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Table of Contents Communications Portfolio Cover Letter.3 Initial Client Contact.4 Georgia Organics Situation Analysis...

on Analysis...5-8 Georgia Organics Company Profile....9 Introductory Address Memo...10 2014 Conference Introductory Address11-13 Locavore Feature.14-15 The Bees Knees Fact Sheet.16 Grits to School Cover Letter.17 Grits to School Event Timeline18-20 Grits to School Event Memos......21-23 Grits to School Newsletter Copy 24-25 Grits to School News Release26 Grits to School Radio PSA Package.......27-30

Lauren Sellers 203 Royal Crescent Terrace Canton, GA, 30115 404-694-5966 laselle@uga.edu March 5, 2013 Michael Wall Communications Director Georgia Organics 200A Ottley Drive Atlanta, GA, 30324 Dear Mr. Wall: Georgia Organics can raise awareness among low-income families and students in Athens-Clarke and surrounding counties if it tailors its existing Farm to School models and plans to the areas unique dynamic. Census data shows that Athens-Clarke is the poorest county in the state of Georgia. For this reason, it is both imperative and beneficial to bring healthy, farm-fresh foods to students in this at-risk area. Enclosed is a communications plan to help bring the farm to these schools and students. Materials include event plans, news and feature releases and radio PSA scripts and fact sheets among others. Materials presented in the following plan may also be supplemented with existing Farm to School plans and materials. In addition to these Farm to School press materials, communications materials supporting Georgia Organics overall fight for local, farm-fresh food are also included in the Locavore Initiative section of the plan. These materials will support existing organizational materials and are not time sensitive. Thank you for considering the following kit. I strongly believe in its potential to help raise awareness of Georgia grown food in Athens schools and in the larger context of the state. If Georgia Organics requires or requests any other materials, please let me know. I will contact the organization in two weeks to follow-up, and am excited to witness the results and efforts of this endeavor. Respectfully yours, Lauren Sellers Enclosure: Communications Plan

Initial Client Contact: Hi all, My name is Lauren Sellers and I am a Public Relations student at the University of Georgia enrolled in a public relations communications course. For the class' final project, we are to pick a nonprofit organization of our choice and compile a communications portfolio for the client (press releases, an e-mail news release, a fact sheet, a pitch letter to an appropriate media contact, a media alert, a feature story, and a newspaper article.) The point to all of this? I would greatly like to focus my efforts on Georgia Organics--and hopefully benefit your organization. I am greatly interested in the farm to table and slow food movements, and sustainable agriculture in general. Foodie and Georgia-lover to the core, I am planning a WWOOFING trip of my own this summer and am an intern at Athens Food Tours this semester. Overall, I greatly respect your organization and feel that our goals and ideals are greatly aligned. Because of this, I am requesting your permission to work with your organization over the course of this semester to complete my final project. If you could respond with your communications goals for this year, that would be greatly appreciated, so that I can also benefit Georgia Organics while completing my project. I will gladly present and share any materials produced for the benefit of your organization with you at the end of the semester. Hope to be in touch with you as this semester progresses! Best, Lauren Sellers Lauren Alexandra Sellers The University of Georgia, '14 Public Relations, A.B.J. 404-694-5966 Response: Lauren, We would be thrilled to work on this project with you. Well help as much as possible. Can you provide me with more specifics about what youll need? Ill be happy to share our communication goals with you. They are currently housed in an Excel matrix. Ill extract them for you, but theyll need some explanation to accompany them. Should we chat on the phone about that or are you thinking you might need to visit us for your project? Thanks for any more clarification you can provide. Michael

Georgia Organics Situation Analysis Focus Statement Food in United States public schools today often lacks nutritional value. Unhealthy, cheap items such as frozen pizza and pre-packaged burritos dominate school menus. Even worse, many cafeterias today are not equipped with standard ovens to prepare homemade recipes, but instead are only outfitted with microwaves to reheat precooked, processed food items. Georgia Organics Farm to School campaign and program recognizes this situation and the serious consequences of childhood obesity and disease. As a trade association organization advocating sustainable agriculture within the state, Georgia Organics fights for fresh ingredients in local schools though its Farm to School Summit, partnerships and promotions. The organization provides resources to schools and individuals interested in local eating. Georgia Organics aims for the day when Georgias people, both young and old, can fill up their plates with Georgia grown food.

