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ARCHAEOLOGICAL DESK-BASED ASSESSMENT

LAND AT SHELFORD ROAD RADCLIFFE-ON-TRENT NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

JANUARY 2013

Local Planning Authority:

Rushcliffe Borough Council

Site centred at: SK 656 400

Author: Paul Gajos

Approved by: Simon Mortimer

Report Status: Final Issue Date: January 2013 CgMs Ref: PG/14656/01

© CgMs Limited No part of this report is to be copied in any way without prior written consent. Every effort is made to provide detailed and accurate information, however, CgMs Limited cannot be held responsible for errors or inaccuracies within this report. © Ordnance Survey maps reproduced with the sanction of the controller of HM Stationery Office.  Licence No: AL 100014723

Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Contents Executive Summary 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 Introduction and Scope of Study Planning Background and Development Plan Framework Geology and Topography Archaeological and Historical Background, Including Assessment of Significance Site Conditions, the Proposed Development and Impact on Heritage Assets Conclusions

Sources Consulted List of Illustrations Figure 1: Site Location Figure 2: HER data Figure 3: Pre-inclosure map of 1787 Figure 4: Inclosure map 1790 Figure 5: Historic Ordnance Survey mapping 1891-1950 Figure 6: ‘Important’ hedgerows List of Plates Plate 1. Ridge and furrow north-west of farm buildings Plate 2. Ridge and furrow south of farm buildings Plate 3. Mound to south-east of farm buildings Plate 4. Headland running across southern part of site Plate 5: Looking north from southern boundary Plate 6: Farmhouse and outbuildings from south Plate 7. Date-stone reading E S 1832 Plate 8. Barn to north of farmhouse Plate 9. Northern range of outbuildings Plate 10. Yard behing farmhouse Plate 11. Trough in yard Plate 12. Feed to trough Appendix 1: Gazetteer of Nottinghamshire HER Data

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Executive Summary This archaeological desk-based assessment considers land promoted for residential

development at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire. The assessment has established that there are no designated heritage assets within the study site and no potential impacts on any designated heritage asset in the wider vicinity of the study site have been identified. Based upon recorded archaeological information from the surrounding area there is considered to be an uncertain but probably low potential for significant archaeological remains of prehistoric and Roman date and a negligible potential for settlement evidence of Saxon or medieval date. The site is known to contain upstanding earthworks of post-medieval ridge and furrow that are considered to be of limited archaeological interest. The surviving 19th century buildings of Shelford Road Farm are considered to be of some local significance. In these circumstances, and in the context of NPPF paragraph 128, this desk-based assessment serves to document the site’s history. In the context of national, regional and local planning policy it is not considered that any further measures will be required to evaluate the site's archaeological potential prior to its allocation for development. Given the size of the site and the limitations of the available archaeological data to fully establish the sites potential, should a planning application be submitted for the development of the site at a future date, it would be reasonable to expect the local planning authority to require a geophysical survey of the site. If this does not identify any significant archaeological remains then no further archaeological fieldwork should be necessary, other than a photographic record of the early 19th century farm buildings of Shelford Road Farm. This could be secured by a condition attached to the grant of planning permission.

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1.0 1.1

INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE OF STUDY This archaeological desk-based assessment of land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-onTrent, Nottinghamshire has been researched and prepared by CgMs Consulting on behalf of William Davis Ltd.

1.2

The site, also referred to as the study site, is located to the north-east of Radcliffe-onTrent. The site comprises c.18.5 ha of land centred at National Grid Reference SK 656 400 (Fig 1). The site is bounded by Shelford Road to the north, extant development to the west, a railway line and scrub to the south, and farmland to the east. The study site is currently under pasture with disused farm buildings in the north.

1.3

This assessment has been prepared with regard to government’s National Planning Policy Framework, to identify and provide a description of the significance of heritage assets within the site and the likely effects of future development. This study concentrates on identifying the archaeological interest in the site and assessing the potential impact of development on the archaeological significance of identified assets.

1.4

The assessment comprises an examination of evidence in the Nottinghamshire Historic Environment Record (HER), the Nottinghamshire Record Office and online resources. Information regarding Scheduled Monuments, Registered Parks and Gardens, Registered Battlefields and Listed Buildings was obtained from English Heritage's National Heritage List for England; information on Conservation Areas was sought from Rushcliffe Borough Council. The assessment incorporates published and unpublished material and charts historic land-use through a map regression exercise. A site inspection was undertaken on 4th January 2013.

