You are on page 1of 18

William Davis: Shelford Road Farm, Radcliffe-on-Trent

Bat Report

November 2013

Executive Park, Avalon Way, Anstey, Leicester, LE7 7GR Tel: 0116 234 8100 Email: midlands.ecology@wyg.com

www.wyg.com

creative minds safe hands

Document Control
Project: Client: Job Number: File Origin: Shelford Road Farm, Radcliffe-on-Trent William Davis A079137-3 \\Leicester12\3504Data\Ecology\Projects A079000 on\A079137-3 Shelford Road Farm \Working\Bats

Document Checking:

Prepared by:

Richard Penson, MCIEEM, Senior Ecologist Victoria Thomas, MCIEEM, Principal Ecologist Victoria Thomas on behalf of: Claire Wilmer CEnv, MCIEEM, Director of Ecology

Signed:

Checked by:

Signed:

Verified by:

Signed:

Issue

Date 11th November 2013 15th November 2013

Status

1

ISSUE

2

V2

www.wyg.com

creative minds safe hands

WYG Environment Planning Transport Ltd. accept no responsibility or liability for the use which is made of this document other than by the Client for the purpose for which it was originally commissioned and prepared.

www.wyg.com

creative minds safe hands

Contents Page
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................ 5 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3 3.3 3.4 4.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 6 Background ..................................................................................................................................... 6 Site Description ................................................................................................................................ 6 Legislation Applicable to Bats ............................................................................................................ 8 Methods .................................................................................................................................... 8 Desk Study ...................................................................................................................................... 8 Preliminary Bat Roost Assessment ..................................................................................................... 9 Nocturnal Bat Surveys ...................................................................................................................... 9 Limitations ..................................................................................................................................... 10 Results .................................................................................................................................... 10 Desk Study .................................................................................................................................... 10 Nocturnal Bat Surveys .................................................................................................................... 11 Survey Timings .............................................................................................................................. 11 Weather Conditions ........................................................................................................................ 11 Survey Results ............................................................................................................................... 12 Summary of Results ....................................................................................................................... 14 Licensing and Further Works........................................................................................................... 15 References.............................................................................................................................. 16 Appendices

Appendix One: Bat Emergence Survey Results Plan

www.wyg.com

creative minds safe hands

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Executive Summary
Site Location: Shelford Road Farm, Shelford Road, Radcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire (OS grid reference SK 655 400). All bat surveys were conducted in accordance with the BCT Bat Surveys:

Methods and Results:

Good Practice Guidelines, 2nd Edition (Hundt, L., 2012).
A preliminary bat roost assessment was conducted at all of the buildings. The house was categorised with moderate potential to support roosting bats and the six farm buildings were categorised with low bat roost potential; Two other buildings, comprising an open barn and wooden shed were assessed as having negligible bat roost potential. Consequently a series of dusk emergence and / or pre-dawn re-entry (and automated) surveys were undertaken at buildings with moderate to low bat roost potential during the optimum period for bat activity in August and early September 2013. Bat roosts of both common pipistrelle and brown long-eared bat were identified. Pipistrelle bat roosts were recorded in Buildings B1, B6 and B7 with a maximum of three individual bats at any one time. Brown long-eared bat roosts were identified in Buildings B6 and B7 involving single individuals in both cases.

Recommendations:

Bat roosts are protected under UK and EU wildlife legislation (whether occupied at the time or not) and as such cannot be damaged, destroyed or obstructed unless a European Protected Species (EPS) development / mitigation licence is first obtained from Natural England. Due to the presence of roosting bats in Buildings B1, B6 and B7, an EPS licence will be required to legally facilitate any roofing works affecting these three buildings; refer to Sections 1.2 and 3.3 for further detail. An EPS licence application will need to include an appropriate mitigation strategy for both species and all three buildings (under the same licence) to include avoidance and compensatory measures, a detailed programme and methods of working, and an outline of the post-works monitoring. A key aspect of the mitigation works affecting these bat roosts under an EPS licence is timing. It is recommended that the works be conducted in either April or October annually, as the ‘safest’ windows of opportunity given the lifecycle of bats, providing prevailing climatic conditions are not unseasonably unfavourable. It is also strongly recommended as part of an EPS licence that any repairs / replacements of roof materials are like-for-like wherever possible.

