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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent Planning Statement & Section 106 Heads of Terms

Prepared on behalf of

William Davis Limited

November 2013
085 PS 181113 V3
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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

CONTENTS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. INTRODUCTION THE SITE & DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS PLANNING POLICY CONTEXT THE PRINCIPLE OF DEVELOPMENT SITE SUITABILITY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OBLIGATION HEADS OF TERMS SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS 3 5 7 15 25 32 35 37

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

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1.1.1

INTRODUCTION
This Planning Statement has been prepared in support of an outline planning application by William Davis for residential development, a primary school and (if required) a health centre, together with associated infrastructure on land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent, Nottinghamshire. The application is submitted in response to the Government’s drive to significantly boost the supply of new homes, and the current acute shortage in the housing land supply in Rushcliffe. Extensive consultation was undertaken at the pre-application stage, notably with Rushcliffe Borough Council (RBC) and Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC), to inform the emerging scheme proposals and preparation of the application submission package. Other key stakeholders (e.g. the Primary Care Trust and Radcliffe Parish Council) and the current residents of Radcliffe were also consulted and the key findings are set out in the Consultation Statement that also accompanies the planning application. An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Screening Opinion was sought from Rushcliffe Borough Council (RBC). The response (dated 23rd April 2013) has confirmed RBC’s view with regard to the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations (2011) that the proposal does not constitute an EIA Development. The planning application is, however, also accompanied by the following key documents: • • • • • • • • Transport Assessment and Travel Plan; Landscape and Visual Appraisal; Flood Risk Assessment and Drainage Strategy Statement; Ecological Assessment; Arboricultural Survey; Heritage Statement; Agricultural Land Quality Assessment; and Noise Assessment.

1.1.2

1.1.3

1.1.4

1.1.5

The development proposals have been evolved through an iterative masterplanning exercise that has taken into account the requirements of these technical and environmental assessments and the consultation undertaken, as well as best urban and landscape design practice. The Design and Access Statement that accompanies the application sets out a detailed description of the scheme’s development parameters, and includes a Masterplan and illustrative vignettes that demonstrate how the scheme can provide a high quality development that is sensitive to its context. The purpose of this Planning Statement is to outline the national and local planning context for the determination of the planning application and assess how the development proposals respond to relevant policies. The principal matter to consider in this regard is the site’s designation as part of the Green Belt that surrounds Nottingham. In this respect the Statement sets out the “very special circumstances” required by the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) to outweigh the presumption against inappropriate 3

1.1.6

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

development in the Green Belt. The Statement continues to establish why the proposals represent sustainable development under the terms of the NPPF, set out the potential Heads of Terms for the Section 106 Agreement, before finally drawing and overall conclusion in respect of the acceptability of the development proposals.

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

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2.1
2.1.1

THE SITE AND DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS
SITE & CONTEXT DESCRIPTION
The application site is located on the eastern periphery Radcliffe on Trent. Shelford Road delineates the site’s northern boundary with existing residential development beyond (except for an individual dwelling to the south of Shelford Road that is not included within the site). The rear gardens of existing properties along Clumber Drive lie to the west of the western site boundary. A stream marks the site’s southern boundary, with the railway line, sports pitches and residential development beyond. Agricultural land lies to the east of the site. The site area is approximately 19.63ha and largely comprises agricultural land subdivided into regular shaped fields that gently slope down to the stream to the south. However, the northern part of the site also contains a number of agricultural buildings and a farmhouse that previously formed Shelford Road Farm.

2.1.2

2.2
2.2.1

THE PROPOSAL
It is proposed that the former Shelford Road Farm buildings are demolished (the separate residential property will be retained) and the site developed for residential purposes, providing up to 400 dwellings, a primary school, health centre (if required) and associated infrastructure, including highway and pedestrian access, open space and structural landscaping, notably along the southern and eastern boundaries. It is proposed that 30% of the dwellings will be affordable homes. Development parameters have been established through a masterplanning exercise, as outlined in the Design & Access Statement. The development would comprise a mixture of traditional house sizes and types (ranging from 1 to 5 bedrooms), including semi detached and detached style properties. It is proposed that the dwellings will be predominately 2 storey, although some single storey might be appropriate, and occasional 2.5 storey dwellings will be used as feature buildings to aid legibility (but not along the western boundary of the site adjacent to existing residential properties or the eastern site boundary, which will form the countryside edge). The pre-application consultation process highlighted that there is a shortage of primary school places at both the infant and junior schools in Radcliffe and there is no scope to expand provision on the existing sites. A similar capacity issue has been identified in respect of the health centre, and again there us limited ability to expand provision on the existing site. Consequently, the planning application includes the provide a 1.5ha serviced site on the application site to accommodate a new one form entry primary school and potentially a health centre as an integral part of the proposed development. It is proposed that this is located in a highly accessible central location. Vehicular pedestrian and cycle access to the proposed development would be via a new roundabout junction with Shelford Road to the north. The existing access drive to the site would be closed to vehicular movement, but retained for pedestrian and cycle movements. The housing will be arranged in perimeter blocks enclosing the private garden space within the block, and allowing the houses to front onto the streets and public open spaces, providing a permeable layout. Consequently new housing will back onto exposed rear property boundaries to the west (Clumber Drive).

2.2.2

2.2.3

2.2.4

2.2.5

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

2.2.6

Development along the eastern site boundary will be at a lower density and informally arranged to create a soft settlement edge where houses face out to the countryside. A landscape buffer will be provided along this boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and proposed tree planting. Green fingers will extend westwards from this buffer to permeate the development. An area of open space, including equipped children’s play and parkland, is located in the centre of the development. Public open space will also be provided to the south of built the development. This will incorporate the drainage features and allotments. The existing hedgerow corridor will be retained within a central northsouth green corridor, providing a pedestrian/cycle link to Shelford Road, and convenient access to the central and southern open spaces.

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

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3.1
3.1.1

PLANNING POLICY CONTEXT
OVERVIEW
Section 38(6) of The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and Section 70(2) of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 require that planning applications must accord with the provisions of the adopted Development Plan, unless material considerations indicate otherwise. This Planning Statement therefore, considers the application proposals in light of the relevant planning policy context and any other relevant material considerations. This requirement is emphasised in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) that was published by the Department for Communities and Local Government in March 2012. (paras 2 & 12). The NPPF is the most recent statement of the Government’s planning policy, and paragraphs 2 and 11 confirm that it is itself a material consideration in the determination of planning applications. The NPPF are underpinned by the presumption in favour of sustainable development. Policies relevant to the application site and proposals are summarised in the following section. The Development Plan for Rushcliffe comprises of the six saved policies of the Rushcliffe Borough Local Plan (RBLP) that was adopted in 1996 and covered the period up to 2001 (the policies were saved by the Secretary of State in 2007). The Secretary of State’s direction letter (dated 27th September 2007) highlights that they should be read in context, and that material considerations such as more recent national policy or evidence will be afforded “considerable weight” in planning decisions. Indeed, the NPPF (para 215 in Annex 1) highlights that the weight that can be attached to the saved policies depends on their degree of consistency with the NPPF policies identified below. Policy ENV15 is the only saved policy that is relevant to the application proposals. That defines the boundaries of the Green Belt in the Borough. Radcliffe on Trent is inset within the Green Belt, but with tightly defined boundaries around its perimeter. The application site, therefore, forms part of the Green Belt. RBC has also adopted a Non-Statutory Replacement Local Plan (NSRLP) in 2006 for development control purposes. Given its status and age only very limited weight can be attached to the policies of the NSRLP, but relevant policies have been identified in the following section. The policies and proposals of emerging Local Development Documents can also be material considerations depending on how far they have progressed through the statutory process. Rushcliffe Borough Council (RBC) is in the process of preparing the Rushcliffe Core Strategy (RCS). It was submitted to the Secretary of State for an examination of its soundness in October 2012. However, since then an Explanatory Meeting held in January 2013 resulted in the suspension of the Examination in February 2013. RBC are in the process of reconsidering and consulting on a number of matters that underpin the RCS, including the length of the plan period, the overall scale of housing provision to be planned for, the location and capacity of strategic urban extensions, and the approach to releasing site’s for development from the Green Belt. It is expected that the Examination will resume in January 2014 and that the RCS will be adopted by April 2014. As the RCS has not yet been fully tested through the examination process and remains unadopted, less weight should be given to its policies at this stage, but it remains an important material consideration, and its policies are summarised in the following section.

3.1.2

3.1.3

3.1.4

3.1.5

3.1.6

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

3.1.7

Ministerial Statements and adopted Supplementary Planning Guidance/Documents (SPG/SPD) can also be material considerations, and relevant policies and guidance are summarised below.

3.2
3.2.1

POLICY SUMMARY
Given the site’s location and the nature of the proposed residential development, the following policies are considered relevant to the determination of this planning application.

