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William Davis

Shelford Road Farm, Radcliffe 0n Trent
Extended Phase 1 Survey Report

October 2013

Executive Park, Avalon Way, Leicester, LE7 7GR Tel: 0116 234 8100 Email: ecology@wyg.com Fax: 0116 234 8002

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Document Control
Project: Client: Job Number: File Origin: Shelford Road William Davis
A079137 O:\Ecology\Projects A079000 on\A079137 Shelford Road - Radcliffe on Trent

Document Checking: Prepared by: Richard Penson CIEEM Signed:

Checked by:

David Goddard MCIEEM

Signed:

Verified by:

Gavin Ward, MCIEEM, AIEMA Associate

Signed:

On behalf of:

Claire Wilmer, CEnv, MCIEEM, MIEMA

Issue 1 2

Date 17th July 2013 17th October 2013

Status FINAL – v1 FINAL – v2

3

15th November 2013

FINAL – v3

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WYG Environment Planning Transport Ltd. accept no responsibility or liability for the use which is made of this document other than by the Client for the purpose for which it was originally commissioned and prepared.

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Contents Page
Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... 1 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2.0 2.1 2.2 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.0 5.1 5.2 Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 3 Background ............................................................................................................................... 3 Site Location and General Description ......................................................................................... 3 Development Proposals .............................................................................................................. 3 Survey and Reporting Objectives ................................................................................................ 3 Desk Study ........................................................................................................................ 5 Methodology .............................................................................................................................. 5 Data Search Results ................................................................................................................... 5 Survey Methodology ........................................................................................................ 12 Habitats .................................................................................................................................. 12 Protected and Notable Species .................................................................................................. 12 Invasive Species ...................................................................................................................... 14 Limitations ............................................................................................................................... 14 Survey Results ................................................................................................................. 16 Habitats .................................................................................................................................. 16 Protected and Notable Species .................................................................................................. 20 Invasive Species ...................................................................................................................... 24 Ecological Impacts and Recommendations..................................................................... 25 Statutory and Non-statutory Sites ............................................................................................. 25 Habitats .................................................................................................................................. 25

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5.3 5.4 6.0 7.0

Protected and Notable Species .................................................................................................. 25 Invasive Species ...................................................................................................................... 30 Summary of Recommendations ...................................................................................... 31 References ....................................................................................................................... 32

Table Contents
Table 1: SINCs within 2km of the site ....................................................................................... 6 Table 2: Legally Protected Schedule 1 Bird Records within 2km of the site ............................. 8 Table 3: Nottinghamshire Rare Plant Register Species within 2km of the site....................... 11 Table 4: Biological Features of Hedgerows ............................................................................. 17 Table B1 Schedules of the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 ......................................................................................................................................... 41 Table B2 Invasive plant species listed in Schedule 9 of the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) ........................................................................................................................... 44 Table E1 Shrub species of native origin or generally thought to be beneficial to wildlife ...... 56 Table E2 Tree species of native origin or generally thought to be beneficial to wildlife ........ 57 Table E3 Gardening for bats .................................................................................................... 58

Appendix Contents
Appendix A - Figures Appendix B – Biodiversity and Environmental Legislation, Conventions & Threatened Lists Appendix C – Data Search Results Appendix D – Wildlife Boxes Appendix E – Wildlife-friendly Planting

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Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

Executive Summary
Site Description and Scope of Works The site comprises agricultural land with farm buildings at the northern end, on the eastern outskirts of the village of Shelford, Nottinghamshire. Potential Constraints Bats Has the site been assessed for bats? Are there any structures or trees on site which have the potential to support roosting bats? (see section 5.3.3) Breeding Birds including Barn Owls Has the site been assessed for breeding birds including barn owls? Will areas of hedgerow, scrub, woodland, trees or other features likely to be used by nesting birds be affected by the proposal? (see section 5.3.7) Badgers Has the site been assessed for badgers? Is there any evidence of badgers on or near the application site including setts, foraging or commuting? (see section 5.3.4) Dormice Has the site been assessed for dormice? Is there suitable habitat for dormice on, or close to the application site? (see section 5.3.7) Great crested newts Has the site been assessed for great crested newts? Is there suitable habitat for great crested newts on, or close to the application site? (see section 5.3.1) Reptiles Has the site been assessed for reptiles? Is there suitable habitat on the site for reptiles? (see section 5.3.2) Other protected species (e.g. otters, water voles, white-clawed crayfish) Has the site been assessed for otters, water voles and white-clawed crayfish Is there suitable habitat on the site for otters, water voles and white-clawed crayfish? (see sections 5.3.5, 5.3.6 and 5.3.7) Other features of nature conservation interest Does the application site support Habitats of Principal Importance or Local Biodiversity Action Plan Priority Habitats? Semi-improved Neutral Grassland, Hedgerows. Does the application site support Species of Principal Importance or Local Biodiversity Action Plan Species? Potentially roosting bats in the house and farm buildings
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Yes Y Y