5

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

1.0 Introduction
1.1 Background
William Davis Ltd propose to demolish the existing farm buildings at Shelford Road Farm, Radcliffe-onTrent, Nottinghamshire (OS grid reference SK 655 400), herein referred to as ‘the site’. WYG was commissioned by William Davis Ltd in July 2013 to undertake an extended phase one survey of the site which recommended a suite of bat surveys of these farm buildings ahead of the proposed demolition. The surveys initially comprised a preliminary (daytime) bat roost assessment of each building; with an appropriate series of nocturnal bat surveys subsequently recommended. This survey report details the methods employed and the results of all bat surveys of the buildings undertaken in the summer of 2013, with subsequent appropriate recommendations. These buildings were referred to as B3 to B9 inclusive on Plan 2 of the Extended Phase One Report (WYG 2013). Buildings B1 and B2 had been assessed as of negligible bat roost potential during the extended phase one report and further bat emergence surveys on these buildings was not considered necessary.

1.2 Site Description
Shelford Road Farm comprises a complex of nine buildings on the south side of Shelford Road on the north eastern outskirts of the village of Radcliffe-on-Trent in the Rushcliffe District of Nottinghamshire. The site is bordered by agricultural land on all except the northern boundary where there is residential housing. The River Trent is located approximately 0.5km to the north-west of the site where there is extensive mature broad-leaved woodland; large mature gardens are also present in the wider landscape to the north and west of the site. The buildings within the site have been numbered B1 to B9 on Plan 1; building description, suitable bat roost features and bat roost potential are summarised in Table 1 below: Building Reference No. Building Construction Description Bat Roost Features Potential Suitability as Bat Roost

B1

Barn composed of fibre board panels on concrete posts with some breeze blocks, fibre board roof. Barn open to south and well-lit. Interior metal container and separate vestibule.
6

None

Negligible

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

B2 B3

Wooden sheds with either corrugated iron or fibreboard roof House, brick built with tile roof, windows blocked up. Generally in good condition still. Roof void probably present but interior not accessible to confirm Brick built with fibre board roof, no roof void Brick barn with fibre board roof, no roof void, dark interior but some heavily stained sky lights. Interior not accessible, partly visible through air bricks Cow sheds with breeze block and some brick walls, slate roof but no underfelting, slates attached directly to rafters. Interior accessible, open to north and partly to south (quadrangle), light interior Animal sheds with brick walls and fibre board roof, no under felting, slates attached directly to rafters. Individual compartments divided by wooden panelling. Light interior, open to north Garage with brick walls and slate roof Garage with fibre-board walls and roof and glass / Perspex windows. Wooden doors, light interior

None Small gaps between tiles and brick work at gable ends Air bricks with grilles, gaps between bricks at gable ends Air bricks, gaps at top of bricked-up doorway

Negligible Moderate

B4

Low

B5

Low

B6

Gaps between slates, some cracks in brick work at gable ends Gaps between slates, air bricks with open grilles, gaps between wooden panelling No access points Doors open, no interior features suitable

Low

B7

Low

B8 B9

Low Low

Roosting Bats: Trees There are eight mature trees within the site, comprising six ash trees in the southern boundary hedgerow, a walnut tree (Juglans regia) to the south-east of the main block of buildings and a cultivated form of crack willow (var. Tortuosa) planted in the yard to the west of the main block of buildings. Each tree was categorised in accordance with BCT guidelines (Hundt, 2012) to determine the likelihood of supporting bats. All of these trees have been assessed as Category 3 trees with no potential to support bats due to their general lack of features such as rot holes, cracks or crevices in trunks or major limbs.

