher costs for airlines.
Rio Tinto, up $2.11 to $53.05
The miner will halt production of alumina at its unprofitable Gove refinery
in Australia’s Northern Territory as prices sag.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., up $10.11 to $556.07
Shares of the iPhone maker surpass $550 for the first time since early
January as the company makes a big Black Friday push.
eBay Inc., up $1.22 to $50.52
The head of the online retailer’s North American operations says eBay sold
an iPad mini every second around midnight.
Microsoft Corp., up 53 cents to $38.13
There are more reports that Ford chief Alan Mulally will lead the software
company when Steve Ballmer steps down next year.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — The stock market fiz-
zled Friday at the end of a holiday-
shortened trading day, but still logged
its longest streak of weekly gains in a
decade.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
ended down one point, or 0.1 percent,
to 1,805.81. The Dow Jones industrial
average slipped 10 points, or 0.1 per-
cent, to 16,086.41.
Investors watched for early trends in
holiday sales as the busiest shopping
day of the year, Black Friday, got
underway. Retailers were one of two
industry groups in the S&P500 to rise.
Stocks overall have surged this year
as the economy maintains a slow but
steady recovery and corporations
keep earnings growing. Demand for
stocks also has been bolstered by
Federal Reserve policies that have
held down interest rates, making
bonds less attractive investments
than stocks.
Stocks rose for most of the day
Friday, but petered out in the last half
hour of trading. The New York Stock
Exchange and the Nasdaq closed early,
at 1 p.m. Eastern Time, and activity
was lower than average a day after
Thanksgiving. Thin trading can lead
to sudden swings in markets.
Although the S&P 500 and Dow
slipped, the Nasdaq composite rose 15
points, or 0.4 percent, to end at
4,059.89. The index has surged 34 per-
cent this year, more than the other two
indexes.
And even though the S&P 500 eased
Friday, it still rose for an eighth
straight week, its longest stretch of
weekly advances in a decade.
The broad stock index saw two of its
10 industry groups rise. One of them
was consumer discretionary compa-
nies as investors hoped for improved
holiday sales.
More than a dozen major chains
opened on Thanksgiving Day and
planned to keep their doors open
through Friday, the traditional start to
the holiday shopping season. Crowds
formed early and often throughout the
two days.
Investors will be following sales
trends closely to get a read on the
health of retailers, as well as the wider
economy. Consumer spending is a crit-
ical component of the U.S. economy.
Retail sales are expected to rise 4
percent to $602 billion during the last
two months of the year, according to
the National Retail Federation. That’s
higher than last year’s 3.5 percent
growth, but lower than the 6 percent
pace from before the recession.
But sales could come at the expense
of profits, analysts expect, as retailers
are likely to use more discounting to
draw in customers.
Shares of EBay, Amazon and Best
Buy all advanced. EBay rose $1.22, or
3 percent, to $50.52, making it the
second-biggest gainer in the S&P 500
index.
“The early signs of retail traffic are
encouraging, but it’s still very early, ”
said Paul Mangus, head of equity
research and strategy for Wells Fargo
Private Bank.
The S&P 500 index has surged 26.6
percent this year, propelling it to a
string of record highs. If its gain
holds, it would be the strongest year
for the index since 1998, when it rose
26.7 percent.
November is typically a strong
month for the stock market, and this
year was no exception. The S&P 500
ended the month with a gain of 2.8 per-
cent, the ninth month this year that
the index has advanced.
Returns for the month rank as the
third best for the Dow and the S&P
500, according to the Stock Trader’s
Almanac, which has analyzed data
going back to 1950.
An unexpectedly robust jobs report
gave stocks a lift at the start of the
month, and strong corporate earnings
reports for the third quarter helped
maintain the momentum.
Almost all of the companies in the
S&P 500 have reported their third-
quarter earnings.
S&P 500 gains for eighth straight week
By Joyce M. Rosenberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Here today, gone in weeks
— pop-up shops and temporary stores are
back for the holiday season.
At Christmas Lights Etc.’s Atlanta show-
room, the public gets to shop for about
month-and-a-half, browsing the high-end
Christmas trees, lighting and other holiday
decorations. The temporary store pulls in
additional sales and the company finds it’s
good marketing for its core business of sell-
ing online and to commercial and wholesale
customers.
The yearly sale draws families from far
and wide. Some drive five hours to see
Christmas trees as tall as 25 feet (customers
can order taller trees). Workers clean, fresh-
en the paint and bring in new inventory for
their holiday guests.
“If customers have a good experience
here, like the product, like the people,
they’ll come back next year when they need
lights or a tree and they’ll recommend you
to their friends,” says marketing director
Hillary Zody.
The sale at Christmas Lights Etc., is one
of many temporary stores that open during
the holidays. These shops, often called
“pop-ups” sometimes produce extra
income, but small business owners increas-
ingly use them as promotional tools and
test labs for merchandise. Manufacturers,
designers and online retailers use them to
decide whether to open an actual store.
STARTUP STRATEGY
Apop-up store was part of the startup plan
for Zady, an online clothing and home
goods retailer that launched in late August.
Owners Maxine Bedat and Soraya Darabi
chose a high-profile location, in the Delta
Airlines terminal at New York’s LaGuardia
Airport. The store operates from Nov. 4
until Jan. 4. They wanted to get feedback
about their merchandise, which includes
$395 sweaters and $225 jeans.
“We have all sorts of metrics to see what
customers are doing on the website, but
nothing compares to actually seeing them
interact with our products,” Bedat says.
So far, they’re getting food feedback. It’s
too soon to tell now if the season will be a
success, but if it is, Zady’s owners say
they’ll consider more pop-ups, and perhaps
a permanent store.
VERIFYING INSTINCTS
Janet Holian opened a pop-up in Boston
to see if Gemvara, her online custom jewel-
ry business, would succeed with a physical
location. The shop opened in a vacant store
on Nov. 3 and will operate until Feb. 15,
longer than most pop-ups, to take advan-
tage of Valentine’s Day.
“I wanted to see whether people needed to
actually touch or feel the jewelry or meet
us,” Holian says.
Her instincts were right. Women want to
see the merchandise and meet the people
selling it. Men who are shopping for jewel-
ry that can cost in the thousands of dollars
want to be sure they’re buying from some-
one reputable.
BRAND BUILDING
Jeanne Chinn chose dog-friendly Century
City Mall in Beverly Hills, Calif., for a
kiosk for the upscale dog accessories she
designs. Chinn, who sells carriers, coats,
beds and toys to retailers and online,
opened the kiosk Nov. 18 near the mall’s
dog park and will be there until Dec. 31.
“I’m trying to capture holiday sales and
make people aware of the brand,” Chinn
says. Her Chihuahua, Mr. Truffle, is by her
side during 12-hour days.
Chinn is also getting more visitors to her
website. She credits that uptick to being in
the mall. One customer bought a dog T-shirt
at the kiosk, then looked at her website and
returned to the mall to buy a bag.
TAKING TURNS
Retailers are rotating through pop-up
shops at the Alki Arts Gallery in downtown
Seattle. Each week, nine merchants will set
up shop for seven days in space paid for by
American Express and Delta Air Lines.
Susan Wheeler is selling antiques and vin-
tage clothing this week. She’s hoping the
pop-up will introduce her three-year old
store, Susan Wheeler Home to new cus-
tomers.
Linda Walsh, who has owned Clementine,
a West Seattle store, since 2006, will run
her temporary shop from Dec. 4-9, selling
women’s clothes and accessories. Her
inventory includes $475 sweaters and $350
tops.
Small businesses pop up for the holidays
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Michael
Crabtree produced a career season a
year ago and helped lead the San
Francisco 49ers back to the Super
Bowl for the
first time in 18
years as Colin
Ka e pe r ni c k’s
top target.
Now, the wide
receiver is
expected to
make his long-
awaited season
debut Sunday
against St.
Louis, barely six months after he
underwent surgery for a torn right
Achilles tendon.
The reigning NFC champion
Niners (7-4) made significant
strides in their passing game dur-
ing Monday night’s 27-6 win at
Washington, and now hope to
<<< Page 16, SJSU pull off
stunning upset of Fresno St.
Weekend, Nov. 30-
Dec. 1, 2013
WESTBROOK STRIKES: WARRIORS LOSE IN OT TO THUNDER >> PAGE 14
Dream season ends
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
A dejected Robby Baumgarten walks off the Burlingame football field one last time in the Panthers’ 41-21 loss to St. Ignatius Friday night in CCS.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The dream season for the
Burlingame High School football
team has ended.
And once again, a team from the
WCAL has proven to be the
Panthers’ worst nightmare.
After going 11-0, winning a
division title for the first time in
11 years, capturing another Paw
and earning the No. 1 seed in the
Central Coast Section Division III
bracket, the boys from
Burlingame have plenty to hang
their hats on for 2013. But unfor-
tunately, all feelings of success are
currently halted after the Panthers’
41-21 defeat at the hands of St.
Ignatius — a West Catholic
Athletic League team that came in
with a 3-8 record.
This marks the third straight
time a WCAL team has knocked
the Panthers out of the playoffs.
The Wildcats were the beneficiar-
ies of a couple of huge plays that
swung the game completely in
their favor. And unfortunately for
the Panthers, they didn’t have the
appropriate answers to those big
plays — especially in a second
half that saw St. Ignatius outscore
Burlingame 20-7.
The Panthers’ season ends with
an appearance in the CCS
Division III semifinal final and an
11-1 record.
“S.I. is a great team,” said
Burlingame head coach John
Philipopoulos, who spent the
majority of his post game speech
See CCS, Page 14
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Dennis Allen’s
second season as coach of the
Oakland Raiders is starting to look
a lot like his
first — and
that’s not nec-
essarily a good
thing.
A year ago,
the Raiders were
3-4 and show-
ing signs of
progress before
s t u m b l i n g
down the
stretch with eight losses over the
final nine games, including a
stretch of six straight.