Sustainable Development
3.2.2 Planning for Growth is a Written Ministerial Statement dated the 23rd March 2011 that remains in place following the publication of the NPPF. It states that the: “Government’s clear expectation is that the answer to development and growth should wherever possible be ‘yes’, except where this would compromise the key sustainable development principles set out in national planning policy.” 3.2.3 NPPF paragraph 6 states that the purpose of the planning system is to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development, and that the policies set out in paragraphs 18219 (outlined below), taken as a whole, define the Government’s view of what sustainable development actually is in practice for the planning system. Furthermore, paragraphs 7 & 9 identify 3 dimensions to sustainable development: an economic role, a social role and an environmental role, and highlight that “pursuing sustainable development involves seeking positive improvements in the quality of the built, natural and historic environmental as well as in people’s quality of life.” Paragraph 14 emphasises that the NPPF is underpinned by a presumption in favour of sustainable development that is central to both plan-making and decision-taking. This reflects the intent for the planning system to positively and proactively support sustainable development and not act as an obstruction. Paragraph 17 stresses the primary emphasis of the NPPF is that all Local Plans and decisions on planning applications should reflect the ‘presumption in favour of sustainable development’. In this respect the NPPF sets out a number of core planning principles, the most relevant to the proposed development are set out below: • drive sustainable economic development to deliver the homes, employment premises and infrastructure to meet the needs of an area; • always seek to secure high quality design and a good standard of amenity for all existing and future occupants of land and buildings; • promote the vitality of urban areas and recognise the intrinsic character and beauty of the countryside; • support the transition to a low carbon future in a changing climate, taking full account of flood risk, and encourage the reuse of existing resources and encourage the use of renewable resources; • contribute to conserving and enhancing the natural environment and reducing pollution, allocating land of lesser environmental value for development, where consistent with other policies;

3.2.4

3.2.5

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

• actively manage patterns of growth to make the fullest possible use of public transport, walking and cycling, and focus significant development in locations which are or can be made sustainable; and • deliver sufficient community and cultural facilities and services to meet local needs. 3.2.6 3.2.7 RCS Policy A confirms that the RBC will take a positive approach to proposals for sustainable development that reflects the NPPF. NSRLP Policy GP1: Delivering Sustainable Development sets out sustainable principles for new development to promote economic growth, social wellbeing and environmental protection and enhancement.

Development Strategy & Housing
3.2.8 NPPF paragraph 47 highlights the importance of significantly boosting the supply of housing, requiring local planning authorities to ensure that their Local Plan meets the full, objectively assessed needs for market and affordable housing. It also requires them to identify a supply of specific “deliverable” sites sufficient to provide 5 years worth of housing against their housing requirements, with an additional buffer of either 5% or 20% depending upon the authority’s ability to delivery housing development historically. Paragraph 49 confirms that applications for residential development should be considered in the context of the presumption in favour of sustainable development, and that relevant policies to the supply of housing cannot be considered up-to-date if a 5 year land supply cannot be demonstrated. RCS Policy 2 (as proposed to be modified) seeks to facilitate the delivery of 9,400 dwellings in the period 2011 to 2026. It establishes a strategy of urban concentration and provides a settlement hierarchy for sustainable development, identifying Radcliffe on Trent as a Key Settlement appropriate for significant future growth in the second tier (only below the main built up area of Nottingham). A minimum of 400 homes are to be provided in or adjoining the settlement. RBLP Policy H1 only allocates sites to meet housing needs in the period to 2001. The NSRLP does not include any site allocations to meet housing needs, but Policy HOU4 confirms that new dwellings are not permitted outside settlements unless they are needed for agricultural or other activities appropriate to the countryside. These policies do not recognise the clear need to provide significant additional housing in the Borough and requirement to facilitate that through the allocation of (predominantly greenfield) sites. They are therefore, clearly inconsistent with the policies of the NPPF, and must be considered out of date in this regard. NPPF paragraph 50 refers to the delivery of a wide choice of high quality homes, widening opportunities for home ownership and the creation of sustainable, inclusive and mixed communities. Similarly RCS Policy 7 seeks to ensure that residential development maintains, provides and contributes to a mix of housing tenures, types and sized in order to create mixed and balanced communities, to reflect the needs and demands of the population and to include up to 30% of the total dwellings as affordable housing. NSRLP Policy HOU7 also seeks the provision of up to 30% of the total dwellings as affordable housing on sites of 0.5ha or 15 dwellings or more.

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3.2.10

3.2.11

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3.2.13

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

Green Belt
3.2.14 NPPF Paragraphs 79 & 80 highlight the importance of the Green Belt the aim of which is to prevent urban sprawl by keeping land permanently open. It sets out 5 purposes: • • • • • 3.2.15 to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas; to prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another; to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; to preserve the setting and special character of historic towns; and to assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict and other urban land.

Paragraphs 87 & 88 state that inappropriate development is by definition harmful to the Green Belt and should not be approved except in very special circumstances. They only exist where the potential harm to the Green Belt by reason of its inappropriateness (policy harm) and any other harm (actual harm) is clearly outweighed by other considerations. Paragraphs 89 & 90 confirm that new buildings in the Green Belt constitute inappropriate development, with limited exceptions none of which apply to the proposed development on the application site. RBLP Policy ENV15 defines the existing Green Belt boundaries in the Borough. As stated above, the site forms part of the designated Green Belt, but the settlement of Radcliffe on Trent is inset within it. The policy has no other provisions. RCS Policy 3 states that the principle of the Nottingham Derby Green Belt will be retained, but acknowledged that alterations will be required to facilitate future development to meet the needs identified in Policy 2. It continues to state that where a review of Green Belt boundaries is required, RBC will have regard to the statutory purposes of the Green Belt, establishing a permanent boundary to allow development in line with the settlement hierarchy, the appropriateness of defining safeguarded land to meet long term development needs, and retaining or creating defensible boundaries. Relevant NSRLP policies include Policy EN14 that confirms that planning permission will only be granted for “appropriate” development within the Green Belt, and Policy EN19 which states that development in the Green Belt that is in accordance with other policies must demonstrate that there will be no significant adverse impact upon the open nature of the Green Belt, or upon important buildings, landscape features or views, that an appropriate landscape scheme is proposed, and that ancillary lighting is designed to minimise impact beyond the necessary area.

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3.2.17

3.2.18

Accessibility
3.2.19 NPPF paragraph 32 requires planning decisions to take account of whether the opportunities for sustainable transport modes have been taken up (depending on the nature and location of the site), safe and suitable access to the site can be achieved, and improvements can be undertaken within the transport network that cost effectively limit the significant impacts of the development. Paragraph 34 seeks to direct developments that generate significant movement to locations “where the need to travel will be minimised and the use of sustainable transport modes can be maximised”. RCS Policy 13 proposes to manage the need to travel (particularly by car) by locating development of an appropriate scale in accordance with the spatial strategy outlined in 10

3.2.20

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

Policy 2, prioritising sites already accessible by walking, cycling and public transport. Any accessibility deficiencies will need to be fully addressed. 3.2.21 Policy 14 proposes that any additional requirements for infrastructure generated from new development are prioritised in accordance with the spatial strategy outlined in RCS Policy 2 and requires new developments to provide a package of measures to encourage journeys by non-private car modes and to ensure that residual car trips to not unacceptably compromise the operation of the wider transport system. The NSRLP also includes a number of relevant policies in this respect: • Policy MOV2 - seeks to ensure that provision for access by public transport can be accommodated in new development as appropriate. Policy MOV6 - requires major developments to make provision for facilities for cyclists and pedestrians and, if appropriate, horse riders at the appropriate stages of the development. Policy MOV7 - requires provision of appropriate footpaths and cycleways linking residential areas, shopping, community facilities and surrounding areas or improvement of existing links.

3.2.22

Design
3.2.23 NPPF Paragraphs 56-66 specifically emphasise the importance of the design of the built environments, noting “good design is a key aspect of sustainable development, is indivisible from good planning, and should contribute positively to making place better or people”. Notably it also proposes that policies and decisions should aim to ensure that developments: • • • • • • 3.2.24 function well and add to the overall quality of the area; establish a strong sense of place; optimise the potential of the site; respond to local character and history; create safe and accessible environments; and are visually attractive.

NPPF Paragraph 69 - 75 highlight that the planning system has an important role in facilitating social interaction and creating healthy, inclusive communities. It states that planning decisions should aim to achieve places which promote opportunities for meetings between members of the community, provide a safe environment, contain clear and legible pedestrian routes, and high quality public space, which encourage the active and continual use of public areas. It also refers to access to high quality open spaces and opportunities for sports and recreation, and to the protection and enhancement of public rights of way. RCS Policy 9 seeks to ensure that all new development contributes positively to the public realm and sense of place, creates an attractive and safe environment, reinforces valued local characteristics, are adaptable to meet evolving demands, and reflect the need to reduce the dominance of motor vehicles. Developments of 10 or more homes are expected to perform highly when assessed against best practice guidance and standards. 11

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

The policy also seeks to ensure the landscape character is conserved or enhanced by new development outside of settlements, assessing proposals by reference to the Great Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment. 3.2.26 Relevant NSRLP policies includes Policy GP2 which requires new development to meet specific design criteria to ensure that it does not have a significant adverse effect on local and residential amenity, Policy EN1 that requires proposals for new development to take into account the needs of disabled people and those with restricted mobility, and Policy COM5 that requires new residential development to include suitable levels of play and amenity space within the site or in close proximity of the area and to ensure the maintenance of such. Rushcliffe Residential Design Guide SPD (2009) provides detailed guidance on all design related matters to be considered for residential developments.

3.2.27

Environmental Sustainability & Protection
Energy 3.2.28 NPPF Paragraph 96 states that local planning authorities should expect proposed developments to comply with adopted Local Plan policies that set out local requirements for a decentralised energy supply unless it can be demonstrated that this would not be feasible or viable. There are no adopted Local Plan policies to comply with in this respect. It also requires that development proposals take account of landform, layout, building orientation, massing and landscaping to minimise energy consumption. RCS Policy 1 requires all development to deliver high levels of sustainability in respect of building design and adaptability, carbon dioxide emissions, energy generation and flood risk, where this is technically feasible and subject to viability. Flood Risk 3.2.30 NPPF Paragraphs 100 & 103 require that development is directed away from areas of the highest flood risk and seeks to ensure that development does not increase flood risk elsewhere. RCS Policy 1 supports development that avoids areas of current and future flood risk and which does not increase the risk of flooding elsewhere, applying a sequential approach to site selection, and requires all new development to incorporate measures to reduce surface water run-off and the implementation of Sustainable Drainage Systems. Landscape 3.2.32 NPPF Paragraph 109 sets out the measures through which the planning process should conserve and enhance the natural environment, whilst meeting development needs, by protecting valued landscapes, recognising ecosystems benefits, minimising impacts and maximising gains in biodiversity, preventing pollution and remediating land where possible. RCS Policy 15 confirms that a strategic approach will be taken to the delivery, protection and enhancement of green infrastructure, seeking to limit adverse impacts from new development through alternative scheme designs, in advance of considering mitigation options on or off site. It also seeks to protect, conserve and enhance landscape character, and protect parks and open spaces from development, except where these are under used or undervalued.