No

Y Y

Y N

Y N

Y Terrestrial only Y N Y N

Y

Y

William Davis A079137 July 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

Have details of biodiversity enhancements been included with the application? Recommendations Are further surveys recommended to inform the ecological impact assessment? • Bat emergence surveys on the house and farm buildings on two occasions

Y Yes Y No

Is mitigation (including avoidance/compensation) and enhancement recommended? • •

Y

It is recommended to incorporate wildlife friendly planting into the soft landscaping design Consideration should be given to incorporating bat and bird boxes into the development proposal design

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1.0 Introduction
1.1 Background
WYG was commissioned by William Davis Ltd. In May 2013 to undertake an extended Phase 1 habitat survey at Shelford Road Farm (‘the site’). The site layout is shown in Plan 1, Appendix A. Plan 2 shows the (numbered) buildings and this should be read in conjunction with Section 5.3.3 Bats.

1.2 Site Location and General Description
The site is located on the eastern outskirts of the village of Shelford, in the Newark and Sherwood District of Nottinghamshire. The central grid reference of the site is SK 655 400. The site is bounded to the north and west by residential housing and by agricultural land to the east and south. An active railway line is located approximately 0.25km to the south of the site with residential housing at Harlequin beyond. The site comprises six fields of grassland with farm buildings which are no longer used. The fields are delimited by species-poor hedgerows with a wet ditch alongside an internal hedgerow. The southern boundary hedgerow adjoins an active railway line.

1.3 Development Proposals
It is proposed to redevelop the site for residential housing.

1.4 Survey and Reporting Objectives
The ecological investigations undertaken by WYG included the following objectives: • A desk study to obtain existing information on statutory and non-statutory sites of nature conservation interest, and records of protected/notable species within the site and its environs; • An extended Phase 1 habitat survey involving a walkover of the site to record habitat types and dominant vegetation, including any invasive species, and a reconnaissance survey for evidence of protected fauna or habitats capable of supporting such species; • An investigation of the buildings and trees for their potential to support bats, including a survey of internal and external features; and
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An assessment of the potential ecological constraints to the proposed works at the site and recommendations for further survey, avoidance, mitigation and enhancement where appropriate.

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Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

2.0 Desk Study
2.1 Methodology
Information was gathered from Nottinghamshire Biological and Geological Records Centre (NBGRC), the ecological records centre for Nottinghamshire, regarding the presence of nature conservation designations and protected and notable species within 2km of the proposed development site. In addition, a search for designations was made of Natural England’s interactive, web-based MAGIC (Multi Agency Geographic Information for the Countryside) database. The data search covers: • Statutory nature conservation designations, such as National Nature Reserves and Sites of Special Scientific Interest; • • • Non-statutory nature conservation designations, such as Wildlife Sites; Protected species, such as badgers, great crested newts and bats; and Notable species, such as those listed in the local Biodiversity Action Plan.

Tree preservation orders (TPOs) and conservation areas are not included in this data search.

2.2 Data Search Results
2.2.1 Statutory Sites

There are no Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) within 2km of the site. The only statutorily protected site within the 2km search radius is Netherfield Lagoons Local Nature Reserve (LNR), which is located approximately 1.5km to the west of the site. This LNR comprises two former fly ash lagoons which have become colonised by common reed (Phragmites australis) and other marginal aquatic species, trees and shrubs and pioneer vegetation on areas of exposed mud. The LNR also includes two former gravel pits. Botanical interest comprises calcareous grassland supporting two species of orchid, both of which are scarce in the County.