Raiders’
collapse
similar to
last year’s
Dennis Allen
Michael
Crabtree
See RAIDERS, Page 13
See 49ERS, Page 13
49ers hope WR
Crabtree makes
his season debut
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sports Brief
Strong start lifts Sharks over Blues
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Brent Burns got his
first NHL hat trick and the Sharks
ended a five-game home losing streak
to St. Louis with a 6-3 victory over
the Blues on Friday.
Joe Thornton, Tomas Hertl and
Tommy Wingels also scored for the
Sharks, who won their fourth straight
and seven of eight.
Ian Cole scored his first goal in
nearly two years as the Blues had their
five-game winning streak halted.
David Backes and Jaden Schwartz also
scored for St. Louis.
Antti Niemi stopped 21 of 24 shots
for his 14th win of the season. Brian
Elliott took the loss, his first in eight
games, after giving up four goals on
12 shots. He was lifted for Jaroslav
Halak, who had 18 saves.
The Blues, who earned points in
their previous nine games, were off to
their best road start in franchise histo-
ry, bringing a 7-2-1 mark into the
game.
Burns scored 35 seconds into the
game, taking a nice pass from Patrick
Marleau and flipping the puck over
Elliott’s right shoulder. Logan
Couture, who has not scored a goal in
seven straight, started the sequence
after intercepting a clearing pass.
Thornton scored a power-play goal
at 3:01, the first allowed by the Blues
in six games and just the second on
the road. Couture took a shot that
bounced off Elliott’s pad and Joe
Pavelski flipped it out to Thornton,
who beat Elliott to the glove side.
Burns scored his second goal of the
game at 9:14 of the first, set up with a
pass from Thornton.
Wingels picked up a flubbed pass to
Jay Bouwmeester and had a give-and-
go with Couture to make it 4-0, get-
ting a good rebound off Elliott’s glove
and into the net at 11:27.
Cole, who last scored on Dec. 8,
2011, against the Anaheim Ducks, a
span of 43 games, rattled the puck off
the right post and had it trickle into
the net.
The scoring sequence began when
Halak made a terrific save and got the
puck out to a streaking Roman Polak.
Backes, who took a 10-minute mis-
conduct late in the second period,
made it 4-2 with a power-play goal at
2:02 of the third period, with Derek
Roy giving him a backhand pass to
set up the score.
Vogelsong agrees to one-year contract
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO— Right-hander
Ryan Vogelsong is staying with the
San Francisco Giants, agreeing to
terms on a one-year contract Friday.
Assistant general manager Bobby
Evans said the deal is pending a phys-
ical, expected to happen later next
week.
The Giants declined to exercise
Vogelsong’s $6.5 million contract
option for 2014 on Nov. 4, but the
parties agreed to keep open the possi-
bility of potential negotiations down
the road during free agency. General
manager Brian Sabean and Evans have
been committed to keeping their
pitching staff intact as best as possi-
ble, which they have done while also
adding right-hander Tim Hudson on
$23 million, two-year contract Nov.
19.
The 36-year-old Vogelsong is deter-
mined to come back strong in 2014
following a frustrating year.
He went 4-6 with a 5.73 ERA in 19
starts and 103 2-3 innings during an
injury-shortened season.
He broke two bones in the right
pinkie area of his pitching hand and
also dislocated a knuckle on a swing
May 20 and underwent surgery the
next day. He had five pins inserted in
his hand.
Vogelsong won 13 and 14 games the
previous two seasons. The journey-
man pitcher became one of baseball’s
feel-good comeback stories in 2011,
when he made the All-Star team after
joining the Giants’ rotation first as a
fill in for the injured Barry Zito.
Vogelsong had toiled through three
seasons in the Japanese League before
Triple-A stints in 2010 for the
Phillies and Angels.
In the Bay Area with the team that
originally drafted him in the fifth
round in 1998, Vogelsong became a
front-line starter at last.
Invited to spring training in 2011
on a minor league deal, he went on to
win the team’s “Willie Mac” Award —
named for Hall of Famer Willie
McCovey and is voted on by players,
coaches and training staff for the most
inspirational Giants player on the
field and in the clubhouse.
Lara Gut wins season-opening WCup downhill
BEAVER CREEK, Colo.— Lara Gut was faster than a field
missing Lindsey Vonn.
Quick in training all week, the Swiss star carried it over
to race day. Gut breezed to her second World Cup win of the
season, taking the season-opening downhill Friday by
holding off Tina Weirather of Liechtenstein by 0.47 sec-
onds.
Meanwhile, down the road a few miles in Vail, Vonn was
squeezing in some early morning training runs to try and
get her surgically repaired right knee back up to speed after
a recent training mishap. Vonn got stronger with each of
the three runs she took.
On this day, though, it’s hard to imagine that any skier
could’ve stayed with Gut, especially on a new Beaver Creek
course she’s figured out better than anyone.
Still, the stage is being set for an entertaining show-
down at the Sochi Games between Gut and Vonn — provid-
ed, of course, that Vonn can get healthy.
This is a race that didn’t happen four years ago in
Vancouver. Gut dislocated her hip during giant slalom
training in September 2009 and missed the entire season,
including the Winter Games. Vonn went on to win the
Olympic downhill title.
“I’ve been working so hard to be back,” the 22-year-old
Gut said. “I had to build everything again, my body, my
skiing skills, my feeling on the snow. I think right now,
just everything is paying off.”
Vonn is hoping that her knee will hold up to the rigors
of training and that she will indeed be ready for Sochi in
February.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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build on that — with or without Crabtree
back in the mix. He sure could provide a
boost as San Francisco makes a push for the
playoffs.
St. Louis certainly knows how dangerous
Crabtree can be. He had five catches for 70
yards and a 14-yard touchdown the last time
the Rams visited Candlestick Park in 2012
and left town with the NFL’s first tie in four
years.
Against the Redskins on Monday, Anquan
Boldin made five receptions with two touch-
downs, while Vernon Davis had four catches
with a TD. Mario Manningham made four
catches in his third game back after recover-
ing from knee surgery late last season.
Boldin and Crabtree have yet to play
together.
“Definitely some good things,” coach Jim
Harbaugh said. “We hit some big plays and
that generated offense and got us going.”
St. Louis (5-6) tries for its first three-game
winning streak.
Here are five more things to watch for
when the division rivals face off for their
second meeting of the season:
KAEPERNICK’S PROGRESS:
Kaepernick quieted all of his critics for at
least five days. The third-year pro, who just
hit the one-year mark since becoming San
Francisco’s starting quarterback, bounced
back from consecutive losses with an
emphatic performance at Washington. He
threw for 235 yards and three touchdowns
without an interception to finish with a
career-best passer rating of 134.5 against
the Redskins. The 49ers moved to 11-0 with
Kaepernick as the starter in games he posts
a passer rating of 90.0 or better.
49ERS PLAYOFF PICTURE: At 7-4
and tied with Arizona for second place in the
NFC West, the 49ers realize full well they
have little margin for error to secure a return
trip to the playoffs after their Super Bowl
run of 2012. Especially with the division
rival Seattle Seahawks (10-1) coming to the
Bay Area on Dec. 8 after whipping the
Niners 29-3 in Week 2.
Kaepernick, for one, doesn’t believe
momentum plays into it at this stage of the
season.
“Game to game,” he said. “Have to win.”
ST. LOUIS’ RUNNING GAME: It’s
next rookie up for coach Jeff Fisher in the
Rams’ running game.
After Zac Stacy, a fifth-round draft pick in
April, went down in the first half of
Sunday’s 42-21 victory against the Bears
with concussion symptoms, undrafted rook-
ie Benny Cunningham stepped in with his
first extended playing time and produced a
100-yard game.
In addition, rookie Tavon Austin made a
65-yard TD run in the win against Chicago
for his first career TD rushing, his fourth
touchdown in a row from beyond midfield
and sixth overall.
“They’re playing really good football
right now,” 49ers safety Donte Whitner
said. “Alot of big plays.”
Stacy has been cleared to play.
St. Louis came out of a bye week to put up
21 first-quarter points after scoring 29 total
in the opening period over the first 10
games — and another fast start could be
important Sunday.
PASS-RUSHING RAMS: Robert Quinn
and that swarming St. Louis defense have
been creating havoc for opposing quarter-
backs, and the defensive line has scored
touchdowns in each of the past two games.
Menacing defensive end Quinn has been a
pain for quarterbacks with 13 sacks, 35
tackles and six forced fumbles. Fellow
defensive end Chris Long returned a fumble
for a touchdown against Indianapolis lead-
ing up to the bye week, then Quinn sacked
and stripped Bears quarterback Josh
McCown, recovered the fumble and scored
against the Bears.
And Kaepernick has shown his vulnera-
bilities in recent weeks.
The 49ers offensive line has surrendered
11 sacks the past three games, nine in back-
to-back losses against Carolina and New
Orleans.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
This year’s team has almost mirrored that
with a similar collapse.
Oakland’s 31-24 loss to the Dallas
Cowboys on Thanksgiving was its fourth in
five weeks after what had been another
encouraging 3-4 start. The Raiders have
blown second-half leads in three of the loss-
es during their recent slide and five overall
this season.
That’s left Allen, Oakland’s first coach in
the post-Al Davis era, with an 8-20 record
that could easily land him on the hot seat in
the offseason.
“We haven’t made enough plays at the end
of football games to be able to win those
games,” Allen said Friday. “(If) we keep giv-
ing ourselves opportunities, we keep put-
ting ourselves in those positions, eventual-
ly ... we’ll make those plays at the end of
the games and we’ll win those games.”
The problem is they haven’t .
Oakland built a 21-7 lead over Dallas in
the second quarter before the Cowboys
stormed back to win. A week earlier, the
Raiders let a 19-16 lead slip away in the
final moments of a loss to the Tennessee
Titans.
They also blew fourth-quarter leads
against the Indianapolis Colts and New York
Giants, and lost to Washington after hold-
ing the advantage at halftime.
Gone is talk of a possible playoff run,
replaced by the mere hope of winning out
and avoiding a losing record for the ninth
time since 2002.
