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Correlation Guide for Users of Crowe-Elger-Roberson: Engineering Fluid Mechanics, 7/e

corresponding to

by Yunus A. engel and John M. Cimbala


Note: McGraw-Hills Fluid Mechanics by Yunus A. engel and John M. Cimbala provides a highly visual and intuitive coverage of fluid mechanics using a conversational writing style. The discussions are supported by numerous real-world examples, photographs, and CFD-generated flow images. The DVD packaged with the book includes several narrated, state-of-the-art videos including both

Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

McGraw-Hills

experimental footage and CFD animations, closely tied to the text content. The book includes an extensive Glossary where key phrases of fluid mechanics are defined for easy reference. The following easy-to-read table shows what engel-Cimbala chapters and sections (right column) correspond to the Crowe et al. chapters and sections (left column).

Crowe Chapters and Sections 1 Introduction 1.1 Fluids 1.2 Flow Classification 1.3 Historical Note 1.4 Significance of Fluid Mechanics 1.5 Trends in Fluid Mechanics 2 Fluid Properties 2.1 Basic Units 2.2 System; Extensive and Intensive Properties 2.3 Properties Involving the Mass or Weight of the Fluid 2.4 Properties Involving the Flow of Heat 2.5 Viscosity 2.6 Elasticity 2.7 Surface Tension 2.8 Vapor Pressure 3 Fluid Statics

engel-Cimbala Chapters and Sections Chapter 1 1-1 1-4 1-3 1-1 1-3 Chapters 1 and 2 1-6 1-5, 2-1 1-6, 2-2 2-4 1-2, 2-6 2-5 2-7 2-3 Chapter 3 1 1

3.1 Pressure 3.2 Pressure Variation with Elevation 3.3 Pressure Measurements 3.4 Hydrostatic Forces on Plane Surfaces 3.5 Hydrostatic Forces on Curved Surfaces 3.6 Buoyancy 3.7 Stability of Immersed and Floating Bodies 4 Fluids in Motion 4.1 Velocity and Flow Visualization 4.2 Rate of Flow 4.3 Acceleration 4.4 Basic Control-Volume Approach 4.5 Continuity Equation 4.6 Rotation and Vorticity 4.7 Separation, Vortices, and Turbulence 5 Pressure Variation in Flowing Fluids 5.1 Basic Causes of Pressure Variation in a Flowing Fluid 5.2 Examples of Pressure Variation Resulting from Acceleration 5.3 Bernoulli Equation 5.4 Application of the Bernoulli Equation 5.5 Separation and Its Effect on Pressure Variation 5.6 Cavitation 6 Momentum Principle 6.1 Momentum Equation: Derivation 6.2 Interpretation of the Momentum Equation 6.3 Typical Applications 6.4 Additional Applications 6.5 Moment-of-Momentum Equation 6.6 NavierStokes Equations

3-1 3-1, 3-3 3-1, 3-2 3-5 3-6 3-7 3-7 Chapters 4, 5 and 9 4-1, 4-2 5-2 4-1, 4-2 4-5 4-2, 9-2 4-4 4-4

Chapters 3, 5, and 10 3-1, 3-8 3-8 5-4 5-5 10-4, 10-5 2-3, Application Spotlight near end of Chapter 2 Chapters 6 and 9 6-1 6-1 6-2 through 6-4 6-2 through 6-4 6-5, 6-6 9-5

7 Energy Principle Chapters 5 and 6 7.1 Derivation of the Energy Equation 5-6 7.2 Simplified Forms of the Energy 5-7 2 2

Equation 7.3 Application of the Energy, 6-4 Momentum, and Continuity Equations in Combination 7.4 Concept of the Hydraulic and 5-4 Energy Grade Lines 8 Dimensional Analysis and Similitude Chapter 7 8.1 The Need for Dimensional Analysis 7-1, 7-3 8.2 Dimensions and Equations 7-1 8.3 The Buckingham Theorem 7-4 8.4 Dimensional Analysis 7-4 8.5 Common Dimensionless Numbers 7-4 8.6 Similitude 7-2 8.7 Model Studies for Flows Without 7-2 Free-Surface Effects 8.8 Significance of the Pressure 7-4 Coefficient 8.9 Approximate Similitude at High 7-2, 7-5 Reynolds Numbers 8.10 Free-Surface Model Studies 7-5 9 Surface Resistance 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Surface Resistance with Uniform Laminar Flow 9.3 Qualitative Description of the Boundary Layer 9.4 Quantitative Relations for the Laminar Boundary Layer 9.5 Quantitative Relations for the Turbulent Boundary Layer 9.6 Boundary-Layer Control Chapters 8 through 11 8-1 9-6, 10-6 10-6, 8-3 11-5, 10-6 8-5, 10-6 10-6

10 Flow in Conduits Chapter 8 10.1 Shear-Stress Distribution Across a 8-2, 8-4 Pipe Section 10.2 Laminar Flow in Pipes 8-2, 8-4 10.3 Criterion for Laminar or Turbulent 8-2 Flow in a Pipe 10.4 Turbulent Flow in Pipes 8-5 10.5 Flow at Pipe Inlets and Losses 8-3, 8-6 from Fittings 10.6 Pipe Systems 8-7 10.7 Turbulent Flow in Noncircular 8-5 Conduits 11 Drag and Lift Chapters 11 and 15 3 3

11.1 Basic Considerations 11.2 Drag of Two-Dimensional Bodies 11.3 Vortex Shedding from Cylindrical Bodies 11.4 Effect of Streamlining 11.5 Drag of Axisymmetric and ThreeDimensional Bodies 11.6 Terminal Velocity 11.7 Effect of Compressibility on Drag 11.8 Lift 12 Compressible Flow 12.1 Wave Propagation in Compressible Fluids 12.2 Mach-Number Relationships 12.3 Normal Shock Waves 12.4 Isentropic Compressible Flow Through a Duct with Varying Area 12.5 Compressible Flow in a Pipe with Friction 13 Flow Measurements 13.1 Instruments for the Measurement of Velocity and Pressure 13.2 Instruments and Procedures for Measurement of Flow Rate 13.3 Measurement in Compressible Flow 13.4 Accuracy of Measurements 14 Turbomachinery 14.1 Propeller Theory 14.2 Axial-Flow Pumps 14.3 Radial-Flow Machines 14.4 Specific Speed 14.5 Suction Limitations of Pumps 14.6 Turbines 14.7 Viscous Effects 15 Varied Flow in Open Channels 15.1 Energy Relations in Open Channels 15.2 The Hydraulic Jump 15.3 Surge or Tidal Bore 15.4 Gradually Varied Flow in Open Channels

11-1 11-1, 11-2 15-2, 15-3 11-3 11-4 11-4 15-5 11-2, 11-7 Chapter 12 12-2 12-2, 12-3 12-5 12-4 12-7 Chapters 1, 3, 8, 12, and 13 3-2, 8-8 8-8, 13-9 12-4 1-10 Chapter 14 14-1, 14-2 14-2 14-2 14-3 14-2 14-4 14-2, 14-4 Chapter 13 13-3, 13-4 13-6, 13-8 13-2 13-7