1.5

The study provides an assessment of the archaeological potential of the site and the significance of heritage assets within and around the site. As a result, the assessment enables relevant parties to identify and assess the impact of any future development proposals.

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2.0 2.1

PLANNING BACKGROUND AND DEVELOPMENT PLAN FRAMEWORK In considering allocation and any planning application for development, the local planning authority will be guided by the policy framework set by government planning policy, by current Development Plan policy and by other material considerations. National Planning Policy Framework

2.2

In March 2012, the government published the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), which replaces national policy relating to heritage and archaeology (Planning Policy Statement 5: Planning for the Historic Environment).

2.2.1

Section 12 of the NPPF, entitled Conserving and enhancing the historic environment provides guidance for planning authorities, property owners, developers and others on the conservation and investigation of heritage assets. Overall, the objectives of Section 12 of the NPPF can be summarised as seeking the:    Delivery of sustainable development Understanding the wider social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits brought by the conservation of the historic environment, and Conservation of England's heritage assets in a manner appropriate to their significance.

2.2.2

Section 12 of the NPPF recognises that intelligently managed change may sometimes be necessary if heritage assets are to be maintained for the long term. Paragraph 128 states that planning decisions should be based on the significance of the heritage asset, and that the level of detail supplied by an applicant should be proportionate to the importance of the asset and should be no more than sufficient to review the potential impact of the proposal upon the significance of that asset.

2.2.3

Heritage Assets are defined in Annex 2 of the NPPF as: a building, monument, site, place, area or landscape positively identified as having a degree of significance meriting consideration in planning decisions, because of its heritage interest . They include designated heritage assets (as defined in the NPPF) and assets identified by the local planning authority during the process of decision-making or through the plan-making process.

2.2.4

Annex 2 also defines Archaeological Interest as a heritage asset which holds or potentially could hold, evidence of past human activity worthy of expert investigation at some point. Heritage assets with archaeological interest are the primary source of evidence about the substance and evolution of places, and of the people and cultures that made them.

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2.2.5

A Designated Heritage Asset comprises a World Heritage Site, Scheduled Monument, Listed Building, Protected Wreck Site, Registered Park and Garden, Registered Battlefield or Conservation Area.

2.2.6

Significance is defined as: The value of a heritage asset to this and future generations because of its heritage interest. This interest may be archaeological, architectural, artistic or historic. Significance derives not only from a heritage asset’s physical presence, but also from its setting.

2.2.7

In short, government policy provides a framework which:  Protects nationally important designated Heritage Assets (which include World Heritage Sites, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, Listed Buildings, Protected Wreck Sites, Registered Parks and Gardens, Registered Battlefields or Conservation Areas)  Protects the settings of such designations  In appropriate circumstances seeks adequate information (from desk based assessment and field evaluation where necessary) to enable informed decisions  Provides for the excavation and investigation of sites not significant enough to merit in-situ preservation. Regional Strategy

2.3

The Localism Act (November 2011) contains provisions which will result in the abolition of regional strategies. However, their abolition will require secondary legislation and until such time as this is introduced they will remain part of the development plan.

2.4

For the Rushcliffe area, the regional spatial strategy is set out in the East Midlands Regional Plan (EMRP) which was published in March 2009 and contains the following policies in regard to archaeology and the historic environment: POLICY 26 – Protecting and Enhancing the Region's Natural and Cultural Heritage Sustainable developments should ensure the protection, appropriate management and enhancement of the Region's natural and cultural heritage. As a result the following principles should be applied:  the Region's internationally and nationally designated natural and historic assets should receive the highest level of protection;  damage to other natural and historic assets or their settings should be avoided wherever possible, recognising that such assets are usually irreplaceable;  unavoidable damage must be minimised and clearly justified by a need for development in that location which outweighs the damage that would result;  unavoidable damage which cannot be mitigated should be compensated for, preferably in a relevant local context and where possible in ways which also contribute to social and economic objectives;  there should be a net increase in the quality and active management of natural and historic assets across the Region in ways that promote the adaption to

