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MODERN UNIVERSITY FOR TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION

SUBMISSION FOR VALIDATION

IN COLLABORATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES

Modular Degree Programme
BSc (Hons) Engineering with Pathways in:
Mechanical Engineering (Production and Mechatronics) Electrical Engineering (Bio-electronics and Control) Electrical Engineering (Communication and Computer) Civil Engineering (Construction and Management) Architecture Engineering

Volume 2 - The programme

Programme Rationale
MTI has carried out a market research project and has identified a significant number of students in the region who are keen to pursue an internationally recognised engineering degree awarded by a quality UK university. Offered programmes provide sound academic underpinning for aspiring engineers and professionals who intend to work in an industrial and/or commercial environment. Each programme is designed to articulate a mix of the different courses and topics that will fulfil the needs of local, regional and international working environments. Strong links with the private sectors of the industry are developed and maintained in order to forecast expectations and obtain funds for projects and research. Each programme is specifically designed enable suitably qualified students to: 1. Develop students‟ knowledge, skills (including transferable skills) and understanding, as well as awareness and “know how”, in the field of specialization and its related disciplines (engineering, construction, manufacturing, mathematical modelling, industrial management …) so that as graduates they will be equipped to enter employment as professional (charted) engineers and a wide range of other professional careers. 2. Prepare students to engage in life-long learning (eg professional practice or further Higher Education) and critical enquiry with skills in research and knowledge acquisition and an appreciation of the value of education to the wider community. 3. Provide students with internationally recognized qualifications which meet the requirements of the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications and Benchmark Statement for Engineering. 4. Provide the engineering industry and profession, in Egypt and elsewhere, with employable and enterprising graduates prepared for the assumption of technical, managerial and financial responsibilities

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Programme Specification Section 1: Basic Data
Awarding institution/body University of Wales

Teaching institution

Modern University for Technology and Information

Faculty responsible for programme

Faculty of Engineering

Programme accredited by

University of Wales

Highest award title

Mechanical Engineering (Mechatronics and Production)

Default award title

BSc in: Mechanical Engineering (Mechatronics and Production) Certificate in Higher Education Diploma in Higher Education

Interim award titles

Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s)

Mechanical Engineering Materials Mathematics, Statistics, and Operational Research

On-going/valid until

On-going

Valid from

1 September 2007

Authorised by…

Date:…

Version code 1

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Case-studies. Communicate with engineers. all integrated through the design process. and computers. Basic Engineering and Specialized Courses phases see Programme Structure (sec. These contributions are identified separately in each generic attribute of the above areas. customers and other technicians. skills and other attributes in the following areas: … A. electronics. and implementation. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. Use and Program PLCs or other programmable control devices. are used throughout the programme. and implementation) for model validation and control. analysis. Transferable Skills and other Attributes The target qualities and skills are acquired through three main phases of study. with hardware demonstrations. Knowledge and Understanding B.  Understand the principles of analogue and digital control and power electronics operation (and design for mechatronics). Build prototype equipment.Section 2: Educational aims of mechatronics programme The mechatronics programme is seen as an engineering discipline that develops the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering. qualities. either on video or in class. These programmes study mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level. Use programming devices to service programs and in automation (mechatronics) Advise customers. with a balance between theory and hardware implementation. Install and maintain industrial systems and controls.  Apply physical modelling. Professional & Practical Skills D. The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. It involves the application of complex decision making to the operation of physical systems.4) below. These phases of study make specific contributions in building the graduate profile.  Understand control actuator (electromechanical and fluid) modelling. and hardware lab exercises. problemsolving. Troubleshoot and repair relevant systems. The program covers the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic system designs are based: On completion of the programme. Emphasis is placed on physical understanding as well as on mathematical formalities.  Evaluate production systems and continuous controller design and real-time analogue and digital implementation. from design to real models. and mathematical modelling of dynamic multidisciplinary physical systems. The main attributes are listed below. Mechatronics systems depend on computer software for their unique functionality. students will be able to:            Design and investigate the main engineering components Evaluate the application systems for proper operation. control engineering.  Assess the use of measurement systems (analogue and digital sensor modelling.  Assess mathematical models through analysis and computer simulation. Intellectual Skill C. 3 . Namely Preparatory. Use computers and test equipment. analysis.

4 . conduct. The main attributes are listed below. problem-solving. Understand and appreciate the technical diversity required to develop new products/processes. and hardware lab exercises. so that life-long learning becomes second nature On completion of the programme. customers and other technicians. and use this understanding to work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams. Professional & Practical Skills H. Intellectual Skill G.Section 2: Educational aims of Production Engineering programme The Production Engineering programme is seen as an engineering discipline that develops the synergistic combination of manufacture technology& mechanical design. Perform Quality control aspects & quality assurance Evaluate Factory planning & organization The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. Namely Preparatory. Develop an appreciation of the contemporary world. with a balance between theory and hardware implementation. These contributions are identified separately in each generic attribute of the above areas. Basic Engineering and Specialized Courses phases see Programme Structure (sec. Emphasis is placed on physical understanding as well as on mathematical formalities. The program covers the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic system designs are based:       Model. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. Naturally incorporate basic sciences and the art of mathematics as part of their thinking and problemsolving processes.e design) realistic and practical systems. either on video or in class. Knowledge and Understanding F. Learn how to learn. with hardware demonstrations. it's aims to develop engineers and researchers with creativity and overall ability. Communicate with engineers. Casestudies. Troubleshoot and repair relevant systems. Build prototype equipment. so that they can lead the world with their own capacity.4) below. Advise customers. products. this programme study production engineering at a theoretical and practical level. Design. and be able to contribute to it in a professional and ethical manner. students will be able to:            Design and investigate the main engineering components Evaluate the application systems for proper operation. Use computers and test equipment. qualities. These phases of study make specific contributions in building the graduate profile. and analyze experimental tests of practical systems and products. and environments. Install and maintain industrial systems and controls. skills and other attributes in the following areas: … E. Transferable Skills and other Attributes The target qualities and skills are acquired through three main phases of study. are used throughout the programme. formulate and creatively synthesize (i.

with specific units obligatory for each route. formulation and solution. The table shown on the next page demonstrates the contribution of study units (courses) in each attribute and educational principle.Generic Attributes: A. and to continue through life to learn. and the need for sustainable development. and B.Transferrable Skills D1. as well as academic matters. 5. 2. D. 5 . and capacity to do so. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. 4.Ability to communicate effectively. 7. Capacity to manage field problem. acquire the skills required to learn. 3.Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. 8. concisely and logically. The table is common for production engineering and mechatronics. Utilizing practical systems approach to design and operational performance. Expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning. Ability to utilize a systems approach to design and operational performance. cultural. master the subject matter and techniques of their chosen discipline at internationallyrecognized levels and standards.Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. A4. C.Understanding of the social. cultural. In-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. adapt acquired knowledge to new situations. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. A6.Professional & Practical Skills C1C2C3C4C5Ability to apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. 6. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. develop mature judgment and responsibility in moral. D3. A5. A2.Understanding of the social. Applying the principles of sustainable design and development. from a variety of sources and experiences. identification. formulation and solution. D4. formulation and solution. A3. write and speak clearly.Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. question accepted wisdom and be open to new ideas and possibilities. and Educational Principles 1. D2. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. P.Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification.Knowledge & Understanding A1. Ability to undertake problem identification. social and practical. think and reason logically and creatively. and the need for sustainable development.S. develop the capacity to take a leadership role in the community.Intellectual Skills B1B2B3B4B5Ability to apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member.Ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.

Project Premium MENG 312 Die Design MENG 332 Digital Signal Processing MENG 339 Automatic Control MENG 316 Technology of Plastics MENG 326 Powder Metallurgy MENG 330 Factory Planning * MENG 342 Environmental Management and Legislations MENG 343 Social Psychology MENG 319 Design of Material Handling Equipment MENG 321 Industrial Management MENG 344 BSc. Project * * x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6 .Generic Skills by Units Production Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills Educational Principles Course Code Course title A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 MENG 201 Mechanical Drawing MENG 203 Production Engineering (III) MENG 205 Engineering Mechanics & Theory of Machines MENG 210 Mathematics (III) MENG 213 Civil Engineering MENG 227 Technical Report Writing MENG 202 Machine Construction MENG 206 Thermodynamics MENG 208 Strength of Material MENG 211 Mathematics (IV) MENG 221 Electronic Engineering STR (I) Field General Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 209 Metallurgy MENG 212 Stress Analysis MENG 214 Fluid Mechanics MENG 222 Computer Applications (I) MENG 216 Mechanical Element Design MENG 218 Fluid Power Systems MENG 224 Circuit Theory MENG 225 Metrology and Measurements STR (II) Factory & Practical Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 301 System Dynamics & Vibration MENG 302 Mechanical System Design MENG 306 Computer Aided Design MENG 314 Heat and Surface Treatment MENG 341 Feasibility studies MENG 311 Machanics of Fracture MENG 323 Computer Aided Product Design MENG 333 Logic Circuits MENG 340 Process Control & Automation STR(III) Field & Practical Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 304 Metal Cutting Theory & Design * MENG 315 Material Design * MENG 305 Metal Forming Theory & Design MENG 309 BSc.

Generic Skills by Units Mechatronics Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills Educational Principles No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 LEVEL Course Code Course title A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 MENG 201 Mechanical Drawing MENG 203 Production Engineering (III) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 MENG 205 Engineering Mechanics & Theory of Machines MENG 210 Mathematics (III) MENG 213 Civil Engineering MENG 227 Technical Report Writing MENG 202 Machine Construction MENG 206 Thermodynamics x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 MENG 208 Strength of Material MENG 211 Mathematics (IV) MENG 221 Electronic Engineering STR (I) Field General Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 209 Metallurgy MENG 212 Stress Analysis x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 MENG 214 Fluid Mechanics MENG 222 Computer Applications (I) MENG 343 Social Psychology MENG 216 Mechanical Element Design MENG 218 Fluid Power Systems x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 MENG 224 Circuit Theory MENG 225 Metrology and Measurements STR (II) Factory & Practical Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 301 System Dynamics & Vibration MENG 302 Mechanical System Design x x x x x x x 6a MENG 306 Computer Aided Design MENG 314 Heat and Surface Treatment MENG 341 Feasibility studies MENG 323 Computer Aided Product Design MENG 333 Logic Circuits x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a MENG 340 Process Control & Automation STR(IV) Field Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x MENG 321 Industrial Management MENG 337 Design of smart machines x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a Elect MENG 318 Reliability and Statistics MENG 327 Internal Combustion Engines MENG 309 BSc. Project MENG 331 Robot Technology MENG 307 Simulation of Industrial Systems x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b Elect MENG 337 Design of smart machines MENG 335 Refrigeration & Air Condition x x x 7 . Project Premium MENG 220 Mechatronics x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b MENG 332 Digital Signal Processing MENG 339 Automatic Control MENG 334 Control using fluid power MENG 303 Hydraulic Machines x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b Elect MENG 317 Information Management and Control MENG 324 Maintenance Planning MENG 342 Environmental Management and Legislations x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b MENG 325 Programmable Logic Controllers MENG 344 BSc.

The table shown below demonstrates the major contribution of study levels to each attribute and educational principle. Generic Skills by Levels Production Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Transferrable Skills Skills B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles No 1 LEVEL A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 4 5 5 6a x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 2 x x x x x 3 6a 6a Elect 6b 6b Elect 6b 6b Elect x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Generic Skills by Levels Mechatronics Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Transferrable Skills Skills B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles No 1 LEVEL A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 4 5 5 6a x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 2 x x x x x 3 6a 6a Elect 6b 6b Elect 6b 6b Elect x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 8 .

Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. 7. cultural. 9 . Learning and Assessment Strategies A Knowledge and understanding in the context of the subject material: On completion of the programme students will have developed an understanding of a complex body of knowledge. oral presentation (learning outcomes 1-6). Each committee formed for evaluating a BSc project must include at least two visiting professors. critical literature review and analysis (learning outcome 7). Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. 5. tasks undertaken under examination conditions (learning outcomes 1-7). Core modules make a primary contribution to one or more knowledge and understanding outcomes as indicated below but most modules make additional contributions. Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. The primary contributions of the core modules are identified in the module mapping schedules. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. Subject specific knowledge and skills. formulation and solution. 6. Each student should then conduct the appropriate procedure to search and build knowledge under supervision. Assessment of student efforts in Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors upon assigning each student specific tasks within the group work. 4. 2. skills and other attributes in the following areas: A Knowledge and understanding Learning outcomes Teaching. in the areas of: Teaching/learning methods and strategies: Knowledge and understanding is acquired through a range of core and optional modules at levels 3 4. which are identified separately in the module specifications. some of it at the current boundaries of the disciplines.Section 3: Learning outcomes of the programme The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. 5 and 6. 3. 1. At least one distinguished visiting professor will attend the project premium committee. See Appendix (A). qualities. Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. Understanding of the social. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. The defence committee will approve the final evaluation. Assessment: Testing of the knowledge base is through a range of formative and cumulative assessment approaches including coursework (learning outcomes 1-6). and the need for sustainable development.