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

3.2.34

NSRLP Policy EN13 requires a suitable landscaping mitigation scheme to be submitted for development likely to have a significant impact on the existing landscape. Agricultural Land

3.2.35

NPPF paragraph 112 states that the economic and other benefits of the best and most versatile agricultural land should be taken into account, but where development is necessary the use of areas of poorer quality land should be sought in preference to a higher quality land. Ecology

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NPPF paragraph 118 states that when determining planning applications local planning authorities should apply a number of key principles that include refusing development where significant harm to biodiversity cannot be avoided, mitigated or compensated for, or where the development would result in the loss of irreplaceable habitats. It also encourages the incorporation of biodiversity in and around development. RCS Policy 16 seeks to increase biodiversity in Rushcliffe by protecting, enhancing, expanding and preventing fragmentation of existing green infrastructure. It requires new development to provide or enhance biodiversity features and their management where appropriate. NSRLP Policy EN11 requires all developments likely to have an adverse impact on features of nature conservation interest to demonstrate that the need for development outweighs the need to safeguard the nature conservation value of the site and, where loss or damage is unavoidable, provide appropriate mitigation measures as part of a landscape scheme. Policy EN12 requires all developments that would affect recognised sites of ecological significance or habitats of species of importance to be accompanied by appropriate surveys and to include appropriate measures to mitigate any impact. Pollution

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3.2.39

NPPF paragraphs 120 & 121 require that planning decisions ensure that new development is appropriate for its location in terms of risks from pollution and land instability. Paragraphs 122-125 also refer to the consideration of noise, air and light pollution impacts arising from developments. NSRLP Policy EN22 states that new housing development will not be permitted close to an existing source of potential pollution unless the impact can be mitigated. Cultural Heritage

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NPPF Paragraph 128-131 states that applicants should describe the significance of any heritage assets affected by the proposed development, including ay contribution made by their setting, and when determining planning applications, account should be taken of the desirability of sustaining and enhancing the significance of heritage assets, the positive contribution their conservation can make to sustainable communities, and the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness. RCS Policy 10 supports proposals that protect the historic environment and heritage assets and their settings. Planning Obligations

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NPPF Paragraphs 203-206 set out the circumstances where it would be appropriate to use planning conditions or a planning obligation. 13

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

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RCS Policy 17 requires new development to be supported by the required infrastructure at the appropriate stage and states that contributions will be sought from development proposals which give rise to the need for new infrastructure. Furthermore, Policy 18 requires development to meet the reasonable cost of associated new infrastructure and contribute to the delivery of necessary infrastructure to manage the cumulative impacts of developments. Prior to the implementation of a Community Infrastructure levy, appropriate planning conditions and obligations will be sought to secure all new infrastructure. Similarly, NSRLP Policy COM2 requires new residential development to make provision for community facilities to serve the scale of development proposed, either by enhancing existing provision or providing new facilities and provided at the appropriate stage of development.

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3.3
3.3.1

SUMMARY
As stated above, paragraph 14 of the NPPF emphasises the presumption in favour of sustainable development. It continues to state that when determining planning applications and appeals where relevant policies of the Development Plan are out-of-date (as is the case here), permission should be granted unless: • any adverse impacts of doing so would significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in this Framework taken as a whole; or specific policies in this Framework indicate development should be restricted (including, for example, SSSI, Green Belt, Local Green Space, AONB, National Park, designated heritage assets, and locations at risk of flooding).

3.3.2

In respect of the second bullet point, the appeal site is located within the designated Green Belt. It is therefore, first necessary to consider the principle of development in light of the Green Belt policies set out in the NPPF. This is addressed in Section 4 below. The Statement then continues to consider the proposals in light of the other relevant policies highlighted above (Section 5) to conclude that the proposals for the application site do constitute sustainable development.

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

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4.1
4.1.1

THE PRINCIPLE OF DEVELOPMENT
GREEN BELT
As stated above, the site forms part of the designated Nottingham Green Belt that extends over much of Rushcliffe Borough close to the city of Nottingham. The long established Green Belt boundaries are defined by Policy ENV15 the RBLP, and whilst the settlement of Radcliffe on Trent is inset within the Green Belt, the boundaries are tightly drawn and there is therefore, no provision for meeting the identified housing needs within the settlement. This is recognised by the RCS and a review of Green Belt boundaries in the Borough is to be undertaken (Policy 3) to allow the allocation of housing sites to accommodate future development needs in the “Key Settlements” identified in Policy 2 (including Radcliffe). This, however, is not due to take place until 2014 at the earliest and the allocations and amendment to the Green Belt boundaries will not be confirmed until the Allocations Development Plan Document is adopted. RBC currently expects that to be in 2015 but given the delay the RCS is experiencing that timescale is clearly ambitious. In the meantime the application development proposals constitute “inappropriate development” and the NPPF requires the demonstration of very special circumstances where the policy harm and actual harm is clearly outweighed by other considerations. The policy harm is inevitable as the proposed built development is, by definition, inappropriate development and will result in the site no longer being kept permanently open, i.e. it impacts on the site’s openness. However, the actual harm to the Green Belt arising from the built development, which in this context relates to the five purposes of the Green Belt as set out in the NPPF, varies from site to site and development to development. An assessment of the degree of actual harm that would arise from the proposed development has been undertaken and the conclusions are set out below. This assessment has taken account of RBC’s Green Belt review methodology as set out in the Green Belt Review (Draft for Consultation (GBR- June 2013). It also draws on the findings of the Landscape and Visual Appraisal (LVA) that also accompanies the planning application.

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4.1.3

Urban Sprawl
4.1.4 The Nottingham Green Belt was originally conceived to contain the outward growth of Nottingham. In that respect the Green Belt around Radcliffe, and its specific purpose, is considered incidental to the main purposes of the Green Belt in that it does not restrict the growth of Nottingham itself. The site instead contributes to the overall extent of the Green Belt and contains the expansion of Radcliffe’s urban area. However, the RCS acknowledges the need for new development on greenfield sites around Radcliffe to meet established housing needs in the area. A direct consequence of the need for greenfield development around Radcliffe is the inevitable growth of the urban form, and an inevitable impact on the purpose of the Green Belt in this regard. However, in respect of this site and proposed development specifically, the current urban form of Radcliffe already contains the site on three of its four sides, and the development would extend no further east than the existing built form of Radcliffe on Trent. In that respect the development would appear as consolidation of the urban form rather than sprawl. Furthermore, the development can be directly linked to the settlement centre along Shelford Road, and the proposals will enhance residents’ accessibility to the countryside, in an area where there is currently limited access, as a result of the wide 15

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4.1.6

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

landscape corridor along the eastern boundary of the site that would be dedicated as public open space with recreation routes running through it. This corridor will also help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future and will form a clearer and more defensible boundary to the Green Belt than currently exists once the boundaries are reviewed to take account of the proposed development. Therefore, the impact of the proposed development on the purpose of the Green Belt can be considered to be very limited in this regard. Impact: Low

Coalescence
4.1.7 The nearest settlements to Radcliffe are Nottingham (min of 800m) to the west and north west, Stoke Bardolph (1km) to the north, Shelford (1.75km) to the north east, Upper Saxondale (500m) and Bingham (2.5km) to the east and Cotgrave (3km) to the south. The proposed development of the site would not extend the urban form of Radcliffe any further north, wast or south. The development would extend the current urban form of Radcliffe eastwards by approximately 350m. However, given the current urban form with built development to both the north and south of the site, the distances between Radcliffe and the settlements highlighted above would not be narrowed. There is, therefore, no threat to coalescence. Furthermore, the visual appraisal in the LVA has highlighted the limited visibility of the site in the surrounding area, particularly from publically accessible viewpoints including key movement routes, and the limited intervisibility between the settlements, that arises from the topography and intervening vegetation. This significantly reduces the visual impact of development, and is further addressed by the proposed public open space and structural landscaping in the eastern and southern parts of the site. Indeed, it is only on the northern fringes of Upper Saxondale that the site is visible and there is already significant development in Radcliffe on Trent to the south of the A52 that is closer and more visible than the proposed development. Therefore, there is no threat of the settlements merging together as a result of the proposed development, and it can also be concluded that there is no actual or perceived coalescence (including in distant views and as perceived when travelling between settlements or from within settlements). Impact: None

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4.1.9

4.1.10

Countryside Encroachment
4.1.11 Whilst the development of the site will inevitably result in some countryside encroachment, in so far as it would be the development of a greenfield site on the edge of the settlement, this is an inevitable result of the development of any greenfield site around Radcliffe on Trent, or indeed elsewhere in the Borough. In this case, however, the site is not subject to any other landscape quality designation and the LVA has highlighted how the established landscape structure within and surrounding the site, notably the topography and retained hedgerows and trees, and the nature of the existing urban form, with existing built development enclosing the site on three sides, combined with the proposed public open space and structural landscaping, would contain the proposed development, generally limit the perception of the encroachment when viewed from the surrounding area, and strengthen the landscape character of the area. Therefore, the impact of the proposed development on the purpose of the Green Belt can be considered to be relatively limited in this regard. 16