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climate change, and an increase in the quantity of environmental assets generally. POLICY 27 - Regional Priorities for the Historic Environment The historic environment should be understood, conserved and enhanced, in recognition of its own intrinsic value, and its contribution to the Region's quality of life. Across the Region and particularly in areas where growth or regeneration is a priority, development should promote sensitive change of the historic environment. To achieve this, Local Planning Authorities should:  identify and assess the significance of specific historic assets and their settings;  use characterisation to understand their contribution to the landscape or townscape in areas of change;  encourage the refurbishment and re-use of disused or under-used buildings of some historic or architectural merit and incorporating them sensitively into regeneration schemes;  promote the use of local building materials; and  recognise the opportunities for enhancing existing tourism attractions and for developing the potential of other areas and sites of historic interest as part of green infrastructure, having regard to potential impacts on biodiversity.

Local Plan 2.5 The local development policy is currently provided by the Rushcliffe Borough NonStatutory replacement local plan (2006) which contains the following policies in relation to archaeology:
EN6 – ANCIENT MONUMENTS PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD DESTROY OR DETRIMENTALLY AFFECT SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENTS OR THEIR SETTINGS. EN7 - SITES OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING SITES OF KNOWN OR SUSPECTED ARCHAEOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE: a) THERE IS A NEED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH OUTWEIGHS THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OR ITS SETTING; b) THE PROPOSAL IS SUPPORTED BY AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIEL EVALUATION OF THE SITE; AND c) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT DAMAGE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS WHERE THESE CAN BE PRESERVED IN SITU. WHERE PRESERVATION IN SITU IS NOT FEASIBLE OR JUSTIFIED, A PROGRAMME OF PRESERVATION BY SURVEYING, EXCAVATION AND RECORDING OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS WILL BE REQUIRED (THROUGH THE USE OF PLANNING CONDITIONS).

2.6

Therefore, in considering the heritage implications of any planning application for development, the local planning authority will be guided by the policy framework set by government, regional and local policy as outlined above.

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3.0 3.1 3.1.1

GEOLOGY AND TOPOGRAPHY Geology The solid geology is Edwalton Member mudstone in the north-east and Gunthope Member mudstone in the south-west. The superficial deposits are only recorded in the north and south of the site. Where they are recorded they are described as head deposits of clay, silt, sand and gravel (mapapps.bgs.ac.uk).

3.2 3.2.1

Topography The site lies on relatively high ground on the southern side of the Trent valley. The River Trent itself is located approximately 400m to the north-west. The site has a gentle, south facing aspect, lying at approximately 50mAOD in the north, dropping to c.35mAOD in the south.

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4.0

ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL BACKGROUND, INCLUDING ASSESSMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

4.1

Timescales used in this report are as follows. Prehistoric Palaeolithic Mesolithic Neolithic Bronze Age Iron Age Historic Roman Saxon/Early Medieval Medieval Post Medieval Modern

450,000 BC 10,000 BC 4,000 BC 1,800 BC 600 BC

-

10,000 BC 4,000 BC 1,800 BC 600 BC AD 43

AD 43 AD 410 AD 1066 AD 1485 AD 1800

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410 AD 1066 AD 1485 AD 1800 AD Present

4.2 4.2.1

Introduction This chapter reviews existing archaeological evidence for the site and the

archaeological/historical background of the general area, based on a consideration of evidence in the Nottinghamshire Historic Environment Record (HER) for the study site and a surrounding search area of 1000m radius from the centre of the site. 4.2.2 A gazetteer of recorded archaeology is provided in Appendix 1. The locations of the HER entries within the search area are shown in Figure 2. 4.2.3 This chapter reviews existing archaeological evidence for the site and the

archaeological/historical background of the general area and, in accordance with the NPPF, considers the potential for as yet undiscovered archaeological evidence on the site. 4.2.4 Chapter 5 subsequently considers the site conditions and whether the theoretical potential identified in this chapter is likely to survive.

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4.3 4.3.1

Designated Heritage Assets Data obtained from English Heritage and the local authority confirms that there are no Listed Buildings, Conservation Areas, Scheduled Monuments, Registered Battlefields or Parks and Gardens within the study site or the surrounding search area.

4.3.2

No impacts upon the settings of any designated heritage asset in the wider vicinity of the study site have been identified.

4.4 4.4.1

Previous Archaeological Investigations There are no records of any archaeological investigations being undertaken within the study site or its immediate environs.