Assessment of student contribution in the design and manufacturing phases of Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. based activities. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation through oral and practical invetiagtions. 5. Apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. 2. Assessment A variety of formative and cumulative assessment methods are employed to demonstrate the acquisition of intellectual skills. Illustrate the capacity to manage field problems. practical exercises. case studies. exercises and I. C Subject. and examinations. Demonstrate in-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. These include reflective essays. group work.T. Assessment 2. Utilise a systems approach to design and operational performance. Assessment of student innovation throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Subject/Professional/Practice skills are developed through all modules. Skill 1 is primarily assessed by coursework research based assignments across a number of modules Skill 2 is primarily assessed through coursework reports Skill 3 is primarily assessed through coursework seminar presentations Skills 4 and 5 are primarily assessed through course work reports and exercises and examinations in all modules. Apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. The defence committee will test. Utilise practical systems approaches to design and operational performance. approve and conclude the final evaluation. cases studies. reports. 5 and 6 through a range of learning approaches including lectures. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Intellectual skills are developed at levels 3. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development. workshops. formulation and solution. presentations. Undertake problem identification. 10 . 3. and identify and formulate solutions. projects. 5. 4. Professional and Practical Skills C Subject/Professional/Practical Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 1. 3. tests. 4. Apply the principles of sustainable design and development.B Intellectual Skills B Intellectual Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 1. Appreciate the need and demonstrate the capacity to undertake life long learning. 4. seminars.

3. Understand the social. All skills are assessed in the pathway modules at level 6 Assessment of student behaviour and cooperation with his colleagues and laboratory technicians will be under full scrutiny by his supervisors throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects. 5. Teaching/learning methods and strategies 11 . with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation.D Transferable Skills and other attributes D Transferable skills and other attributes On completion of the programme students will be able to: 1. Assessment 8. Function effectively as an individual and in multidisciplinary and multi-cultural teams. which include written individual and group coursework. tests. 4. and examinations. process and present numerical information for a given purpose. 3. Take responsibility for own learning. Understand professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to engineers. Extract. cultural. Reflect on own performance and respond positively to feedback. Communicate effectively. 9. 3. 5. 6. Use information technology. presentations. 10. and the need for sustainable development. 4. 7. Assessment of transferable skills is accomplished through a range of methods. 11. are developed in all core modules. are given particular emphasis in coursework assignment across all modules. self-assessment. peer assessment. Transferable skills are developed through an integrated programme of learning. which is built into all core modules at levels 3. Exhibit and critically assess the skills required by employers. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. Transfer knowledge and skills across different settings. 2. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. Manage own time and workload. 4. 2. Skills 1. and 6. Skills 1.

Programme Specification Section 1: Basic Data Awarding institution/body University of Wales Teaching institution Modern University for Technology and Information Faculty responsible for programme Faculty of Engineering Programme accredited by University of Wales Highest award title Civil Engineering (Construction and Project Management) BSc in: Civil Engineering (Construction and Project Management) Certificate in Higher Education Diploma in Higher Education Default award title Interim award titles Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s) Building and Surveying Engineering On-going/valid until On-going Valid from Authorised by… Date:… 1 September 2007 Version code 1 12 .

Appreciate construction management planning and cost considerations. roads. Professional & Practical Skills L. Use different types of surveying instruments to carry out construction work. hydraulic structures. 13 . The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding.4) below. and construction projects management. These contributions are identified separately in each generic attribute of the above areas. Have a through knowledge of all properties and mechanics of construction materials. aiming to provide a flexible comprehensive education at undergraduate level which progresses from basic disciplines through functional areas to specialist pathways. Study properties of soil and design foundations for large structures. qualities. Understand the properties of different types of building materials. Construction deals with various types of construction works including buildings. with a balance between theory/analysis and design. Knowledge and Understanding J. It explores various projects scheduling techniques and their suitability for different types of works. Construction projects management consists of approximately 70% construction works and 30% projects management. On completion of the programme students will be able to:       Design and supervise construction work. steel structures and bridges. execution and finally maintenance. Namely Preparatory.Section 2: Educational aims of the programme Civil engineering The civil engineering programme offers both construction. Transferable Skills and other Attributes The target qualities and skills are acquired through three main phases of study. This programme studies construction and construction projects management at a theoretical and practical level. Be aware of the various modern engineering trends. tunnels. Use computer and software applications in the construction field. Intellectual Skill K. The main attributes are listed below. Understand the Egyptian building code to avoid wastage in construction. The programme aims to enable students to:      Study the principals of engineering. skills and other attributes in the following areas: … I. These phases of study make specific contributions in building the graduate profile. and involves the operation of planning analysis and design. see Programme Structure (sec. Basic Engineering and Specialized Courses phases. Identify and analyse construction and management problems and evaluate alternative solutions.

and Educational Principles 9. G. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development. formulation and solution. 16. adapt acquired knowledge to new situations. social and practical. Capacity to manage field problem. 11.Transferrable Skills D1.Understanding of the social. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. Expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning. A5. 13. question accepted wisdom and be open to new ideas and possibilities. Ability to undertake problem identification. D3.Generic Attributes: E. D4. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. A2. develop mature judgment and responsibility in moral. The table shown on the next page demonstrates the contribution of study units (courses) in each attribute and educational principle. and the need for sustainable development. acquire the skills required to learn. formulation and solution. and capacity to do so. concisely and logically. write and speak clearly. cultural.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them.Professional & Practical Skills C1C2C3C4C5Ability to apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations.Knowledge & Understanding A1. Ability to utilize a systems approach to design and operational performance. think and reason logically and creatively. Develop the capacity to take a leadership role in the community. A6.Ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams. formulation and solution.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. P. 14 . D2. Applying the principles of sustainable design and development.Intellectual Skills B1B2B3B4B5Ability to apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. and to continue through life to learn.Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. identification. and F.Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals.S. from a variety of sources and experiences. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. A4. A3.Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. The table is common for production engineering and mechatronics.Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. 12. 14. In-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. master the subject matter and techniques of their chosen discipline at internationallyrecognized levels and standards.Understanding of the social. 10. and the need for sustainable development. Utilizing practical systems approach to design and operational performance. with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. as well as academic matters. H. with specific units obligatory for each route. 15. cultural.Ability to communicate effectively.

Generic Skills by Units Civil Engineering * Elective Subjects Knowledge & Understanding Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills Intellectual Skills Educational Principles No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 LEVEL Course Code Course title A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CENG 201 Engineering Graphics CENG 202 Introduction to Civil Engineering x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 CENG 203 Mathematics (III) CENG 206 Strength of Material & Structure CENG 207 Civil Engineering Mechanics (I) x x x x x x x x x CENG 227 Technical Report Writing 4 elective CENG 228 Foundation of rational thoughts CENG 204 Mathematics (IV) CENG 205 Properties & Receptivity of Materials x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 CENG 208 Surveying (I) CENG 211 Fluid Mechanics CENG 215 Structural Analysis STR (II) Field Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x CENG 226 Communication in Civil Engineering 4 15 CENG 229 Engineering Geology elective 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 CENG 230 Engineering Economics CENG 209 Surveying (II) CENG 210 Geotechnical Engineering (I) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 CENG 212 Hydraulics CENG 213 Computer Application (I) CENG 216 Structural Design (I) CENG 220 Building Technology CENG 214 Computer Application (II) CENG 217 Reinforced Concrete Design x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 CENG 218 Structural Design (II) CENG 219 Hydrology CENG 225 Building Equipment * STR (III) Practical Training CENG 221 Civil Engineering Mechanics (II) * x x x x x x x x CENG 222 Mechanical Engineering * 5 elective 15 .

Project Premium STR(IV) Field & Practical Training CEM 305 Quality Control CEM 314 Cost management & accounting CEM 303 Municipal Engineering CEM 309 Decision making & project planning x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a 13 elective 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 x x x x x x x x x 6b CEM 313 Projects planning & analysis CEM 315 Construction management CEM 329 BSc. Project CEM 323 Sanitary installations & management * . x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b elective CEM 324 Matrix analysis & Structure * CEM 325 Architecture &Civil Projects pollution * CEM 326 Work and time study * CEM 327 Facility planning and control * x x x x x x x x 16 . x x . Project CEM 317 Numerical Analysis * CEM 318 Fire and Explosion project protection * x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b CEM 319 Urban Projects Environmental Assessment * CEM 320 Micro/Macro problems issue * CEM 321 Environmental Architecture * CEM 322 Hospitals construction Management * CEM 310 Civil planning and Housing 23 elective 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b CEM 316 Public works construction CEM 329 BSc. CEM 330 History of the build Environment 7 8 9 10 11 12 CEM 306 Solid Waste Management CEM 311 Quality control and assessment x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a CEM 312 Structural Steel Design CEM 328 BSc.Generic Skills by Units Construction Project Management * Elective Subjects Knowledge & Understanding Professional & Transferrable Practical Skills Skills Intellectual Skills Educational Principles No LEVEL 1 2 3 4 5 Course Code Course title A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CEM 301 Construction Unit Operation CEM 302 Geotechnical Engineering (II) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a CEM 307 Foundation Design CEM 308 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design CEM 331 Legislations in Civil Engineering x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6 6a elect.

Project Premium x x x x x x x x x x CENG 319 Decision Making in Urban Environment * 6b 20 elective CENG 320 Civil Planning & Housing * 21 22 23 24 25 27 CENG 310 Roads & Runways Design CENG 315 Tunnels and Under Ground Structures x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b CENG 316 Management CENG 320 Civil Planning & Housing * CENG 321 Town Planning * CENG 324 BSc.Generic Skills by Units Construction Engineering * Elective Subjects Knowledge & Understanding Professional & Transferrable Practical Skills Skills Intellectual Skills Educational Principles No LEVEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Course Code Course title A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CENG 301 Geotechnical Engineering (II) CENG 302 Transportation Engineering x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a CENG 306 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design (I) CENG 309 Matrix Analysis & Structure CENG 312 Water Engineering CENG 325 Environmental Auditing & Inspection CENG 303 Structural Steel Design (I) CENG 304 Foundation Design x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a CENG 305 Highway Engineering CENG 311 Health & Industrial Safety CENG 326 Feasibility studies STR (III) Practical Training 3 CENG 317 Municipal Engineering * x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a 14 CENG 318 Environmental Engineering * elective 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 CENG 322 Numerical Analysis * CENG 306 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design (I) CENG 308 Sanitary Engineering x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b CENG 313 Structure Steel Design (II) CENG 314 Quantities and specifications CENG 323 BSc. Project x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 17 .

Generic Skills by Levels Civil Engineering * Elective Subjects Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Transferrable Skills Skills C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles No LEVEL A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 3 4 5 6 7 8 Basic phase 4 4 Elect 1 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 4 Elect 5 2 5 5 Elect Construction Project Management 6a 6a Elect 3 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a 6a Elect 6b 6b Elect 4 6b 6b Elect Construction Engineering 6a 3 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a 6a Elect 6b 4 6b Elect 6b 18 .The table shown below demonstrates the major contribution of study levels to each attribute and educational principle.

Each committee formed for evaluating a BSc project must include at least two visiting professors. The defence committee will approve the final evaluation. critical literature review and analysis (learning outcome 7). Each student should then conduct the appropriate procedure to search and build knowledge under supervision. Subject specific knowledge and skills. 9. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. 5 and 6. some of it at the current boundaries of the disciplines. oral presentation (learning outcomes 1-6). 12. qualities. Assessment of student efforts in Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors upon assigning each student specific tasks within the group work. Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. See Appendix (A). formulation and solution. Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. Understanding of the social. Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. 10. Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. At least one distinguished visiting professor will attend the project premium committee. The primary contributions of the core modules are identified in the module mapping schedules. 19 . Learning and Assessment Strategies A Knowledge and understanding in the context of the subject material: On completion of the programme students will have developed an understanding of a complex body of knowledge. 11. 13. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. Core modules make a primary contribution to one or more knowledge and understanding outcomes as indicated below but most modules make additional contributions. 8. skills and other attributes in the following areas: A Knowledge and understanding Learning outcomes Teaching. tasks undertaken under examination conditions (learning outcomes 1-7). and the need for sustainable development. in the areas of: Teaching/learning methods and strategies: Knowledge and understanding is acquired through a range of core and optional modules at levels 3 4. which are identified separately in the module specifications. 14. Assessment: Testing of the knowledge base is through a range of formative and cumulative assessment approaches including coursework (learning outcomes 1-6).Section 3: Learning outcomes of the programme The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. cultural.

approve and conclude the final evaluation. tests. 20 . Apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. Assessment A variety of formative and cumulative assessment methods are employed to demonstrate the acquisition of intellectual skills. projects. Illustrate the capacity to manage field problems. 9. Utilise practical systems approaches to design and operational performance. case studies. Apply the principles of sustainable design and development. practical exercises. Demonstrate in-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. 10. 4. 10. Undertake problem identification. 8. exercises and I. Assessment of student innovation throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. Apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. Utilise a systems approach to design and operational performance. These include reflective essays. group work. reports. formulation and solution. presentations. and identify and formulate solutions. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development. Assessment of student contribution in the design and manufacturing phases of Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation through oral and practical invetiagtions. 8. and examinations. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Subject/Professional/Practice skills are developed through all modules. cases studies. 5 and 6 through a range of learning approaches including lectures. Skill 1 is primarily assessed by coursework research based assignments across a number of modules Skill 2 is primarily assessed through coursework reports Skill 3 is primarily assessed through coursework seminar presentations Skills 4 and 5 are primarily assessed through course work reports and exercises and examinations in all modules. based activities. 9. Assessment 7. C Subject. The defence committee will test. Appreciate the need and demonstrate the capacity to undertake life long learning.B Intellectual Skills B Intellectual Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 6. 7. Professional and Practical Skills C Subject/Professional/Practical Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 6. seminars. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Intellectual skills are developed at levels 3. workshops.T.

with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. Understand the social. tests. Manage own time and workload. Use information technology.D Transferable Skills and other attributes D Transferable skills and other attributes On completion of the programme students will be able to: 12. which include written individual and group coursework. Function effectively as an individual and in multidisciplinary and multi-cultural teams. 17. self-assessment. which is built into all core modules at levels 3. Understand professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to engineers. Communicate effectively. 16. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. 3. Exhibit and critically assess the skills required by employers. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation. 21. Teaching/learning methods and strategies 21 . and examinations. peer assessment. 2. 5. 3. Reflect on own performance and respond positively to feedback. Assessment 19. 4. 13. Skills 1. 4. presentations. 20. Skills 1. 15. Transferable skills are developed through an integrated programme of learning. 22. Transfer knowledge and skills across different settings. All skills are assessed in the pathway modules at level 6 Assessment of student behaviour and cooperation with his colleagues and laboratory technicians will be under full scrutiny by his supervisors throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects. are given particular emphasis in coursework assignment across all modules. Assessment of transferable skills is accomplished through a range of methods. 14. and the need for sustainable development. cultural. Extract. and 6. process and present numerical information for a given purpose. 18. Take responsibility for own learning. are developed in all core modules. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering.