7

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

1.3 Legislation Applicable to Bats
All British bat species are listed in Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and in Schedule 2 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2012 (as amended) as European Protected Species (EPS). Under the legislation, it is an offence to deliberately, recklessly or intentionally kill, injure or take a bat; to deliberately, intentionally or recklessly damage, destroy or obstruct access to any structure or place used for shelter or protection by a bat or to deliberately disturb an animal while it is occupying a structure or place which it uses for that purpose. It is also an offence to attempt any of the above acts. Where development will result in causing an offence under the legislation described above, a European Protected Species (EPS) Licence is required from Natural England, the regulatory body responsible for protected species in England, to allow the development to proceed. The legal interpretation of "development" in the context of EPS is not restricted to works requiring planning permission from Local Planning Authorities (LPA’s) but includes permitted development and can encompass works that do not require any formal permission. Bats are also afforded more general protection in England (and Wales) within the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (NERC), 2006. This imposes a duty on all public bodies, including local authorities and statutory bodies, in exercising their functions, “to have due regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of conserving biodiversity” [Section 40 (1)]. It notes that “conserving biodiversity includes restoring or enhancing a population or habitat” [Section 40 (3)]. Consequently, attention should be given to dealing with the modification or development of an area if aspects of it are deemed important to bats, such as roosts, flight corridors and foraging areas.

2.0 Methods
2.1 Desk Study
Information was gathered from Nottinghamshire Biological and Geological Records Centre (NBGRC), the ecological records centre for Nottinghamshire, regarding the presence of bats within 2km of the site.

8

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

2.2 Preliminary Bat Roost Assessment
A preliminary (daytime) bat roost assessment (sometimes referred to as a scoping survey) of the buildings was conducted on 18th June 2013 by Richard Penson from WYG. A preliminary bat roost assessment is used to determine the actual or likely presence of bats by means of an internal and external building inspection. The accessible buildings were searched internally and externally in order to locate evidence of current or past bat roosts, hibernacula, or activity; typically evident by way of bats, droppings, urine or fur staining, feeding remains, marking and scratching, odour, and / or remains of bats. Such evidence in buildings is usually associated with gaps, crevices and cavities in walls; below roof, hip, and ridge tiles; behind and below bargeboards, fascias, soffit boxes and eaves; beneath lead flashing; behind window and door surrounds; within roof voids; associated with internal ridgeboards and roof timbers such as purlins and crossbeams; on windows; and on the ground below such construction features. During this survey visit an assessment of the overall potential of the building(s) to support roosting and / or hibernating bats was also made. An appropriate level of further nocturnal survey effort is then prescribed; refer to Section 2.3 below.

2.3 Nocturnal Bat Surveys
A single preliminary roost assessment visit, in which no bats are found, is not normally considered sufficient survey effort of a building to establish presence or likely absence. Further survey work in the form of dusk emergence and / or pre-dawn re-entry surveys are typically undertaken to provide additional information on any identified bat roost, or to provide a reasonable level of confidence that bats are not present. Nocturnal bat surveys were carried out by Jeremy Truscott (NE Licence No. 20123096), Emma Hankinson (CLSO 1276), John Richardson and Dr. Bradley Cain in August and early September 2013. The Bat Conservation Trust’s (BCT) Bat Surveys: Good Practice Guidelines, 2nd Edition (Hundt, L., 2012), the current guidance, uses the following system to categorise buildings following a preliminary roost assessment, with the corresponding level of further nocturnal presence / absence survey effort attributed: • High Roost Potential / Confirmed Roost: Two dusk emergence and / or pre-dawn re-entry surveys and a further survey comprising a dusk and dawn survey within a 24 hour period (three survey visits), carried out during May to September (optimum period May to August); • Low to Moderate Roost Potential: One dusk emergence and / or pre-dawn re-entry surveys and a further survey comprising a dusk and dawn survey within a 24 hour period (two survey visits), carried out during May to September (optimum period May to August); or
9

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Low Roost Potential: One dusk emergence together with a pre-dawn re-entry survey (one survey visit) during May to September (optimum period May to August).