4.5 4.5.1

Non-Designated Heritage Assets and other archaeological monuments The data provided by the HER does not list any sites of archaeological interest within the study site itself. There are 13 records of archaeological/historical interest within the surrounding search area. breakdown as follows:Prehistoric: Roman: Medieval: Post-Medieval/modern: Undated: 2 records in surrounding area 1 record in surrounding area 2 records in surrounding area 5 records in surrounding area 3 records in surrounding area The records relating to archaeological remains

4.5.2

A gazetteer of the HER records is included as Appendix 1. The locations of monuments and buildings recorded in the HER are shown in Figure 2.

4.6 4.6.1

Prehistoric There are 2 records of prehistoric activity listed on the HER from the surrounding search area.

4.6.2

An area located c.400m to the north of the study site on a ridge of high ground overlooking the River Trent was fieldwalked in the early 1970’s and a collection of worked flint, predominantly of Neolithic date, was recovered that has been taken to suggest the presence of settlement activity (HER 8236).

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4.6.3

The second record of prehistoric activity is a barbed and tanged arrowhead of Bronze Age date that was found in the garden of a property close to the south-western extent of the study site (HER L888).

4.6.4

Whilst little prehistoric activity is recorded within the search area there are several areas of reasonably extensive cropmarks known from within a zone extending.11.5km from the study site. Many of these cropmarks are believed to be of later prehistoric date (Iron Age). These remains are more extensive on the floodplain to the north of the River Trent, but are known from the southern side, to the north-east and east of the search area.

4.6.5

Whilst the evidence for prehistoric activity in the immediate environs of the study site is sparse, there is reasonably extensive evidence from the wider area. The lack of evidence in the immediate environs of the study site may well be a factor of less favourable ground conditions for the identification of cropmarks and a lack of organised investigation as much as reflecting a genuine absence of activity. The potential for remains of prehistoric date to survive within the study site is therefore considered as uncertain but probably low.

4.7 4.7.1

Roman There is only a single record of Roman activity from the search area surrounding the study site. HER L8235 refers to a site c.400m to the north of the study site at Gibbet Hill. It had been thought that the mound of Gibbet Hill was a Bronze Age barrow and an excavation of the site was undertaken in 1968 to test this theory. The excavation recovered Roman pottery from beneath the mound material proving that it was not a Bronze Age feature but is more likely to have been a medieval or post medieval gallows. The nature of activity to which the Roman pottery relates is not clear, however, it would indicate some settlement in the vicinity.

4.7.2

As with the prehistoric period, there is cropmark evidence to indicate Roman settlement in the wider area, however, based on the records from within the search area the potential for such remains to exist within the study site is regarded as uncertain but probably low.

4.8 4.8.1

Saxon/Medieval There are no records of Saxon finds or features from within the study site or the surrounding search area. Spellow Hill (HER L5464) is located c.700m to the east of the study site. Place name evidence would suggest that the name derives from Old English and means ‘hill of speech’. This could be taken to suggest that the hill was the site of