Programme Specification Section 1: Basic Data Awarding institution/body University of Wales Teaching institution Modern University for Technology and Information Faculty responsible for programme Faculty of Engineering Programme accredited by University of Wales BSc (Hons) in: Electrical Engineering (Bio.Electronics) Electrical Engineering (Control Engineering) Electrical Engineering (Communication Engineering) Electrical Engineering (Computer Engineering) Highest award title Default award title Interim award titles Certificate in Higher Education Diploma in Higher Education Electrical Engineering Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s) On-going/valid until On-going Valid from Authorised by… Date:… 1 September 2007 Version code 1 22 .Electronics) Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) Electrical Engineering (Communication) Electrical Engineering (Computers) BSc in: Electrical Engineering (Bio.

capture. The programme features enhanced subject breadth through a wide selection of elective modules. They are subject to continuing development. physicians. science and technology which are fundamental to control systems engineering.  Evaluate the techniques and attitudes employed in the business and management context of bio-electronic engineering. social and ethical responsibilities of the bio-electronic engineer. This programme of study is to enable the participants to develop progressively the capability to address with confidence the kinds of problems which practising Bio-Electronic engineers meet at work including the communication with clinical colleagues with a real understanding of the problems associated with the application of medical technology in the clinical setting. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. FPGAs or other programmable devices. process and display human body signals.  Develop the personal skills required in engineering practice. Use computer aided analysis and design software tools and hardware test equipment.  Appreciate the professional. processors. Design. physiology. Communicate with engineers. Program PLCs. Advise customers.  Appreciate the professional. control. The control systems programme of study enables students to develop progressively the capability to address with confidence the kinds of problems which practising control systems engineers meet at work.  Evaluate the techniques and attitudes employed in the business and management context of and control systems engineering. therapeutic equipment Troubleshoot and repair bio-medical electronic systems. mechanical engineering knowledge and skills. so as to meet the current requirements of the standards of best practice in academic matters as prescribed by the relevant educational bodies and relevant professional bodies. Build prototype equipment. Take part in design teams of bio-medical monitoring.Section 2: Educational aims of the programme The bio-electronics programme is concerned with the ever increasing sophisticated applications of electronics in the medical field applications. 23 . diagnostic.  Develop the personal skills required in engineering practice.  Appreciate the theory and practice of solving problems encountered in the application of bio-electronic engineering. The bio-electronic engineer should have the necessary background of human body science (anatomy. social and ethical responsibilities of the bio-electronic engineer. pathology) in addition to a combination of electrical. test and maintain the bio-signal sensors. On completion of the programme students will be able to:           Simulate. electronic. science and technology which are fundamental to bioelectronic engineering.  Appreciate the theory and practice of solving problems encountered in the application of control systems engineering.  Understand the basic principles of mathematics. The programme aims to enable students to:  Understand the basic principles of mathematics. customers and other technicians. displays.

24 . test and maintain control systems sensors. Communicate with engineers. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. Communicate with engineers. science and technology which are fundamental to communications systems engineering. capture. customers and other technicians. Advise customers. test and maintain communications systems. design. Advise customers. Program PLCs. Design. They are subject to continuing development. The purpose of the communications systems engineering programme of study is to enable students to develop progressively the capability to address with confidence the kinds of problems which practising communications systems engineers meet at work. Use computer aided analysis and design software tools and hardware test equipment.  Appreciate the theory and practice of solving problems encountered in the application of communications systems engineering. Use computer aided analysis and design software tools and hardware test equipment. Take part in design teams of control systems Troubleshoot and repair control electronic systems. Build prototype equipment. On completion of the programme students will be able to:          Analyze. customers and other technicians. The programme aims to enable students to:  Understand the basic principles of mathematics.  Develop the personal skills required in engineering practice. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. and displays. so as to meet the current requirements of the standards of best practice in academic matters as prescribed by the relevant educational bodies. FPGAs or other programmable devices. process and display control systems signals. relevant professional bodies. processors. FPGAs or other programmable devices. social and ethical responsibilities of the communications systems engineering.  Appreciate the professional. Take part in design teams of communications equipment Troubleshoot and repair communications systems.  Evaluate the techniques and attitudes employed in the business and management context of communications systems engineering. Program PLCs.On completion of the programme students will be able to:           Simulate. The programme features enhanced subject breadth through a wide selection of elective modules. Build prototype equipment.

 Evaluate the techniques and attitudes employed in the business and management computer engineering. Calibrate instrumentation and test equipment. The programme features enhanced subject breadth through a wide selection of elective modules.  Appreciate the professional.  Appreciate the theory and practice of solving problems encountered in the application of computer engineering. These phases of study make specific contributions in building the graduate profile. The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. They are subject to continuing development.The purpose of the computer engineering programme of study is to enable students to develop progressively the capability to address with confidence the kinds of problems which practising computer systems engineers meet at work. Advise customers. test and maintain computers systems.4) below. Knowledge and Understanding N. Use computer aided analysis and design software tools and hardware test equipment. customers and other technicians. social and ethical responsibilities of the computer systems engineer. Basic Engineering and Specialized Courses phases. Build prototype equipment. Take part in design teams of computers systems and computer equipment. The programme aims to enable students to:  Understand the basic principles of mathematics. On completion of the programme students will be able to:          Analyze. Communicate with engineers. These contributions are identified separately in each generic attribute of the above areas. science and technology which are fundamental to computer systems engineering. Troubleshoot and repair computers systems. The main attributes are listed below 25 . Professional & Practical Skills P. see Programme Structure (sec.  Develop the personal skills required in engineering practice. skills and other attributes in the following areas: … M. Transferable Skills and other Attributes The target qualities and skills are acquired through three main phases of study. Program PLCs. so as to meet the current requirements of the standards of best practice in academic matters as prescribed by the relevant educational bodies. Namely Preparatory. design. FPGAs or other programmable devices. Intellectual Skill O. relevant professional bodies. qualities.

In-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. social and practical. A2.Knowledge & Understanding A1. cultural. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. develop mature judgment and responsibility in moral.Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. D2. think and reason logically and creatively. K. 3. 7. Develop the capacity to take a leadership role in the community. 8. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development. Ability to undertake problem identification.Transferable Skills D1.Ability to communicate effectively.Generic Attributes: I. The tables shown on the next pages demonstrate the contribution of study units (modules) in each attribute and educational principle. 4. and the need for sustainable development. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering.Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. A5. and J. Utilizing practical systems approach to design and operational performance.Ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams. D4. and the need for sustainable development. A6. cultural.Understanding of the social. with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. 26 . 5. L.Professional & Practical Skills C1C2C3C4C5Ability to apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. A4. formulation and solution.Intellectual Skills B1B2B3B4B5Ability to apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals.Understanding of the social. master the subject matter and techniques of their chosen discipline at internationally-recognized levels and standards. and Educational Principles 1. from a variety of sources and experiences. formulation and solution.Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. Expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. 6. question accepted wisdom and be open to new ideas and possibilities. 2. adapt acquired knowledge to new situations. A3. as well as academic matters. formulation and solution. Ability to utilize a systems approach to design and operational performance. identification.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. and to continue through life to learn. Capacity to manage field problem. concisely and logically. and capacity to do so. acquire the skills required to learn.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. write and speak clearly. D3.Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. Applying the principles of sustainable design and development.

Generic Skills by Units Bio-electronics Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills 1 Educational Principles 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 LEVEL Course Code BIO 201 BIO 216 Course title Mathe matics (III) Anatomy and Physiology Stre ngth of Mate rials Ele ctrical circuits The rmodynamics A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4a BIO 207 BIO 209 BIO 213 X X X X X X X BIO 226 4a MTI addi ti onal modul e s. One from: BIO 320 BIO 324 BIO 325 BIO 326 BIO 312 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-2 BIO 315 BIO 317 BIO 333 BIO 321 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-2 optional modules. Sc. Proje ct Pre mium X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X BIO 331 6a-2 MTI addi ti onal modul e s.one from : BIO 220 BIO 225 BIO 222 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5b BIO 223 BIO 214 X X X X STR (II) BIO 218 5b O pti onal modul e s.Two from : Field Training 2 Ele ctrical Drive s Syste m Micro-Computing Engine e ring Stre ss Analysis for human body Compute r in Me dicine Microwave s Circuits and Equipme nt Powe r Ele ctronics Data base Manage me nt Re al time Ope ration X X X X X X X X X BIO 215 BIO 224 BIO 301 BIO 302 X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6a-1 BIO 304 BIO 307 BIO 318 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X BIO 330 BIO 303 BIO 305 Management & Health Care Medical Laboratory Science & Methods X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X CAD of Signals & Syste ms Mode l i ng of El e ctri cal Machi ne s 6a-2 BIO 306 BIO 309 STR(III) BIO 333 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Bio-me chanics Syste ms Fie ld & Practical Training B. O ne from : Field General Training Bio Me dical Engine e ring (I). Sc. Proje ct-2 Ne w Engine e ring Mate rial Fault Diagnosis Re frige ration & Air-Condition Parametric Estimations and Systems Identification Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems BIO 332 BIOE 308 BIO 310 BIO 311 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-1 BIO 313 BIO 314 BIO 316 BIO 333 BIO 319 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-1 MTI additional modules. X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X BIO 227 BIO 228 BIO 203 BIO 206 Legislations Projects Evaluation Mathe matics (V) Engine e ring De sign (II) Ele ctronic circuits Instrume ntations (I) Compute r Application (I) Bio Me dical Engine e ring (II). O ne from : Technical Report Writing Psychology and Sociology Civil Engine e ring Mathe matics (IV) Engine e ring Me chanics Engine e ring De sign (I) Manufacturing Te chnology X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X BIO 217 BIO 221 BIO 202 BIO 204 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4b BIO 205 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X STR (I) BIO 219 4b MTI addi ti onal modul e s. O ne from : Industrial Psychology Feasibility Study Hospital Work Me dical Gase s Syste m De sign Inve ntory Control Ele ctronic Vision Clinic Instrume ntation Ste rilization Te chnique s B. Proje ct-1 Micro Proce ssor Control Digital Compute r Engine e ring Robot Te chnology & Me dical Care TQM in He alth Care Me dical Space Planning Advance d Control Syste ms Nucle ar & Radio Equipme nts Physiothe rapy Equipme nt B. Sc.Tw o From: BIO 322 BIO 323 BIO 327 BIO 328 BIO 329 Mainte nance Planning Of Hospitals 27X X X X X X X X X X . Syste m Dynamics for human body Imaging Te chnology Wave s & Radiating Syste ms Fluid Me chanics X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5a BIO 210 BIO 211 BIO 212 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5a O pti onal modul e s.

one from: 4 LEVEL Course Code CONT 201 CONT 204 CONT 205 CONT 207 CONT 209 CONT 229 CONT 202 CONT 206 CONT 208 CONT 210 STR (I) CONT 216 CONT 219 CONT 217 CONT 218 CONT 203 CONT 213 CONT 211 CONT235 CONT 212 CONT 214 STR (II) CONT 220 CONT 222 CONT 223 CONT 225 CONT 228 CONT 221 CONT 224 CONT 226 CONT 227 CONT 215 CONT 230 CONT 231 CONT 301 CONT 302 CONT 304 CONT 306 CONT 309 CONT 326 Course title Mathematics (III) Engineering Meehanics Engineering Design (I) Strength of Material Electric Circuit Technical Reports Writing Mathematics (IV) Engineering Design( II) Manufacturing technology Electronic Circuits Field General Training Computer Programming (I ) Civil Engineering Computer Programming (II) Properties Testing of Material Mathematics ( V) Thermodynamics Instrumentations (I) micro-computing engineering Computer Applications (I) Fluid Mechanics Factory & Practical Training Digital &Electronic Circuits (I) Machine Element Design Engineering Applications (I) Field Theory Semiconductors Physics Digital &Electronic Circuits(II) Engineering Applications (II) Microelectronic (I) Control Engineering (I) Numerical Analysis Industrial Psychology Ethnic Studies Use of Microcomputers Control Engineering (II) Electric machines & Power Electronics Circuit Design Electronic Instruments & Sensors Feasibility Studies x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x A1 x x x x x A2 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 x x x x x Intellectual Skills B2 x x x x x x x x x B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Skills C1 x x x x x x x x x x x x x C2 x C3 x x C4 C5 x x Transferrable Skills D1 x D2 D3 D4 1 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 2 x x Educational Principles 3 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 4 5 6 7 8 28 .Sc.Generic Skills by Units Control Engineering Knowledge & Understanding No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 6a 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 6b-2 optional Three from: 6b-1 Optional modules. one from: 5 optional modules group A. one from: 6b-2 6b-1 6a MTI additional modules.Sc. one from: STR(III) CONT 327 CONT 328 CONT 320 CONT 310 CONT 311 CONT 312 CONT 314 CONT 329 CONT 313 CONT 315 CONT 329 CONT 316 CONT 317 CONT 318 CONT 325 CONT 319 CONT 321 CONT 322 CONT 323 CONT 324 CONT 303 CONT 305 CONT 307 CONT 308 Microelectronics (II) Power Electronics (I) Microprocessors Based systems Advanced Control Engineering (I) BSc Project Premuim Field & Practical Training Accounting Engineering Economics Control of Industrial Systems Digital Signal Processing * Digital Control Modeling of Industrial Systems Programmable Logic controller B. Two from: 5/ optional modules. Project-first term Robot Engineering & control Systems Design and Analysis B. one from: Optional modules. two from: 5 4 MTI additional modules. Project-2nd term Instrumentations (II) Computer Applications (II) Power Electronics (II) Parameter Estimation & System Identification Systems Dynamics Fluid power control systems Advanced Electronic Systems Control of Biomedical Equipment Microwaves Principles x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 optional groupB.