“I understand where we’re at from a record
standpoint, but these guys have gone out
there and given us everything that they’ve
had every single week,” Allen said. “I con-
tinue to expect to see that for the last four
weeks of the season. They’re learning expe-
riences for us and hopefully guys are contin-
uing to learn from it.”
Oakland has a nine-day break in between
games and needs the extra rest.
Running back Rashad Jennings suffered a
concussion against Dallas and will have to
go through NFL protocol before being
cleared to play. Right guard Mike Brisiel
was knocked out of the game with a knee
injury, while safety Usama Young injured
his neck.
Even at full strength, it has been a tough
haul for the Raiders in November.
Oakland’s last three losses have come by
seven points or fewer. The only win came
against a Houston team that had dropped
seven straight going in.
Along the way, the Raiders have switched
quarterbacks, lost their top running back
and wide receiver to injury and played with
an ever-changing offensive line that has
also been beset by injuries.
Undrafted rookie quarterback Matt
McGloin, who replaced injured starter
Terrelle Pryor before the win against the
Texans, had a second straight mediocre out-
ing but is expected to keep his job.
“I don’t think he’s done anything to play
himself out of that position,” Allen said.
“Really, in every game that he’s been the
starting quarterback, we’ve had an opportu-
nity to win those football games. We just
haven’t been able to pull them out.”
That might be the one area in which the
Raiders have improved from a year ago.
They lost five games by 21 points or more
in 2012. This year, Oakland has had just one
lopsided loss — a 49-20 blowout by the
Philadelphia Eagles on Nov. 3.
“When you watch us play and you watch us
work every day, there is absolutely nothing
that would give me any indication that there
is anybody in that locker room that has any
give up in them,” Allen said. “I like this
football team.”
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
reminding his Panthers of the great season
they had. “I think if you look at the score, I
don’t know how indicative it is of the game
and just looking back, and before I have a
chance to watch the film, I think there were
five plays that really changed the outcome
of this game. And if you look at most foot-
ball games ... anytime it’s a close game, it’s
usually five or six plays that change the out-
come. They made them at the right time. We
didn’t. And I think that’s the difference in
today’s game.”
The game itself was decided in a 10 to 12
minute span starting at the five-minute mark
of the second quarter. At the time, St.
Ignatius was dominating in the category
that mattered the most: Points. The
Wildcats were up 21-0 behind two of those
five plays Philipopoulos mentioned. First,
a 75-yard touchdown grab on play-action
that saw Joe Lang get behind the
Burlingame defense and increased S.I’s lead
to 14-0. And second, a fumble deep in
Burlingame territory gave the Wildcats the
football on the 21-yard line. Three plays
later, St. Ignatius was up by three touch-
downs and looking to put the game away
early.
But with five minutes and change left in
the half, Burlingame responded. On second
down, Manese Palu got his hands on the
football and scampered 50 yards to the
house, igniting the Burlingame side of the
field. Then, with time ticking off the clock,
the Panthers defense held and then were
granted a big gift when the Wildcats botched
the punt attempt and gave Burlingame the
ball on the S.I. 17-yard line.
On the next snap, Griffin Intrieri went
over the left side and scored to make it 21-
14.
“I thought we ran the ball a little better
that I thought we would coming into the
game,” Philipopoulos said. “I really
thought we would have to pass the ball to
loosen them up. But once we got into a good
rhythm, we had some big runs. I thought
that was the most consistent part of our
game tonight. Maybe I’m wrong.”
Even though St. Ignatius was up by
seven, Burlingame had the momentum and
the ball to start the third quarter. But the
Panthers weren’t able to do much on that
opening drive — which might have really
made things very interesting. Instead, they
punted and a nice return by Lang set S.I up at
the Burlingame 40-yard line. Abig comple-
tion on fourth down kept the drive alive
early and the Wildcats went up 28-14 with
7:37 left in the third quarter.
The Panthers couldn’t do much on the
ensuing possession either and after another
punt, an enormous roughing the kicker
penalty gave S.I new life on a drive that had
been thwarted but instead culminated with a
fourth down conversion that went for 32-
yard and touchdown — that score actually
came on a broken play that the Wildcats
converted miraculously.
“That hurt,” Philipopoulos said. “That
hurt. ... All those little things, they add up.
And when you play a team like S.I., you
can’t do that. And we did and that is why
we’re looking at a loss and will be collect-
ing gear tonight.
“We had a lot of momentum. We were feel-
ing good in the locker room. We had a game
plan. We stuck to it. We just, again, S.I. is a
great defense. Their front is very formida-
ble. They’re hard to block. They’re hard to
get a push on and even in our pass sets, they
were getting a lot of penetration. They had
guys in our quarterback’s face and we just
didn’t have time to throw the ball. We had
guys open at times, their defensive front
was just so ferocious it was hard to keep
them off our quarterback.”
The three touchdown deficit to begin the
fourth quarter proved way too much for the
Panthers to overcome. They’d score on a
Keone Keahi run with 3:57 left in the game
but failed to recover an onside kick. S.I put
an exclamation point on the night with a
late touchdown.
“I think we had a great season,”
Philipopoulos said. “We had a record season
and did a lot of great things. Ultimately, we
want to be playing next and we didn’t get
that done.”
Over in CCS Division II, Menlo-Atherton
saw its season come to an end against Los
Gatos 35-6.
The win served as a bit of revenge for Los
Gatos, who lost to M-A19-10 earlier in the
season. The Bears end their 2013 campaign
with an 8-4 overall record.
SPORTS 14
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Continued from page 11
CCS
Westbrook’s 3-pointer beats Warriors in OT
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma City
Thunder coach Scott Brooks might have
some choices to make when scripting last-
second shots.
Brooks drew up a play for Kevin Durant
on Friday night, but it was Russell
Westbrook that came through in the end.
Westbrook’s corner 3-pointer with 0.1
seconds left in overtime gave Oklahoma
City a wild 113-112 victory over the
Golden State Warriors.
Brooks drew up the play to get Durant
the ball, but the NBA scoring leader’s
floater missed with 12 seconds left.
Officials called the ball out on Golden
State and used replay to confirm the call.
After the review, Serge Ibaka’s 15-foot
jump shot missed the mark and the ball
looked headed out of bounds before Thabo
Sefolosha’s diving save gave the Thunder
one final try.
Sefolosha found Westbrook, who took
off one way, turned the other and drilled
the 3-pointer over Harrison Barnes to give
the Thunder the win.
“When he tells people about out this
one, he doesn’t have to exaggerate it
because there’s no bigger fish story than
what he did tonight,” Brooks said of
Westbrook’s heroics.
Westbrooks’ shot was reviewed as well
but once again, replay sided with the
Thunder.
When Westbrook snagged the ball, there
was no question he was going for the win.
“I’m not going to tie the game,”
Westbrook said. “There’s no need to tie the
game. I did the same thing in Golden State
but unfortunately it didn’t work out for
us.”
In that game on Nov. 14, it was the
Warriors who came out ahead with a big
last-second shot, when Andre Iguodala’s
fallaway jumper at the buzzer gave Golden
State a 116-115 win.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
vs.Ducks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/30
vs.Devils
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/23
vs.L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/27
vs. St.Louis
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/29
@Penguins
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/5
@Toronto
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/3
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/27
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN/ESPN
11/22
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/23
@Pelicans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/26
@Kings
3p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/1
@OKC
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/29
@Carolina
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
12/6
vs.Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/3
Playoffs
Playoffs
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 6 9 .400 —
Boston 7 11 .389 1/2
Philadelphia 6 11 .353 1
Brooklyn 4 12 .250 2 1/2
New York 3 12 .200 3
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 13 3 .813 —
Atlanta 9 8 .529 4 1/2
Charlotte 8 9 .471 5 1/2
Washington 7 9 .438 6
Orlando 6 10 .375 7
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 15 1 .938 —
Chicago 7 7 .500 7
Detroit 6 10 .375 9
Cleveland 4 12 .250 11
Milwaukee 2 13 .133 12 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 14 2 .875 —
Houston 12 5 .706 2 1/2
Dallas 10 7 .588 4 1/2
Memphis 8 7 .533 5 1/2
New Orleans 7 8 .467 6 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 13 3 .813 —
Oklahoma City 11 3 .786 1
Denver 9 6 .600 3 1/2
Minnesota 8 9 .471 5 1/2
Utah 2 15 .118 11 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 12 5 .706 —
Phoenix 9 7 .563 2 1/2
L.A. Lakers 9 8 .529 3
Golden State 9 8 .529 3
Sacramento 4 10 .286 6 1/2
Friday’sGames
San Antonio 109, Orlando 91
Charlotte 92, Milwaukee 76
Miami 90,Toronto 83
Boston 103, Cleveland 86
Atlanta 88, Dallas 87
L.A. Lakers 106, Detroit 102
Houston 114, Brooklyn 95
Oklahoma City 113, Golden State 112, OT
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 26 17 7 2 36 72 54
Tampa Bay 26 16 9 1 33 76 66
Detroit 27 13 7 7 33 74 71
Montreal 26 14 9 3 31 69 55
Toronto 26 14 9 3 31 73 69
Ottawa 26 10 12 4 24 76 86
Florida 26 7 14 5 19 58 86
Buffalo 27 6 20 1 13 48 84
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 27 17 9 1 35 81 63
Washington 26 13 11 2 28 79 76
N.Y. Rangers 26 13 13 0 26 55 64
New Jersey 26 10 11 5 25 58 64
Carolina 26 10 11 5 25 55 75
Philadelphia 25 11 12 2 24 54 61
Columbus 26 10 13 3 23 66 77
N.Y. Islanders 26 8 15 3 19 70 90
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 27 19 4 4 42 97 74
St. Louis 25 18 4 3 39 89 57
Colorado 24 18 6 0 36 73 50
Minnesota 27 15 8 4 34 66 64
Nashville 26 13 11 2 28 60 72
Winnipeg 28 12 12 4 28 73 80
Dallas 24 12 9 3 27 68 70
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 25 17 3 5 39 88 57
Anaheim 28 18 7 3 39 88 73
Los Angeles 26 16 6 4 36 69 56
Phoenix 25 15 6 4 34 83 79
Vancouver 27 13 9 5 31 72 70
Calgary 25 8 13 4 20 68 92
Edmonton 27 8 17 2 18 70 93
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday’sGames
Washington 3, Montreal 2, SO
Chicago 2, Dallas 1, SO
Philadelphia 2,Winnipeg 1
Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 3,Tampa Bay 0
Detroit 5, N.Y. Islanders 0
Anaheim 5, Calgary 2
San Jose 6, St. Louis 3
Colorado 3, Minnesota 1
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 6 5 0 .545 298 279
Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260
N.Y. Giants 4 7 0 .364 213 280
Washington 3 8 0 .273 252 338
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196
Carolina 7 3 0 .700 238 135
Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 237
Atlanta 2 9 0 .182 227 309
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 253
Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 267
Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 239
Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 320
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179
San Francisco 7 4 0 .636 274 184
Arizona 7 4 0 .636 254 223
St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 266 255
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 3 0 .700 256 199
N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 268
Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 225
Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 276
Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 318
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206
Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216 245
Baltimore 4 6 0 .400 208 212
Cleveland 4 6 0 .400 192 238
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 255
Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232 138
Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 246
San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 222
Thursday, Nov. 28
Green Bay at Detroit, 9:30 a.m.