4.1.12

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

Impact: Low

Setting and Character of Historic Towns
4.1.13 Radcliffe is not specifically identified as a historic town and does not contain a Conservation Area. As a settlement Radcliffe grew significantly in the 1960s and 1970s, and that growth is evident in the established residential areas around the site and the historic settlement centre. It can, therefore, be concluded that the purpose of the Green Belt will not be harmed in this respect. Impact: None

Urban Regeneration
4.1.14 The RCS sets out the requirement for new development to take place on greenfield sites around Rushcliffe in addition to the development of appropriate and available previously developed sites to meet established housing needs in the area. Indeed, it specifically proposes the development of a minimum of 400 dwellings in Radcliffe. Moreover, it is apparent from a review of the 2012 Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) that the opportunities for the development of previously developed land in Radcliffe on Trent are extremely limited. Therefore, the impact of the proposed development on the purpose of the Green Belt can be considered to be extremely limited in this regard. Impact: Negligible

Summary
4.1.15 The Green Belt around Radcliffe on Trent is incidental to the main purposes of the Nottingham Green Belt in terms of restricting the expansion of Nottingham itself, and the proposed development would constitute a relatively small-scale intrusion on a much wider Green Belt corridor and would not undermine the purposes of the wider Green Belt. The development of the site will inevitably result in the growth of Radcliffe’s urban form and an encroachment on the surrounding countryside, but that would be the case for any greenfield development around the settlement. The location and aspect of the site combined with the existing urban and landscape structure (notably with development already containing the site on three sides) mean that it does not form a sensitive part of the Green Belt. There is no risk of physical coalescence with other settlements and in visual terms is extremely well contained by a combination of the urban form, topography and existing vegetation. The proposed landscape scheme will also provide an enhanced settlement edge that will form a clearer and more defensible long term Green Belt boundary. Moreover, Radcliffe on Trent is not identified as an historic settlement and contains very limited opportunities for the development of previously developed land. Therefore, impact of the proposed development in terms of coalescence, urban sprawl, countryside encroachment, impact on historic towns and in relation to urban regeneration ranges between none and low.

4.1.16

4.2
4.2.1

VERY SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Set against the policy and actual harm to the Green Belt are the following material factors:

Housing Need & Delivery
4.2.2 Policy 2 of the RCS proposes to facilitate the provision of 9,600 new homes in the Borough over the period 2011 to 2026 (640 dwellings per annum (dpa)). A minimum of 17

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

400 dwellings are to be provided in Radcliffe on Trent. However, the RCS Examination Inspector raised concerns in relation to the apparent difference between the requirement set out in the RCS and the 15,000 dwellings required by the (now revoked) East Midlands Regional Plan (2009) in the period 2006-2026 (750dpa), and the lack of agreement with the other local authorities in the Housing Market Area in relation to the appropriate level of provision (in relation to the duty to co-operate). After initial exploratory meetings, the Examination was suspended (in February 2013) to allow RBC to continue discussion with the neighbouring authorities, reexamine in the level of housing proposed, revisit the allocation of sustainable urban extension, extend the plan period and undertake a broad review of the Green Belt. 4.2.3 This work has been on-going and it is understood that Proposed Main Modifications to the Submitted RCS will be published for consultation in December. It is expected that these will include an extension of the plan period to 2028 and an increased in the housing requirement to 13,150 dwellings (774 dpa). The minimum 400 dwelling requirement for Radcliffe on Trent is expect to remain unchanged. The forward programme for the RCS then anticipates the Examination resuming in March, receipt of the Inspectors Report in May/June and adoption mid 2014. It is clear, therefore, that there is a pressing need to provide new housing in the Borough, and Radcliffe specifically, to meet identified future housing needs and address the backlog that has built up through a lack of delivery in recent years. The Annual Monitoring Report 2012 (AMR) highlights that completions in the Borough totaled 1,876 dwellings in the period 2006-2012, an average of 313 dpa which is well below either of the RCS requirements or the original EMRP requirement. Moreover, it is apparent that there is currently an acute shortage in the housing land supply in the Borough, and Radcliffe specifically, to meet the identified housing needs. The 2012 AMR highlights that (based on current commitments and the SHLAA) there is only sufficient land supply in the Borough to provide 1,820 new dwellings in the next 5 years, and in Radcliffe on Trent specifically the land supply will only provide 5 dwellings. RBC’s last set out their 5 year housing land supply position (as at April 2012) in the 2012 AMR, published in December 2012. The 5 year land supply calculation conceded that there has been a record of persistent under delivery of housing in the Borough and, therefore, a 20% buffer should be included in accordance with paragraph 47 of the NPPF. However, the calculation did use a residual approach (where the early backlog is spread over the entire remaining plan period). Nevertheless, the AMR still concludes that there is only 1.6 years of supply in the Borough. If the Sedgefield approach is used (where the backlog is address within the first 5 years of the remaining period) then the supply reduces to only 1.2 years. The land supply position would improve marginally if the submitted RCS housing requirement figure is used (to 1.9 years using RBC’s approach or 1.5 years using the Sedgefield approach), but worsens again using the anticipated Main Modification requirement (to 1.6 years using RBC’s approach or 1.1 years using the Sedgefield approach). The housing land supply in the Borough, therefore, falls very significantly short of the 5 year supply required, and there is no up-to-date development plan in place that will rectify this position. This is clearly contrary to policy set out in NPPF and only serves to exacerbate the already acute issues of housing opportunity, choice and affordability, and also hinder improvements in social well-being, economic growth and the prosperity of the area as a whole. This position is a direct consequence of the historic planning policy position as set out in Section 3 and the subsequent persistent shortfall in the delivery of housing in the Borough. Whilst the adoption of the RCS in the middle of next year will be a significant 18

4.2.4

4.2.5

4.2.6

4.2.7

4.2.8

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

step towards remedying this position, that heavily relies on the delivery of the strategic sites around the Nottingham urban area. It is widely acknowledged that these sites will have long lead in times, and therefore, it will be quite some time until those extremely large sites start to provide housing to meet the identified needs in the Borough. 4.2.9 Furthermore, beyond the urban area, the Site Allocations Development Plan Document will allocate sites in the Key Settlements including Radcliffe on Trent. However, preparation of that will not begin in earnest until the RCS is adopted, and its preparation will inevitably take time. RBC predict that it will be adopted in 2015, but that appears very optimistic. Nevertheless, it is only on its adoption that the allocations required to meet the housing need identified for the Borough will be in place. Notwithstanding that, it is clear that there is a demonstrable need to release land to meet housing development requirements and, given the slow progress in the preparation of the RCS, there is no other means of remedying the substantial undersupply in the Borough other than through the approval of planning applications for residential development on appropriate sites in sustainable locations in the Green Belt. Whilst there are some settlements in the Borough that are not located within the Green Belt, only Bingham and East Leake are identified as key settlements in the RCS, and there is a limit to how much additional growth they, or other settlements can, reasonable accommodate, especially if the development strategy within the emerging RCS is not to be prejudiced. In the case of the application proposals the whole site, including land required for access, is in the control of the applicants, who are a reputable and locally based national house builder without funding or capacity constraints, who have been active in the county for many years, and who are ready to develop the site as soon as possible. The site is therefore available now for immediate development. The proposed development of up to 400 new dwellings could, therefore, make an extremely valuable contribution towards remedying the shortfall in housing land provision in the Borough in the short term, with around 180 dwellings anticipated for completion within the first 5 years. That weighs significantly in favour of the proposed development.

4.2.10

4.2.11

Affordable Housing
4.2.12 Affordable housing needs are significant in the Borough. The ‘Nottingham Core Housing Market Assessment Update 2009 – Rushcliffe’ modelled an affordable housing requirement of 362 dwellings per annum in Rushcliffe. It found that there was a specific need for new affordable homes in Radcliffe, identifying that in 2009 56% of new local households were unable to afford to purchase a home, and 13% were unable to afford to rent. The more recent Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) Update 2012 concluded that there is a need for 463 new affordable homes per annum to meet emerging need and to clear the backlog that has built up in the Borough. The application site could provide up to 120 affordable homes (30% of the maximum 400 dwellings) to contribute to meeting these local needs. The provision of affordable housing is a key aspiration of the Government (as set out in the NPPF and The Housing Strategy for England) as well as RBC (as highlighted in the planning policies set out above, and this contribution should be given significant weight in the determination of this application.

4.2.13

A Sustainable Location For Development
4.2.14 It is also important to note that the proposed development on the application site would also entirely accord with the extant and emerging housing objectives and the spatial vision for the area in the emerging RCS. Furthermore, the evidence base that underpins the RCS also highlights the sustainability of the settlement and its suitability for growth.

19

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

4.2.15

RBC’s Profile of Radcliffe on Trent refers to the substantial growth that the settlement underwent in the 1950s and 1960s, and that the settlement now acts as a service centre for some surrounding settlements “providing schooling, local shops, health facilities and recreational activities”. The settlement profile highlights that Radcliffe contains a wide variety of local facilities, including a vibrant settlement centre with an array of local shops, including supermarkets, eateries and public houses. Radcliffe-on-Trent Primary School, Radcliffe Infant and Nursery School, South Nottinghamshire Academy and Radcliffe-onTrent Health Centre are situated to the south of the settlement centre. All of these facilities are easily accessible from the site via Shelford Road that provides a direct connection to the settlement centre. Moreover, Radcliffe-on-Trent train station providing connections on the Nottingham Skegness line is also located in the centre of the settlement and can be easily accessed via Shelford Road. A number of bus stops are situated within close proximity of the site providing convenient access to local public transport services. The Radcliffe Line offers direct and convenient bus services with combined frequency of 3 buses per hour to/from Nottingham during the main working day. On this basis Radcliffe on Trent, and indeed the application site, is clearly a sustainable location for future development. The Greater Nottingham Accessibility Study indicated that Radcliffe ranks 4th in Rushcliffe in terms of overall accessibility (a key factor in the NPPF). Moreover, the Housing Background Paper notes that Radcliffe on Trent is as close to the centre of Nottingham as some of the suburbs of the city itself. The Tribal Study ‘Greater Nottingham Sustainable Locations for Growth’ (2010) an independent piece of work undertaken on behalf of RBC and the other Greater Nottingham Authorities concluded, that Radcliffe has: “Overall medium to high suitability for growth. Evidence of high levels of infrastructure capacity. Good current transport accessibility, but would not sustain future growth. No overwhelming environmental constraints although major flood constraints to the west. Potential economic development benefits of growth.