Proje ct Microwave s Ele ctronics Expe rt Syste ms Industrial Ele ctronics Optical e le ctronics Digital Communications Optical Se miconductor Ante nnas & Wave s Propagation Micro proce ssor Syste ms B. two from: ELTE 217 ELTE 220 ELTE 222 ELTE 217 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5b ELTE 215 STR(II) ELTE 219 ELTE 221 5b optional module s. Sc. Sc. Sc. Proje ct-a Fe asibility Studie s Microwave s Ele ctronics Environme ntal Impact of Communication Syste ms Mobile Phone s Syste ms Radar Engine e ring Syste ms B. Proje ct-b Advance d Automatic Control Ne uro Ne tworks Programmable Logic Controlle r X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ELTE 320 ELTE 323 Robot syste ms and Te chnology Artificial Inte llige nce X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 29 . One from: 5b MTI addi ti onal modul e s. O ne from : Intellectual Skills Professional & Transferrab Practical Skills le Skills Educational Principles 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LEVEL Course Code ELTE 201 ELTE 204 ELTE 209 ELTE 207 ELTE 212 ELTE 208 ELTE 202 ELTE 210 ELTE 211 ELTE 206 ELTE 226 STR(I) ELTE 203 ELTE 213 Course title Mathe matics (III) Engine e ring Me chanics Ele ctrical circuits Ele ctromagne tic Fie lds Compute r Application Signal Proce ssing Mathe matics (IV) Ele ctronic Engine e ring (I) Instrume ntations (I) Logic Circuits Te chnical Re port Writing Fie ld Training 1 Mathe matics (V) Ele ctronic Engine e ring (I) Communication Syste ms (I) Digital Syste ms (I) Ele ctromagne tic Principle s Ele ctrical Engine e ring Te sting Civil Engine e ring The ory of Machincs & De sign Ele ctronic Engine e ring 2 Communication Syste ms 2 Fie ld Training 2 Compute r Organization Digital Syste ms 2 Syste m Dynamics & Control Compone nt Manufacture Te chnology Ele ctronic Engine e ring Te sting le gislations industrial psychology Compute r Scie nce & Data manage me nt Ele ctric Powe r & Machine s Control Syste ms 1 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5a ELTE 214 ELTE 205 ELTE 216 X 5a Optional module s. Thre e from: X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ELTE 224 ELTE 223 ELTE 218 ELTE 227 ELTE 228 ELTE 301 ELTE 302 ELTE 304 ELTE 308 ELTE 224 ELTE 318 ELTE 305 ELTE 309 ELTE 311 ELTE 314 STR (III) ELTE 327 ELTE 318 ELTE 322 ELTE 319 ELTE 307 ELTE 312 ELTE 313 ELTE 310 ELTE 303 ELTE 327 ELTE 225 ELTE 318 ELTE 226 ELTE 315 ELTE 316 ELTE 327 ELTE 317 ELTE 321 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Microwave s Ele ctronic Engine e ring Engine e ring Economics Ele ctromagne tic Wave s Control Syste ms 2 Inte grate d Circuits Communication Ne tworks Sate llite Communications Fie ld Training 3 B.Generic Skills by Units communication Engineering Knowledge & Understanding No 1 2 3 4a 4 5 6 7 8 9 4b 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 6a-1 34 35 36 37 38 39 6a-2 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 6b-2 Optional module s Thre e from: 6b-2 6b-1 optional module one from: 6b-1 6a-2 Optional module s.

O ne from: COME 221 COME 222 COME 223 COME 224 COME226 COME227 COME 301 COME 302 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Manufacturing Accounting Legislations Computer S cience & Data management X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Real time Operating Systems Control Systems (I) Feasibility studies Database Systems Data Communication System Electromagnetic field Microprocessor Based Systems Computer Organization Computer Networks Fie ld & Practical Training 6a1 COME 303 C O ME 328 X X X X COME 310 COME 307 COME 304 COME 306 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6a-2 COME 309 COME 311 STR(III) X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X COME 329 C O ME 326 6a-2 MTI additional module s. O ne from: C O ME 327 BSc. Project -2 Neural-Networks Computer Controlled Systems Engineering Systems Simulation Expert Systems Artificial Intelligence Advanced Automatic Control 6b-2 COME 316 COME 329 COME 320 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-2 Optional modules. Project -1 C ommunication in Industry X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X COME 305 COME 314 COME 315 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-1 COME 312 COME 308 COME 329 COME 317 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6b-1 O ptional module s.Generic Skills by Units Computer Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills 1 Educational Principles 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 LEVEL Course Code COME 201 COME 204 Course title Mathematics (III) Engineering Mechanics Computer Science (I) Electrical circuits Instrumentations (I) A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4a COME 207 COME 209 COME 211 BIO 226 COME 202 COME 205 Technical Report Writing Mathematics (IV) Digital Systems (I) Electronic circuits Computer Architecture (I) Computer Science (II) Field General Training Mathematics (V) Logic circuits Electronic Engineering Computer Architecture (II) Digital System (II) System Software (I) Data Structure System Software (II) Advanced data structure Factory & Practical Training Civil Engineering Theory of Machines & Design Manufacture Technology Communication Systems Computer Numerical Methods 4b COME 210 COME 212 COME 208 STR (I) COME 203 COME 206 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5a COME 213 COME 214 COME 215 COME 217 COME 216 5b COME 218 COME 219 STR (II) COME 220 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5b Optional modules.O ne from: COME 318 COME 319 COME 313 Electric Power & Machines Control Systems (II) Image Procesing Robot systems and Technology BSc. Project primum Engineering Economics Environmental Impact of Projects Signal Processing Computer Security Information Systems Computer Vision Communication Networks BSc. Three from: COME 321 COME 322 COME 323 COME 324 COME 325 X X X 30 . Two from: 5b MTI additional module s.

The table shown below demonstrates the major contribution of study levels to each attribute and educational principle Generic Skills by Levels Bio-electronics Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Skills C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 Transferrable Skills D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles 3 4 5 6 7 8 LEVE No L 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4a 4b 5a 5b 6a-1 6a-2 6b-1 6b-2 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Generic Skills by Levels Control Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Skills C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 Transferrable Skills D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles 3 4 5 6 7 8 LEVE No L 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4a 4b 5a 5b 6a-1 6a-2 6b-1 6b-2 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Generic Skills by Levels Communications Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Skills C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 Transferrable Skills D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles 3 4 5 6 7 8 LEVE No L 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4a 4b 5a 5b 6a-1 6a-2 6b-1 6b-2 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Generic Skills by Levels Computer Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 Professional & Practical Skills C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 Transferrable Skills D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles 3 4 5 6 7 8 LEVE No L 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 4a 4b 5a 5b 6a-1 6a-2 6b-1 6b-2 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 31 .

[8 %]  Procurement of the needed h/w and s/w components for realization of the allocated module. [10 %] 5. The committee should inspect the realized hardware and / or software.[2 %]  Specification of the overall characteristics of the selected design [3%]  Breaking down the designed system into subsystems (modules) and specification of the interface parameters. The theoretical background relevant to the project area. 4.[5 %]  Preparation of the project presentation.Assessment of BSc Graduation Project Assembly of the project evaluation committee Five teaching staff members including the project leader (may include external members from industry or other universities) Assessment criteria .[7 %]  Overall performance testing of the integrated system modules. During the session a number of points (out of 40) points are granted to the individual students according to the following distribution: 1.  Testing and measurements. [10 %]  Cooperation and synchronization with other team members. The project leader statement contributes to 60 % of the final mark while the remaining 40% is estimated by the committee during the evaluation session. The demonstration of the realized system operation. Understanding of project objective and awareness of his role in addition to the roles of other project members.  Selection of the preferred solution.  References. [5%] .[5 %]  Realization of the final (operational) module. The student presentation speech quality and his response to the asked questions.  The typographic quality. 32 .  Conclusions. Each student should take part in the project presentation.[3 %] II-Committee Contribution [40%]     Copies of the project Technical Report should be available to the members of the committee 3 days before the project evaluation session.  Detailed design and implementation data.[5 %] 2. I-Project leader statement [60%] The project leader supplies the committee with his evaluation to the contributions of the student to the following project activities  Data collection [3 %]  Design ideas.  Theoretical treatment. [15%] The following points are checked  Project objectives. [5 %]  Measurements of his module performance separately then measurements when integrated with the other system modules.[3 %]  Realization of the module prototype.[3 %]  Editing of the project Technical Report sections relevant to his module.[3 %]  Detailed design of a specific sub-system (module) allocated by the project leader including calculations and computer simulation. [5 %] 3. Completeness of the project Technical Report.

Understanding of project objective and awareness of his role in addition to the roles of other project members.  Time plan  Specification of needed resources. sub-blocks. During the session a number of points (out of 40) are granted to the individual students according to the following distribution: 1.  Data collection  System design [ Concept .  Theoretical treatment.  Testing and measurements. The committee should inspect the realized hardware and / or software. Assessment criteria . I-Project leader statement [60%] The student involvement and achievement in the following project activities [according to the project leader report]. specification of blocks. elements]  Computer simulation of designed system. 4. [15%] The following points are checked  Project objectives. [5%] . [5 %] 3. The theoretical background relevant to the project area.  Selection of the preferred solution. II-Committee Contribution [40%]     Copies of the project Technical Report should be available to the members of the committee 3 days before the project evaluation session.Assessment of BSc Project Premium Assembly of the project evaluation committee Three teaching staff members. Completeness of the project Technical Report.  Editing of the project Technical Report. The student presentation speech quality and his response to the asked questions. 33 .  Conclusions.  Prototype implementation and testing.  Final hardware implementation and testing. Each student should take part in the project presentation.  Detailed design and implementation data.[5 %] 2.  The typographic quality. The demonstration of the realized system operation.  Procurement of components.  References. [10 %] 5. The project leader statement contributes to 60 % of the final mark while the remaining 40% is estimated by the committee during the evaluation session. including the project leader.

Programme Specification Section 1: Basic Data Awarding institution/body University of Wales Teaching institution Modern University for Technology and Information Faculty responsible for programme Faculty of Engineering Programme accredited by University of Wales Highest award title Architectural Engineering Default award title BSc in: Architectural Engineering Certificate in Higher Education Diploma in Higher Education Interim award titles Relevant QAA subject benchmarking group(s) On-going/valid until On-going Valid from Authorised by… Date:… 1 September 2007 Version code 1 34 .

Professional & Practical Skills T. qualities.etc. execution documents and project management at site.  Increase the student awareness of different building system ad historical significance for developing the architectural forms and styles. 35 . having the proportion sense and so having the ability to express. These contributions are identified separately in each generic attribute of the above areas.  Solve deign problems integrating the human needs.  Adapt the student to a primary courses (architecture program design – management….etc. Architecture department orient the student view and convert him from an ordinary spectator to an architect having the ability to tread the architecture terminology and analyze it. The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. Basic Engineering and Specialized Courses phases. Namely Preparatory.  Study of the recent technological construction methods and fabrication system. skills and other attributes in the following areas: … Q.. The main attributes are listed below.) The program aims to enable student to:Develop the design skills.Section 2: Educational aims of the programme The architecture department adapts the student to be either a designer or a site executor. climate and technological consideration..  On completion of the programme.4) below. sense of proportion and visual studies to expose the student to the basic design language. Transferable Skills and other Attributes The target qualities and skills are acquired through three main phases of study. The education procedure count on the architecture design by providing the student with historical background and the theories of architecture by hierarchy in the projects levels beside the variety in the projects sorts with specifying the goals of each concentrating on one of the architectural elements (Function – Architecture style – Environmental Factors – Construction Elements .Design Integration…. Intellectual Skill S.  Complete learning planning principles by applying development concepts with regard of the constraints concerning the current situation in planning different aspects. students will be able to:  Study the integrated architecture design at sites  Deal with a dose of technological information from the execution principles and language site till the recent technological execution methods & construction system passing through execution tools and equipments. Knowledge and Understanding R. These phases of study make specific contributions in building the graduate profile. see Programme Structure (sec.) his sense may tends to. site constraints.  Use the graphic and architecture program modelling in addition to dealing with design language principles of architecture program.

