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Presentation Rubric – Student Version

Deliverables
Spelling & Grammar Errors 

Quentin Evans, Enoch Shipman, & Kai Grogan
Geneticist Master (3) (Proficient)
 0–2 Spelling & Grammar Errors

Geneticist PHD (4) (Exceeds Expectations)
0 Spelling & Grammar Errors

Geneticist Apprentice (2) (Emerging Proficient)
 3–5 Spelling & Grammar Errors 

Geneticist Trainee (1) (Emerging)
5–7 Spelling & Grammar Errors 

Geneticist Drop Out (0) (Unsatisfactory)
8+ Spelling & Grammar Errors

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   Theoretical Tree & Experimental Tree Must Include:  

3 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 100% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 100% of our family tree traits 13 People Named on our family tree 13 Gender Classified on our family tree 13 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 13 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will convert our family traits between fractions, decimals, and percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator and will offer new ideas and make connections between our family traits between fractions, decimals, and percents We will make predictions and determine solutions using theoretical and experimental data for simple and compound events and will demonstrate a deeper understanding of these terms by explaining the relationship and forming real world examples

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3 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 90–100% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 90–100% of our family tree traits 11–13 People Named on our family tree 11–13 Gender Classified on our family tree 11–13 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 11–13 Family Pictures Present on our family tree 7.4 B – We will convert our family traits between fractions, decimals, and percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator

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2 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 70–89% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 70–89% of our family tree traits 8–10 People Named on our family tree 8–10 Gender Classified on our family tree 8–10 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 8–10 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will convert our family traits between simple (2 digit or less) fractions, decimals, and percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator

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1 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 50–69% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 50–69% of our family tree traits 5–7 People Named on our family tree 5–7 Gender Classified on our family tree 5–7 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 5–7 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will convert our family traits into simple (2 digit or less) fractions or decimals or percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator

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0 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 0– 49% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 0– 49% of our family tree traits 0–6 People Named on our family tree 0–6 Gender Classified on our family tree 0–6 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 0–6 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We did not convert our family traits between fractions, decimals, and percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator

7.6 D & C – We will make predictions and determine solutions using theoretical and experimental data for simple and compound events

We will make predictions and determine solutions using theoretical or experimental data for simple and compound events

We will make predictions and determine solutions using theoretical or experimental probability

We did not make predictions and determine solutions using theoretical and experimental data for simple and compound events

Quentin Evans, Enoch Shipman, & Kai Grogan
 We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation and will relate the concept to other concepts 3 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 100% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 100% of our family tree traits 13 People Named on our family tree 13 Gender Classified on our family tree 13 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 13 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation and will relate the concept to other concepts Classified our tree as: Theoretical or Experimental Probability Described the difference between Theoretical and Experimental Probability Used simple and compound events Correctly classified and justified our tree by using data and mathematical/scientific language We will compare three populations based on  7.14 A – We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation  We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions  We will define heredity  We did not define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation

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    Punnett Square Tree 

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3 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 90–100% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 90–100% of our family tree traits 11–13 People Named on our family tree 11–13 Gender Classified on our family tree 11–13 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 11–13 Family Pictures Present on our family tree 7.14 A – We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation

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2 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 70–89% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 70–89% of our family tree traits 8–10 People Named on our family tree 8–10 Gender Classified on our family tree 8–10 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 8–10 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions

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1 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 50–69% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 50–69% of our family tree traits 5–7 People Named on our family tree 5–7 Gender Classified on our family tree 5–7 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 5–7 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We will define heredity

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0 Generations Displayed We will demonstrate our knowledge of genotypes by correctly classifying 0– 49% of our family tree traits We will express our knowledge of phenotype by correctly classifying 0– 49% of our family tree traits 0–6 People Named on our family tree 0–6 Gender Classified on our family tree 0–6 Family Percentages Labeled on our family tree 0–6 Family Pictures Present on our family tree We did not define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation

 1. 2. 3. 4.