4.2.16

4.2.17

4.2.18

4.2.19

In respect of the scale of growth the study concluded: “Radcliffe has the potential to accommodate a higher level of growth compared with other settlements in the Greater Nottingham sub region.”

4.2.20

The Tribal Study states that Radcliffe has a population of over 7,800 people, but RBC’s Profile highlights that there is a significant proportion of older people in the settlement (significantly greater than the Borough or national average). Consequently there is also a smaller proportion of younger people and people of working age. This is a cause for concern: “An elderly and aging population can have serious impacts n the local economy and the services and facilities it provides!. Declining numbers of people under the age of 16 could also impact on local schools and their future viability. Due to the increasing average life expectancy and people living in smaller households, it is unlikely that the limited supply of sites with planning permission in Radcliffe n Trent would maintain the existing population level of the settlement. A declining population would likely compound the problems identified above.”

20

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

4.2.21

Indeed, the Profile also highlights that only 256 new dwellings were completed within the parish in the last 10 years and only 17 of those were affordable dwellings. Furthermore, that there were limited commitments for additional development (25 dwellings at that timeit is now even less), and that there are limited opportunities for further development within the existing built up area. Consequently, RBC has identified Radcliffe as a Key Settlement in Policy 2 of the RCS and is proposed to accommodate a minimum of 400 new homes. Clearly, therefore, Radcliffe on Trent is an important population and service centre in the Borough, and it has been recognised as an entirely appropriate and sustainable focus for growth. Moreover, the application site is well integrated with the urban form and Shelford Road provides a direct connection to the settlement centre. The residents on the application site would, therefore, benefit from good access to local and higher order services in Radcliffe via a range of sustainable transport modes. The development of the application site would therefore accord with the development location strategy of both the RCS and the emerging the housing objectives and the spatial vision for the area providing essential new housing to sustain the settlement’s population, which will in turn help to support the existing services and facilities, notably the secondary school where a declining school roll has been highlighted.

4.2.22

Inevitable Need to Release Land from Green Belt
4.2.23 Most of the main settlements in Rushcliffe, including Radcliffe, are tightly surrounded by the Green Belt, and it is recognised that Green Belt boundaries will need to be revised to facilitate the release of sites for development to meet the identified housing requirements. Indeed, it is apparent from the RCS that the vast majority of development in the Borough will take place on land which is currently Green Belt. This is particularly the case in Radcliffe on Trent where a minimum requirement of 400 dwellings has been identified, and the opportunities for development within the existing urban form (as evidenced by the 2012 Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment) is extremely limited.

Alternatives
4.2.24 Indeed, even if land currently within the Green Belt is taken into account the options for providing the 400 dwellings are extremely limited. The Housing Background Paper states (para 6.90): “The floodplain acts as a major constraint to growth to the west, particularly due to historic flooding and poor drainage in this area. The A52 creates a defensible boundary to the south. The south and southeast have topographical constrains, and the development of this area would be highly visible. Any proposals for growth would need to be in proportion with the existing size and settlement, and must avoid coalescence with Saxondale.” 4.2.25 Moreover, the key conclusions of the 2012 SHLAA in respect of Radcliffe on Trent are as follows: • There are only 5 small sites considered deliverable within 5 years, and they can only deliver 5 dwellings There are 2 sites considered developable in the 6 to 10 year period. However, Site 191 would only deliver 4 new dwellings. The SHLAA assumes that Site 185 to the north of the A52 at the western extent of Radcliffe would be able to deliver 98 dwellings in years 8 and 9. However, that site formed part of a planning application was refused largely because of flood risk 21

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

concerns. Even if those issues could be addressed, and that us unlikely given that the SHLAA indicates that it requires third party actions, it is likely that the capacity of the site would be somewhat less than assumed. The SHLAA also highlights issues relating to the potential impact on the A52, a trunk road with acknowledged capacity issues. • The SHLAA identifies 5 sites that maybe suitable subject to a change of policy (in this case Green Belt). They include the application site (Site 547) and the adjacent fields enclosed by the application site to the west (Site 186). The SHLAA conclusion in respect of the application site highlights that the site is within the Green Belt (as are all of the large sites apart from Site 185), but is otherwise relatively unconstrained (reference is made to congestion on Shelford Road at peak times). Site 183 lies between the A52 and the railway line to the south east of the application site. The much larger Site 184 lies to east of both the application site and Site 183, straddling the railway line. The SHLAA assumes that Site 183 has capacity for 56 dwellings and Site 184 has capacity for 1000 dwellings. However, both sites would need to be accessed from the A52 and the SHLAA highlights the difficulties that would present given the capacity constraints along that route and the Highway Agency have indicated that a new access from the A52 is unlikely to be acceptable (although there may be some potential to use an existing access). It is also apparent that development of the larger part of Site 184 to the north of the railway line would be disconnected from the urban form of Radcliffe on Trent, and the Housing Background Paper refers to it as being “isolated”. Site 187 lies to the south of the A52 and the SHLAA site report highlights site constrains are likely to severely limit capacity (12 dwellings is assumed). The site would need to be accessed for the A52 and that again presents a significant site constraint. Site 188 Nottingham Road was the subject of a recent planning application for 300 dwelling that was refused in January 2013. The reasons for refusal were wideranging and made reference to its location in the Green Belt, the traffic impact, flood issues, a lack of information in relation to ecology, landscape, archaeology and noise, and that it had not been demonstrated that the scheme would provide an acceptable level of affordable housing or provision of developer contributions or facilities to support the development. It is understood that flood risk issues were also why the planning application was for substantially less than the 500 dwellings the SHLAA assumed the site might be able to accommodate.

4.2.26

It is, therefore, apparent from the above analysis of the SHLAA’s conclusions that there are constraints on all of other sites in Radcliffe. The application site also has the added advantage for being able to accommodate the minimum 400 dwellings required in the settlement, together with the new primary school, health centre (see below) and public open space on a single site.

Community Provision
4.2.27 RBC’s Profile of Radcliffe on Trent highlighted some of the key concerns of local residents, which includes the capacity of both the health centre and primary schools. This matter was also raised in the pre-application consultation. Consequently the applicants have engaged with the Education Authority (NCC) and the NH’S Rushcliffe Clinical Commissioning Group and GPs Practice.

22

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

4.2.28

In terms of school provision there is a shortage of primary school places at both the infant and junior schools in Radcliffe and that is project to remain the case until at least 2017. Moreover, there is no scope to expand provision on the existing sites. Space constraint issues have also been identified in respect of the health centre, and again there is limited ability to expand provision on the existing site. It is understood that there are also problems with the physical condition of the existing building. These matters directly affect service provision and the ability of the Practice to expand clinical service provision to meet the needs of the community. It is understood that the GP Practice have been considering their options for the provision of a new health centre for a number of years and that process is still on-going. Consequently, the proposed development will facilitate the provision of a new primary school and health centre to meet the needs of the development’s residents and address existing capacity issues within the settlement. The application scheme proposals include the provision of a 1.1ha serviced site to accommodate a new one form entry primary school. The Education Authority have confirmed that the application site is their preferred location for the provision of a new primary school in Radcliffe, as the existing schools are all located in the southern part of the settlement. The new school will be able to serve the residents of the proposed development and a substantial part of the settlement without the need to travel through the settlement centre. The scheme proposals also include the provision of a 0.4ha serviced site to accommodate a new health centre should no other appropriate alternative option be identified in the GP Practice’s search. The consultation with the service providers highlighted the potential benefits of a colocated education and health site as an integral part of the proposed development to provide enhanced integrated services. Therefore a single 1.5ha site has been allocated for the development of these community uses. It is proposed that this is located in an accessible location within the scheme on the primary route which can accommodate bus services, and very close to the pedestrian cycle link from Shelford Road, which provides a direct connection to the settlement centre and is already well served by public transport.

4.2.29

4.2.30

4.2.31

Conclusion
4.2.32 The NPPF is clear that for “very special circumstances” to exist the harm by way of inappropriateness and other harm must be clearly outweighed by other factors. The Green Belt policy harm is unavoidable, but as set out above, the other actual harm in relation to the impact on the purposes of the Green Belt as a result of the loss of openness, is in this case relatively limited. The harm to the Green Belt should be given significant weight in the determination of the planning application, but set against it are the following material factors: • There is a pressing need for new housing in the Borough, and consequently the emerging RCS establishes a significant housing requirement that is likely to increase further as a result of the recent discussions with the neighbouring authorities and Examination Inspector. There is an acute housing land supply shortage in the Borough and Radcliffe specifically. The proposed development of up to 400 new dwellings on the application site would make a valuable contribution towards remedying the shortfall. There is a significant need for affordable housing, both across the Borough and in Radcliffe specifically. The development proposals will provide up to 120 new affordable homes to contribute to meeting that need.