D4.Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. and N.Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development.Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. master the subject matter and techniques of their chosen discipline at internationallyrecognized levels and standards. A2. from a variety of sources and experiences. 23.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them.Understanding of the social. formulation and solution. 18. 22. Ability to undertake problem identification. concisely and logically. Capacity to manage field problem. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. write and speak clearly. develop mature judgment and responsibility in moral. with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. 24. Applying the principles of sustainable design and development. and Educational Principles 17. identification. A5. Utilizing practical systems approach to design and operational performance. D2. as well as academic matters. and the need for sustainable development. 36 . Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development. cultural.Understanding of the social. 21. A6. develop the capacity to take a leadership role in the community. In-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. Ability to utilize a systems approach to design and operational performance. 20. 19.Ability to communicate effectively.Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance.Knowledge & Understanding A1. P.Transferrable Skills D1. question accepted wisdom and be open to new ideas and possibilities.Professional & Practical Skills C1C2C3C4C5Ability to apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. cultural. and capacity to do so.Generic Attributes : M. formulation and solution.Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them.Intellectual Skills B1B2B3B4B5Ability to apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. adapt acquired knowledge to new situations. A3. and to continue through life to learn. and the need for sustainable development. A4. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. think and reason logically and creatively.Ability to function effectively as an individual and in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams. D3. Expectation of the need to undertake lifelong learning. O. formulation and solution. social and practical. acquire the skills required to learn.

Generic Skills by Units Architectural Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills Intellectual Skills Educational Principles No 1 2 3 4 5 LEVEL Course Code ARCH 201 Course title Fundamentals of Architecture Design A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x ARCH 215 Visual Training (I) 4 ARCH 205 Building Construction (I) ARCH 208 Theory of Architecture (I) ARCH 216 Theory of structure (1) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6 7 8 9 10 11 4 elective ARCH 225 Mathematics (III) ARCH 222 Computer Applicants (I) ARCH 202 Architecture Design (I) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Building Construction (II) ARCH 206 ARCH 2O9 Theory of Architecture (II) 4 ARCH 211 History of Architecture (I) ARCH 214 Perspective and Sciography STR(I) Field Training x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 12 13 14 4 elective ARCH 224 Numerical Methods ARCH 226 Statistics Methods ARCH 203 Architecture Design (II) x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 Building Construction (III) ARCH 207 ARCH 210 Theory of Architecture (III) ARCH 212 History of Architecture (II) x x x x x 15 16 17 18 19 20 ARCH 217 Properties & Receptivity of Materials x x x 5 elective ARCH 219 Modern Architecture ARCH 221 Climate & Architecture Design ARCH 213 History of Architecture (III) ARCH 218 Surveying x x x x x x x x x x x 5 Architecture Design (III) ARCH 204 ARCH 229 Preservation of Civil & Env. STR ( II ) Practical Training ARCH 223 Operation Research x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 5 elective 21 22 23 24 25 ARCH 228 ARCH 220 Environmental Control Principles of Project Management ARCH 301 Architecture Design (IV) ARCH 302 Working Drawings (I) x x x x 6a ARCH 309 Theory of Structure ( II ) ARCH 310 Reinforced Concrete ARCH 306 Theory of Architecture (IV ) x x x x x x x x 26 27 28 29 30 31 6a Elective ARCH 335 Building Economics ARCH 338 Legislations ARCH 303 Working Drawings (II) ARCH 311 Steel Construction 6a ARCH 304 Technological Installation For buildings ( II ) STR(III) Field Practical Training ARCH 313 BSC project premium x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 37 .

&Sp.Sc Project ARCH 316 Town Planning ( II ) ARCH 317 Modular Coordination Urban Planning ARCH 318 Design & Development of Rural Areas x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x ARCH 321 Smart Building Design 6b Elective ARCH 325 Architecture Design (VI) ARCH 327 Hospital Buildings ( II ) ARCH 331 Restorations ( II ) ARCH 329 Educational Buildings ( II ) ARCH 312 Quan.Generic Skills by Units Architectural Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Skills Transferrable Skills Educational Principles LEVEL Course Course title Code ARCH 319 Computer Application ( II ) ARCH 320 Architecture Design Using Computer ARCH 307 Town Planning ( I ) ARCH 324 Architecture Design (V) A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6a Elective ARCH 326 Hospital Buildings ( I ) ARCH 328 Educational Buildings ( I ) ARCH 330 Restorations ( I ) ARCH 336 Accounting ARCH 337 Feasibility Studies ARCH 305 Technical Sanitary Installations ARCH 308 Soil Mechanics & Foundation ARCH 315 Interior Design ARCH 334 Human Architecture Studies x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b ARCH 339 B. x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 6b ARCH 314 Building Construction Equipment ARCH 339 B.Sc Project ARCH 322 Solar Architecture ARCH 323 Passive Heating and Cooling x x x x x x x x x x x 6b ARCH 332 Urban Renewal Elective x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x ARCH 333 Design Methodology ARCH 340 Human Studies x x x x x 38 .

Generic Skills by Levels Architectural Engineering Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual Skills Professional & Practical Transferrable Skills Skills B5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 D1 D2 D3 D4 1 2 Educational Principles LEVEL A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 B1 B2 B3 B4 3 4 5 6 7 8 4 4 4 elective 4 elective 5 5 5 elective 5 elective 6a 6a 6a elective 6a elective 6b 6b 6b Elect 6b Elect x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 39 .The table shown below demonstrates the major contribution of study levels to each attribute and educational principle.

Core modules make a primary contribution to one or more knowledge and understanding outcomes as indicated below but most modules make additional contributions. The primary contributions of the core modules are identified in the module mapping schedules. 20. 17. Assessment of student efforts in Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors upon assigning each student specific tasks within the group work. 21. formulation and solution. 40 . At least one distinguished visiting professor will attend the project premium committee. and the need for sustainable development. 19. 15. tasks undertaken under examination conditions (learning outcomes 1-7). Assessment: Testing of the knowledge base is through a range of formative and cumulative assessment approaches including coursework (learning outcomes 1-6). Subject specific knowledge and skills. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to them. Learning and Assessment Strategies A Knowledge and understanding in the context of the subject material: On completion of the programme students will have developed an understanding of a complex body of knowledge. Each committee formed for evaluating a BSc project must include at least two visiting professors. Each student should then conduct the appropriate procedure to search and build knowledge under supervision. qualities. See Appendix (A). in the areas of: Teaching/learning methods and strategies: Knowledge and understanding is acquired through a range of core and optional modules at levels 3 4. Understanding of the social. The defence committee will approve the final evaluation. Understanding of the principles of sustainable design and development. 16.Section 3: Learning outcomes of the programme The award route provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding. skills and other attributes in the following areas: A Knowledge and understanding Learning outcomes Teaching. Understanding the fundamentals of problem identification. which are identified separately in the module specifications. cultural. oral presentation (learning outcomes 1-6). some of it at the current boundaries of the disciplines. 5 and 6. 18. Learning and mastering the approach to design and operational performance. critical literature review and analysis (learning outcome 7). global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. Knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals.

workshops. approve and conclude the final evaluation. cases studies. Undertake problem identification. formulation and solution. 14. case studies. 41 . seminars. 13. reports. Utilise a systems approach to design and operational performance.B Intellectual Skills B Intellectual Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 11. C Subject. and examinations. practical exercises. Apply engineering knowledge in complex practical situations. 12. These include reflective essays. 5 and 6 through a range of learning approaches including lectures. 13. based activities. 15. Assessment 12. Demonstrate in-depth technical competence in at least one engineering discipline. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Intellectual skills are developed at levels 3. projects. presentations. 14. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation through oral and practical invetiagtions. Appreciate the need and demonstrate the capacity to undertake life long learning. and identify and formulate solutions. exercises and I. Utilise practical systems approaches to design and operational performance. Assessment A variety of formative and cumulative assessment methods are employed to demonstrate the acquisition of intellectual skills. Professional and Practical Skills C Subject/Professional/Practical Skills On completion of the programme students will be able to: 11. Apply the principles of sustainable design and development. 15. 4. Illustrate the capacity to manage field problems. tests. Assessment of student innovation throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Subject/Professional/Practice skills are developed through all modules.T. Apply knowledge of basic science and engineering fundamentals. Skill 1 is primarily assessed by coursework research based assignments across a number of modules Skill 2 is primarily assessed through coursework reports Skill 3 is primarily assessed through coursework seminar presentations Skills 4 and 5 are primarily assessed through course work reports and exercises and examinations in all modules. The defence committee will test. group work. Assessment of student contribution in the design and manufacturing phases of Project Premium and BSc Projects is basically carried out by the supervisors. Field applications of the principles of sustainable design and development.

and 6. Exhibit and critically assess the skills required by employers. global and environmental responsibilities of the professional engineering. 5. 24. Function effectively as an individual and in multidisciplinary and multi-cultural teams. and the need for sustainable development. 4. self-assessment. 32. and examinations. Reflect on own performance and respond positively to feedback. 27. 28.D Transferable Skills and other attributes D Transferable skills and other attributes On completion of the programme students will be able to: 23. are developed in all core modules. 3. process and present numerical information for a given purpose. not only with engineers but also with the community at large. Transfer knowledge and skills across different settings. 25. which include written individual and group coursework. Skills 1. Understand professional and ethical responsibilities and commitment to engineers. Assessment 30. peer assessment. with the capacity to be a leader or manager as well as an effective team member. 26. Use information technology. Communicate effectively. The defence committee will test and approve the final evaluation. Skills 1. Understand the social. 4. Transferable skills are developed through an integrated programme of learning. tests. are given particular emphasis in coursework assignment across all modules. cultural. Teaching/learning methods and strategies 42 . 3. Extract. Manage own time and workload. which is built into all core modules at levels 3. 33. Take responsibility for own learning. 31. All skills are assessed in the pathway modules at level 6 Assessment of student behaviour and cooperation with his colleagues and laboratory technicians will be under full scrutiny by his supervisors throughout all phases of the Project Premium and BSc Projects. 29. presentations. Assessment of transferable skills is accomplished through a range of methods. 2.

all 10 credits One from:  Computer programming  Production Engineering 2  Chemistry 2 Note: Level 3 does not form part of the University of Wales validated programme. 43 .all 10 credits Two from: Interim Awards: None Foundation level  History of Engineering  Technical English 1  Technical English 2 Core modules – all 10 credits       Mathematics 2 Mechanics 2 Chemistry 1 Physics 2 Engineering Drawing 2 Training Optional modules .Section 4: Programme structure Common Modules Level 3 Core modules – all 10 credits       Mathematics 1 Mechanics 1 Production Engineering 1 Engineering Drawing 1 Physics 1 Introduction to Computers Optional modules .

Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4. Certificate level One from:  Technical Report Writing  Industrial Psychology Core modules .Architectural Engineering Pathway Level 4 Core modules .All 10 credits       Architecture Design 1 Building Construction 2 Theory of Architecture 2 History of Architecture 1 Perspective and Sciography Field training 1 MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Architectural Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels One from:  Numerical Methods  Statistics Methods 44 .All 10 credits  Fundamentals of Architecture Design  Visual Training 1  Building Construction 1  Theory of Architecture 1  Theory of Structure 1 Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Mathematics 3  Computer Applications 1 MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3.

Diploma level Core modules .Architectural Engineering Pathway Level 5 Core modules .All 10 credits     History of Architecture 3 Surveying 1 Architecture Design 3 Preservation of Civil and Environmental Era  Field training 2 Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Operations Research  Principles of Project Management  Environmental Control MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Architectural Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels One from:  Ethnic Studies  Visual training 2 45 .All 10 credits      Architecture Design 2 Building Construction 3 Theory of Architecture 3 History of Architecture 2 Properties and Receptivity of Materials Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Modern Architecture  Climate and Architecture Design Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.

120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None Core modules .One from:  Architecture Design 5  Hospital Buildings 1  Educational Buildings 1  Restorations 1 Group C .One from:  Accounting  Feasibility Studies Note: Only one optional module is required for the University of Wales validated programme. This will be from group B BSc (Hons) level 46 .One from:  Computer Application 2  Architecture Design Using Computers  Town Planning 1 Group B .Architectural Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .All 10 credits  Working Drawings 2  Steel Construction  Technological Installation For Buildings 2  Field Training 2  Project premium Optional modules – all 10 credits Group A .All 10 credits      Architecture Design 4 Working Drawings 1 Theory of Structure 2 Reinforced Concrete Theory of Architecture 4 Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Building Economics  Legislations Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5. Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.

One from:  Architecture Design 6  Hospital Buildings 2  Educational Buildings 2  Restorations 2 BSc (Hons) level Note: Only one optional module is required for the University of Wales validated programme. This will be from group B.One from:  Solar Architecture  Passive Heating and Cooling Group B .All 10 credits      Technical Sanitary Installations Soil Mechanics and Foundations Interior Design Humanities 1 BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits Group A . Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Architectural Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Award: BSc in Architectural Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels Core modules .All 10 credits  Quantities and Specifications  Building Construction Equipment  BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits Group A .Two from:  Urban Renewal  Design Methodology  Human Architecture Studies 47 .One from:  Town Planning 2  Modular coordination Urban planning  Design and Development of Rural Areas  Smart Building Design Group B .Architectural Engineering Pathway Level 6b Core modules .

Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits  Mathematic 4  Surveying 1  Properties and Receptivity of Materials  Structural Analysis  Fluid Mechanics  Field Training 1 MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Communications in Civil Engineering  Engineering Geology  Engineering Economics Optional modules – all 10 credits Level 5 Core modules .All 10 credits       Surveying 2 Geotechnical Engineering 1 Computer Applications 1 Building Technology Structural Design 1 Hydraulics Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5. Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Civil Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels None Diploma level Core modules .All 10 credits  Mathematic 3  Engineering Graphics  Introduction to Civil Engineering  Strength of Materials and Structure  Civil Engineering Mechanics 1 Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Technical Report Writing  Foundation of Rational Thought Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3. Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Civil Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels Certificate level Core modules .All 10 credits       Hydrology Reinforced Concrete Design Computer Application 2 Structural Design 2 Field Training 2 Building Equipment Optional modules – all 10 credits MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) Two from:  Mechanical Engineering  Electrical Engineering  Civil Engineering Mechanics 2  Civil Engineering Technology 48 .Civil Engineering Pathway Common Modules Level 4 Core modules .

All 10 credits       Highway Engineering Foundation Design Health and Industrial Safety Structural Steel Design 1 Field Training 3 BSc. 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None None BSc (Hons) level Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits     Sanitary Engineering Structural Steel Design 2 Quantities and Specifications Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design 2  BSc Project BSc (Hons) level Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Construction Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Core modules . project MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Environmental Engineering  Municipal Engineering  Numerical Analysis Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Decision Making in Urban Environment  Civil Planning and Housing  Town Planning Optional modules – all 10 credits None: Default Awards: BSc in Construction Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels Level 6b Core modules .All 10 credits     Geotechnical Engineering 2 Transportation Engineering Water Engineering Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design 1  Matrix Analysis and Structure  Environmental Auditing and Inspection Optional modules – all 10 credits Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.All 10 credits  Roads and Runway Design  Tunnels and Underground Structures  Management  Town Planning  Civil Planning and Housing  BSc Project 49 .Construction Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .

Construction Project Management Pathway Level 6a Core modules .All 10 credits  Municipal Engineering  Decision Making and Project Planning  Projects Planning and Analysis  Construction Management  BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Numerical Analysis  Fire and Explosion Project Protection  Urban Projects Environmental Assessment  Micro/Macro Problems Issue  Environmental Architecture  Hospitals Construction Management Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Sanitary Installations and Management  Matrix Analysis and Construction  Architecture and Civil Projects Pollution  Work and Time Study  Facility Planning and Control Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Construction Project Management BSc (Hons) level Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Awards: BSc in Construction Project Management Core modules . 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None Core modules .All 10 credits  Civil Planning and Housing  Public Works Construction  BSc Project Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels 50 . Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits       Structural Steel Design 1 Quality Control and Assessment Solid Waste Management Field Training 3 Feasibility Studies BSc Project Premium MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme)  Cost and Management Accounting  Quality control Level 6b Core modules .All 10 credits     BSc (Hons) level Geotechnical Engineering 2 Construction Unit Operation Foundation Design Legislations in Civil Engineering  Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design Optional modules – all 10 credits  History of the Build Environment Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.

Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in BioElectronics Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels Certificate level Core modules .All 10 credits     Imaging Technology Waves and Radiating Systems Fluid Mechanics Field Training 2 Optional modules – all 10 credits Two from:  Electrical Drives Systems  Micro-Computing Engineering  Stress Analysis for the Human Body 51 .All 10 credits       Mathematics 3 Anatomy and Physiology Strength of Materials Electrical Circuits Thermodynamics Technical Report Writing MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Psychology and Sociology  Civil Engineering MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Legislations  Projects Evaluation Optional modules – all 10 credits Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3.Bio-Electronics Engineering Pathway Level 4 Core modules . Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in BioElectronics Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.All 10 credits       Mathematics 4 Engineering Mechanics Engineering Design 1 Bio Medical Engineering 1 Manufacturing Technology Field Training 1 Level 5 Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits      Diploma level Mathematics 5 Engineering Design 2 Electronic Circuits Computer Applications Instrumentations One from:  Bio Medical Engineering 2  System Dynamics for the Human Body Core modules .

Equipment  Power Electronics  Data Base Management  Real Time Operation. 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None BSc (Hons) level Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits  Computers in Medicine  Microwaves Circuits and .Bio-Electronics Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .All 10 credits  Medical Laboratory Science and Methods  CAD of Signals and Systems  Modelling of Electrical Machines  Bio-Mechanics Systems  Field Training 3  BSc Project Premium MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Industrial Psychology  Feasibility Study  Hospital Work 52 .  Management and Healthcare Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.

Bio-Electronics Engineering Pathway Level 6b Core modules .All 10 credits     Advanced Control Systems Nuclear and Radio Equipments Physiotherapy Equipments BSc Project 53 .All 10 credits       Medical Gases System Design Inventory Control Electronic Vision Sterilization Techniques Clinic Instrumentations BSc Project MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Micro Processor Control  Digital Computer Engineering  TQM in Health Care  Medical Space Planning  Robot Technology and Medical Care Optional modules – all 10 credits Two from:  New Engineering Material  Fault Diagnosis  Refrigerating and Air Conditioning  Parametric Estimations and Systems Identification  Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems  Maintenance Planning of Hospitals Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in BioElectronics Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Award: BSc Bio-Electronics Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels BSc (Hons) level Core modules .

All 10 credits      Mathematic 4 Engineering Design 2 Manufacturing Technology Electronic Circuits Field Training 1 Level 5 Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.One from:  Industrial Psychology  Ethnic Studies 54 .All 10 credits       Mathematics 3 Engineering Mechanics Engineering Design 1 Strength of Materials Electrical Circuits Technical Report Writing MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Computer Programming 1  Civil Engineering Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Computer Programming 2  Properties and Testing of Materials Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3.Two from:  Digital and Electronic Circuits 2  Engineering Applications 2  Micro-Electronics 1  Control Engineering 1  Numerical Analysis Group B .All 10 credits  Computer Applications 1  Fluid Mechanics  Field Training 2 Optional modules – all 10 credits Group A .All 10 credits     Mathematic 5 Thermodynamics Instrumentation 1 Micro Computing Engineering Optional modules – all 10 credits Two from:  Digital and Electronic Circuits 1  Machine Element Design  Engineering Applications 1  Field Theory  Semi-Conductor Physics Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.Control Engineering Pathway Level 4 Core modules . Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Control Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels Diploma level Core modules . Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Control Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels Certificate level Core modules .

All 10 credits      BSc (Hons) level Use of Micro-Computers Control Engineering Electric Machines and Power Electronic Circuit Design Electronic Instruments and Sensors  Feasibility Studies Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.All 10 credits  Micro-Electronics  Power Electronics 1  Micro-Processors Based Systems  Advanced Control Engineering  Field Training 3  BSc Project Premium MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Accounting  Engineering Economics  Control of Industrial Systems Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Instrumentation 2  Computer Applications 2  Power Electronics 2  Parameter Estimation and System Identification Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  System Dynamics Level 6b Core modules .Control Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules . 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None Core modules .All 10 credits  Robot Engineering and Control  System Design and Analysis  BSc Project  Fluid Power Control System  Advanced Electronic Systems  Micro-Wave Principles  Control of Bio-Medical Equipments 55 . Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits      BSc (Hons) level Digital Signal Processing Modelling of Industrial Systems Digital Control Programmable Logic Controller BSc Project Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Control Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Award: BSc in Control Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels Core modules .

Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Communication Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels Core modules .All 10 credits     Certificate level Mathematics 3 Engineering Mechanics Electrical circuits Electromagnetic Fields  Computer Applications  Signal Processing Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3.Communication Engineering Pathway Level 4 Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits       Mathematics 4 Electronic Circuits Instrumentations 1 Logic Circuits Technical Report Writing Field Training 1 Optional modules – all 10 credits None 56 .

All 10 credits      Mathematics 5 Electronic Engineering 1 Communication Systems 1 Digital Systems 1 Electromagnetic Principles Optional modules – all 10 credits Two from:  Electric Engineering Testing  Civil Engineering  Theory of Machines and Design Only one option is required for the university of Wales validated programme. Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Computer Organisation  Digital Systems 2  Manufacture Technology  System Dynamics and Control Component  Electronic Engineering Testing MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Legislations  Industrial Psychology Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.Level 5 Core modules .All 10 credits Diploma level  Electronic Engineering 2  Communication Systems 2  Field Training 2 57 . Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Communication Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels Core modules .

All 10 credits  Digital Communications  Optical Semiconductors  Antennae and Waves Propagation  Micro Processor Systems  BSc Project BSc (Hons) level Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Communication Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Awards: BSc in Communication Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels Core modules .All 10 credits  Mobile Phones Systems  Radar Engineering Systems  BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Advanced Automatic Control  Neuro Networks  Artificial Intelligence  Programmable Logic Controller  Robot Systems and Technology 58 . Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4. 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None BSc (Hons) level Core modules .All 10 credits     Control Systems 2 Integrated Circuits Communication Networks Satellite Communications  Field training 3  BSc Project Premium MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Microwaves Electronics  Expert Systems  Industrial Electronics  Optical electronics Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Feasibility Studies  Microwaves Electronics  Environmental Impact of Communication Systems Level 6b Core modules .Communication Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .All 10 credits  Computer Science and Data Management  Electric Power and Machines  Control Systems 1  Electromagnetic Waves  Microwaves Electronic Engineering  Engineering Economics Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.

All 10 credits     Data Structure System Software 2 Advanced Data Structure Field training 2 Optional modules – all 10 credits Two from:  Civil Engineering  Theory of Machines  Manufacture Technology  Communication Systems  Computer Numerical Methods MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Manufacturing Accounting  Legislations Diploma level 59 .All 10 credits       Mathematics 5 Logic Circuits Electronic Engineering Computer Architecture 2 Digital System 2 System Software 1 Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.All 10 credits       Mathematics 4 Digital Systems 1 Electronic Circuits Computer Architecture 1 Computer Science 2 Field Training 1 Optional modules – all 10 credits None Level 5 Core modules . Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Computer Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels Optional modules – all 10 credits None Certificate level Core modules .All 10 credits       Mathematics 3 Engineering Mechanics Electrical Circuits Computer Science 1 Instrumentations 1 Technical Report Writing Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3. Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Computer Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels Core modules . Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.Computer Engineering Pathway Level 4 Core modules .

Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits     Electromagnetic Fields Microprocessor Based Systems Computer Organisation Computer Networks  Field Training 3  BSc Project Premium MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Environmental Impact of Projects  Engineering Economics  Signal Processing Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Communication in Industry  Electric Power and Machines  Control Systems 2 Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Neuro-Networks  Computer Controlled Systems  Engineering Systems Simulation  Expert Systems  Artificial Intelligence  Advanced Automatic Control Level 6b Core modules .All 10 credits      BSc (Hons) level Communication Networks Computer Vision Information Systems Computer Security BSc Project Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Computer Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Awards: BSc in Computer Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels Core modules .All 10 credits  Computer Science and Data Management  Real Time Operating Systems  Control Systems 1  Data Communication System  Database Systems  Feasibility Studies Optional modules – all 10 credits None Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5.Computer Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules . 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None BSc (Hons) level Core modules .All 10 credits  Image Processing  Robot Engineering and Control  BSc Project 60 .

all 10 credits One from:  Material and Process Selection  Heat Transfer and Industrial Furnaces  Computer Applications 2 61 .One from:  Thermodynamics and Energy Systems  Composite Material Group B . Interim Awards: Certificate of Higher Education in Mechanical Engineering Credit requirements: 120 at the appropriate levels None Certificate level Optional modules – all 10 credits None Level 5 Core modules – all 10 credits     Stress Analysis Fluid Mechanics Computer Applications 1 Metallurgy Optional modules . Interim Awards: Diploma of Higher Education in Mechanical Engineering Credit requirements: 240 at the appropriate levels Diploma level Core modules – all 10 credits      Fluid Power Systems Metrology and Measurements Electronic Devices and Circuits Mechanical Element Design Factory and Practical Training Optional modules .Two from:  Technical Legislations  Engineering Economics  Technology and Social Change Only one option from group B is required for the University of Wales validated programme Prerequisite requirements 80 credits at the appropriate level Progression: To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5. Progression: To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 80 credits at Level 4.all 10 credits Group A .Mechanical Engineering Pathway Common Modules Level 4 Core modules – all 10 credits  Mechanical Drawing  Engineering Mechanics and Theory of Machines  Manufacturing Technology  Mathematics 3  Civil Engineering  Technical Report Writing Core modules – all 10 credits     Machine Construction Strength of Material Thermodynamics Electronic Engineering Fundamentals and Circuits  Mathematics 4  Field General Training Optional modules – all 10 credits Prerequisite requirements Successful completion of level 3.

Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.All 10 credits  System Dynamics and Vibration  Mechanical System Design  Computer Aided Design  Heat and Surface Treatment  Feasibility studies  Metal Forming Theory and Design Optional modules – all 10 credits Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5. 120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None None BSc (Hons) level Core modules .All 10 credits       Computer Aided Product Design Mechanics of Fracture Process Control and Automation Factory planning BSc Project Premium Field and Practical Training Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Metal Cutting Theory and Design  Material Design  Computer Aided Manufacturing 62 .Production Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .

One from:  Technology of Plastics  Powder Metallurgy Group B .One from:  Environmental Management and Legislations  Social Psychology Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Digital Signal Processing  Simulation of Industrial Systems  Design of Production Machines  Material design Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Production Engineering Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Awards: BSc in Production Engineering Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels BSc (Hons) level Core modules .All 10 credits     Quality control Automatic Control Die Design BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits Group A .All 10 credits  Design of Material Handling Equipment  Industrial Management  BSc Project 63 .Production Engineering Pathway Level 6b Core modules .