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a Saxon moot, however, no traces of any Anglo Saxon remains are known and no man made earthworks are visible at the site. 4.8.2 Radcliffe-on-Trent is mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086. Whilst this demonstrates that there was settlement in the area dating to at least the Late Saxon period, the study site is well removed from the historic core of the settlement and there are no finds or features of Saxon date recorded on the HER from the search area. The potential for Saxon period remains to exist within the study site is therefore considered to be negligible. 4.8.3 There are two records of later medieval activity entered on the HER for the search area (HER L887 and M1800). L887 relates to the finding of a silver penny dating to between 1300 and 1340 and M1800 relates to the medieval or post-medieval gallows at Gibbet Hill (see 4.7.1 above). Neither of these finds adds to the understanding of the use of the study site in the medieval period. 4.8.4 As stated above, the study site is well removed from the historic cores of surrounding settlements and is likely to have been agricultural land throughout much of the medieval period. Upstanding earthworks of ridge and furrow are present within the northernmost fields of the study site and there are some vague remnants of ridge and furrow across the southern part of the site. These surviving elements are likely to be post medieval in origin as they are all marked on the Radcliffe pre-enclosure plan of 1790 (see section 4.9.2 below). However, it seems reasonable to assume that these represent a continuation of medieval practices. 4.8.5 The potential for Saxon and Medieval period settlement remains within the study site is assessed as negligible. 4.9 4.9.1 Post-Medieval & Modern (including map progression) The HER lists 5 sites of post-medieval or modern period activity (HER L1936, L1937, M1074, M1075 & M924) and 2 undated sites that are also likely to be post-medieval or modern (HER M1073 & M1939) from within the search area. These are all at some distance from the study site and are of a well defined nature and extent and as such they add little to the understanding of the archaeological potential of the study site itself. 4.9.2 The study site itself would appear to have remained in agricultural use throughout much of the post-medieval period. A map of Radcliffe parish produced in 1787 shows the arrangement of field strips within the study site prior to inclosure (Fig 3). The direction of the cultivation strips shown on the plan corresponds with the sections of ridge and furrow that survive as earthworks within the study site (see 4.8.4 above). A
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number of existing hedgerows within the study site correspond with field boundaries shown on the pre-inclosure plan. No development is shown within the study site but the map does show that the Shelford Road had previously passed through the northern part of the study site but had been straightened to its current course at some point prior to 1787. 4.9.3 The parish was inclosed by Act of Parliament in 1790. The study site was divided between two land owners as shown in Figure 4. 4.9.4 Shelford Road Farm was constructed in 1832 (as demonstrated by a date-stone on the gable end of the farmhouse (Plate 7)). The majority of the farm buildings (including the house) appear to have been constructed in a single phase, with the house at the eastern corner, a range of barns leading north-west from the house and a series of three cattle stalls/stables arranged at right angles to the house and barns. Some of the original 19th century features of the buildings remain, such as feeding troughs in the stock yard that could be filled via the back of the farmhouse (Plates 11 & 12). 4.9.5 The earliest historic mapping to show Shelford Road Farm is the Ordnance Survey (OS) map of 1891 (Fig 5). The map shows the farm buildings within the northern part of the site with a series of small fields or paddocks to the east of the buildings. The major part of the study site falls within two enclosed fields. The subsequent historic OS mapping from 1899 to 1950 show no substantive changes to the study site itself but do demonstrate the gradual encroachment of development in the surrounding area (Fig 5). 4.9.6 The surviving ridge and furrow earthworks within the study site are fragmentary and likely to be of post-medieval date and, as such, are considered to be of very limited archaeological interest. The extant farm buildings dating to the early 19th century form a reasonably coherent group and are considered to be of some local archaeological interest. There is considered to be a negligible potential for any other significant postmedieval or modern period remains within the study site. 4.10 4.10.1 Assessment of Significance In line with the requirements of the NPPF, the significance of identified heritage assets is described below. Significance is defined as “ The value of a heritage asset to this and future generations because of its heritage interest.” (NPPF Annex 2). Nationally designated heritage assets:

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4.10.2

There are no nationally designated heritage assets within the study site or its immediate environs. No potential impacts upon the significance of any designated heritage asset have been identified by this study. Other, undesignated, archaeological heritage assets:

4.10.3

This assessment has established that the study site has an uncertain, but probably low, potential to contain significant archaeological remains of prehistoric and Roman date. Archaeological evidence from the wider area around the study site would suggest that if any such remains did survive within the study site they are unlikely to be of more than local to regional significance.

4.10.4

A negligible potential for Saxon or later medieval settlement remains has been identified. Remains relating to medieval and post-medieval agricultural practices will survive within the study site, however, these remains are considered to be of little archaeological interest.

4.10.5

There is one section of hedgerow within the study site that fulfils Criterion 1 of the Hedgerows Regulations 1997 in that it marks the boundary of Radcliffe and Shelford parishes, and there are several stretches of hedgerow within the site, shown as field boundaries on the 1787 plan, which fulfil Criterion 5(a) of the Hedgerows Regulations 1997 as they can be demonstrated to be part of a field system pre-dating the Inclosure Acts (taken as being anything before 1845). All these identified hedgerows are therefore regarded as ‘important’ in terms of the regulations (Fig 6).

4.10.6

The original (1830s) buildings of Shelford Road Farm are considered to be of local archaeological significance.

