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RUNNING HEAD: DOMINANANT SUBORDINATE REFLECTION

Dominant Subordinate Reflection Shawntia Williams Georgia State University: SW3000

DOMINANT SUBORDINATE REFLECTION Abstract

This paper will discuss different elements of oppression. The way oppression has been successful in the use of force and authority. Oppression is broken down into subordinate and dominate groups. Subordinate groups are those that are at a disadvantage. Dominate groups are those with an advantage. The three subordinate groups that can be identified are African American, women, and absent fathers. While the three dominate groups are United States Citizen, heterosexual, and education.

DOMINANT SUBORDINATE REFLECTION Introduction Oppression is a system that has been put into place to have different cultural groups at a lower standard in society than others. Oppression has been successful by the use of force and or authority. This system divides into subordinate which is the underprivileged and dominates which is privileged. This paper will discuss my personal subordinate groups which are African American, women, and absent fathers. As well as my dominate groups United States citizen, heterosexual, and education. African American Subordinate Group

One of the subordinate groups I choose to identify myself with is African American. I feel the group that is dominant to my subordinate group is Caucasians. Growing up as an African American has always been difficult. Our group as a whole has progressed to freedom. Every day is a continuous struggle to not allow ourselves to be judged, ignored, and mistreated. I have experienced being treated unfairly. I attended a predominantly Caucasian school system and I was often called racial slurs. It was assumed that because I was African American I could play sports, I only ate chicken and that I was suppose to have nappy hair. The issues I've stated previously have put me in the mind frame to think as well as feel subordinate to Caucasian individuals. Women Subordinate Group The second subordinate group I choose to indentify myself with is women. I feel that the group that is dominant to my subordinate group is men. The perception of womanhood is consciousness, internalized sexism (settles, 2008). Women are supposed to be weaker than men. Women are supposed to be extremely sensitive, emotional and friendly individuals. Women are suppose to work as teachers, secretaries, and other clean jobs. This directly affects me daily because I am security supervisor and I am the only women at my job. I am also the youngest. My employees often test my knowledge as well as my ability to perform not realizing that have over six years of experience. Comments are often made that I do great job as a women but it's still a mans job. Absent Father's Subordinate Group The third subordinate group I choose to identify myself with is absent fathers. I feel that the group that is dominant to my subordinate group is children with fathers. The reason being is because I grew up without my father playing a significant role in my life. I feel that I am at a disadvantage because I don't know what its like to have a male role model. I have never attended a father daughter dance. I was never able to learn lessons about men from a man. This has created a lot of road blocks for me in relationships because I allowed myself to be mistreated because I didn't understand why the man that was suppose to want me and be there for me wasn't.

DOMINANT SUBORDINATE REFLECTION U.S. Citizen Dominant Group

The first dominant group I choose to identify myself with is United States citizen. I feel that the group that is subordinate to my dominant group is non United States citizens. The reason being is because I am given many privileges. I am protected by the United States Constitution. I am allowed to vote in throughout the states and federal elections. I am also able to apply and work in government agencies that I qualify for. I am also allowed to run for an elected officials position. Unlike a non United States Citizen being denied and or mistreated in the attempt to use these options. Heterosexual Dominant Group The second dominant group I choose to identify myself with is heterosexual. I feel that the subordinate group to my dominant group is LGBT community. I am privileged as a heterosexual because I am not judged and or discriminated against due to my sexual orientation. As a heterosexual I am granted rights and treatment that are not guaranteed to other sexual orientation groups. Feminist scholars have also recognized the systematic social and economic advantages women gain through heterosexual relations (Morgan, 2012). Some examples are public support and recognition of my relationships, immediate access to significant other in a case accident or emergency, and paid leave from employment when grieving the death of a spouse or partner. Education Dominant Group The third dominant group I choose to identify myself with is education. I feel that the subordinate group to my dominant group is uneducated. As an individual with a degree I am given more opportunities for jobs. Employers seem to seek more college educated individuals for careers. Being educated opens the opportunity to gain higher wages. Education creates variations in numerous opportunities in my desired field. Having an education has helped me gain more extensive cognitive and communication skills. Also, education gives you better social skills and the ability to meet all types of different people. Having these social skills has prepared me to work throughout the workforce. Conclusion In this paper, I have discussed my views and feelings as how I fit into my subordinate groups which are African American, women, and absent fathers. As well as my dominant groups which are United States citizen, heterosexual, and education. I have learned that oppression has played a significant role on my life. I have been made aware of the basic things I often take for granted another group of individuals are underprivileged in that category. In doing this assignment I have become culturally competent as it relates to oppression, dominant and subordinate groups.

DOMINANT SUBORDINATE REFLECTION References

Settles, I. H., Pratt-Hyatt, J. S., & Buchanan, N. T. (2008). THROUGH THE LENS OF RACE: BLACK AND WHITE WOMEN's PERCEPTIONS OF WOMANHOOD. Psychology Of Women Quarterly, 32(4), 454-468. doi:10.1111/j.1471-6402.2008.00458.x Morgan, E. (2012). Not Always a Straight Path: College Students' Narratives of Heterosexual Identity Development. Sex Roles, 66(1/2), 79-93. doi:10.1007/s11199-011-0068-4