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Netherfield Lagoons also supports notable breeding and wintering birds and a notable dragonfly assemblage of 16 species. This site is also a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINC) – see below. 2.2.2 Non-statutory Sites

In addition to Netherfield Lagoons, there are a further six Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation within the 2km search radius. These are summarised in Table 1 below: Table 1: SINCs within 2km of the site SINC Name (SINC No.) Distance from Site Saxondale Railway (2/193) Swallow Plantation (2/946) 2Km East 0.5Km North SK 678401 SK 654415 Botanical, Butterfly Assemblage Botanical Botanical, Dragonfly Assemblage, Water Beetle / Bug Assemblage Grid Ref. Reason for Designation

The Avenue Pool (2/947)

0.5Km West

SK 649403

Netherfield Dismantled Railway Sidings (5/210) Trent Bluff Scrub, Radcliffe (5/214) Dewberry Hill (5/2176)

1Km West

SK 634403

Botanical, Butterfly Assemblage

0.5Km Northwest 0.5Km South

SK 651407

Botanical

SK 656390

Botanical

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2.2.3

Protected and Notable Species

Invertebrates (includes White-clawed Crayfish) No white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes) records were returned through the data search although there was a record of the invasive Chinese mitten-crab (see invasive species section). There are three records of two notable butterfly species within the 2km data search: Dingy skipper (Errynis tages) was recorded from Netherfield Dismantled Railway Sidings in 2011, approximately 1km west of the site. Grizzled skippers (Pyrgus malvae) have been recorded from Saxondale Railway with a continuous run of records between 1980 and 2011 although records from 2012 and 2013 have been received from this locality by the Nottinghamshire Butterfly Recorder (Richard Penson). Both dingy and grizzled skippers were added to the list of priority species in the National BAP in 2007. The assemblages of 16 dragonfly and damselfly species at Netherfield Lagoons exceeds the threshold of 11 species to qualify as being of County Importance. This includes records of small red-eyed damselfly (Erythromma viridulum) which is a recent colonist and has a restricted distribution within the County. The Avenue Pool SINC supports assemblages of notable water beetles and water bugs which are of County Importance. Great Crested Newts The data search returned three records of great crested newts from the 2km search area although two of these are historical ones. The most recent record is from 2001, from Newstead Avenue in Radcliffe, presumably from a garden pond. This record is approximately 200m west of the site. The other two records date from 1993 and 1989, both being from Radcliffe, the former being introduced from Keyworth Nature Reserve but were not seen after their release. Common frog (Rana temporaria), common toad (Bufo bufo) and smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) have been recorded from the 2km data search area; the majority of records of all three species are from Radcliffe and Netherfield Lagoons.

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Reptiles The only reptile record received from the data search was a historical one of a grass snake (Natrix natrix) from Cropwell Road, Radcliffe in 1995, approximately 1.5km south west of the site. Birds The data search returned records of 32 legally protected birds listed on Schedule 1 of the W&CA 1981 (as amended) from Netherfield Lagoons. These are summarised in Table 2 below along with their status at the site: Table 2: Legally Protected Schedule 1 Bird Records within 2km of the site Common Name Avocet Barn Owl Bearded Tit Bittern Black Tern Black-necked Grebe Black-tailed Godwit Brambling Cetti’s Warbler Fieldfare Garganey Greenshank Green Sandpiper Goldeneye Hen Harrier Hobby Kingfisher Little Gull Little-ringed Plover Little Tern Marsh Harrier Mediterranean Gull Merlin Scientific Name Year of Record 2009, 2010 2009 - 2011 2010 2008 – 2011 2008 – 2010 2008 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 Comments Passage migrants Winter records, January to March Vagrant Winter visitor Passage migrants Passage migrants Passage migrants Winter visitor Resident since 2008, possibly breeding Winter visitor Passage Migrants Passage Migrants Passage Migrant / Winter Visitor Winter Visitor Passage Migrant Potential Local Breeder Potential Breeder Passage Migrant Breeder at this locality Vagrant Passage Migrant Passage Migrant / Winter Visitor Winter Visitor

Recurvirostra avocetta Tyto alba Panurus biarmicus Botaurus stellaris Chlidonias niger Podiceps nigricollis Limosa limosa Fringilla montifringilla Cettia cetti Turdus pilaris Anas querquedula Tringa nebularia Tringa ochropus Clangula hyemalis Circus cyaneus Falco subbuteo Alcedo atthis Hydrocoloeus minutus Charadrius dubius Sternula albifrons Circus aeruginosus Larus melanocephalus Falco columbarius

– 2011 - 2011 – 2011 – 2011 – 2011 – 2011 – 2011

2008 - 2011 2011 2008 – 2011 2008 – 2011 2008 – 2011 2008 – 2011 2009 2009 – 2010 2009 – 2011 2008, 2010 – 2011
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Osprey Peregrine Pintail Red Kite Redwing Ruff Scaup Whimbrel Whooper Swan