120 credits at Level 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Interim Award: None None BSc (Hons) level Core modules .All 10 credits       System Dynamics and Vibration Mechanical System Design Computer Aided Design Mechatronics I Mechatronics II Simulation of industrial system Optional modules – all 10 credits Prerequisite requirements A minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 and 80 credits at level 5. Progression: To progress from Level 6a to Level 6b a student would normally be required to have a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4.Mechatronics Engineering Pathway Level 6a Core modules .All 10 credits       Hydraulic Machines Logic Circuits Process Control and Automation Feasibility studies BSc Project Premium Field and Practical Training Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Refrigeration & air conditioning  Internal Combustion Engines 64 .

Level 6b Core modules .All 10 credits  Programmable Logic Controllers  Industrial Management  BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits Three from:  Expert Systems  Simulation of Industrial Systems  Refrigeration and Air Condition  Information Management and Control Credit requirements: 400 at the appropriate levels 65 .All 10 credits      Robot Technology Control Using Fluid Power Digital Signal Processing Automatic Control BSc Project Optional modules – all 10 credits One from:  Maintenance Planning  Inventory Control  Design of Smart Machines MTI additional modules – all 10 credits (these are not part of the University of Wales validated programme) One from:  Environmental Management and Legislations  Social Psychology Prerequisite requirements 240 credits at levels 4 and 5 and 80 credits at level 6a Target Award: BSc (Hons) in Mechatronics Engineering BSc (Hons) level Credit requirements: 480 at the appropriate levels Default Awards: BSc in Mechatronics Engineering Core modules .

The basic nature of technical and engineering studies are well taken care of. and in particular emphasises:      The development of autonomous learners Provision of learning opportunities that are personally and professionally relevant and quality assured The maintenance of a supportive learning environment The promotion of the scholarship of teaching The provision of continuing professional development opportunities for all staff within a culture of reflective practice CURRICULUM DESIGN CONTENT AND ORGANISATION The program is delivered over three phase scheme. the foundation stage. The compulsory modules ensure that the student will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for the award.0 or equivalent. tutorials. Each case will be dealt with individually according to its merits. This is believed to be the best practice in engineering education according to international standards.Section 5: Entry Requirements Admission into level 3. and are set out in volume 1. Students entering the programme are required. The assignments and problem based learning constitute the main strategy for teaching and learning. Section 6: Assessment Regulations The assessment regulations for the Modern University for Technology and Information have been developed in accordance with University of Wales regulations. to demonstrate a command of the English language through a recognised English language qualification such as IELTS 6. therefore. level 5 or level 6 if they can demonstrate that they are capable of managing the programme. Attendance is essential for success and if a student‟s attendance is 65% or less he/she is automatically disqualified from the module. is subject to fulfilling the requirements set by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Universities. In rare cases students may be admitted into level 4. under the of Engineering Section Education regulations. which allows credit accumulation and flexibility in the student learning process. Students will attend a variety of classes in which student participation is essential. The design of the programme is such that it gives the student the opportunities to customize his/her individual requirements. Section 7: Student Learning: Distinctive Features and Support The program reflects The Modern University for Technology and Information‟s Teaching and Learning Strategy. The modules are taught as “short fat modules”. The teaching process is completely carried out in English and hence all literatures and text books used are in English. 66 . laboratory work and project work. Modules are delivered through a combination of lectures. This enables them to have their own personal input into the learning process and identify their own particular areas of interest. Students are then considered for entry into the University of Wales validated programme upon successfully completing level 3 modules.

and guidance on access and using journals papers and web-based sources. case-study work. Module leaders are the initial point of contact for all issues relating to content and learning processes. Subject specific. empirical research and practice. MODULE ASSESSMENT Students are assessed on an individual unit basis and details are provided in the descriptions for each module. STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE Student support is provided through the programme management team. and assessment preparation. self-managed support groups) and independent learning throughout with a strong emphasis on working in a critical way with theory and empirical research sources. The level of direct face-to-face teaching contact accounts for approximately one-quarter of the hours associated with the module. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning with the aim of encouraging high levels of autonomy. Assessments are chosen to examine student‟s ability to integrate theory and practice. Most modules assess a variety of skills. This will promote their capacity to operate efficiently within the wider environment. exercises. quizzes. Electrical Engineering (Bio. Feedback is sought on a regular basis and information on resulting actions is communicated to students and staff. text books and set texts. There is a strong emphasis on using the resources provided by the University of Wales on-line Library and the MTI library and IT amenities. web-based learning and guided discussions). summer internships. This is achieved through the course of carrying out the final graduation project. Assessments follow the guidelines within the University of Wales Modular Scheme Assessment Regulations. The programme includes guided learning (lectures.Electronics and Control ). Section 8 Reference points/benchmarks The programme design reflects QAA Subject benchmarks in Mechanical Engineering (Production and Mechatronics). Each element of assessment will test appropriate learning outcomes. professional and transferable skills are developed within classroom-based and independent learning activities. and this is reinforced through the Programme Management Committee review system. Electrical Engineering (Communication and Computer ). midterm and end of semester examinations. However. LEARNING RESOURCES All modules have paper-based teaching and learning resources. Module leaders will determine the nature of assignments and examinations within the context of the learning outcomes of the individual module. either directly or indirectly through the assessment work for the module. implementation and completion.TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT The program is embedded within the values and practices espoused in the University‟s Teaching and Learning and Assessment strategy. laboratories and engineering workshop facilities. group learning (small and large group discussions. Students must finally show their ability to conduct a major independent investigation (either theoretical or experimental or both) and produce a substantial original report and to describe the work seminars before staff and peers. Civil Engineering ( Construction and Management). MTI provides fully equipped. Architecture Engineering The proposed award conforms with the credit level descriptors (Please refer to appendix 5) 67 . which deals also with matters relating to administration and management of the programme. workshop practice and independent reading and research. the remaining hours being devoted to tutor-guided activities. up to date. each student has to demonstrate the attributes needed to establish his or her abilities in the Major and Minor fields in the key units of the Specialized Phase. Assessment within the programme is through a combination of assignments. structured activities including application within the workplace simulated through visits. and to think critically in relation to theory.

 the ability to make informed judgements based on evidence. and adapt their strategy.  the ability to recognise and analyse problems and plan novel strategies for their solution. They can help graduates to be flexible in future work. Building and Surveying. in writing. and models.  an awareness of the provisional nature of knowledge. In a world that requires people to respond to and anticipate change. as necessary.  the skills in presenting architectural technology information and arguments clearly and correctly.  the ability to recognise and implement good practice. They are relevant to all levels of an organisation. drawing. Generic skills are those that can help architectural technology graduates improve their own learning and performance. photography. including paper/computer aided design drawings and sketches. 68 . it is expected that all programmes will ensure that students become conversant with the four main aspects of architectural technology listed under the following headings:  Design procedures  Technology  Procurements and contracts  Professional practice Each of these subject-specific areas requires cognitive skills in understanding. improving own learning and performance. schedules. Engineering. further study and life outside of work.  the ability to produce quality architectural presentations through various media. namely communication.  being able to question current theories and practice. and verbally. and problem solving. a graduate must demonstrate the ability to:  develop a strategy for using the relevant key skill over an extended period of time.  skills in the analysis.  the ability to develop and design creative and innovative solutions. The discipline-specific practical skills that students are expected to have developed by the end of their bachelor's honours degree programme in architectural technology are:  the ability to use information technology (IT) independently to support previously identified cognitive abilities and skills. and Operational Research Key sections from the benchmark statements are summarised below Architectural Technology: While it is acknowledged that the depth in which individual aspects are treated may vary with the nature of specific architectural technology programmes.  evaluate their overall strategy and present the outcomes from their work. Statistics. critically reflect on their performance in using the relevant skill. to a range of audiences. IT. as well as to self-employment. calculations. concepts. There are six generic skills defined by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) as key skills. electronic visualisations. Mathematics. and plan how this will be achieved. these skills are essential to remaining employable. To achieve a skill. synthesis and evaluation of technological information and data. working with others. numeracy. all of which are appropriate to architectural technology and a graduate achieving a the threshold standard set out in this subject benchmark statement would be expected to achieve each skill.Appendix 1 Extracts from QAA Benchmark Statements on Architectural Technology.  monitor progress. principals and theories relating to the subject area.  the ability to apply such knowledge and understanding to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature. to achieve the quality of outcomes required. including ways of further improving their skills. synthesis and evaluation to differing extents The discipline-specific cognitive skills and abilities that students are expected to have developed by the end of their bachelor's honours degree programme in architectural technology are:  the ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts. Materials. analysis. application.

 the ability to question standard practice. and to apply professional judgement in making recommendations and solving problems for future best practice. including appropriate acknowledgement and referencing of sources. Given the diverse nature of building and surveying. use and modify existing communication technologies. commerce and communication. T hey will be professional in their outlook. and able to exercise responsibility. Graduates are expected to be able to demonstrate a range of cognitive and intellectual skills together with techniques specific to building and surveying.  Ability to identify. They should also be able to demonstrate relevant personal and interpersonal skills. design.  the use of statistical concepts at an appropriate level. and capable of attention to detail. Engineering: The creative way of approaching all engineering challenges is being seen increasingly as a 'way of thinking' which is generic across all disciplines. When faced with an ethical issue.  the ability to locate. It is anticipated that graduates from programmes will continue to develop and refine their skills throughout their professional life using both formal and informal methods. In order to operate effectively. Graduates should be able to make a positive contribution to their place of work and to the wider community using the skills that they acquire.  the solution of routine and unfamiliar problems. They will be cost and value-conscious and aware of the social. analyse and manipulate data. and the broad range of discipline specialisms. current.  skills to summarise legal and other documents. to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering context. cultural. They will be numerate and highly computer literate. such that they can interpret. including collecting. They will want to solve problems and have strategies for being creative.  skills in the use of communications and information technology such that they can acquire.  Ability to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of their own engineering discipline. in order to solve engineering problems. They will be rational and pragmatic. analysing and interpreting data. together with analysis. using appropriate quantitative and other equipment. classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques. environmental and wider professional responsibilities they should display.  Understanding of and ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems. interested in the practical steps necessary for a concept to become reality. and to support their understanding of historical. extract and analyse data from multiple sources. 69 . argument and commentary. These include:  the capacity for the critical evaluation of arguments and evidence. capable of team working. engineering graduates thus need to possess the following characteristics.  the capacity for independent and self-managed learning such that they can analyse their own personal strengths and weaknesses and formulate strategies for improvement.  Understanding of engineering principles and the ability to apply them to analyse key engineering processes. innovative and overcoming difficulties by employing their knowledge in a flexible manner. effective communicators. and future developments and technologies. tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems. including drawn information.  Knowledge and understanding of mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in their engineering discipline and to enable them to apply mathematical methods. in a form appropriate to the intended audience. and using standard and relevant IT software. They will appreciate the international dimension to engineering.  Ability to apply quantitative methods and computer software relevant to their engineering discipline. they will be able to formulate and operate within appropriate codes of conduct.  communication skills such that they can present quantitative and qualitative information. Graduates in Engineering should achieve the following specific learning outcomes:  Knowledge and understanding of scientific principles and methodology necessary to underpin their education in their engineering discipline.Building and Surveying: Programmes in building and surveying should encourage students to develop personal and professional skills that broaden access to employment.  the ability to effectively work with others within the context of a team. it is not intended that the skills listed below are either prescriptive or exhaustive in setting out what a graduate should be able to demonstrate.

 Ensure fitness for purpose for all aspects of the problem including production.  Knowledge and understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering  processes. Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints including environmental and sustainability limitations.  have an awareness of sustainability and environmental issues.  Understanding of the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering.  Use creativity to establish innovative solutions. 70 .  be able to exercise original thought.  Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such  as aesthetics. equipment.  have problem-solving skills.  Identify and manage cost drivers.  have the ability to design and execute an individual project.  Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes. processes.  have a good understanding of the interaction between composition. technology development. maintenance and disposal.  mechanical behaviour.  functional behaviour.  have an awareness of the importance of materials to industry and society.  Understanding use of technical literature and other information sources.  operation.  Knowledge of characteristics of particular materials.  processing and manufacture.  Understanding of appropriate codes of practice and industry standards.  Awareness of nature of intellectual property and contractual issues.  Knowledge of management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering objectives within that context.  Awareness of quality issues.  Ability to work with technical uncertainty. both orally and in writing.  be able to communicate effectively.  have acquired some key practical skills and competence. leading to appropriate application of materials.  Awareness of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities.  Workshop and laboratory skills.  design with materials. and risk (including environmental risk) issues. orproducts. Materials: Materials graduates would be expected to:  have acquired a good knowledge of basic principles of materials.  materials selection.  have acquired the relevant mathematical and computational skills. processing.  Understanding of the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development. microstructure and properties. It is anticipated that materials graduates will have an awareness of a range of materials. health and safety and risk assessment issues. safety.  degradation/durability of materials.  phase equilibria and phase transformations.  biomaterials. supported by the necessary background science. etc).  Understanding of contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (eg operations and management.  characterisation of composition and microstructure. and some familiarity with relevant concepts associated with most of the following:  structure of materials. including personnel. health.