Client Assessment

Georgia Organics is a nonprofit organization committed to advocating local, sustainable crops and food items within the state of Georgia. Founded in the 1970s as a growers association, the organization raises awareness for sustainable Georgia agriculture practices through communications campaigns and events, conferences, and lobbying. The organization is supported both financially and in-kind by a network of 1,200 members, and reaches a network of over 11,000 through its print and electronic communications.

With its focus on local food products, Georgia Organics affects a variety of unique publics. Key stakeholders include Georgia farmers and citizens interested in a healthier Georgia. The organization works actively to assist these key publics through a variety of resources. Georgia Organics main function is to raise awareness in the states sustainable agriculture dialogue among farmers, individuals and policymakers. The nonprofit works as a hub for all of those involved in the issue to gather discuss and promote local food through its annual conferences, events and communications.

Operating on the idea that local food is the key to the health of the state, Georgia Organics believes that support for the local agricultural community will, in turn, support the states economy and people, too. This idea also applies to the organizations Farm to School campaign which fights to put local food back into Georgia schools. By working with area policymakers, school officials, farmers, restaurant owners and students, Georgia Organics follows the journey of local crops intended for the lunchroom from production to the ring of the lunch bellon a point to point basis. It is through this model of operation that the organization interacts with its publics and stakeholders.

Key organizational publics such as farmers, restaurateurs and concerned citizens are typically collaborative and cooperative in their shared goal of advocacy for Georgia-grown agriculture. On the other hand, Georgia Organics must work to persuade other critical publics such as policymakers and school officials that may have contradictory motives or needs to that of Georgia Organics such as political aims and budgetary constraints.

Issues Analysis

Strengths

Georgia Organics is the foremost nonprofit advocacy organization with a focus of sustainable agriculture in the state. As a result, its networks, connections and resources are all well-developed. Its credibility is high within the state, and built through community and farmer partnerships. Thus, it holds a high degree of authority and influence with key publics.

Weaknesses Georgia Organics primary emphasis on awareness goals may jeopardize the organizations implementation goals if it forgets to act on its messages because organizational publics may develop the negative opinion that the organization will talk about an issue, but not solve it. The organization may also suffer in how it allocates its time.

Opportunities Georgia Organics can move into raising awareness among a targeted public this year lower income families. Through the credibility of Georgia Organics Farm to School movement with third-party endorsements from figures such as Michelle Obama, Georgia Organics is primed to move into this market through increased Farm to School initiatives in 2013.

Threats

Georgia Organics leads in its market and niche; therefore, it does not receive direct competition from similar organizations in its area of influence. On the other hand, it is susceptible to changes in legislature affecting agriculture and fluctuations in member support. For this reason, membership retention is a primary and constant need and concern for the organization. Additionally, because Georgia Organics works to foster a dialogue within the state, opinions from conflicting publics have the opportunity to negatively impact the tone of the conversation.

Summary of the Plan

In order to further the dialogue of local, healthful food within the state, Georgia Organics will support its successful Farm to School campaign through a variety of communications, media and events focused on raising awareness.

Through hands-on activities, Georgia Organics will engage low income families directly this year. Programming will include in-school cooking demonstrations, farm field trips and social media awareness campaigns. The expected budget for the organizations Farm to School Campaign in Athens-Clarke County for fiscal year 2013 is $10,000. In addition, press materials to support Georgia Organics fundamental support for local food culture are also included in the Locavore Initiative section of the plan, and will serve to refresh the local food movement in Georgia.

February 10, 2013 04:08 PM Eastern Standard Time

Company Profile for Georgia Organics

-- (BUSINESS WIRE) --Devoted to promoting local, sustainable food within the state of Georgia, Georgia Organics maintains a critical presence in the states sustainable agriculture dialogue. Founded in the 1970s out of a growers association, the organization actively promotes fresh and healthful fare within the state. The member-supported nonprofit currently has 1,200 members and reaches a network of 11,000 stakeholders through the organizations quarterly communications. Through its web of local farmers, community leaders and consumers, Georgia Organics fights to advocate for a healthier Georgia, operating under the belief that locally produced agriculture will benefit the states people. Company: Headquarters Address: Georgia Organics 200A Ottley Drive Atlanta, GA 30324 678-702-0400 Nonprofit Agriculture Executive Director; Alice Rolls Michael Wall, Communications Director 678-702-0400 ext. 202

Main Telephone: Type of Organization: Industry: Key Executives: Public Relations Contact: Phone:

To: Michael Wall

From: Lauren Sellers

Date: April 27, 2013

Subject: 2014 Georgia Organics Conference Welcome Address Locavore Initiative Speech

This speech, intended to be delivered, at the Welcome Dinner of the 2014 Georgia Organics Conference is a celebratory/activating speech with aims of inspiring conference goers to take up action for the Locavore Initiative and activities concerning the initiative at the conference, but it also encourages conference goers to think about their own roles in the local food movement in Georgia. Alice Mills, the organizations director will deliver the speech to a room of Georgia farmers, artisans and concerned citizens.