Pandion haliaetus Falco peregrinus Anas acuta Milvus milvus Turdus iliacus Philomachus pugnax Aythya marila Numenius phaeopus Cygnus cygnus

2008 – 2010 2008 – 2011 2008 – 2011 2009 – 2011 2008 – 2011 2010 – 2011 2008 2008 – 2011 2009 – 2011

Passage Migrant Non-breeding at this locality Winter Visitor Passage Migrant / Non-breeding Resident Winter Visitor Passage Migrant Winter Visitor / Passage Migrant Passage Migrant Winter Visitor / Passage Migrant

Records of a further 11 Schedule 1 birds were returned from elsewhere within the 2km data search area, although only three of these were considered likely to relate to breeding birds. These comprise two records of barn owl, one from within a nesting box at Stragglethorpe in 2010 (approx 2km south of the site) and another at Radcliffe in 2009. Hobbies were repeatedly recorded from a locality at Burton Joyce (approx 2km away) over the summer of 2011. There is also a record of kingfisher from the River Trent near Burton Joyce (approx 2km away) in 2011 in suitable breeding habitat. The remaining species, comprising red kite, marsh harrier, peregrine, whimbrel, fieldfare, redwing, brambling and crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) were either recorded in the non-breeding season or else it is considered that there is no suitable breeding habitat within the 2km data search area. A range of notable breeding farmland birds, including Birds of Conservation Concern (BoCC) Red and Amber List species were recorded within the 2km search area, including grey partridge (Perdix perdix), yellowhammer (Emberiza schoeniclus), linnet (Carduelis cannabina) and lapwing (Vanellus vanellus). Bats Four bat species have been confirmed as present within the 2km data search area and there are a further ten records of unidentified bats. The data search returned fifteen records of confirmed bat roosts within the data search area; all but three of these are from residential buildings within Radcliffe-on-Trent. Seven of these are of common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) and one of a maternity roost of soprano pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pygmaeus). The remainder of these roosts are of unidentified bats. All of these bat roosts date between 1989 and 2010.

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Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

There is a 2011 record of a brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) roost from Shelford Lodge Farm Buildings, approximately 250m away from the site. There is also a roost of this species, plus common pipistrelle at Stoke Bardolph Farm from 2001, approximately 1.5km to the north-west of the site. There are several records of foraging bats within the 2km data search area, comprising common and soprano pipistrelles, noctule (Nyctalus noctula) and unidentified bats between 2001 and 2010. Netherfield Lagoons stands out as likely to be an important bat foraging area. Badgers NBGRC provided three records of badgers within 2km of the site although no setts have been found to date. A fresh badger latrine was found alongside one of the gravel pits at Netherfield Lagoons in 2010 and footprints in the mud of the slurry lagoon in 2009; both these locations are approximately 1km away from the site. The third record comprises a road casualty on the minor road (Shelford Road) in 2008, approximately 1km north east of the site. Otter There is one record of otter from the search area, comprising a sighting of one on the River Trent at Stoke Bardolph in 2001, approximately 1.3km north of the site. Water Voles The data search returned one record of water vole, from Netherfield Slurry Lagoon in 2002, approximately 2km west of the site. The NBGRC appended the note “first record for several years” to this record. Other Mammal Species Both brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and harvest mouse (Micromys minutus) have been recorded from the data search area; both of these are listed as priority species under Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act 2006 and are also LBAP species.

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William Davis A079137 July 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

There are fifteen records of brown hare from the 2km search area, two of them being within 200m of the site. The two records of harvest mouse are both from Netherfield Lagoons, one from 1999 and the other from 2011 when a nest was found. Vascular Plants A total of seven vascular plants listed on the Nottinghamshire Rare Plant Register (NRPR) have been recorded within the 2km data search area. These are summarised in Table 3 below: Table 3: Nottinghamshire Rare Plant Register Species1 within 2km of the site Site of record Netherfield Dismantled Railway Sidings (SINC 5/210) Netherfield Pits (SINC 2/379) Species Fig (Ficus carica) Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris) Common cudweed (Filago vulgaris) Dittander (Lepidium latifolium) Pyramidal orchid (Anacamptis pyramidalis) Bird cherry (Prunus padus) Marsh stitchwort (Stellaria palustris) Distance from Site 1.5Km 1.5km 1.5Km 1.5Km 1.5Km 1.5Km 1.5Km Comments Alien in UK Alien in Nottinghamshire Native Alien in Nottinghamshire Native Alien in Nottinghamshire Native

Invasive Species There is a 2011 record of American mink (Neovison vison) from Netherfield Lagoons, approximately 2km away from the site. There is a record from 2008 of Chinese mitten-crab (Eriocheir sinensis) from Stoke Lock on the River Trent which had been found in a dredging hopper which had originated from West Burton Power Station. Both these are invasive species listed on Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended). No records of invasive plants were returned through the data search.