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5.0

SITE CONDITIONS, THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT & IMPACT ON HERITAGE ASSETS

5.1 5.1.1

Site Conditions The study site is predominantly under pasture, with smaller paddocks to the north and two large fields extending to the south. Buildings of Shelford Road Farm survive within the northern part of the site but are currently disused and boarded up (Plates 1-12).

5.1.2

Ridge and furrow earthworks survive within three paddocks to the north, north-east and south-east of the farm buildings (Plates 1 & 2). These are reasonably broad and survive to a height of approximately 0.3m from top of ridge to base of furrow. The ridges turn towards the west at their northern extent indicating the characteristic reversed ‘S’ shape that is typical of medieval examples, although none of the areas of surviving ridge and furrow show the complete length of the furrows. Despite the shape of the furrows suggesting medieval origins the alignments match that shown on the plan of 1787 showing that they continued in use into the late post-medieval period.

5.1.3

Very slight remnants of ridge and furrow could be observed within the main part of the site along with what appears to be a slight headland (Plate 4) crossing from east to west about two thirds of the way down the study site. It would appear that, although the study site is currently under long term pasture, it has at some point in the past been subject to ploughing which has slighted the earthworks.

5.1.4

A small earthwork mound was noted by a gateway in the northern part of the site, but this appears to be a dump of relatively modern origin (Plate 3).

5.1.5

The buildings of Shelford Road Farm survive largely intact with most appearing to be of the original 1830s construction but with later additions and modifications (Plates 612). No access was available to the interior of the buildings.

5.2 5.2.1

The Proposed Development The study site is being promoted for residential development. At the time of writing the master plan has yet to be agreed.

5.3 5.3.1

Impact on Heritage Assets No potential impacts upon any designated heritage assets in the vicinity of the study site have been identified.

5.3.2

This assessment has established that the study site has an uncertain, but probably low potential to contain significant archaeological remains of prehistoric and Roman

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date. A negligible potential for Saxon or later medieval settlement remains has been identified. Remains relating to medieval and post-medieval agricultural practices will survive within the study site, however, these remains are considered to be of little archaeological interest. 4.10.7 Several sections of hedgerow within the study site are considered ‘important’ under the Hedgerows Regulations 1997. The majority of these hedgerows form the boundary to the site and are unlikely to be impacted by development. The treatment of these hedgerows should be given careful consideration in any future development proposals. 4.10.8 The original (1830s) buildings of Shelford Road Farm are considered to be of local archaeological significance. Currently the treatment of these buildings as part of any development proposals is not known, however, if proposals did involve the demolition of the buildings their archaeological interest could be secured through the creation of a photographic record. 5.3.3 The nature of development is such that areas of new build will cause substantial below ground disturbance which will severely impact the survival of any archaeological remains that may be present. However, current evidence suggests that any significant archaeological remains that do exist within the study site can be safely mitigated through preservation by record.

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6.0 6.1

CONCLUSIONS In accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), regional and local plan policies, this archaeological desk-based assessment draws together the available archaeological, historic, topographic and land-use information in order to clarify the heritage significance and archaeological potential of land being promoted for development at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire.

6.2

The assessment has established that there are no designated heritage assets within the study site and no potential impacts on any designated heritage asset in the wider vicinity of the study site have been identified.

6.2.1

Based upon recorded archaeological information from the surrounding area there is considered to be an uncertain but probably low potential for significant archaeological remains of prehistoric and Roman date and a negligible potential for settlement evidence of Saxon or medieval date. The site is known to contain upstanding earthworks of post-medieval ridge and furrow that are considered to be of limited archaeological interest. The surviving 19th century buildings of Shelford Road Farm are considered to be of some local significance.

6.3

In these circumstances, and in the context of NPPF paragraph 128, this desk-based assessment serves to document the site’s history. In the context of national, regional and local planning policy it is not considered that any further measures will be required to evaluate the site's archaeological potential prior to its allocation for development.

6.4

Given the size of the site and the limitations of the available archaeological data to fully establish the sites potential, should a planning application be submitted for the development of the site at a future date, it would be reasonable to expect the local planning authority to require a geophysical survey of the site. If this does not identify any significant archaeological remains then no further archaeological fieldwork should be necessary, other than a photographic record of the early 19th century farm buildings of Shelford Road Farm. This could be secured by a condition attached to the grant of planning permission.