23

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

It is widely recognised that substantial Green Belt releases will be required to meet the housing needs of the Borough, indeed the RCS implies that most new housing will have to be delivered on sites that are currently located in the Green Belt, including at Radcliffe on Trent. Radcliffe a key settlement in the Borough and has been identified as a sustainable settlement where growth can be accommodated and the emerging RCS proposes a minimum of 400 dwellings should be delivered in the settlement. Therefore, the development proposals would entirely accord with the emerging development strategy and housing objectives contained within the RCS. All of the other potential development sites in Radcliffe are constrained, and the application site has the distinct advantage of being able to accommodate the 400 dwellings required, together with the primary school, health centre and public open space on a single site. The proposed development will also facilitate the provision of a new primary school and health centre to meet the needs of the development’s residents and address existing capacity issues within the settlement. It will also support other important community services and facilities in the settlement, such as the secondary school.

4.2.33

Individually these matters are very significant taken together and they clearly outweigh the harm by way of inappropriateness and the limited “other” harm that would result from the development. It is concluded therefore, that the very special circumstances required by the NPPF in order to approve inappropriate development in the Green Belt exists in this instance and that the proposals accord with Green Belt policy.

24

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

5
5.1
5.1.1

SITE AND SCHEME SUITABILITY
SITE ASSESSMENTS
A number of environmental and technical assessments were undertaken To inform the preparation of the development proposals. The findings are summarised below.

Transport & Accessibility
5.1.2 The scope of the Transport Assessment (TA) that accompanies the planning application was agreed in consultation with NCC and the Highways Agency. The TA confirms that the site is suitably located for residential development, being within walking distance of the settlement centre, the train station and a number of schools. Residents on the site would also have good access to bus stops where there are hourly and half-hourly daytime services to Nottingham from Shelford Road and Clumber Drive. The proposed vehicular access from Shelford Road is a new 3-arm roundabout junction. NCC identified a single roundabout as their preferred form of access at an early stage in the pre-application consultation process as it would act as a gateway feature to the settlement and help to slow traffic speeds. NCC also set out the design standards that the roundabout junction must meet, which together with a subsequent safety audit of the scheme, directly resulted in the size and position of the final roundabout design. The TA concludes that the roundabout will operate with sufficient spare capacity once the proposed development is complete. The TA also assesses the likely impact of the development of the site on the highway network (taking account of background growth and committed schemes), and a number of specific off-site junctions. The TA proposes a number of improvements to appropriately enhance future capacity and traffic management, as well as create a safer environment for pedestrians and cyclists and improve bus patronage including: • Improvements to the bus stops on Shelford Road and a financial contribution towards local bus service enhancements; • The provision of a travel pack (including bus passes) to new residents; • Provision of pedestrian and cycle routes through the site with connections to the existing footway network and provision of cycle parking in the new dwelling plots; • Provision of a traffic calming scheme along Shelford Road with new and improved pedestrian crossings; • Conversion of the existing Shelford Road / Main Road mini-roundabout junction to traffic signal control, including provision of controlled pedestrian crossings on all approaches; • Capacity improvements at the A52 / Nottingham Road sign junction; • Capacity improvements at the A52 / Stragglethorpe Road signal junction; • Section 106 contributions towards a traffic management / traffic calming scheme in Newton. 5.1.5 The proposals therefore take account of all modes of transport and will enhance pedestrian and cycle access and access to local bus services, whilst also improving traffic 25

5.1.3

5.1.4

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

management in the area. The proposed development is, therefore, considered to be acceptable in access and highways terms, subject to the delivery of the identified sustainable travel measures and highway improvements.

Landscape and Visual Amenity
5.1.6 The landscape character and visual amenity of the area has been examined in the Landscape and Visual Appraisal (LVA) that also accompanies the planning application. The site is not subject to any landscape policy designation, but does lie within Policy Zone SN05 in the South Nottinghamshire Farmlands Character Area as defined by the Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment (GNLCA 2009), and the site and surrounding area contains some elements that have been identified as general characteristics of this area. The GNLCA concludes that the landscape character area has a landscape condition of “Moderate” and landscape strength of “Moderate”. The overall landscape strategy is to “Enhance”. The LVA concludes that the site’s sensitivity to the change proposed on the site is low in landscape character terms. This reflects the proximity and influence of the adjacent settlement edge, the ability of the existing landscape structure to absorb potential development, the lack of any significant landscape features of importance on the site and the ability to retain those features that do exist. In terms of visual amenity, views of the site from the surrounding area are generally limited by the urban form and topography. Existing residential properties effectively contain views of the site from the west and north west to the immediate surrounds of the site. To the north Malkin Hill limits views of the site from the countryside to approximately 1km from the centre of the site. Site visibility extends further east along the valley between Malkin Hill to the north and Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale to the south, but there is a flat perspective and the intervening vegetation filters views to the site. From the south the site is visible from open areas located between the railways line and Grantham Road (A52). The site is also visible from the north facing slopes of Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale south of the Grantham Road (A52). However, there are no views of particular value that should be retained or protected, and the views of the site from the surrounding area tend to incorporate urban elements within Radcliffe itself, and in some cases elsewhere in the surrounding area. The LVA concludes that the treatment (density, orientation, height and materials) of the development edge will be important, and provides an opportunity to further soften the settlement edge of Radcliffe. Consequently, existing hedgerows and trees on the site will be retained wherever possible and supplemented with new planting, most notably along the western fringes of the site. The LVA recommends a mitigation strategy that has directly shaped the development proposals to ensure that the proposed development responds to the existing landscape character context and visual amenity. The proposed development is, therefore, considered acceptable in landscape and visual amenity terms.

5.1.7

5.1.8

5.1.9

Trees & Hedgerows
5.1.10 An Arboricultural Assessment prepared for the site examined a total of 49 trees (many are located off site, but close to the site’s boundaries). There are no category A trees that are considered to be of high quality and value, and in a condition that allows them to make a substantial contribution to the local environment. The trees on the southern boundary, and most of those around the buildings within the site, are category B trees of moderate quality and value, able to make a significant contribution to the local environment. The other trees notably along the western boundary are category C trees of low quality and value and in adequate condition. There are only 2 trees on the northern boundary both of which are Category B trees. 26

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

5.1.11

The survey also highlighted that the hedges are predominantly hawthorn, with some elderberry, ivy and brambles also present. The hedge on the southern site boundary contains some mature trees, mainly ash, and hawthorn. They have all received routine machine maintenance in recent years. The ecological survey that also accompanies the planning application describes all of the hedgerows as species poor, and none are considered to qualify as “important” under the Hedgerow Regulations 1997. No tree removal will be required to facilitate the development, but some hedgerow removal will be required, notably along the northern boundary to facilitate access to the site, and two small sections of the internal north-south running hedgerow for the internal road to cross the central green link between development parcels. However, the proposed landscaping scheme will provide a significant number of additional trees in and around the site, notably along the eastern boundary of the site where there are currently none, and the hedgerow along the northern boundary will be replaced with a new hedgerow around the roundabout. The proposed landscaping scheme will, therefore, more than compensate for the loss.

5.1.12

Ecology
5.1.13 The Phase 1 Habitat Survey Report that accompanies the planning application submission sets out the findings of a desk study, extended Phase 1 habitat survey involving a walkover of the site, and an investigation of buildings and trees for their potential to support bats. The desk study confirms that there are no statutory designated sites of nature conservation value within or immediately adjacent to the site. Nor are there any nonstatutory designations of conservation value within or immediately adjacent to the site. The habitat survey confirms the potential ecological constraints within the site, being that the it incorporates structures and trees which have the potential to support bats, features likely to be used by nesting birds including barn owls, some terrestrial habitat suitable for great crested newts. The site also supports Habitats of Principle Importance or Local Biodiversity Action Plan Habitats, notably semi-improved neutral grassland and hedgerows, and Species of Principal Importance of Local Biodiversity Action Plan Species, notably potentially roosting bats within the house (Building B3). The survey also confirms that there is no evidence of badgers and the site does not contain suitable habitat for dormice, reptiles, or other protected species including otters, water voles and white-clawed crayfish. No invasive plants were recorded on the site during the survey. Given the findings, the report recommends a number of additional surveys should demolition or vegetation removal be proposed. These include two emergence surveys for bats to be carried out prior to demolition of the house (Building B3), with one dusk emergence and pre dawn re-entry bat survey of the remaining buildings. The further bat surveys have been undertaken and accompany the planning application. The surveys indicate that there is some use of 3 of the 9 buildings on site by bats, but not the house. It also recommends surveys to establish if buildings are being used by barn owls to roost and/or nest. Should vegetation or building be removed / demolished, these should be thoroughly checked for active bird nests. The report also recommends biodiversity enhancements are considered as part of the development, incorporating bat and bird boxes on any new buildings and wildlife friendly planting into the soft landscaping designs. With the implementation of the recommended surveys and potential biodiversity enhancements, the development proposals accord with nature conservation related

5.1.14

5.1.15

5.1.16

5.1.17

5.1.18

27

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

planning policies. The proposed development is, therefore, considered to be acceptable in ecological terms.

Agricultural Land Quality
5.1.19 A agricultural land quality assessment has been undertaken and the findings are set out in the Soil Resources, Agricultural Use and Quality of Land report that accompanies the application. This confirms that the site comprises 12ha of grade 2 land and 5.9ha of subsidiary sub-grade 3a land, which are dominant on the slopes to the east and west of the village. Grade 2 land comprises land where there is more than 40cm or medium to light loam and sub-grade 3a land is where clay is closer to the surface or where the topsoil is a heavy loam. The principal agricultural limitation in both instances is (to varying degrees) seasonal wetness and ponding over slowly permeable subsoils. Development of the site will, therefore, result in the loss of best and most versatile agricultural land. However, it is important to note that this pattern of land is typical of the agricultural land around Radcliffe on Trent. Therefore the development of any otherwise appropriate greenfield site around the settlement may well also result in the loss of some best and most versatile land. The site is, therefore, not exceptional in that respect and given the specific need for residential development in Radcliffe on Trent, the development proposals are considered to be acceptable in this regard.