1

This information has been derived from data search information, including plant lists for SINCs which list their county status on the proforma. 11

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Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

3.0 Survey Methodology
An extended Phase 1 habitat survey was conducted on the site and within the predicted zone of influence2 of the proposed development. All areas of the site were investigated, including those parts that are not expected to be affected directly by the works but may be indirectly impacted upon. As recommended by English Nature’s Badgers and Development (2002), a 30m buffer around the site was investigated for evidence of badger activity where possible.

3.1 Habitats
The vegetation and habitat types within the site were noted during the walkover survey in accordance with the categories specified for a Phase 1 Vegetation and Habitat Survey (Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 2010). Dominant plant species were recorded for each habitat present.

3.2 Protected and Notable Species
The site was inspected for evidence of and its potential to support protected and/or notable species, especially those listed under the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012, the

Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended), including those given extra protection under the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act 2006 and Countryside & Rights of Way (CRoW) Act 2000,
and listed on the UK and local Biodiversity Action Plans. The following species were considered: 3.2.1 Great Crested Newts

The site was appraised for its suitability to support great-crested newts. The assessment was based on guidance outlined in the Joint Nature Conservation Committees’ published Herpetofauna Workers’ Manual (Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 2003) and the Great Crested Newt Conservation Handbook (Langton, Beckett & Foster, 2001).

2

Zone of influence: the area that may be affected by the biophysical changes caused by the activities associated with the development. 12

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Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

As recommended by Natural England, the Oldham et al. (2000) Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) was applied to ponds on site and to those within 500m of the site, where access permitted; these were identified using Ordnance Survey maps and aerial images. 3.2.2 Reptiles

The site was appraised for its suitability to support reptiles. The assessment was based on guidance outlined in the Joint Nature Conservation Committees’ published Herpetofauna Workers’ Manual (Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 2003). 3.2.3 Bats

The buildings/trees within the boundary were appraised by an experienced ecologist from WYG for their suitability to support breeding, resting and hibernating bats using survey methods based on those outlined in the Bat Conservation Trust’s Bat Surveys: Good Practice Guidelines (2012) and English Nature’s Bat

Mitigation Guidelines (2004).
3.2.4 Badgers

The site was surveyed for evidence of badger setts or other badger activity such as paths, latrines or signs of foraging. Methodologies used and any setts recorded were classified according to published criteria (Harris, Cresswell & Jefferies, 1989). A 30m buffer zone around the expected zone of influence was surveyed as recommended in English Nature’s Badgers and Development (2002). 3.2.5 Otters

Water courses on site were assessed for their suitability to support otters. This assessment was based on guidance outlined in Chanin, P. (2003) Monitoring the otter. 3.2.6 Water Voles

Following methods set out in the Water Vole Conservation Handbook (Strachan & Moorhouse, 2011), an assessment of waterbodies within and adjacent to the site was undertaken to determine their suitability to support water voles and a search for evidence of activity was undertaken, including droppings, latrines, burrows, footprints and feeding lawns, of any areas considered suitable.

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3.2.7

Other Species

The site was also appraised for its suitability to support other protected or notable fauna including mammals, birds and invertebrates in accordance with the Institute for Ecology and Environmental Management’s Guidelines for Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (2012). Evidence of any current or historical presence of such species was recorded. The buildings were appraised for their potential to support breeding / roosting barn owls and evidence of them was also searched for during the bat emergence surveys carried out on the buildings.

3.3 Invasive Species
The site was searched for evidence of invasive plant species, such as Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica, Himalayan balsam Impatiens glandulifera, giant hogweed Heracleum mantegazzianum, New Zealand pygmyweed Crassula helmssii, wall cotoneaster Cotoneaster horizontalis, rhododendron Rhododendron

ponticum and floating pennywort Hydrocotyle ranunculoides (see Appendix B Table B2 for full list).