If a preliminary roost assessment and / or presence / absence surveys reveal a bat roost at a proposed development site, and an EPS mitigation licence is likely to be required, then roost characterisation surveys are usually necessary. Three of the dusk emergence and pre-dawn re-entry surveys were conducted during the optimal period for such nocturnal surveys in August and a further two were conducted in early September, in accordance with the BCT Bat Surveys: Good Practice Guidelines, 2nd Edition (Hundt, L., 2012). Also in accordance with these guidelines, each survey was conducted in favourable weather conditions for bat activity, using appropriate acoustic bat detecting equipment. Each survey was led by a licensed bat ecologist (Jeremy Truscott) assisted by 2-3 other bat surveyors to provide adequate coverage for the buildings.

2.4 Limitations
Buildings B3, B4 and B5 were not accessible for the preliminary bat roost assessment as the doors had been blocked up with breeze blocks. This did not affect the emergence and dawn re-entry surveys however. It should be noted that bats are highly mobile wild animals and may colonise or change how they utilise a suitable structure at any time. The results of this survey are therefore considered valid for a maximum of two years in keeping with standard guidance from Natural England.

3.0 Results
3.1 Desk Study
Four bat species have been confirmed as present within the 2km data search area and there are a further ten records of unidentified bats. The data search returned fifteen records of confirmed bat roosts within the data search area; all but three of these are from residential buildings within Radcliffe-on-Trent. Seven of these are of common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) and one of a maternity roost of soprano pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pygmaeus). The remainder of these roosts are of unidentified bats. All of these bat roosts date between 1989 and 2010.

10

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

There is a 2011 record of a brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) roost from Shelford Lodge Farm Buildings, approximately 250m away from the site. There is also a roost of this species, plus common pipistrelle at Stoke Bardolph Farm from 2001, approximately 1.5km to the north-west of the site. There are several records of foraging bats within the 2km data search area, comprising common and soprano pipistrelles, noctule (Nyctalus noctula) and unidentified bats between 2001 and 2010. Netherfield Lagoons stands out as likely to be an important bat foraging area.

3.2 Nocturnal Bat Surveys
One dusk / pre-dawn re-entry survey and two dusk emergence surveys were conducted during the optimum period (late August) and the other two dusk surveys were conducted within the recommended survey period (early September). 3.2.1 Survey Timings

Table 3.1 below provides details of the dates and timings of each nocturnal survey including sunset and sunrise times. Table 3.1: Timing of 2013 nocturnal surveys

Date
26
th th th

Survey Type
Dusk Dawn Dusk Dusk Dusk

Survey Start
19:55 04:36 19:50 19:20 19:20

Sunset / Sunrise
20:06 06:06 20:04 19:34 19:37

Survey End
21:50 06:06 21:40 21:00 21:00

Duration
1 hour 55 mins 1 hour 30 mins 1 hour 50 mins 1 hour 40 mins 1 hour 40 mins

August

27 August 27 August 9 September 12 September 3.2.2
th th

Weather Conditions

All nocturnal surveys were conducted in weather suitable for bat activity, being dry, mild and relatively calm. Table 3.2 below provides details of the weather conditions for each nocturnal survey. On the 12th September dusk survey, rain started just after the survey had finished.