5.1.20

Cultural Heritage
5.1.21 An Archaeological Desk-Based Assessment has been prepared to support the planning application. This assessment confirms that there are no designated heritage assets within the study site and no potential impacts on any designated heritage assets in the wider vicinity of the study site have been identified. Recorded archaeological information indicates that there is likely to be low potential for significant archaeological remains of prehistoric and Roman date and a negligible potential for settlement evidence of Saxon or medieval date. The site does contain upstanding earthworks of post-medieval ridge and furrow that are considered of limited archaeological interest. Surviving 19th century building of Shelford Road Farm are considered to be of some local significance. Subsequent surveys and intrusive investigations of the site include a Geophysical Survey and Archaeological Trial Trenching and have revealed evidence for a Late Iron Age / Early Romano-British settlement within the west of the site and medieval / post-medieval ridge and furrow present throughout the site. The settlement activity is contained in two large enclosures, with smaller internal divisions, ditches and pits. The majority of features identified in the trenches correspond with geophysical anomalies and evaluation suggests that significant archaeological activity is confined to the west of the site, as indicated within the Geophysical Survey. The archive from the fieldwork will be deposited with an appropriate museum in due course under the relevant accession number. As such an appropriate level of evaluation has been carried out to demonstrate and record the significance of any heritage assets within the local area and any archaeological activity within the site specifically, and confirms that the development will not result in any significant impact on any cultural heritage features.

5.1.22

5.1.23

Flood Risk
5.1.24 A Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) has been undertaken to support the planning application. It highlights that the sites lies within Flood Zone 1 (1:1000 year probability flood event) and is not at risk of fluvial flooding, being some 11m higher above AOD than the River Trent at its lowest point and over 29m higher above AOD at its highest. An unnamed watercourse passes east to west along the southern edge of the site and modelling results 28

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

indicate that only the south west of the site is likely to be subject to flooding in the 1:100 year plus climate change flood emanating from the stream. As such, the FRA recommends that the finished floor levels are set at least 600mm above the 1:100 year plus climate change flood levels at the adjacent modelled watercourse sections. 5.1.25 The FRA includes a drainage strategy that ensures the development will not increase flood risk downstream or elsewhere in the surrounding area. Specifically it will limit the drainage discharge to a rate that is less than the existing greenfield runoff prior to discharging into the stream. It will, therefore, result in a betterment to the existing fluvial flooding conditions adjacent to the site and downstream for the life of the development. The drainage strategy includes the provision of attenuation ponds as part of a sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS). Initial feedback from Severn Trent Water (STW) confirms that sufficient foul water capacity may exist within the existing network and waste water treatment works. However, the foul water drainage proposals will be confirmed following the conclusion of detailed discussions with STW. The proposed development is, therefore, considered to be acceptable in terms of both flood risk and drainage.

5.1.26

5.1.27

Pollution
5.1.28 A Noise and Vibration Assessment has been undertaken that describes the existing noise environment in and around the site and assesses the implications for the proposed development. It states that internal noise levels are generally met across the site during the daytime and night-time and the proposed glazing and ventilation strategy for the site will achieve the relevant ventilation and ambient noise requirements. The strategy includes enhanced glazing to dwellings within approximately 60m of Shelford Road to the north and 100m of the railway to the south. Vibration levels were also assessed and it was concluded that there is unlikely to be any building damage associated with vibration from the existing use of the adjacent railway line and that there is a low risk of adverse comment. The proposed development is, therefore, considered to be acceptable in these respects.

5.1.29

5.1.30

5.2
5.2.1

DESIGN AND LAYOUT
The Design and Access Statement (DAS) that accompanies the outline planning application provides a detailed account of the application proposals. The ambition as set out in the DAS is to deliver a high quality development as advocated by the NPPF and the design policies and SPD guidance set out in Section 3 above. There has been a sensitive approach to the design of the development proposals, which has taken into account the environmental and technical assessments that have been undertaken, as well as RBC’s advice and the conclusions of the pre-application consultation exercise. The form and character of the proposed development has been carefully considered in line with established best design practice to realise a high quality housing development that makes efficient and effective use of the site, responds to the site’s setting, reflects the local character, and is well integrated into its surroundings. The proposals are for a maximum of 400 residential units at a development density of approximately 30 dwellings per hectare making efficient and effective use of the site. The precise mix of dwellings will be determined at the reserved matters stage. However, it is proposed that the development will deliver a range of house types from smaller properties 29

5.2.2

5.2.3

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

suitable for couples and young families through to larger bed family properties. The development will also include 30% of the dwellings as affordable homes to meet local needs in accordance with the policies set out in Section 3 above. 5.2.4 The appearance of the housing is also a reserved matter, but the DAS highlights how their design will take its cues from the surrounding context. The dwellings will be predominantly 2 storeys and detached (potentially with some single storey and occasional 2.5 storey to be used as feature buildings). The dwellings will be arranged in perimeter blocks providing a permeable layout and passive surveillance of the public realm whilst also securing the private amenity space. The proposed scheme layout and design incorporates the following features: • Provision of 5.12ha of public open space including a children’s play space and allotments, with significant improvements in terms of biodiversity, sustainable drainage systems, recreational facilities and strategic landscaping. The existing hedgerow structure around and within the site will be retained and reinforced wherever possible to provide structure for the development and help integrate it into the landscape. The hedgerow along Shelford Road that will be lost to facility the provision of the site access will be replaced. Limited building heights and positioning of proposed dwellings along the western edge to provide appropriate distances between buildings, extended garden lengths (10.5m), and a landscape buffer (5m) and reduce the impact on the adjacent existing houses. Development on the eastern part of the site will be provided at a relatively low density, with the blocks arranged to face out to the countryside in an informal arrangement. This will present a more visually sympathetic settlement edge, which in places will help to soften the existing abrupt transition between the urban area and countryside. A landscape buffer (minimum 10m in depth) along the eastern boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and significant tree planting in small pockets. The planting will strengthen the landscape character and filter and screen views into the development and towards Radcliffe. Green fingers will extend west from this buffer to permeate the development, creating woodland blocks and green streets that step up the slope hill. This will help integrate the development into its surroundings by filtering views and breaking up the roofline.

5.2.5

5.3
5.3.1

SUMMARY
The application site is relatively unconstrained. A number of environmental and technical assessments have been undertaken to inform the design of the development proposals, and this has ensured that appropriate mitigation to address potential impacts that may arise from the development has been incorporated into the proposals. As such it is apparent from the conclusions of the assessments summarised above that the development accords with the planning policies identified in Section 3. The development proposals as set out in the DAS have been evolved through an iterative masterplanning exercise that has taken into account the requirements of the various technical and environmental assessments, as well as best urban and landscape design practice. The proposals have also responded to direct consultation feedback from the County and Borough Councils and the general public. Consequently, the application 30

5.3.2

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

proposals will deliver a high quality housing development that is well related to the built form of Radcliffe on Trent, respects its relationship with the countryside, and uses the site in an effective and efficient manner. As such the proposals clearly meet the design policy tests outlined in Section 3.

31

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

6
6.1.1

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
From the above analysis it is considered that the application proposals entirely accord with the provisions of the NPPF and constitute “sustainable development”. Indeed, the development of the site would result in a number of significant economic, social and environmental benefits that reflect the three dimensions of sustainable development identified in paragraph 7 of the NPPF.

6.2
6.2.1

ECONOMIC ROLE
Prior to the publication of the NPPF, the Coalition Government set out their ‘pro growth’ agenda in The Plan for Growth (March 2011). The Written Ministerial Statement Planning for Growth (23 March 2011) by The Minister for Decentralisation (Mr Clark), emphasised the Coalition Government’s view that “the planning system has a key role to play in ensuring that the sustainable development needed to support economic growth is able to proceed as quickly as possible”. It continues to state that the Secretary of State will attach particular weight to the need to secure economic growth and employment. The Government’s published (November 2011) Housing Strategy for England “Laying the Foundations” highlights (paragraph 11) that house building is crucial to economic growth: “housing has a direct impact on economic output, averaging 3 per cent of GDP in the last decade. For every new home built, up to two new jobs are created for a year. Without building new homes our economic recovery will take longer than it needs to. The construction workforce has fallen from 2.35 million just before the credit crunch to 2.1 million today and is likely to have been mostly in house building. This 10 per cent fall is around four times greater than the decline in the overall workforce.”

6.2.2

6.2.3

It later highlights that housing construction will bring direct and indirect employment benefits. Paragraph 7 states: “Housing construction also supports more jobs compared with investment in many other sectors of the economy, because it supports a large amount of related activity such as concrete production, and glass and brick manufacturing. Every £1 million of new house building output supports 12 net jobs (seven direct and five indirect) for a year. Builders of new affordable homes also provide apprenticeships”

6.2.4

The applicant is a locally based developer who has a large directly employed labour force. On the basis of the above figures the development of 400 dwellings, would provide for up to 800 jobs for a year. The development proposals would therefore support new jobs, create economic growth and result in expenditure to the significant benefit of the local area. These are clear economic benefits that would stem from the proposed development.

6.3
6.3.1

SOCIAL ROLE
Laying the Foundations states in paragraph 1 that a “thriving, active but stable housing market that offers choice, flexibility and affordable housing is critical to our economic and social wellbeing.” It continues to highlight (paragraph 5) that “we have not built enough homes for more that a generation and the credit crunch has simply compounded this challenge”, and (paragraph 8) that “without urgent action to build new homes, children will grow up without the same opportunities to live near their families, young people will struggle to get a place to call their own and older people will not have the choice and support they need.”

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Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

6.3.2

Paragraph 9 states: “Housing is crucial for our social mobility, health and wellbeing – with quality and choice having an impact on social mobility and wellbeing from an early age, and our homes accounting for about half of all household wealth. Social housing should provide support for those who need it, when they need it, and should help vulnerable people to live independently. And opportunities for wealth must be open to all, with housing choices helping rather than hindering people’s ability to build assets and find employment.”