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SOURCES General English Heritage Heritage List for England (list.english-heritage.org.uk) Heritage Gateway (www.heritagegateway.org.uk) Nottinghamshire Historic Environment Record (HER) Nottinghamshire County Record Office (NRO) Rushcliffe Borough Council Bibliographic EKWALL, E. 1991. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names. 4th ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press. MARGERY, I.D., 1955. Roman Roads in Britain Vol. 2. North of the Foss Way - Bristol Channel (including Wales & Scotland). London: Phoenix House. MORGAN, P., ed., 1978. Domesday Book 27 Derbyshire. Chichester: Phillimore. PRIESTLAND, P. & COBBING, B. 1996 Village life in Tudor and Stewart times, A study of Radcliffe-on-Trent Nottingham SAWYER, P.H. 1968. Anglo-Saxon Charters: an annotated list and bibliography. London: Royal Historical Society. SOIL SURVEYS OF ENGLAND AND WALES, 1983, Soil Map of England and Wales. 1:250000. TATE, W.E. & TURNER, M.E., c1974. Domesday of Enclosures. No publishing details. YOUNGS, F.A., 1991. Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England Volume II: Northern England. London: Royal Historical Society. Cartographic Map of the parish of Ratcliffe 1787 (NRO RT1L) Radcliffe-on-Trent Enclosure Map 1790 (NRO EA 152/2) Ordnance Survey 1:2500 editions of: 1891, 1899, 1915, 1950 Scale

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Figure 1: Site Location

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Figure 2: HER data

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Figure 3: Pre-inclosure map of 1787

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Figure 4: Inclosure map 1790

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Figure 5: Historic Ordnance Survey mapping 1891-1950

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Figure 6: ‘Important’ hedgerows

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 1. Ridge and furrow north-west of farm buildings

Plate 2. Ridge and furrow south of farm buildings

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 3. Mound to south-east of farm buildings

Plate 4. Headland running across southern part of site

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 5: Looking north from southern boundary

Plate 6: Farmhouse and outbuildings from south

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 7. Date-stone reading E S 1832

Plate 8. Barn to north of farmhouse

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 9. Northern range of outbuildings

Plate 10. Yard behing farmhouse

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Plate 11. Trough in yard

Plate 12. Feed to trough

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Archaeological Desk-based Assessment Land at Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent

APPENDIX 1: GAZETTEER OF NOTTINGHAMSHIRE HER DATA
HER Number L 1936 L 1937 L 5464 Name & Description Shelford Quarry Shelford Pit Spellow Hill, Radcliffe on Trent c 1825, OS. Compares to Speller Hill, Aslockton (L5627) - the name means "hill of speech". No traces of Anglo Saxon remains are known. No ancient artificial works were noted during perambulation of Spellow Hill, the whole of which is now agricultural land Gibbet Hill, Shelford The discovery of sherds of Roman coarse ware (one dated to C4) beneath the pre-mound ground surface proved that it was not a BA barrow Gibbet Hill, Shelford Field walking in the vicinity of the mound produced a collection of worked flints suggestive of a Neolithic settlement in the area Covert Crescent, Radcliffe on Trent Silver penny 1300-1340 Edward I or II Clumber Drive, Radcliffe on Trent A barbed and tanged arrowhead (light brown flint) was found by Mr R Straw in 1961 Radcliffe on Trent Quarry Radcliffe on Trent Brickworks Radcliffe on Trent Windpump Gibbet Hill, Shelford A large mound in a prominent position on Gibbet Hill, shown on a map of c 1600 AD with the symbol of a gallows, was partially excavated by TS in 1968. Its use as a motte was precluded by the absence of a surrounding ditch and of any Med pottery; Ro pottery beneath shows it was not a BA barrow. It was assumed that the feature was a gallows mound from the beginning Radcliffe on Trent Quarry Radcliffe on Trent Brick kiln pre 1835 Location SK 651 407 SK 651 409 Date Modern Modern

L 8235

SK 652 407

Roman

L 8236

SK 652 407

Neolithic

L 887 L 888 M 1073 M 1074 M 1075 M 1800

SK 659 392 SK 655 396 SK 660 392 SK 658 392 SK 661 394 SK 652 407

Medieval Bronze Age Unknown Modern Modern Medieval to Post Medieval

M 1939 M 924

SK 665 401 SK 655 394

Unknown Modern

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