Oakland at Dallas, 1:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 1
NFL GLANCE
FRIDAY
Football
CCSsemifinals
DivisionII
Los Gatos 35, Menlo-Atherton 6
DivisionIII
St. Ignatius 41, Burlingame 21
SATURDAY
Football
CCSsemifinals
OpenDivision
No. 6 Bellarmine (8-3) vs. No. 2 Serra (9-2), 7 p.m. at
Independence
DivisionIV
No.5 Monterey (8-3) at No.1 Sacred Heart Prep (10-
1), 1 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB — LHP Ted Lilly announced his retirement.
American League
KANSASCITYROYALS—Agreedtotermswithsen-
ior vice president of baseball operatons/general
manager Dayton Moore on a two-year contract ex-
tension.
National League
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Ryan Vogelsong on a one-year contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Pittsburgh CB William Gay $15,750,
New Orleans DE Cam Jordan $10,000 and Detroit
DT Ndamukong Suh, N.Y. Jets DT Kenrick Ellis and
Chicago G Kyle Long $7,875 for their actions dur-
ing last week’s games.
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed S Sean Cattouse from
the practice squad. Released DT Tracy Robertson.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed CB Chase Min-
nifield from the practice squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Returned D Tim Er-
ixon to Springfield (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Activated D Anton
Volchenkov from injured reserve.
NEW YORK RANGERS — Reassigned Fs Michael St.
Croix and Josh Nicholls from Hartford (AHL) to
Greenville (ECHL).
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — One play. One yard. One
disputed video review.
More than 60 minutes of tough, physical
football in South Bend last season ended
when a wall of Notre Dame defenders
stopped Stanford’s Stepfan Taylor inches
short of the end zone in overtime. Cardinal
coach David Shaw and his players believed
the ball crossed the goal line on Taylor’s
second effort, but officials had already
blown the whistle — and that meant the
play was over.
Notre Dame 20, Stanford 13.
While the Fighting Irish advanced to the
BCS championship game in Miami, where
they lost to Alabama, the Cardinal’s motto
became “finish strong.” Stanford did just
that, winning its final eight games, includ-
ing the Pac-12 title and the Rose Bowl.
The eighth-ranked Cardinal (9-2) carry
that same message into Saturday’s regular-
season finale against No. 25 Notre Dame (8-
3) before next week’s conference champi-
onship game. Not as a rallying cry for
revenge, rather as a reminder not to let any
game come down to such a difficult decision.
“In the end, the opportunities that were
there for us to make, we didn’t make. The
opportunities that were there for Notre
Dame to make, they made,” Shaw said.
“Besides that last play in the game, that was
the real difference in the game.”
The teams are different now and so are the
stakes.
Kevin Hogan took over for struggling
starter Josh Nunes two weeks after the loss
to the Irish and has been a key cog in the
Cardinal’s resurgence. Linebacker Manti
Te’o and other starters are gone for Notre
Dame, and the Irish’s defense has hardly
been as dominant in their absence.
And unlike last year’s meeting, both
teams are already out of the national cham-
pionship picture.
The only way Stanford can clinch a fourth
straight BCS bowl is by beating No. 13
Arizona State in the Pac-12 championship
game next week and booking a return trip to
the Rose Bowl. Notre Dame, with three
losses, has no chance of making a BCS
bowl but still wants to finish strong in
coach Brian Kelly’s fourth season.
The Irish, who can move closer to consec-
utive 10-win seasons for the first time since
1992-93, know exactly what it will take in
the rematch at Stanford Stadium — where
the Cardinal have won 15 straight.
“When you’re playing a physical team
like Stanford, it’s always going to come
down to a couple of plays that will change
the course of the game,” left guard Chris
Watt said. “So just being able to capitalize
on some of the opportunities that Stanford
gives us is very important.”
Here are two things to watch when
Stanford and Notre Dame meet again:
SIMILAR STYLES: Both teams recruit the
same players and play a bruising brand of
football. They also make so secret about
what they want to do: run the ball and stop
the run. As last year showed, that makes the
margin for error awfully small. “It’s two
people trying to do the same thing,” Irish
left tackle Zack Martin said, “and neither
team breaks that easy. ”
PERFECT REES: Tommy Rees completed
all four of his passes for 43 yards and the
winning TD in overtime last year after
Stanford knocked out Everett Golson. Rees
is the starter now, throwing for 2,739 yards,
25 touchdowns and 11 interceptions this
season. And he’d love nothing more than
another big-time performance against
Stanford. “It was one of the cooler moments
here at Notre Dame Stadium since I’ve been
here,” Rees said. “I remember the goal-line
stand and not being able to watch. Running
out on the field, it was an awesome memory
for sure.”
Stanford, Notre Dame ready for another tough game
San Jose State upsets No. 16 Fresno State
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — After watching two potent
offenses march up and down the field with
ease in the first half, San Jose State coach
Ron Caragher knew he needed to do some-
thing bold to get an extra possession in the
second.
An onside kick to open the half accom-
plished just that and helped the Spartans get
bowl eligible with their first win over a
ranked opponent in 13 years.
San Jose State converted that surprise
play into a touchdown and David Fales did
the rest by throwing for a school-record 547
yards and six scores in a 62-52 victory
Friday over No. 16 Fresno State.
“The way things were going, it becomes a
matter of possessions with two offenses
that were constantly scoring,” Caragher
said. “It was executed to perfection. Ahuge
thing to gain this extra possession.”
That combined with a fourth-quarter inter-
ception by Carr proved to be much for the
Bulldogs (10-1, 7-1 Mountain West) to
overcome as they saw their hopes for a pos-
sible BCS bowl berth end with the loss.
Fales was every bit as good as the more
heralded Carr, matching his six first-half
touchdown passes and completing 37 of 45
passes in a near perfect performance that
made the Spartans (6-6, 4-4) eligible to go
to a bowl game in consecutive seasons for
the first time since 1986-87.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 17
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If there were ever a sea-
son to learn, via the
movies, about crucial peri-
ods of history, it’s this one.
Last month we were intro-
duced to “12 Years a Slave,”
Steve McQueen’s unforget-
table look at American slav-
ery, through one man with an
incredible story.
And now we have “Mandela:
Long Walk to Freedom,” a film
about another vital chapter in the
world’s history — the struggle
against apartheid in South Africa —
also through the incredible story of
one man, albeit one we know well,
and an adored hero of our times.
Cinematically, “Mandela,” directed
by Justin Chadwick and based on
Mandela’s autobiography, is not nearly as
groundbreaking, nor as powerful, as “12
Years a Slave.” But that doesn’t mean it
doesn’t handle its subject with admirable
ambition and scope.
It is, though, that ambition and scope
that also bogs down the movie a bit.
Mandela’s life is portrayed here from his
beginnings in a rural village to his election
as president in 1994 at age 75. That’s a huge
amount of ground to cover, even without the
newsreel-like scenes of historical context.
And so, the film can feel too much like a
stock, traditional biopic, with little time to
delve into any one thing.
The happy news here is Idris Elba’s mag-
netic performance as Mandela, portraying
both the man’s heroic aspects and, at times,
his faults: The younger Mandela was rather a
playboy, it appears, and the film does not
portray his behavior toward his first wife in
a favorable light.
Most of all, Elba finds the core of human-
i t y, wisdom, strength and patience that
made this one man capable of changing his
country’s history. By the end of this 139-
minute film, Elba has so inhabited the char-
acter that you might be stunned to see pho-
tos of the real man, during credits, and real-
ize the extensive physical differences
(although the real man, apparently, thought
he might be seeing footage of himself when
the producer showed him a scene).
The wise casting extends to the second
most important character, Winnie Mandela.
As portrayed by Naomie Harris, the woman
who would become Mandela’s second wife
first appears to us as a hypnotically lovely
young lady, full of verve. “I’ve heard you
have a lot of girlfriends,” Winnie tells
Mandela when they meet. “I’m different.”
And you believe her. Later, Harris must
transform Winnie into a hardened, increas-
ingly bold activist, eventually at odds with
her husband. Again, you believe her.
We get to know Mandela as an engaging
young lawyer, reluctant to attend an African
National Congress meeting. As he becomes
Elba anchors ‘Mandela’ with dignity, charm
By Jessica
Herndon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEVERLY HILLS — When
portraying South African rev-
olutionary Nelson Mandela in
the biopic, “Mandela: Long
Walk to Freedom,” Idris Elba
embraced the harsh realities
of Mandela’s life and was determined to stay
in character even when the cameras stopped
rolling.
But the British actor knew his latest
movie wouldn’t be believable unless his
fellow actors could deliver a performance as
raw as his own — so he pushed them to
embrace uncomfortable realties, too.