2014 Georgia Organics Conference Introductory Address Lets Revive Local Eating

This year marks a new time for our organization, our state and its people. As we gather to celebrateyou all look great, by the wayexchange new ideas and come together as a community, I implore each of you to consider the meals you ate earlier today. Lets be honest. Who here stopped by McDonalds or Chick-fil-A on your way in to town this morning? Wait for response. I know, and even better, I understand. A long trip can make even the most disciplined person yearn for a hot, salty waffle fry and milkshake. You pull off of the exit, position your Prius or Subaru behind the long line of tired moms and hungry children on their way to soccer practice and before you know it, fast-food bliss.

Last year, we spent our time here at our annual Georgia Organics conference talking about our food and its power to make or break the health of our state. But thats not where Im going with this example of grease-filled gratification that, lets be honest, most of us have fallen prey to at least once. As nutrition leaders, we fully understand that one cheeseburger eaten sparingly will not kill you, so lets just clarify right now, the idea of a cheeseburger, every once in a while is no crime.

Why bring this up? Because what I invite you all to talk about in these next few days are cheeseburgers.

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Homemade and homegrown buns, grass-fed beef, freshly-made cheese, thick tomato slices, juicy and plump, and a few quality pickled summer vegetables. Pause. Who knew a cheeseburger could be such a great thing?

You see, the problem occurs when that soft bun is hyper-processed in Wisconsin and shipped 1,500 miles to the Burger King off I-75, (pause) when the cheese is not, in fact, cheese, but a cheese-like product, (pause) when the tomato is flavorless and rubbery, stunted from its trip around the world (pause) and when the beef has upwards of 37 percent filler product like the beef of Americas favorite Mexicana chain, Taco Bell. This (points) is what causes internal combustion. This is whats killing our state (emphatic pause) but it wont kill us. During this years conference, let us fight to save the cheeseburger, and all that goes on it, so that more tired moms driving to soccer practice will not only be able to nourish their children, but their Georgia economy, their land, our home. The time is now.

The upcoming workshops, speakers and events at this conference plan to foster awareness, community and a dialogue. What does it mean to be green again, after all? Today, we want to revive our aims, goals and dreams as Georgia farmers, and we will learn to better feed our people healthful, local produce. People of Georgia have a right to healthful foods grown locally. Local foods dont just taste better, they are better, and this is a fact that I am sure we can all attest to.

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The aim for this years conference is what we at Georgia Organics are calling the Locavore Initiative. Today, consumers of a primarily locally and seasonally sourced diet are labeled locavores. This term, though catchy, has exclusive connotations. Georgia Organics hopes one day that all citizens will be able to wear this label, and you all sitting here tonight are the key to this mission through your various backgrounds and expertise. So, lets do it this week. Lets unlock the door to making local food accessible in Georgia, even at your favorite fast-food eatery. Thank you. Were ready if you are.

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CONTACT: Lauren Sellers Georgia Organics 404-694-5966 laselle@uga.edu For Immediate Release GEORGIA ORGANICS PROVES IT IS COOL TO BE A LOCAVORE Practical Tips For Eating Locally In Georgia ATLANTAThe celebrated bowl of 100 calorie diet cereal may not be as health conscious as its advertisers say. Pesticides coupled with food processing in common foods rob the consumer of the nutritional value nature intends. The Organic Center says that pesticide-laden foods the public consumes everyday are linked to an increased risk of gestational diabetes and a disruption in brain development, among other health concerns. Georgia Organics answer to avoiding these risks and staying in good health? It is simpleeat local. People that eat organic food products within a 100-mile radius from their home are known as locavores. But do not let the name be misleading, these people are not crazy. Rather, they help sustain the network of growers and makers in the state, supporting both the local economy and local bodies. Even more, it is easy to be a locavore. Locavores maintain their lifestyle by shopping their local farmers markets, eating seasonally, and supporting restaurants that feature local fare. And while local farmers markets are often the most direct market to buy local food, chain grocers like Kroger and Publix now have sections filled with local food products and items like honey and produce. For the more adventurous local-eaters, planting a garden or raising chickens are other locavorefriendly options that will leave year-round eggs and seasonal produce, but if this prospect is offputting, simply eating seasonally and supporting local farmers at the farmers market and the grocery can provide a seal of locavore approval. Seeking alternatives to far-off sourced produce and ultra-processed snack foods of the recesses of the pantry can really pay off. Georgia Organics reports that studies show that the average food to plate distance is 1,500 miles. 1,500 miles provides enough time for plants cells to shrink and lose their vitality. The point to all of this fuss: locavores eat vital produce. Now, that is cool. MORE