11

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Table 3.2: Weather conditions for 2013 nocturnal surveys

Date
26 August 27 August 27 August 9 September 12 September 3.2.3
th th th th th

Survey Type
Dusk Dawn Dusk Dusk Dusk

Min. Temp
13ºC 12ºC 17ºC 13ºC 13ºC

Rain?
No No No No No

Wind (Beaufort Scale)
2 1 1 2 0

Cloud Cover
60% 100% 30% 60% 90%

Survey Results

Three species of bats were recorded during the surveys although there was only a single record of noctule (Nyctalus noctula) recorded foraging over the site on the 26th August between 21:21 and 21:25. As this recording was made approximately an hour after sunset it is considered likely that this individual had commuted from a roost some distance from the site. Small numbers of common pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) and brown long-eared bats (Plecotus

auritus) were recorded during the surveys. Further details are provided in the individual building accounts
below. Building B1 A single common pipistrelle was foraging for approximately 15 minutes inside this building at 20:30 on 26th August and resumed foraging around this location until 21:00. A single common pipistrelle (presumably the above individual) emerged from B1 at 20:37 on the 27th August and continued to forage in and around the building for approximately one hour. No further bat activity was recorded from building B1 during the remainder of the surveys. Buildings B2, B3, B4 and B5 No bats were recorded emerging from buildings B2, B3, B4 or B5 during any of the dusk or dawn surveys. Two brown long-eared bats were recorded commuting and /or foraging over B4 and B5 between 21:00 and 21:22 on 26th August. Two common pipistrelles were recorded flying around buildings B3 and B4 between 05:19 and 05:30 on 27th August on the dawn return survey. These two individuals (joined by a third on 9th September) were

12

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

recorded foraging around these buildings on all of the surveys up to and including the last survey on 12th September. Building B6 A single brown long-eared bat emerged from B6 at 20:22 on the 9th September although it was not recorded during the dusk emergence of 12th September. Three common pipistrelles emerged from B6 between 19:48 and 19:55 on the dusk survey of 12th September, all flying west; two of which were subsequently recorded flying over building B5. Building B7 A single common pipistrelle emerged from the south-west corner of B7 at 20:39 on the 26th August with a second individual (which may also have emerged from the building) foraging around this building on this date. No bats were recorded returning to this building at dawn on 27th August but a single common pipistrelle emerged at 20:50 on 27th August. Two common pipistrelles were foraging inside the building from approximately 20 minutes after sunset (19:50) on 9th September. A common pipistrelle emerged from B7 at 20:10, another common pipistrelle emerged from B7 at 20:18 on this date and commuted to the south west, foraging as it went. A single brown long-eared bat was suspected of having emerged from B7 at 20:20 on the 9th September, 20 minutes later this individual was recorded foraging inside the building. Buildings B8 and B9 No bats were recorded emerging from these buildings during any of the surveys.

13

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Table 3.6: Number of common pipistrelles (in bold) and brown long-eared bats (in red) recorded emerging from or returning to each of the above locations during the series of nocturnal surveys. The total number recorded for each count is shown in the Total column. The peak count was 3 common pipistrelles at dusk on 12th September.
Location (See Above)

Date
26 Aug 27 Aug 27 Aug 9 Sept 12 Sept
th th th th th

Survey Type
Dusk Dawn Dusk Dusk Dusk

B1
1 1 -

B2
-

B3
-

B4
-

B5
-

B6
1 3

B7
2 1 2, 1 -

B8
-

B9
-

Totals
3 0 2 4 3

3.3 Summary of Results
All surveys were conducted in accordance with the BCT Bat Surveys: Good Practice Guidelines, 2nd Edition

(Hundt, L., 2012); all nocturnal surveys were conducted during the recommended period for such activity
surveys within these guidelines. Brown long-eared bats Buildings B6 and B7 support a roost of 1 brown long-eared bat each although they were not consistently present throughout the survey period and these buildings are considered to represent a transitory roost. Internal inspections of these buildings revealed only limited areas suitable for roost sites for this species, comprising gaps between the wooden interior fittings (B7) and between brickwork at the gable ends (both buildings). These buildings were also used for foraging. Common pipistrelles Building B1, despite being assessed as having negligible bat roost potential, supported a single roosting common pipistrelle on two consecutive nights in late August. Buildings B6 and B7 supported a maximum of 3 and 2 common pipistrelles respectively although as in brown long-eared bat, they were not consistently present throughout the survey period. As with the above species, interior inspections revealed only limited areas suitable for roosting.