Elba recounted one such instance when he
was shooting scenes that focused on
Mandela’s 27 years in jail under white
minority rule. During the filming, he sensed
that a couple of white actors were struggling
to portray the brutality in which Mandela
was treated.
“They felt bad. ... I could see it in their
eyes. I spoke to director (Justin Chadwick)
and I said, ‘I need these guys to go back to
their core. If there is any sense of racism in
them I need them to bring it up. If there is a
black person that they don’t like let me hear
it and feel it,”’ said Elba intently, leaning in
during a recent interview in a dim
Hollywood bar.
“That was important because it would
come through in the performance and sud-
denly it becomes the biopic that’s safe.”
Safe would not be the word to describe
Mandela the man, or the movie. While it
shows him as the genial peacemaker that
the world embraced when he was freed from
‘Mandela’ marks Elba’s cinematic maturity
See MANDELA, Page 19
See ELBA, Page 19
18
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
With the election a mere week
away, an intellectually and ethical-
ly challenged American president
is deeply worried about his
chances for re-election in David
Mamet’s “November,” presented
by Dragon Theatre in Redwood
City.
President Charles Smith’s (Peter
K. Owen) fears are justified. As
pointed out by his chief of staff,
Archer Brown (Fred Pitts), the
American people hate him, and his
campaign has run out of money for
last-second TV spots.
Smith decides to extract the
money from a hapless, sputtering
representative of the National
Turkey and Turkey By-Products
Manufacturers (Bill Davidovich),
which usually pays the president
$50,000 to pardon a turkey for
Thanksgiving.
In the midst of these machina-
tions, the president summons his
ace speech writer, Clarice
Bernstein (Stephanie Crowley), to
the White House even though she
has called in sick. She has just
returned from China where she and
her female partner adopted a baby
girl.
The wheeling and dealing goes
back and forth. One of the negoti-
ations involves Bernstein agree-
ing to write a turkey-pardon
speech for the president if he’ll
agree to preside over her marriage
to her partner. As pointed out by
the president and his aide in this
2008 play, same-sex marriage is
illegal, but Bernstein is unde-
terred.
As if all this weren’t enough, an
Indian chief, Dwight Grackle
(James Devreaux Lewis), barges
into the Oval Office after the pres-
ident insulted him on the phone.
Director Troy Johnson deftly
oversees the three principals —
Owen as the president, Pitts as the
aide and Crowley as the speech
writer. Owen is telegenic and glib
enough to at least look presiden-
tial, while Pitts is marvelously
low-key yet blunt as his aide.
Crowley is believable as the ail-
ing Bernstein, who is quick-witted
and tough when trying to achieve
her own goal.
On the other hand, Davidovich
as the turkey lobbyist and Lewis as
the Indian chief overact, and both
are too loud for Dragon’s intimate
space.
Still, this two-act production is
enjoyable not only for its often
humorous, even absurd moments
but also for its credible hints at
how business might sometimes be
conducted in Washington, replete
with lots of four-letter words.
“November” will continue at the
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City, through Dec. 15.
For tickets and information call
(650) 493-2006 or visit
http://dragonproductions.net.
‘November’ paints unflattering picture of Oval Office
Peter K. Owen, left, plays President Charles Smith, and Fred Pitts plays
Archer Brown, the president’s chief of staff, in ‘November,’ presented by
Dragon Theatre in Redwood City.
WEEKED JOURNAL 19
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
ELVIS, LEAD BELLYAND THE RESIDENTS: SHREVEPORT, LA., REVELS IN ITS
MUSIC.
Music is woven into the fiber of
Shreveport. Generations of performers have
been born or nurtured there, adding their
names to the rich history of this upbeat city
on the banks of the historic Red River.
ELVIS MAY HAVE LEFT THE
BUILDING, BUT HIS LEGEND, AND
THE BUILDING, REMAIN. Two build-
ings in Shreveport mark key dates in music
history. Built in the 1920s, and noted for its
intricate brickwork and lavish interior, the
Shreveport Municipal Memorial Auditorium
has been cited as the finest example of Art
Deco construction in Louisiana. But more
importantly, at least for popular culture, it
is where, on Oct. 16, 1954, a 19-year-old
Elvis Presley stepped on stage to sing for
the storied Louisiana Hayride radio pro-
gram. That performance, generally consid-
ered his first big break, was broadcast live
on KWKH, a 50,000-watt Shreveport sta-
tion reaching 28 states. Elvis eventually
gave 84 shows for the Hayride (at $18 per
show). During the last of those performanc-
es, on Dec. 15, 1956, at the Hirsch
Memorial Coliseum in Shreveport, 9,000
fans screamed at the top of their lungs for
the entire show so loudly that it was impos-
sible to hear if he was actually singing.
After Elvis gave his final encore and left the
stage, the crowd headed for the exits, hop-
ing to see him outside. Hayride promoter
Horace Logan pleaded with concertgoers to
stay for the other acts on the bill, saying,
“Alright, alright, Elvis has left the build-
ing. I’ve told you absolutely straight up to
this point, you know that he has left the
building; he left the stage and went out the
back with the policeman and he is now gone
from the building.” Today visitors from
around the world come to Shreveport to see
where the legend began and to pose with a
bronze statue of a forever young Elvis in
front of the Shreveport Municipal
Memorial Auditorium at 705 Elvis Presley
Ave.
WELL, HE WAS DOWN IN
LOUISIANA: LEAD BELLY IN
SHREVEPORT. Blues musician Huddie
“Lead Belly” Ledbetter (1888-1949), the
first to record “Goodnight, Irene” (his sig-
nature song) and the author of “Cotton
Fields,” developed his musical style as a
teenager by playing on Fannin Street in
Shreveport’s red light district. The “King of
the 12-string Guitar,” Lead Belly was
inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of
Fame in 2008. His life-sized bronze statue,
by Shreveport artist Jesse Pitts, stands in
front of the Shreve Memorial Library at 424
Texas St. in downtown Shreveport, just a
few blocks from Ledbetter’s Fannin street
roots. Ledbetter was known to say that he
always knew he was nearing Shreveport
when he could see the steeple of the First
United Methodist Church; the statue stands
with an outstretched right arm pointing up
Texas Street at that very church. He is buried
in Mooringsport, La., 12 miles north of
Shreveport.
FROM SHREVEPORT TO SAN
MATEO TO ?? WHO/WHAT/WHERE
ARE THEY?? THE RESIDENTS KEEP
THEIR FANS GUESSING. Although the
four member avant-garde group The
Residents have steadfastly refused to reveal
WHO they are, they do allow people to
know WHERE they hail from, namely
Shreveport, where they met in high school
in the 1960s. The only other city that they
specifically claim is San Mateo where the
four happened to be when their truck broke
down in the mid ’60s, and where they
stayed, at least for a while. San Mateo
served as an incubator for the mysterious
foursome and, as the album notes on the
back of their debut record Meet The
Residents say, “The Residents ... gained
widespread notoriety for their unusual
recordings, sometimes jokingly referred to
as the San Mateo Sound.” But Shreveport is
where they started, where they are honored
and where their return is awaited.
RED RIVER REVEL. Shreveport’s love
affair with music plays out during its Red
River Revel Arts Festival each October. The
Revel, as locals know it, is a high-spirited,
high-calorie celebration of the food, art and
music of Northern Louisiana. And it can
serve to launch a music career. A video of
guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd’s first per-
formance at the Revel put him on the path to
a multiple album record deal.
AND REMEMBER: All journeys have
secret destinations of which the traveler is
unaware. — Martin Buber.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine & Travel
Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
THE RESIDENTS:FROM SHREVEPORT TO SAN MATEO TO THE WORLD STAGE.A banner hanging
during the 2013 Red River Revel Arts Festival in Shreveport, La., depicts The Residents, the
famously anonymous multi-media artists with roots in both Northern Louisiana and San
Mateo.
prison and became South Africa’s first black
president, it also shows him as a fiery and
flawed revolutionary who sought to abolish
apartheid through any means necessary as
leader as the African National Congress.
Chadwick called Idris brave and lauded his
portrayal of Mandela.
“There are not many people who would
step into the shoes of Mandela, particularly
the way I was making the movie,” he said.
“There was no room for any untruth. When
you are standing in front of thousands of
people portraying their leader that they
know so well you’d better be on it, and Idris
was on it.”
Elba did not have a chance to speak to the
95-year-old icon because of his failing
health. But he drew on the mannerisms of his
late father to help him with his interpreta-
tion of Mandela. He also spoke to a few of
Mandela’s daughters and his second wife,
Winnie, who was also a powerful figure in the
anti-apartheid movement.
“Winnie said it’s all good to see a guy who
is waving and smiling,” said Elba. “But she
needed to see the complex man.”
Based on Mandela’s autobiography, the
film, which opens Friday, has been in the
works for years. Denzel Washington was the
original choice for the role.
“But at some point the DNAchanged and it
didn’t work for him to do the film, so my
name was thrown in that mix,” said Elba. “In
actuality it was really easy to get the job, but
I didn’t believe that I had gotten it.”
Once reality set in, so did Elba’s nerves. “I
was like, ‘Damn, do I have this performance
in me?”’ the 41-year-old actor said.
Continued from page 17
ELBA
more involved in the struggle, his worried
mother, Nosekeni (an affecting Zikhona
Sodlaka), makes no secret of her disap-
proval. His first marriage fails.
Mandela’s lovely courtship with Winnie
culminates in a traditional wedding in tribal
dress. This dreamlike moment gives way to
scenes of the shocking Sharpeville mas-
sacre in 1960, when police mowed down 69
people. Soon, activist Mandela is on the
run.
His famous trial, with the masses gathered
outside, is well captured here. As the world
knows, Mandela and his co-defendants were
sentenced to life in prison, and his next 27
years were spent there, 18 of them at the for-
bidding Robben Island.
“You will never touch a woman or a child
again,” a prison official tells Mandela. “You
will die here.” Everyone watching the film
will know this isn’t true. But knowing what
happens hardly blunts the impact of the
thrilling 1990 release scene, nor Mandela’s
election as president in 1994.