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About Georgia Organics Georgia Organics maintains a critical presence in the states sustainable agriculture dialogue. Today it actively promotes fresh and healthful fare within a network of 1,200 members and 11,000 stakeholders. Georgia Organics fights to advocate for a healthier Georgia, operating under the belief that locally produced agriculture will benefit the people of Georgia. ###

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Fact Sheet
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contact: Michael Wall, Communications Director Georgia Organics 678-702-0400 Michael@georgiaorganics.org The Bees Knees: Honeybee and Honey Fun Facts

Honeybees are the only strain of bee that dies after they sting.

Honey is slightly sweeter than sugar, so it can be used in smaller quantities in recipes and dishes.

Honey has 64 calories and 17 carbohydrates per tablespoon making it a prime source of energy for athletes.

Try a spoonful of honey to soothe a sore throat. It will cover the throat and ease any irritation.

Honeybees are the only insect to produce a food product for humans.

Honey will never spoil. If your honey hardens, it has undergone a process called crystallization. To reverse this effect, simply submerge your honey container in warm water until it loosens.

Lazy B Farm in Statham will be teaching a Jr. Beekeeping course for children 8-15 starting Valentines Day. The course fee is $200 and covers 20 hours of instruction.

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Lauren Sellers 203 Royal Crescent Terrace Canton, GA, 30115 404-694-5966 laselle@uga.edu March 5, 2013 Michael Wall Communications Director Georgia Organics 200A Ottley Drive Atlanta, GA, 30324 Dear Mr. Wall: Georgia Organics can raise awareness among low-income families and students in Athens-Clarke and surrounding counties if it tailors its existing Farm to School models and plans to the areas unique dynamic. Census data shows that Athens-Clarke is the poorest county in the state of Georgia. For this reason, it is both imperative and beneficial to bring healthy, farm-fresh foods to students in this at-risk area. Enclosed is a communications plan to help bring the farm to these schools and students. Materials include event plans, news and feature releases, and radio PSA scripts. Materials presented in the following plan may also be supplemented with existing Farm to School plans and materials. Thank you for considering the following kit. I strongly believe in its potential to help raise awareness of Georgia grown food in Athens schools and in the larger context of the state. If Georgia Organics requires or requests any other materials, please let me know. I will contact the organization in two weeks to follow-up, and am excited to witness the results and efforts of this endeavor. Respectfully yours, Lauren Sellers Enclosure: Grits to School Event Plan

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Grits to School Event Timeline Initial Planning Meeting Via Skype. Meeting purpose: Brainstorming Confirm Mills Farm Participation Mills Farm 150 Harve Mathis Rd Athens, GA 30601 Phone: (706) 543-8113

10 a.m. March 21, 2013

Confirm by April 1, 2013

Back-up farms include Three Porch Farm and Blackbriar Farmboth of Athens, GA

Coordinate Participating Schools Create committee to determine schools of best fit for program Desired schools should represent all Athens neighborhoods. Candidates include: Stroud Elementary, Alps Road Elementary, Timothy Road Elementary, Clarke Middle School, Hilsman Middle School Participating Schools Meeting Principals, designated committee and Mills Farm representative to discuss lunch menus, dates of field trips and cooking demonstration dates. Conference call, if necessary Mills Farm Programming Meeting Meeting with Mills Farm and school nutritionists to determine menu items. Field trip activities will also be confirmed.

Confirm participating schools by April 15, 2013

5-8 p.m. April 23, 2013

May 1, 2013

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Georgia Organics Update Meeting Meeting to discuss progress of initiative. Goal setting for summer months. Logistical concerns, budget overview. Contingency plans. Communications plans overview.

May 14, 2013

Summer Vacation Athens-Clarke Schools

May-July School to end on May 17, 2013 for 2012-2013 term, to begin in early August

Media Pitching Local and Regional Outlets. Athens BannerHerald, The Red and Black, Southern Living, The Atlanta JournalConstitution Social Media Campaigns Create Accounts (Twitter, Facebook). Maintain weekly updates through implementation in October.