Classified our tree using 3 out of the 4

Classified our tree using 2 out of the 4

Classified our tree using 1 out of the 4

Classified our tree using 0 out of the 4

Comparing

We will compare three populations based on

We will compare two populations based on

We will compare two populations based on

We did not compare three populations based on

Quentin Evans, Enoch Shipman, & Kai Grogan
data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the three populations and will justify the comparisons and outcomes with detailed and thoughtful explanations We will compare the results of uniform and diverse offspring from sexual reproduction and will demonstrate a level of skill beyond expectations by comparing asexual reproduction to sexual reproductions st We will use the 21 Century Skill of critical thinking and problem solving to help justify our inferences using data We will compare two populations based on data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the two populations and will justify the comparisons and outcomes with detailed and thoughtful explanations st We will display the 21 Century Skill of Health Literacy by: Demonstrating how genetic disorders occur Demonstrating how they can be prevented Demonstrating how they can be predicted Offers new ideas by expanding on our research data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the three populations data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the two populations data in random samples from these populations data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the three populations

7.14 C – We will compare the results of uniform and diverse offspring from sexual reproduction

We will compare the results of uniform or diverse offspring from sexual reproduction

We will compare the results of uniform or diverse offspring

We did not compare the results of uniform and diverse offspring from sexual reproduction

Inferences

We will use the 21 Century Skill of critical thinking and problem solving to help justify our inferences 7.12 C – We will compare populations based on data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the populations

st

We will use the 21 Century Skill of critical thinking or problem solving to help justify our inferences using data We will compare populations based on data in random samples from these populations or make informal comparative inferences about differences between the populations

st

We will use the 21 Century Skill of critical thinking or problem solving to help justify our inferences We can recognize similarities between populations however they incorrectly justified our reasoning

st

We did not use the 21 Century Skill of critical thinking and problem solving to help justify our inferences using data We did not compare populations based on data in random samples from these populations, including informal comparative inferences about differences between the populations

st

 1. Research 2. 3. 4.

 1. 2. 3.

We will display the 21 Century Skill of Health Literacy by: Demonstrating how genetic disorders occur Demonstrating how they can be prevented Demonstrating how they can be predicted

st

We will display the 21 Century Skill of Health Literacy by completing 2 out of the 3

st

We will display the 21 Century Skill of Health Literacy by completing 1 out of the 3

st

We will display the 21 Century Skill of Health Literacy by completing 0 out of the 3

st

Quentin Evans, Enoch Shipman, & Kai Grogan
Presentation Length   12–14 Minutes We used multiple forms of data representations to convey our understanding in a: Clear Concise Organized Smooth transitional manner We will select and use appropriate representation for presenting and displaying relationships among collected data and will justify our reasoning for our selection We will incorporate a correct explanation of the st 21 Century Skills of: Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility Flexibility Adaptability Discussed our group’s communication and collaboration And justified how these elements are beneficial and useful in a group setting We will demonstrate an understanding to our peers and teacher by st using the 21 Century Skill of: ICT literacy Information literacy Media literacy And will explain how these elements can be used to improve our project   9–11 Minutes We used multiple forms of data representations to convey our understanding using 3 out of the 4   6–8 Minutes We used multiple forms of data representations to convey our understanding using 2 out of the 4   3–5 Minutes We used multiple forms of data representations to convey our understanding using 1 out of the 4   0–2 Minutes We used multiple forms of data representations to convey our understanding using 0 out of the 4

1. 2. 3. 4. 

7.11 A – We will select and use appropriate representation for presenting and displaying relationships among collected data

We will select and use appropriate representation for presenting or displayed relationships among collected data

 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Presentation Forms

We will incorporate a correct explanation of the st 21 Century Skills of: Productivity Accountability Leadership Responsibility Flexibility Adaptability Discussed our group’s communication and collaboration

We will incorporate a correct explanation of the st 21 Century Skills using 5 out of the 7

We will select and use appropriate representation for presenting or displaying relationships among collected data but our justification for using each was partially incorrect We will incorporate a correct explanation of the st 21 Century Skills using 3 out of the 7

We did not select and use appropriate representation for presenting and displaying relationships among collected data

We will incorporate a correct explanation of the st 21 Century Skills using 0 out of the 7

1. 2. 3. 4.

1. 2. 3.

We will demonstrate an understanding to our peers and teacher by st using the 21 Century Skill of: ICT literacy Information literacy Media literacy

We will demonstrate an understanding to our peers and teacher by st using the 21 Century Skill using 2 out of the 3

We will demonstrate an understanding to our peers and teacher by st using the 21 Century Skill using 1 out of the 3

We will demonstrate an understanding to our peers and teacher by st using the 21 Century Skill using 0 out of the 3