Aclosing scene of the older Mandela, sur-
rounded by children, reminds us that he is
still alive, at 95. This is the perfect time for
youngsters (or their elders) who don’t know
enough about the man to go learn about
him. For that reason alone, if not for Elba’s
terrific performance, “Mandela: Long Walk
to Freedom” is 139 minutes very well spent.
“Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom,” a
Weinstein Company release, is rated PG-13
by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “some intense sequences of vio-
lence and disturbing images, sexual content
and brief strong language.” Running time:
139 minutes. Three stars out of four.
MPAA definition of PG-13: Parents
strongly cautioned. Some material may be
inappropriate for children under 13.
Continued from page 17
MANDELA
best way to get home. They decided to book
two weeks in China, two weeks in Japan and
three to four weeks in Hawaii.
While in China, they visited Shanghai
which was a challenge because of the lan-
guage barrier. In Europe, Sri Lanka,
Singapore and Bali, many people speak
English. For a few days, they functioned
without a tour guide and had to decipher street
signs and words on buildings. Fortunately,
while blogging and posting pictures on
Facebook, one of their son’s friend’s mother
connected them to a friend in Xi’an. That
friend invited the Lukes to dinner at their
home and experienced how the Xi’an people
live. Gigi Luke recalls that the dumpling soup
served at dinner became an instant hit with
her family.
In Xi’an and Beijing, they learned about the
Silk Road, the Terra Cotta Warriors and the
Great Wall of China. They also rode pedi-
bikes through the Hu tong area in Beijing,
which is an old dilapidated neighborhood
being prepped for demolition for the con-
struction of skyscrapers. The open markets in
China also provided an adventure, as the
Lukes’ youngest son Justin ate a fried scorpi-
on and enjoyed every bite. The Lukes traveled
to Japan from China and continued to
explore. They visited the Peace Memorial in
Hiroshima as well as several museums. From
Japan, the Lukes headed back to the United
States and enjoyed some well-deserved rest
and relaxation. They stayed in Hawaii for
three weeks and, on June 30, they arrived
back home to California.
Reflection on the journey
In a year, the Lukes visited 14 countries, 34
major cities, 93 towns and villages and more
than 100 historical sites, including 36
UNESCO World Heritage sites. They took 19
flights, drove more than 8,700 miles, rode 40
trains, 36 buses, 14 boats and several sub-
ways in Europe and Asia.
As the family reflected on their adventure,
they recalled some of their favorite foods,
fruit, drinks, art and parts of nature. Gigi Luke
mentioned the tea shops in France and the
daily farmers’ market. Bob and Gigi Luke also
enjoyed the roasted duck and quality provin-
cial rose wine in France. Sri Lanka and
Singapore possessed some of the most exot-
ic and tasty fruit, vegetables and dishes like
Lotus root curry, purple mangosteen, snake-
fruit and rambuton.
Jordan and Justin loved exploring some of
the castles in Europe and enjoyed eating the
Cornish pasties in London. Justin remembers
the pandas at the zoo in China, and the multi-
tude of monkeys in Bali. Bob Luke was
intrigued with the beauty of Sri Lanka and the
history of the Silk Road in China. In
Pompeii, the family was enthralled by the
mosaic of Alexander beating Darius and the
prehistoric cave paintings in the valley of
France. The family agreed that each place
they visited had its own value at that time.
They’re grateful for the hospitality they
received from all of their friends, including
the ones they made along the way, especially
in Bali.
Gigi Luke credits her husband with being an
ultimate supporter and partner that made sure
the family was safe and comfortable. The
Lukes created a bond with their family that
will always live. Their children are now
equipped with priceless knowledge and char-
acter.
The Lukes suggest that if a family is think-
ing about embarking on a similar adventure,
don’t hesitate to move out of your comfort
zone. Be prepared to simply let it go.
“It’s liberating to be spontaneous, flexible
and self-sufficient,” said Gigi Luke. “It’s so
fulfilling to know that you were present to the
vivid experience.”
Continued from page 8
TRAVEL
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, NOV. 30
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. The American
Legion San Bruno Post No. 409, 757
San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon,
ham or sausage and French toast
will be served. There will also be
juice, coffee and tea. $8 for adults
and $5 for children under 10. For
more information call 583-1740.
Autumn in the Watershed. 10 a.m.
to noon. Picchetti Ranch Open Space
Preserve. Leisurely 3-mile stroll
through the Stevens Creek
Watershed. Learn about the interac-
tions between water, plants, animals,
geology and soils during the fall.
Free. For more information go to
www.openspace.org/activities.
Make Your Own Gifts and Cards.
10 a.m. Reach And Teach, 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
www.reachandteach.com.
San Bruno Education Foundation
Bookfair. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Barnes &
Noble at Tanforan, San Bruno. Your
purchase of books, gifts, music, toys,
games, electronics and Starbucks
food earn money for San Bruno
schools. You can also order online
from Nov. 30 to Dec. 5 using our
code, 11234028 at BN.com/book-
fairs. For more information go to
www.sanbrunoedfound.org.
Author Talks and Book Signing.
11:45 a.m. Reach And Teach — 144
W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 759-3784.
Scout’s Fund Holiday Gathering.
Noon to 2 p.m. Peninsula Humane
Society and SPCA, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. Enjoy holiday treats for
you and your pet. $50 suggested
donation. For more information
admin@scoutsfund.org.
Free Scottish Holiday Concert. 3
p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 415
El Camino Real, Burlingame. The
Stewart Tartan Pipes and Drums will
perform. For more information con-
tact phil@lenihan.org.
Author Talks and Book Signing.
5:30 p.m. Reach And Teach — 144 W.
25th Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 759-3784.
The Fab Four-The Ultimate
Tribute. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. For more
information go to foxrwe.com.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
SUNDAY, DEC. 1
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
$5. For more information call 616-
7150.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 2
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
32nd Annual Classical Piano Fest.
4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach House, 307
Miranda Road, Half Moon Bay. Mack
McCray of the San Francisco
Conservatory joins South Korean
award winning pianist Yoonie Han
and Jeffrey LaDeur, founding mem-
ber of the San Francisco based
Delphi Trio, for three individual 35
minute sets on the 9-foot Steinway.
$35, $30 for 12 and under. Tickets at
www.bachddsoc.org. For more infor-
mation call 726-2020.
MONDAY, DEC. 2
December meeting for Hearing
Loss of the Peninsula. 1 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Free holiday party with activities and
food. Open to the public. For more
information, call publicity chairman
Cora Jean Kleppe at 345-4551.
Maker Monday: Make Crafts. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Ages 12 to
19. For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
Celebrate Hanukkah, Festival of
Lights. 4 p.m. Stanford Hospital
Atrium, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford.
A light snack will be served. For more
information contact lallen@stan-
fordmed.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Ron Borelli Trio. Free dance les-
sons, 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m.; open dance 7
p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame Woman’s
Club, 241 Park Road, Burlingame. Fun
evening of dance and camaraderie.
Admission is $8 members, $10
guests. Male dance hosts get free
admission. For more information call
342-2221.
TUESDAY, DEC. 3
American Red Cross Northern
California Region Mobile Blood
Drive. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Ritz
Carlton, 1 Miramontes Point Road,
Half Moon Bay. Open to the public.
For more information go to red-
crossblood.org.
Fourth Annual Public Outdoor
Hanukkah Festival. 5:15 p.m. to
6:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
Broadway, Redwood City. This takes
place on the seventh night of the
eight-day holiday. For more informa-
tion call 232-0995.
Lecture: Maintaining Immune
Health through the Flu Season. 6
p.m. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas St. New Leaf wellness lecture
by Dr. Tobi Schmidt, Ph.D. For more
information call 726-3110 ext. 101.
Ari Shavit. 7 p.m. Cubberley
Community Theatre, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Join
Shavit as he discusses why and how
Israel came to be. $20. For more
information call (800) 847-7730.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4
Free Job Search Assistance. 10 a.m.
to noon. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information email jcowan@jvs.org.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. All books, CDs, tapes and
DVDs are 20 to 50 percent off.
Facebook information session.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Previous computer basics suggest-
ed. For more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Teen Movie: ‘American Graffiti.’
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. A
couple of high school grads spend
one final night cruising the strip with
their buddies before they head off to
college. Rated PG. 110 minutes. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Christmas at Kohl Holiday
Boutique. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Kohl
Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. Get a jump start on hol-
iday shopping with more than 60
vendors. No reservations necessary.
$10 admission fee.
Tree Lighting Ceremony. 6 p.m.
Lagoon Room Patio of the Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. There will be music,
light refreshments, a countdown to
light the holiday tree, and a visit
from Santa. Free. Please bring a
canned good or non-perishable
item to donate to local charity. For
more information go to www.foster-
city.org or call 286-3380.
Small Business Networking Mixer.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Redwood City
Public Library, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
THURSDAY, DEC. 5
The Americas – A Plethora of
Business Opportunity. 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. NestGSV, 425 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation call (831) 335-4780.
Opportunities in Big Data. 6:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. Capgemini, 4000
Shoreline Court, South San
Francisco. Join this panel of distin-
guished experts who will share their
experience and insights in Big Data.
$20 for Members, $35 for Non-
Members, $45 at the Door, $5 Early
Bird discount until Nov 28. For more
information call 386-5015.
Hillsdale High School Presents ‘In
The Heights.’ 7 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Theatre, 3115 Del Monte St.,
San Mateo. $17 for adults and $12 for
students and seniors. Tickets can be
purchased at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama. For
more information email hillsdaledra-
matix@gmail.com.
Notre Dame de Namur
University’s ‘Noël.’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
$25 for students, $15 for students
and seniors. For more information
call 508-3713.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
started Resource Area For Teaching, or
RAFT, after teaching math and science
to second and third graders for 12 years
and having her two children. RAFT is a
nonprofit that gives teachers access to
ready-made, hands-on teaching kits,
more than 600 idea sheets for activities
in math, science and art, a resource
room staffed with education specialists
who can help teachers plan their proj-
ects or lessons, teaching workshops
and affordable teaching supplies.