AugustSeptember

August (Beginning of school-year)October

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Implementation The five participating schools will take alternating field trips to Mills Farm, hold cooking demonstrations. Local recipes will be featured on all participating schools menus for duration of the month.

October (full month)

Evaluation Media Impressions on Social Media Sites

Post Initiative October/November

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To: Georgia Organics Communications Department From: Lauren Sellers Date: March 15, 2013 Subject: Grits to School Event Meeting We will have a Skype meeting to discuss details of the upcoming Grits to School event in Michael Walls office at 10 A.M. Thursday. We will finalize event details, and departmentwide tasks will be delegated.

Agenda 10:10- 10:10Introductions/Event Details Overview 10:10-10:20Day-of Brainstorming Session 10:20-10:30Delegation of Tasks

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To: Georgia Organics Communication Department From: Lauren Sellers Date: May 7, 2013 Subject: Grits to School Conference Call We will have a department-wide conference call at 9:30 A.M. next Tuesday to discuss the Grits to School event. The call will focus on the progress of initiative, goal setting for summer months, logistical concerns, budget overview, contingency plans, and a communications plans overview. It will last for roughly one hour.

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To: Georgia Organics Communications Department From: Lauren Sellers Date: March 10, 2013 Subject: Volunteers Needed for Grits to School Event in April Please reach out to Georgia Organics members via the organizational listserv to address the upcoming Grits to School event. Roughly 20 volunteers will be needed to assist with dayof tasks. Task details are to come, and may involve snack duty, videographer hands and chaperone responsibilities. A training session will occur two-hours prior to the event for more instruction.

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CONTACT: Lauren Sellers Georgia Organics 404-694-5966 laselle@uga.edu For Thats Good Business Farm to School Grows Healthy Habits in Local Schools ATLANTARecent childrens growth charts indicate horizontal rather than vertical growth. Blame the cafeteria, the Atlanta-based advocacy organization Georgia Organics says. Concerned parents, policy makers and community leaders like Michelle Obama are currently fighting childhood obesity, disease and the infamous processed snack item with locally sourced, farm-fresh ingredients. The mission is to get frozen, ultra-processed foods out of local schools kitchens, and to get cooking with sustainably grown, fresh ingredients. Georgia Organics Farm to School program partners local schools with Georgia farms to replace the cafeterias processed favorites with fresh alternatives like seasonal produce and pasture-fed meat in addition to advocating healthier alternatives at the states legislature. The farm-fighting organization believes that a healthier Georgia should start with the youth. Fruits and veggies are not icky as popular culture portrays, and even more, a youngster would often prefer a ripe and in season natural treat to its packaged counterpart. Local students, it turns out, like and want more of these fresh items. Georgia Organics agrees and says that more from-the-farm foods on cafeteria menus will not only grow strong students, but a stronger community and local economy, too. By depoliticizing the issue and reconnecting local growers back to the community, area farmers are able to not only support the health of local students, but also to support their own operations. Government and school contracts dont have the right to stand in the way of the health Georgias youngest, Georgia Organics says. Recognizing the seriousness of the issue and its potential to benefit the community, Georgia Organics has been coordinating campaigns and events to highlight the power of the locally grown crop on lunchroom plates. The organization holds farm-fresh cooking demonstrations, sustainable chef visits and community garden plantings throughout Georgia. By spotlighting these engaging events through the groups social media avenues, the organization generated positive buzz on the movement and gained the attention of national opinion leaders like the first lady. MORE

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Farm meals are the heart of a sustainable and healthy state. Currently modeling this belief are Athens-Clarke County schools with its Grits to School experiment. Athens-Clarke County, the poorest county in the state, has been featuring its acclaimed Red Mule Grits on school-wide menus in addition to leading tours to Mills Farm, the site where the grits are ground by Luke, the red mule responsible for the crowd-pleasing hit. Many of the participating students have never seen where their food comes from, and all are excited to see the process. This enthusiasm is what the Farm to School program is all about, and this enthusiasm is what Georgia Organics thinks is Georgias key to a better, healthier state. About Georgia Organics Georgia Organics maintains a critical presence in the states sustainable agriculture dialogue. Today it actively promotes fresh and healthful fare within a network of 1,200 members and 11,000 stakeholders. Georgia Organics fights to advocate for a healthier Georgia, operating under the belief that locally produced agriculture will benefit the people of Georgia. ###