14

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Despite the house (Building B3) being assessed as of moderate bat roost potential, no bats were recorded emerging from it during the survey period. Personnel were deployed in such a manner as to provide more than adequate coverage of this building and it is considered unlikely that any emerging bats would have been missed. It was not possible to enter this building to confirm the presence of a roof void to assess its suitability as a maternity roost as the doors had been blocked up.

3.4 Licensing and Further Works
Bat roosts are protected under UK and EU wildlife legislation (whether occupied at the time or not) and as such cannot be damaged, destroyed or have access obstructed unless a European Protected Species (EPS) development / mitigation licence is first obtained from Natural England. Due to the presence of roosting bats in Buildings B1, B6 and B7, an EPS licence will be required to legally facilitate works affecting these three buildings. In order to obtain an EPS licence it will be necessary for William Davis to demonstrate that: • The work is required for the purpose of ‘preserving public health or public safety’ or ‘other imperative reasons of overriding public interest including those of social or economic nature and beneficial consequences of primary importance for the environment’; • • There is no satisfactory alternative; and, The work will not be detrimental to the maintenance of the population of the species at a favourable conservation status. An EPS licence application will need to include an appropriate mitigation strategy for both species and for all three buildings (under the same licence) to include avoidance and compensatory measures, a detailed programme and methods of working, and an outline of the post-works monitoring. Please note that Natural England can take approximately six weeks to determine an EPS licence application. This licence application comprises four parts: an application form; a reasoned statement; and a method statement comprising background and supporting information, and delivery information. Whilst WYG can complete the method statement (to include the proposed mitigation strategy) and provide advice and a review of the application form and reasoned statement, please note that WYG are unable to complete these two documents which should be completed by the client; the reasoned statement requires completion by the landowner to justify the need for the works affecting the bat roost(s) (with regard to the three licensing criteria or ‘three tests’ above) including any specific constraints on preferred mitigation.

15

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

It is recommended that some provision for bats should be considered in new buildings constructed on the site; this may include • bat bricks on those exterior walls facing open landscape to increase the potential for roosting bats across the site; and • bat boxes are installed on trees around the site to increase the potential opportunities for roosting bats across the site.
• vegetation which is removed (i.e. sections of hedgerow or trees) should be replanted wherever possible; vegetation planted throughout or around the site should aim to provide additional ‘green corridors’ to allow bats to traverse the site readily;

Recommendations are made in line with the National Planning Policy Framework and the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006, which both place a duty on Local Planning Authorities to maintain and enhance biodiversity levels through the planning process.

4.0 References
• Bat Conservation Trust’s (BCT) Bat Surveys: Good Practice Guidelines, 2nd Edition (Hundt, L., 2012). • • English Nature (2004) Bat Mitigation Guidelines. Joint Nature Conservation Committee (2004) Bat Worker’s Manual.

16

William Davis A079137

October 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Bat Report

Appendix 1 Bat Survey Plan

17

William Davis A079137

October 2013

±
Pipistrelle Roost
H !

Legend
Buildings Hard standing
B1 Building Number

B1
H !

H !

Pipistrelle Roost

B6

B5 B2 B4 B7
H !

B8 Brown long-eared Roost
H !

Pipistrelle Roost

B3

B9
Executive Park Avalon Way Anstey Leicester LE7 7GR
Tel: 0116 2348100 Fax: 0116 2348002 email: midlands.ecology@wyg.com

WYG Environment
Project

............
creative minds safe hands

Brown long-eared and Pipistrelle Roost
30 15 0 30 Meters
.

Shelford Road Radcliffe on Trent
Drawing Title:

Plan 1: Bat Emergence Survey Results
Scale at A3: Drawn by: Date: Office Type Checked By: Date: Approved By: Date:

1:495
Project No:

RJP 11/11/13 DG 11/11/13
Drawing No.

VT

11/11/13
Revision

A079137-1 45

94 .

01