Locations include Redwood City and
San Jose.
“I wanted to create something I’d love
to have as a teacher,” said Simon, 62. “I
created a wonderful place in which the
minute teachers walk in the door they
feel very respected and are celebrated
professionals. They also find things at
a very low price; it’s sad teachers pay
for things out of pocket.”
Her favorite part of RAFT has been
hearing teacher’s stories as they wander
around RAFT.
“Listening to their challenges and
how RAFT inspired them and their
kids,” she said. “It’s important to me
that teachers are re-inspired to be what
they imagined when they were in col-
lege.”
RAFT serves 10,000 educators each
year who teach more than 825,000 stu-
dents. RAFT also has a processing
facility in Sunnyvale, where volunteers
process materials donated by local
companies and assemble kits made up
of cardboard tubes, rubber bands, CDs
and many other items.
“You’re limited only by your imagi-
nation,” said Simon about what stu-
dents and teachers can do with the mate-
rials.
The transition to Common Core cur-
riculum, the statewide shift to more
project-based learning, challenges edu-
cators to offer practical and engaging
activities that help students develop
critical-thinking skills, she said.
Project-based activities, like those
provided by RAFT, have been proven
effective in helping students achieve a
deeper understanding of complex math
and science concepts, she noted.
“Technology is changing and how
teaching is happening in the classroom
is going to change,” she said. “It will
be interesting to see how RAFT’s real
world, tangible resources can compli-
ment technology. For the first time the
administration is recognizing the
importance of project-based learning
and having students ask questions, not
just answer them.”
Why retire now?
“It was a big decision,” she said.
“There comes a time in life when you
have to make a decision like that. I
know I will miss it.”
Although she has lots of little hob-
bies that will fill her time when she offi-
cially leaves in March 2014, Simon
plans to learn who she is outside of
RAFT. As RAFT is already well-estab-
lished, she’d potentially like to get
back into a startup type environment.
“People will sometimes call me Mary
RAFT,” she said. “I will take at least six
months to find out what will my next
passion be. I’m not the kind of person
who sits at home. I want to go back to
get involved in an operational type
thing. I like to be in the trenches.”
Others from RAFT praised Simon’s
work.
“Under Mary’s leadership, RAFT has
become an invaluable resource for edu-
cators and a hub for community
involvement,” Jon Flaxman, chair of
the RAFT Board of Directors, said in a
prepared statement. “RAFT would not
be what it is today without Mary’s
vision and creativity. We look forward
to celebrating what she has accom-
plished over two decades and welcom-
ing a new leader to grow RAFT’s impact
on education.”
RAFT has not yet hired a replacement
for Simon.
Continued from page 1
SIMON
venues didn’t appear quite as packed but
store workers said business remained
steady.
“Business has been going really
well,” said Brittany Bustamante, assis-
tant manager of hat store Lids which was
open on both Thanksgiving and Black
Friday. “We wanted to give customers
more of an opportunity to purchase
more items.”
One shopper named Jamie, who
declined to give a last name, hit the
Macy’s department store at Hillsdale the
morning of Black Friday looking to
score deals on jewelry, pots and pans.
“I’m working a double shift today so
this is my only time to Black Friday
shop,” she said.
Other non-typical Black Friday shop-
pers also went to Hillsdale for the day.
Bob Spain arrived at 9 a.m. with his
wife and was surprised there weren’t
more people, noting there were no park-
ing issues.
“It’s getting more crowded now,” he
said around 10 a.m. “I don’t normally do
Black Friday.”
Likewise, Susan Forbes of Belmont
simply went to Hillsdale to get her com-
puter fixed at the Apple retail store, but
ended up slipping into Coldwater Creek
to buy some clothing while waiting.
Some stores barely offered a break
between shopping opportunities on
Thursday and Friday. Big box retailer
Kmart, which has a location in San
Mateo, opened for nearly two straight
days beginning on Gray Thursday. Old
Navy at Hillsdale Shopping Center was-
n’t far behind, staying open from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Thanksgiving
through 11 p.m. on Black Friday.
Some Bay Area groups hosted anti-
Black Friday events to protest con-
sumerism. Buy Nothing Day promoted
“unshopping, unspending and unwind-
ing.” Small Business Saturday aims to
support local businesses in the Bay
Area. American Express cardholders can
sign up to get $10 back after spending
$10 or more at participating small busi-
nesses. Participants along the
Peninsula include Dean’s Produce,
Plato’s Closet and Galati Jewelers in
San Mateo, Tutti Frutti in San Carlos,
Broadway Grill in Burlingame, East
West Gallery in San Bruno, Pickled in
Redwood City and other small stores
that take American Express Cards.
Others used the day as an opportunity
to highlight their causes at big box
retailers. A protest at the San Leandro
Walmart coincided with Black Friday
shopping. Agroup of Walmart workers,
labor activists, other low-wage employ-
ees and supporters gathered at the store
to shed light on low worker wages and
workers’ rights violations as part of a
nationwide protest.
For the complete list of small busi-
nesses taking part in Small Business
Saturday visit shopsmallnow.ameri-
canexpress.com/ShopSmall.
Bay City News contributed to this
report .
Continued from page 1
SHOPPING
chains have been opening on
Thanksgiving.
This year, several welcomed shoppers
for the first time on Thanksgiving
night, while Gap Inc., which owns
Banana Republic, Gap and Old Navy,
opened half its stores earlier on the hol-
iday.
Wal-Mart stores, most of which stay
open 24 hours, has for the past several
years offered doorbusters that had been
reserved for Black Friday. And Kmart
planned to stay open 41 hours starting
at 6 a.m. on Thanksgiving.
That has led some to question how
much further Black Friday will creep
into Thanksgiving, which along with
Christmas is one of only two days a year
that most stores are closed.
“Black Friday is now Gray Friday,”
said Craig Johnson, president of
Customer Growth Partners, a retail con-
sultancy.
The earlier openings have met with
some resistance.
Workers’ rights groups and some
shoppers had planned protests on
Thanksgiving and Black Friday to decry
the way some store employees were
forced to miss holiday meals at home.
But as of Thursday afternoon,
there were no reports of wide-
spread protests.
Judy Espey ducked out of a
Thanksgiving family dinner
to buy a 50-inch flat-screen
TV at Wal-Mart near Clifton
Park, N.Y., for $288. But “I
don’t really dig the
Thanksgiving night thing,”
she confessed. “I feel bad for
the workers.”
Vinnie Gopalakrishnan
pledged not to hit the stores
after seeing TV footage of
people shopping on
Thanksgiving. But he flip-
flopped after his cousin told
him about a deal on a big-
screen TV.
“I said, ‘I’m not going to do
it. Those people are crazy,”’
Gopalakrishnan said before
heading to a Wal-Mart on
Friday.
It’s unclear whether the
early openings will lead
shoppers to spend more over
the two days or simply spread
sales out.
Continued from page 1
MARATHON
COMICS/GAMES
11-30-13
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Mischievous sprite
5 Blueprint
9 Gleeful shout
12 District
13 Minute amount
14 Ewe’s mate
15 Carefree escapade
16 Optometrist tool (2 wds.)
18 Used a poker
20 Rudders
21 New singles
22 Coal measure
23 Papa
26 Twist-offs
30 — me with a spoon!
33 River in Asia
34 Lamb’s pen name
35 Tel —
37 Mr. Montand
39 CD forerunners
40 He loved Lucy
41 Early harps
43 Chap
45 “Stormy Weather” singer
48 Mountain retreat
51 Spooked
53 Dancing on air
56 Actress Sorvino
57 Conducted
58 Unwrinkle
59 Cookie baker
60 QB objectives
61 Beach resort
62 Monster’s loch
DOWN
1 Buddies
2 Fuming
3 Make copies
4 Tied up the phone
5 Dappled
6 Actress Myrna —
7 Had brunch
8 Salsa go-with
9 Inland sea of Asia
10 Injure
11 Tsp. and oz.
17 And so
19 Genesis hunter
22 Harrison’s successor
24 With caustic humor
25 — Jones’ locker
27 Omitting none
28 Apple seed
29 Stockholm carrier
30 Run around
31 Wide st.
32 PFCs
36 Watch
38 Part of SASE
42 Homily
44 Prior to
46 Overly trusting
47 Buenos —
48 Druid
49 Pink-slipped
50 Leafs out
51 — — extra charge
52 Karate levels
54 Jackie’s second
55 Gesture
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You will learn the
hard way if you let anger take over. Don’t complain
or waste time arguing a moot point. Concentrate on
what is working. Live in the moment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Set your
standards and stick to your principles. Your
integrity will separate you from any competition you
face, allowing you clear passage to the destination
you choose. Romance is highlighted.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Get along, no matter
how difficult it might be. Arguments will drain you of
the energy you’ll need to reflect and make alternate
plans when things veer off course.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Look into small
business ventures or an investment that shows
potential. Contracts may not be straightforward,
but your negotiating skills will help you find creative
solutions that include the perks you want.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Staying on top of what
needs to be finished will be difficult but a necessity.
Don’t let restlessness cause you to make a move
without sufficient thought. Avoid overindulgence.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Speak up and offer
suggestions. Whether you are dealing with friends,
family or peers, you will capture the attention
required to put your plans in motion and receive the
benefits you desire.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Take care of your
interests first. You must not allow anyone to sidetrack
you, especially if money is involved. You’ll end up being
taken advantage of if you are too complacent.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Make plans, step
into the spotlight, do your own thing and reap the
rewards. Follow your heart and lay groundwork to
secure your home and business future.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Think about what you want
and revamp your plans for the future to better suit
your needs. Don’t discuss what you are doing until
you are ready to take action.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Put more into your
home, family and personal property. Enjoying the
company of someone you love or who shares similar
interests will lead to future plans.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You may want to help
the world, but keep in mind that charity begins at
home. Focus on the people you care about most as
well as making home improvements.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Show how much
you care. Pay more attention to someone you love
or make a donation to a cause you feel passionate
about helping, and you will achieve personal
success and happiness.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec 1, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524926
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
JenniferMichelle Austin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Michelle Austin filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jennifer Michelle Austin
Proposed name: Jennifer Austin Conti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
20, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/04/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/31/2013
(Published, 11/16/13, 11/23/2013,
11/30/2013, 12/07/2013)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258324
The following person is doing business
as: Bitters and Bottles, 240 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bar Antz, LLC. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 07/01/2013.