6.3.3

The importance that the Government attributes to increasing the supply of housing and the social benefits that would follow is very clear. Moreover, the need for both open market and affordable housing in the District is well established (in the extant and emerging Development Plan documents). The proposed development of up to 400 new dwellings would make a valuable contribution towards meeting this need in a location that entirely accords with the established development strategy. Furthermore, the construction of a full range of house types will widen the choice of housing in the area, and will ensure the creation of a mixed and cohesive community that is representative of the local population. The development will also include 30% of the dwellings as affordable homes to meet local needs, and allow those on lower incomes or concealed families to remain in or return to the area. The proposed development proposes to include equipped children’s play space in a central location adjacent to the public right of way green corridor, creating a focus for the development and providing an easily accessible resource for the wider community. Following pre-application consultation with RBC, 0.37ha of allotments will also be provided on site, and a financial contribution will be made towards off-site sports provision in Radcliffe on Trent. Furthermore, the development will generate demand for, and thereby help to support the wide range of existing services and facilities and local retail in Radcliffe on Trent, notably the secondary school which has experienced declining numbers in recent years. However, the pre-application consultation has highlighted that there are existing capacity issues associated with primary school and health provision in the settlement. Consequently the proposed development will facilitate the provision of a new primary school and health centre within the site, in a highly accessible location that will serve the development itself and the wider area.

6.3.4

6.3.5

6.3.6

6.4
6.4.1

ENVIRONMENTAL ROLE
The application proposals have been developed through a clear knowledge and understanding of the specific characteristics of this site, seeking to maximise the use of existing features and respect the local context within which the development will sit. The core aim is to create an attractive and sustainable environment that responds to and respects its existing setting, and retains key features to create a high quality residential development with a sense of place that uses the land efficiently and effectively, and encourages sustainable travel, notably to the key services and facilities within Radcliffe on Trent. Whilst the development of the site would result in the loss of best and most versatile agricultural land, 5.12ha of the site would be retained as public open space with amenity and habitat benefits for future residents and the local community. The hedgerows and trees in and around the site would be retained in the development and supplemented with substantial tree planting on the site to reflect and enhance the local landscape character. This will integrate the proposed development into the countryside by softening the 33

6.4.2

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

settlement edge, which is currently quite abrupt. The tree planting and provision of SUDS, will also provide notable ecological benefits by creating new habitats and enhancing the quality of the existing habitats improving the biodiversity in the site.

6.5
6.5.1

CONCLUSION
The application proposals entirely accord with the provisions of the NPPF and constitute “sustainable development”. Indeed, the proposed development would result in a number of significant economic, social and environmental benefits that reflect the 3 dimensions of sustainable development identified in paragraph 7 of the NPPF.

34

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

7
7.1.1 7.1.2

PLANNING OBLIGATION HEADS OF TERMS
As indicated above in Section 4, the applicants will provide 30% of affordable housing on the site. Further discussions will determine the final tenure split and housing mix. As described in Section 5, the development proposes to provide 5.12ha of green space on site as public open space. This will include a children’s play area, allotments and informal open space to meet the requirements identified in the pre-application consultation with RBC. A requirement for financial contribution to off-site formal sports facilities has also been identified. Contributions associated with the maintenance of the various elements of public open space will be agreed with RBC. As described in Section 4, the pre-application consultation has highlighted that there are existing capacity issues associated with primary school and health provision in the settlement. Consequently the proposed development will facilitate the provision of a new primary school and health centre within the site, in a highly accessible location that will serve the development itself and the wider area. As described in Section 5, the Transport Assessment has identified an appropriate form of access, and identified the off-site highway improvements are required to accommodate the proposed development. Furthermore, the submitted Travel Plan includes a number of measures that will need to be secured through the Section 106 Agreement. Further Section 106 contributions will be negotiated and agreed in accordance with Regulation 122 of the Community Infrastructure Regulations introduced in April 2010 once formal responses from the statutory consultees have been received. Therefore, at present it is expected that the following matters will be included in the Section 106: Affordable housing- 30% of the total number of houses provided on-site as affordable homes. Mix to be determined. Open space and recreation- Provision and maintenance of a minimum of on site public open space, together with financial contributions to off site sport provision, as follows: • • • • 0.66ha of formal and informal amenity open space & future maintenance; 0.23ha of equipped children’s play space & future maintenance; 0.37ha of allotments & future maintenance; A financial contribution to the equivalent of 1.63ha of sports pitch provision (est. £171,476 @ £10.52 per m2) A financial contribution of £127,229 to off-site swimming pool provision; A financial contribution of £164,267 to off-site sports hall provision;

7.1.3

7.1.4

7.1.5

7.1.6

• •

Education / Health- Provision of a serviced site of up to 1.5ha for the development of a primary school and health centre as required. Further financial contributions as required in accordance with CIL Regulation 122. Transport- Provision of off-site highway works and travel plan measures as follows. • Improvements to the 2 nearest bus stops on Shelford Road; 35

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

• A financial contribution of £300,000 towards local bus service enhancements; • A travel pack (including bus passes) to new residents; • A financial contribution of £200,000 to the implementation of a traffic calming scheme along Shelford Road with new and improved pedestrian crossings; • Conversion of the existing Shelford Road / Main Road mini-roundabout junction to traffic signal control, including provision of controlled pedestrian crossings on all approaches; • Capacity improvements at the A52 / Nottingham Road sign junction; • Capacity improvements at the A52 / Stragglethorpe Road signal junction; • A financial contribution of £27,000 towards a traffic management / traffic calming scheme in Newton.

36

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

8
8.1.1

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
This Planning Statement has been prepared in support of an outline planning application by William Davis Ltd for development the development of up to 400 dwellings and associated infrastructure on 19.63ha land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent, Nottinghamshire. The site forms part of the Green Belt designated by the Rushcliffe Borough Local Plan. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that “inappropriate” development in the Green Belt should only be permitted in “very special circumstances” where the harm by way of inappropriateness and any other harm to the Green Belt must be clearly outweighed by other matters. The Green Belt policy harm is unavoidable, but the other actual harm in relation to the impact on the purposes of the Green Belt as set out in the NPPF is, in this case, relatively limited. The application site is enclosed on 3 sides by the existing urban form of Radcliffe on Trent, there is no risk of physical coalescence with other settlements and in visual terms is extremely well contained by a combination of the urban form, topography and existing vegetation. The proposed landscape scheme will also provide an enhanced settlement edge that will form a clearer and more defensible long term Green Belt boundary. Moreover, Radcliffe on Trent is not identified as an historic settlement and contains very limited opportunities for the development of previously developed land. Therefore, impact of the proposed development in terms of coalescence, urban sprawl, countryside encroachment, impact on historic towns and in relation to urban regeneration ranges between negligible and low. The harm to the Green Belt should be given significant weight in the determination of the planning application, but set against it are the following material factors: • There is a pressing need for new housing in the Borough, and consequently the emerging RCS establishes a significant housing requirement that is likely to increase further as a result of the recent discussions with the neighbouring authorities and Examination Inspector. There is an acute housing land supply shortage in the Borough and Radcliffe specifically. The proposed development of up to 400 new dwellings on the application site would make a valuable contribution towards remedying the shortfall. There is a significant need for affordable housing, both across the Borough and in Radcliffe specifically. The development proposals will provide up to 120 new affordable homes to contribute to meeting that need. It is widely recognised that substantial Green Belt releases will be required to meet the housing needs of the Borough, indeed the RCS highlights that most new housing will have to be delivered on sites that are currently located in the Green Belt, including at Radcliffe on Trent Radcliffe a key settlement in the Borough and has been identified as a sustainable settlement where growth can be accommodated and the emerging RCS proposes a minimum of 400 dwellings should be delivered in the settlement. Therefore, the development proposals would entirely accord with the emerging development strategy and housing objectives contained within the RCS. All of the other potential development sites in Radcliffe are constrained, and the application site has the distinct advantage of being able to accommodate the 400 37

8.1.2

8.1.3

8.1.4

Planning Statement: Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent

dwellings required, together with the primary school, health centre and public open space on a single site. • The proposed development will also facilitate the provision of a new primary school and health centre to meet the needs of the development’s residents and address existing capacity issues within the settlement. It will also support other important community services and facilities in the settlement, such as the secondary school, which has experienced as declining school role as a result of the aging settlement population.

8.1.5

Furthermore, the scheme proposals on the application site would represent a sustainable development as envisaged by the NPPF. The proposals optimise the use of an otherwise unconstrained site in a sustainable location that is integrated with the built form of Radcliffe, and respects the relationship with the countryside. A number of environmental and technical assessments have been undertaken to inform the design of the development proposals, and ensure that appropriate mitigation to address potential impacts that may arise from the development, has been incorporated into the development proposals that will provide positive environmental enhancements in this urban fringe location. The development would provide much needed housing, including affordable housing, a new primary school, health centre and recreation resources, support existing community facilities and services, support new jobs and create economic growth. It is clear that the significant benefits that would arise from the proposed development significantly outweigh the policy and actual Green Belt harm that would arise from the proposed development, by way of inappropriateness and the limited “other” harm that would result from the development. It is concluded therefore, that the very special circumstances required by the NPPF in order to approve inappropriate development in the Green Belt exists in this instance, and that the proposals, therefore, accord with Green Belt policy as set out in the NPPF. Moreover, there would be no other significant and demonstrable harm arising from the development of the application site that cannot be appropriately mitigated, and the application scheme proposals will positively contribute to the economic, social and environmental objectives of sustainable development advocated by the NPPF. They should therefore, benefit from the presumption in favour of sustainable development, and planning permission should be granted.

8.1.6

38