implement and interpret experimental investigations.  numeracy and computational skills.  understand the published literature on the topic of the investigation that demonstrates both what is known and the limits of current knowledge. usually in the solution of a complex materials problem.  the ability to work in a team. processing. In addition materials engineers need a foundation of engineering science in order to understand manufacturing/processing/fabrication methods and predict the service performance of materials (eg strength of materials and mechanics of solids. and of some results from a range of major areas of MSOR. testing) designed to develop the ability to plan. and having gained experience.  competence in using information technology effectively. Such a project will be described in a report. 71 . All graduates will have knowledge and understanding of. and the ability to use. characterisation.  an awareness of functions required for organisational success. Common ground for all programmes will include basic calculus and basic linear algebra. mathematical methods and techniques appropriate to their programme. be able to exercise original thought. recycling).Materials graduates should have had opportunities for first hand experience of a range of techniques and materials (artefact analysis. take responsibility for the direction of important tasks. for example. Graduates from theory-based programmes will have knowledge and understanding of the role of logical mathematical argument and deductive reasoning.  present findings in a clear and concise manner. principles of manufacture including computer-aided engineering. pollution. Each programme will develop in depth according to its own requirements. It is also desirable that graduates will have participated in an activity involving teamwork. materials graduates will need to acquire an adequate knowledge of mathematics and sciences to prepare a foundation for learning within the materials discipline. Many materials graduates will also be familiar with the organisation and structure of business. Different skills will be developed in the graduates according to the focus of the programme. and industrial projects. They would be expected to possess a number of valuable transferable skills:  the ability to communicate in writing.  select the methodology to undertake investigation. Materials graduates would be expected to have carried out an individual research project. Statistics and Operational Research: All graduates will have knowledge and understanding of mathematical methods and techniques appropriate to their main field of study.  the ability to manage time and resources. Experience of computer modelling techniques is also desirable. which will also largely determine the levels to which the developments are taken. In addition. Industrial experience may be acquired via.) Those graduating with a degree in materials will have good professional judgement.  interpret and discuss findings in the light of current knowledge. Mathematics. All programmes will cover methods and techniques that pertain to a range of areas of mathematics. Other methods and techniques will be developed according to the requirements of the programme. orally and using graphics.  the ability to solve problems. economic analysis and environmental issues (health and safety at work. These projects would develop competence in investigating. This will often include formal processes of mathematical proof. managing and applying knowledge. In order to understand the materials topics discussed above. speakers from industry. graduates from most programmes will have met at least one major area of application of their subject in which it is used in a serious manner and is essential for proper understanding. which will demonstrate the abilities to:  analyse quantitatively and assess the uncertainty of results. COSSH.  study skills needed for continuing professional development. industrial visits.  summarise the main conclusions and provide an accurate synopsis of the work undertaken. The nature of the application area and the manner in which it is studied might vary depending on whether the programme is theory-based or practice-based. . industrial placements.

Graduates from practice-based programmes will have knowledge and understanding of the importance of using a structured mathematical or analytical approach to problem solving. All graduates will have an understanding of the importance of assumptions and an awareness of where they are used and of possible consequences of their violation. This will include an appreciation of the distinction between the roles of validity of assumptions and validity of arguments. Graduates will also appreciate the power of generalisation and abstraction in developing mathematical theories or methods to use in problem solving. All graduates will have knowledge and understanding, at the level required for their programmes, of some processes and pitfalls of mathematical approximation. All graduates of practice-based programmes and many from theory-based programmes will have some knowledge and understanding of mathematical computing, often with direct experience of one or more computer packages. They will have an awareness of the appropriateness of the package(s) to the problems being addressed and, when feasible, some awareness of the nature of the algorithms on which the package(s) are based. All graduates of practice-based programmes and many from theory-based programmes will have knowledge and understanding of a range of modelling techniques and their conditions and limitations, and of the need to validate and revise models. Additionally, they will know how to use models to analyse and as far as possible solve the underlying problem or to consider a range of scenarios resulting from modifications to it, as well as how to interpret the results of these analyses. Graduates from the MSOR area will have acquired many general skills honed by their experiences of studying MSOR subjects. All these subjects are essentially problem-solving disciplines, whether the problems arise within MSOR itself or come from areas of application. Thus the graduates' experiences will be embedded in a general ethos of numeracy and of analytical approaches to problem solving. In addition, an important part of most MSOR programmes is to take theoretical knowledge gained in one area and apply it elsewhere. The field of application is often a significant topic of study in its own right, but the crucial aspect of the process is the cultivation of the general skill of transferring expertise from one context to another. A number of general skills are to be expected of all MSOR graduates, though in some cases they are likely to be developed more in graduates from some programmes than others. Even more than in the case of the subjectspecific skills, it must be recognised that some are not susceptible to explicit assessment and indeed some are better not assessed so as to avoid creating imbalances. MSOR graduates will possess general study skills, particularly including the ability to learn independently using a variety of media which might include books, learned journals, the internet and so on. They will also be able to work independently with patience and persistence, pursuing the solution of a problem to its conclusion. They will have good general skills of time-management and organisation. They will be adaptable, in particular displaying readiness to address new problems from new areas. They will be able to transfer knowledge from one context to another, to assess problems logically and to approach them analytically. They will have highly developed skills of numeracy, including being thoroughly comfortable with numerate concepts and arguments in all stages of work. T hey will have general IT skills, such as word processing, use of the internet and the ability to obtain information (there may be very rare exceptions to this, such as distance learning students studying abroad in countries where IT facilities are very restricted). They will also have general communication skills, such as the ability to write coherently and communicate results clearly.

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Appendix 2 QAA National Qualifications Framework: a brief guide to academic qualifications The higher education qualifications awarded by universities and colleges in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are at five levels. In ascending order, these are the Certificate, Intermediate, Honours, Masters and Doctoral levels. Certificate level The holder of a Certificate of Higher Education will have a sound knowledge of the basic concepts of a subject, and will have learned how to take different approaches to solving problems. He or she will be able to communicate accurately, and will have the qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility. The Certificate may be a first step towards obtaining higher-level qualifications. Intermediate level Holders of qualifications at this level will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their field of study, and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. Through this, they will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. Their studies may well have had a vocational orientation, enabling them to perform effectively in their chosen field. They will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making. The intermediate level includes ordinary (non-Honours) degrees, the Foundation degree, Diplomas of Higher Education, and other higher diplomas. Honours level An Honours graduate will have developed an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, some of it at the current boundaries of an academic discipline. Through this, the graduate will have developed analytical techniques and problem-solving skills that can be applied in many types of employment. The graduate will be able to evaluate evidence, arguments and assumptions, to reach sound judgements, and to communicate effectively. An Honours graduate should have the qualities needed for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility, and decision-making in complex and unpredictable circumstances. Masters level Much of the study undertaken at Masters level will have been at, or informed by, the forefront of an academic or professional discipline. Students will have shown originality in the application of knowledge, and they will understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research. They will be able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, and they will show originality in tackling and solving problems. They will have the qualities needed for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, personal responsibility and initiative, in complex and unpredictable professional environments. Doctoral level Doctorates are awarded for the creation and interpretation of knowledge, which extends the forefront of a discipline, usually through original research. Holders of doctorates will be able to conceptualise, design and implement projects for the generation of significant new knowledge and/or understanding. Holders of doctorates will have the qualities needed for employment requiring the ability to make informed judgements on complex issues in specialist fields, and innovation in tackling and solving problems. Qualification nomenclature Public understanding of the achievements represented by higher education qualifications requires a consistent use of qualification titles. The following guidelines are designed to assist institutions in achieving consistency in the ways in which qualification titles convey information about the level, nature and subjects of study. Subject Qualification titles that reflect the subject focus of programmes of study in two disciplines (e.g. a joint Honours award) should consider nomenclatures based on:  „A and B‟, where there is an approximately equal balance between two components;  „A with B‟ for a major/minor combination where the minor subject accounts for at least a quarter of the programme. Qualification titles should not normally reflect more than three subject components. Where there are more than three significant components, the title ’Combined Studies’ would be appropriate. 73

Appendix 3 CREDIT AND QUALIFICATIONS FRAMEWORK FOR WALES (CQFW) LEVEL DESCRIPTORS 2004 LEVEL 4: HE LEVEL 1 Development of Knowledge and Understanding (subject specific) The Learner:  Knowledge base: has a given factual and/or conceptual knowledge base with emphasis on the nature of the field of study and appropriate terminology;  Ethical issues: can demonstrate awareness of ethical issues in current areas of study and is able to discuss these in relation to personal beliefs and values. Cognitive/Intellectual skills (generic) The Learner:  Analysis: can analyse with guidance using given classifications/principles  Synthesis: can collect and categorise ideas and information in a predictable and standard format  Evaluation: can evaluate the reliability of data using defined techniques and/or tutor guidance  Application: can apply given tools/methods accurately and carefully to a well defined problem and begin to appreciate the complexity of the issues Key/transferable skills (generic) The Learner:  Group working: can work effectively with others as a member of a group and meet obligations to others (for example, tutors, peers, and colleagues)  Learning resources: can work within an appropriate ethos and can use and access a range of learning resources  Self evaluation: can evaluate own strengths and weakness within criteria largely set by others  Management of information: can manage information, collect appropriate data from a range of sources and undertake simple research tasks with external guidance  Autonomy: can take responsibility for own learning with appropriate support  Communications: can communicate effectively in a format appropriate to the discipline(s) and report practical procedures in a clear and concise manner  Problem solving: can apply given tools/methods accurately and carefully to a well defined problem and begin to appreciate the complexity of the issues in the discipline Practical skills (subject specific) The Learner:  Application: can operate in predictable, defined contexts that require use of a specified range of standard techniques  Autonomy in skill use: is able to act with limited autonomy, under direction or supervision, within defined guidelines

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within defined guidelines 75 . challenge received opinion and develop own criteria and judgement  Management of information: can manage information. contexts and frameworks  Ethical issues: is aware of the wider social and environmental implications of area(s) of study and is able to debate issues in relation to more general ethical perspectives Cognitive/Intellectual skills (generic) The Learner:  Analysis: can analyse a range of information with minimum guidance using given classifications/principles and can compare alternative methods and techniques for obtaining data  Synthesis: can reformat a range of ideas and information towards a given purpose  Evaluation: can select appropriate techniques of evaluation and can evaluate the relevance and significance of the data collected  Application: can identify key elements of problems and choose appropriate methods for their resolution in a considered manner Key/transferable skills (generic) The Learner:  Group working: can interact effectively within a team / learning group. Can develop working relationships of a professional nature within the discipline(s)  Self evaluation: can evaluate own strengths and weakness. can select appropriate data from a range of sources and develop appropriate research strategies  Autonomy: can take responsibility for own learning with minimum direction  Communications: can communicate effectively in a manner appropriate to the discipline(s) and report practical procedures in a clear and concise manner in a variety of formats  Problem-solving: can identify key areas of problems and choose appropriate tools / methods for their resolution in a considered manner Practical skills (subject specific) The Learner:  Application of skills: can operate in situations of varying complexity and predictability requiring application of a wide range of techniques  Autonomy in skill use: able to act with increasing autonomy. giving and receiving information and ideas and modifying responses where appropriate  Learning resources: can manage learning using resources for the discipline.LEVEL 5: HE LEVEL 2 Development of Knowledge and Understanding (subject specific) The Learner:  Knowledge base: has a detailed knowledge of major theories of the discipline(s) and an awareness of a variety of ideas. with reduced need for supervision and direction.

LEVEL 6: HE LEVEL 3 Development of Knowledge and Understanding (subject specific) The Learner:  Knowledge base: has a comprehensive/detailed knowledge of a major discipline(s). negotiate in a professional context and manage conflict  Learning resources: with minimum guidance can manage own learning using full range of resources for the discipline(s). requiring selection and application from a wide range of innovative or standard techniques  Autonomy in skill use: able to act autonomously. and an awareness of the provisional nature of knowledge  Ethical issues: is aware of personal responsibility and professional codes of conduct and can incorporate a critical ethical dimension into a major piece of work Cognitive/Intellectual skills (generic) The Learner:  Analysis: can analyse new and/or abstract data and situations without guidance. Can seek and make use of feedback  Information management: can select and manage information. competently undertaking reasonably straightforward research tasks with minimum guidance  Autonomy: can take responsibility for own work and can criticise it  Communications: can engage effectively in debate in a professional manner and produce detailed and coherent project reports  Problem solving: is confident and flexible in identifying and defining complex problems and the application of appropriate knowledge. tools / methods to their solution Practical skills (subject specific) The Learner:  Application of skills: can operate in complex and unpredictable contexts. using a range of techniques appropriate to the subject  Synthesis: with minimum guidance can transform abstract data and concepts towards a given purpose and design novel solutions  Evaluation: can critically evaluate evidence to support conclusions/recommendations. within agreed guidelines 76 . Can work professionally within the discipline  Self-evaluation: is confident in application of own criteria of judgement and can challenge received opinion and reflect on action. validity and significance. with areas of specialisation in depth. recognise. support or be proactive in leadership. with minimal supervision or direction. Can investigate contradictory information/identify reasons for contradictions  Application: is confident and flexible in identifying and defining complex problems and can apply appropriate knowledge and skills to their solution Key/transferable skills (generic) The Learner:  Group working: can interact effectively within a team / learning / professional group. reviewing its reliability.

Can isolate.  Information technology and information skills Can monitor.  Employability Can assess the effectiveness of the skills development and identify further ways of developing skills required by employers. assess and manage resolution of most relevant problems.Appendix 4.  Problem solving Is confident and autonomous in problem solving. clarify. assess and critically reflect on the use of IT and information skills and identify ways of further developing these skills. 77 . Makes professional use of others in support of self directed learning. making appropriate use of the capacities of the group members. Is able to negotiate and handle conflict with confidence.  Working with others Can clarify a group task and lead. University of Wales key skills at masters level The University of Wales Validation Unit has adopted the following key skills to be applied to all degree programmes:  Communication Can engage confidently in academic and professional communication with others within her/his field. work with or work within a group towards defined outcomes.  Study skills Is autonomous in study and use of resources for learning.