/s/ Joseph Barwin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258421
The following person is doing business
as: Ryan Limo Transportation, 1456 Bel-
levue Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bouagou Jalal, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bouagou Jalal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258364
The following person is doing business
as: TFG Interim Partners, 1700 S. El Ca-
mino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Ferneborg Group, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/01/2013.
/s/ John Ferneborg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258321
The following person is doing business
as: 1) SFO Express Mart, 2) SFO Ex-
press Maket t300 S. Airport Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Greiner Sevices Stations, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joseph Campagna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258300
The following person is doing business
as: 1 Salon, 34 San Pedro Dr., DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Ying Mei Zhong,
1550 Sloat Blvd., San Francisco, CA
94132. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
12/0113.
/s/ Ying Mei Zhong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258536
The following person is doing business
as: Pendulum Comics, 40 W. 4th Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Max-
well Brown, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Maxwell Leon Brown/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258542
The following person is doing business
as: Skyline News and Gifts, SFO Termi-
nal 3, Boarding Area E, SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94128 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Skyline Concess-
sions, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Manuel Soto IV /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258412
The following person is doing business
as: ALL Care Nurses Staffing Agency,81
Bayview Drive,SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94083 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Joel Dacoron, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 12/01/2013
/s/ Joel Dacoron/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258567
The following person is doing business
as: Special Advantage, 505 Sapphire St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Denise
Jeanne Carbon, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/05/2013.
/s/ Denise Jeanne Carbon/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258659
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Roverware, 116 Hillcrest Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner:Graeme
Ware, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 11/12/2013.
/s/ Graeme Ware /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13).
23 Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258683
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Biz Magic, 2) Business Strat-
egy Technologies, 3) Silcon Valley High
Tech Parade, 2162 Carlmont Dr., Unit 3,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bistratex,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 11/12/2013.
/s/ Graeme Ware /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Vidyagauri Kantilal Khatri
Case Number: 123880
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Vidyagauri Kantilal Kha-
tri. A Petition for Probate has been filed
by Pradeep Kantilal Khatri in the Superi-
or Court of California, County of San Ma-
teo. The Petition for Probate requests
that Pradeep Kantilal Khatri be appointed
as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 13, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Cecelia C. Fusich
2300 Geng Rd. #200
PALO ALTO, CA 94303
(650)493-8070
Dated: November 21, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 23, 30, December 7, 2013.
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Gein Seki
Case Number: 123933
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Gein Seki. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Glenn Seki in
the Superior Court of California, County
of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate
requests that Glenn Seki be appointed
as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 3, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Ken W. Obata
437 El Alamo
DANVILLE, CA 94526
(510)378-3586
Dated: November 22, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 23, 30, December 7, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521342
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado):Nicholas Makreus, aka Nick J.
Makreas, an individual: Does 1-30
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Citibank,
N.A.,
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
203 Public Notices
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harvey M. Moore, Esq. (101128),
Terri Lazo, Esq. (228663)
The Moore Law Group, A Profesional
Corporation
3710 S. Susan St., Ste. 210
SANTA ANA, CA 92704
(714)431-2075
Date: (Fecha) Apr. 29, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: 113CV250881
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): DAI TRUONG; TERESA
TROUNG; and Does 1-50 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): TECH-
NOLOGY CREDIT UNION
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
203 Public Notices
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
Santa Clara
191 N. First St..
San Jose, CA 95113
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
REILLY D. WILKINSON (Bar# 250086)
Scheer Law Group, LLP
155 N. Redwood Dr., Ste. 100
SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903
(415)491-8900
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 08, 2013
David H. Yamasaki, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 23, 30, December 7, 14,
2013.
204 Parking Spaces
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both SOLD!
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both SOLD!
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
24
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CITY OF SAN MATEO PLANNING COMMISSION REGU-
LAR MEETING AGENDA TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2013
COUNCIL CHAMBERS, CITY HALL 3 30 WEST 20TH AVE-
NUE, SAN MATEO 7:30 PM Pledge of Allegiance Roll Call
Approve Minutes for November 12, 2013 ***Public Comment
Period + ITEM 1 STUDY SESSION PA13-058 CLASSICS
AT SAN MATEO PRE-APPLICATION, preliminary review for
the demolition of existing structures and major landscaping
on site (including heritage trees) and the construction of a
new 36,202 square feet, four story residential development
with 27 units at 106, 110, & 120 Tilton Avenue, San Mateo.
APN 032-311-120 and 130. The project site is 33,450 square
feet located on Tilton Avenue between North San Mateo
Drive and North El Camino Real. The surrounding uses in-
clude single-family residences to the west, multi-family resi-
dential uses to the north and south, and medical office use to
the east. The project site is zoned R5 (Multiple-Family Dwell-
ings – High Density). PROJECT PLANNER: Julia Klein, As-
sociate Planner jklein@cityofsanmateo.org
APPLICANT/PROPERTY OWNER: Scott Ward & Adam
Kates Classic Communities, Inc. 1068 East Meadow Circle
Palo Alto, CA 94303 (650) 496-4496 akates@mozartdev.com
sward@mozartdev.com COMMUNICATIONS/ANNOUNCE-
MENTS 1. Communications from the Staff 2. Communica-
tions from the Commissioners 3. Other ADJOURNMENT ~
SPECIAL MEETING item for discussion purposes only, NO
vote is taken; instead comments are given for consideration
and explanation before the project comes back to a future,
publicly noticed Planning Commission meeting. + STUDY
SESSION item for discussion purposes only, NO vote is tak-
en; instead comments are given for consideration and subse-
quent plan revision before the project comes back to a future,
publicly noticed Planning Commission meeting. * Decision fi-
nal with Planning Commission unless appealed in accord-
ance with Section 27.08.090 of the San Mateo Municipal
Code. ** This item will be presented to the City Council un-
less otherwise stated by the Planning Commission. *** PUB-
LIC COMMENT PERIOD: During the public comment period,
members of the public may speak on general items of inter-
est within the Commission's jurisdiction that are not on the
agenda. Each member of the public may speak for a maxi-
mum of three minutes with a maximum of 15 minutes for the
entire public comment period. The Chair shall determine
whether the matter is within the Commission's jurisdiction.
The Commission shall not act on or discuss any matters
raised during the public comment period, which are not on
the agenda, but shall refer such matters to staff for review
and/or place such matters on a future agenda. If any person
challenges this Planning action in court, that person may be
limited to raising only those issues the person or someone
else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in
written correspondence delivered to the City of San Mateo at,
or prior to, the public hearing. AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, those with disabilities requiring special accommodations
to participate in this meeting may contact the Planning Divi-
sion at (650)522-7202 or communitydevelopment@cityofsan-
mateo.org . Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will en-
able the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure ac-
cessibility to this meeting. Any supplemental material distrib-
uted to the members of the Planning Commission after the
posting of this agenda will be available for public review in
the Planning Division Office.
12/1/13
CNS-2563934#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL
298 Collectibles
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
303 Electronics
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 SOLD!
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $350 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, SOLD!
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
308 Tools
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
310 Misc. For Sale
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 (650)348-6428
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
25 Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Leafhopper
relative
7 2002 Man
Booker Prize-
winning novel
15 Oath
16 Show of
confidence
17 Evict
18 Accounting
concerns
19 Ad infinitum?
21 Having a dark
complexion
22 Clipper target
24 “Permit Me
Voyage” poet
25 Dish prepared
hot and served
cold
29 Ones, e.g.: Abbr.
31 Fonda’s “My
Darling
Clementine” role
33 Setting for the
2001 film “No
Man’s Land”
36 Like Singha beer
38 Correction
39 Astronomical
scales
40 Tremendous
spans
41 Olympic hurdler
Jones
42 Inexplicable, in a
way
44 Stop wearing
down?
46 Fa follower
47 “I don’t care if
you __ again”:
The Cars lyric
48 Coal container
50 Showed grief
52 Mr. Peabody’s
boy
55 Conic section
60 Balance sheet
items
62 Make less musty
63 Like some decals
64 Easier to see,
perhaps
65 It’s not charged
66 Cakewalk
DOWN
1 Kvetch
2 2011 Best New
Artist Grammy
winner Bon __
3 Parting aid
4 Taps absentee,
possibly
5 Renaissance
standout
6 Hal Foster’s
Queen of the
Misty Isles
7 Author Yutang
8 Refreshing treats
9 Islamic ruling
10 Put behind bars
11 Sneaker inserts
12 Short-term
residence,
usually
13 Substance
14 Far from
substantial
20 Hummingbird
attractors
23 Like some humor
25 Genesis son
26 Genesis city
27 “Song based on
a letter,” per
McCartney
28 Bigoted
30 Ball Park Franks
owner
32 2011 ABC show
with multiple pilots
34 The tallest one is
nearly 16,000
feet high
35 Took off
37 Emerald __
43 Statistical
anomaly
45 Building material
49 Nita of early
filmdom
51 Backup
52 __ doctor
53 Hopping game?
54 __ Carrot:
Crayola color
56 Requiem title
word
57 Plant’s stoma,
e.g.
58 1956 crisis site
59 French 101 word
61 __-Cat
By Julian Lim
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/30/13
11/30/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
316 Clothes
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. Please call
(650)283-6997
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY
SEPT 30
8am-1pm
1750 GUM
STREET
SAN MATEO
Vintage items, lots of glass
ware, and much more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252 SOLD
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each (650)365-5530
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
27 Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
28
Weekend • Nov. 30-Dec.1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR

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