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CONTACT: Lauren Sellers 404-694-5966 laselle@uga.edu KIDS WANT GRITS AT ATHENS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Stroud Elementary School and Red Mule Grits Partake in Farm Fresh Demonstration Day ATHENS, Ga. (October 8, 2013)Mills Farm and Stroud Elementary will host lunchtime farmsourced cooking demonstrations at the school Wednesday. Alice and Tim Mills, the farm couple behind the popular Red Mule Grits, will help students prepare healthy recipes with its stoneground grits. Stroud Elementary received a Green Grant in 2010an award given to schools committed to environmental excellence. The elementary school hopes to incorporate more farm-fresh ingredients on its cafeteria menu.

Alice and Tim Mills and their 18-year-old red mule Luke stone grind their popular grits with the gristmill Tim built himself. Their grits are a favorite of Top Chef judge Hugh Acheson where they are featured on the menu of his award-winning restaurant Five & Ten in Athens.

About Georgia Organics Georgia Organics is an Atlanta-based advocacy organization that promotes local, sustainable food within the state of Georgia. ###

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LAUREN SELLERS GEORGIA ORGANICS 203 ROYAL CRESCENT TERRACE CANTON, GA, 30115 GRITS TO SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT 60-SECOND WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT GRANDPAS FAVORITE SUNDAY MORNING

MEAL WOULD HELP UNLOCK THE NATIONS HEALTHY SCHOOL LUNCH DEBATE.

STUDENTS IN ONE GEORGIA SCHOOL DISTRICT HAVE BEEN GETTING THEIR

HANDS DIRTY WITH A RED MULE AND BOWL OF A SOUTHERN STAPLE.

FOR THE LAST MONTH ATHENS SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN SERVING UP CHEF

ACCLAIMED RED MULE GRITS ON BREAKFAST AND LUNCH MENUS

IN ADDITION TO VISITING ALICE AND TIM MILLS GRITS OPERATION.

THE MILLS HAVE HOSTED FIVE GROUPS FROM LOCAL SCHOOLS SO FAR TO MEET

LUKE THEIR RED GRITS MULE. MORE

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THE ATLANTA BASED GEORGIA ORGANICS HOPES TO GET STUDENTS EXCITED

ABOUT THE FOODS GROWN IN THEIR OWN NEIGHBORHOODS. THE FARM LOVING

ORGANIZATION DOCUMENTED THE GRITS PROJECT THOUGH A SERIES OF VIDEO

SHORTS FOLLOWING THE STUDENT GRITS EXPERIENCE. YOU CAN KEEP TABS ON THE STUDENTS EXPERIENCES BY LIKING THE GRITS TO SCHOOL PAGE ON

FACEBOOK AND FOLLOWING AT A PLUS GRITS ON TWITTER. THE SERIES WILL

END ON APRIL THIRTIETH AND FOLLOW A TOTAL OF FIVE AREA SCHOOLS.

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LAUREN SELLERS GEORGIA ORGANICS 203 ROYAL CRESCENT TERRACE CANTON, GA, 30115 GRITS TO SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT 30-SECOND

STUDENTS IN ONE GEORGIA SCHOOL DISTRICT HAVE BEEN GETTING

THEIR HANDS DIRTY WITH A RED MULE AND BOWL OF GRITS. FOR THE LAST

MONTH ATHENS SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN SERVING UP CHEF ACCLAIMED RED

MULE GRITS ON BREAKFAST AND LUNCH MENUS. THE STUDENTS ALSO VISITED

THE GRITS OPERATION IN ORDER TO SEE THE JOURNEY BEHIND THEIR NEW

FAVORITE LOCAL FOOD. THE PROGRAM WILL END ON APRIL THIRTIETH.

FOLLOW A PLUS GRITS ON TWITTER AND LIKE THE GRITS TO SCHOOL

FACEBOOK PAGE TO FOLLOW THE STUDENTS.

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LAUREN SELLERS GEORGIA ORGANICS 203 ROYAL CRESCENT TERRACE CANTON, GA, 30115 GRITS TO SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT 10-SECOND

FOLLOW A PLUS GRITS ON TWITTER AND LIKE THE GRITS TO

SCHOOL FACEBOOK PAGE TO FOLLOW THE STORIES OF FIVE ATHENS CLARKE

SCHOOLS TRADING IN FROZEN MEALS FOR FRESH LOCAL FOOD THIS MONTH.

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