3.4 Limitations
The comprehensiveness of any ecological assessment will be limited by the season in which surveys are undertaken. To determine likely presence or absence of protected species usually requires multiple visits at suitable times of the year. As a result, this survey focuses on assessing the potential of the site to support species of note, which are considered to be of principal importance for the conservation of biodiversity with reference to the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF, 2012), especially those given protection under UK or European wildlife legislation. The two largest meadows had been shallow ploughed prior to the survey and the majority of the flora appeared dead. However, there were areas adjacent to the hedgerows and in field corners where the grass remained green. This report cannot therefore be considered a comprehensive assessment of the ecological interest of the site. However, it does provide an assessment of the ecological interest present on the day of the visit and highlights areas where further survey work may be recommended.

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The details of this report will remain valid for a period of two years. Beyond this period, if works have not yet been undertaken, it is recommended that a new review of the ecological conditions is undertaken.

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4.0 Survey Results
An extended Phase 1 habitat plan (Plan 1) showing the location of key ecological features is included in Appendix A. Plan 2 shows the area of buildings in more detail and also shows the building numbers with relation to Section 4.2.3.

4.1 Habitats
4.1.1 Semi-improved Neutral Grassland

There are three small meadows of this habitat at the northern end of the survey area. These had a wide diversity of grasses and herbs; grasses recorded comprised Yorkshire-fog (Holcus lanatus), Timothy (Phleum pratense), crested dog’s-tail (Cynosurus cristatus), meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis), common bent (Agrostis capillaris), sweet vernal grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum), smooth meadow-grass (Poa pratensis), rough meadow-grass (Poa trivialis), red fescue (Festuca rubra), false oat-grass (Arrhenatherum elatius), cock’s-foot (Dactylis glomerata) and soft brome (Bromus hordeaceus). A total of five herb species indicative of less improved swards were recorded and these comprise: bird’sfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), common sorrel (Rumex acetosa), common cat’s-ear (Hypochaeris radicata), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and meadow buttercup (Ranunculus acris). Other, non-ruderal herbs recorded included lesser stitchwort (Stellaria graminea), common mouse-ear (Cerastium fontanum), daisy (Bellis perennis), white clover (Trifolium repens), ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), greater plantain (Plantago major), black medick (Medicago lupulina), yarrow (Achillea millefolium) and smooth hawk’s-beard (Crepis capillaris). Ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) and fox-and-cubs (Pilosella aurantiaca) were found in close proximity to houses and were considered to be garden escapes. There was a low level of ruderal herbs beginning to invade these meadows from the peripheral hedgerows and these include broad-leaved dock (Rumex obtusifolius), creeping thistle (Cirsium arvense), spear thistle (Cirsium vulgare), common ragwort (Senecio jacobaea), stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) and hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium).

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4.1.2

Species-poor Semi-improved Grassland

The grassland within the triangle of land adjacent to the railway line was of this type, dominated by tall and coarse grasses such as false oat-grass, cock’s-foot and Timothy with small patches of Yorkshire-fog and red fescue. Herbs were few and were composed of ruderal species; common ragwort and creeping thistle were the only species evident at the time of the survey. The two largest meadows were of this habitat type at the time of the original survey in July 2013 although they had been ploughed and reverted to arable by October 2013. Grassland species recorded adjacent to the hedgerows comprised Yorkshire-fog, crested dog’s-tail, false oat-grass, cock’s-foot and Timothy. The low level of herb diversity was evident in the areas where the grass remained green. Herb species recorded comprised meadow buttercup, common sorrel, lesser stitchwort, Germander speedwell (Veronica

chamaedrys), cow parsley, hogweed and dandelion species (Taraxacum spp).
4.1.3 Hedgerows

The site was delimited by fifteen species-poor hedgerows, the majority of which were dominated by hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna). The floral composition and associated features of these hedgerows are summarised in Table 4 below. In the tree and shrub column, the dominant species are shown first. Associated features comprise hedge banks, ditches, walls etc: Table 4: Biological Features of Hedgerows Hedgerow No. H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6 H7 H8 H9 Tree / Shrub Species Recorded Hawthorn, sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) saplings Hawthorn, elder (Sambucus nigra) Hawthorn, dog rose (Rosa canina), ash (saplings), elder Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Hawthorn, elder, laburnum (Laburnum anagyroides) Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa), hawthorn, dog rose, elder Hawthorn, elder Hawthorn, dog rose, elder Hawthorn, elder, sycamore saplings
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Height (metres) 3.5m 3.5m 3.5m 1.8m 3m 3m 3m 3.5m 3.5 – 4m

Management Trimmed Trimmed Trimmed Trimmed Free growing Free growing Free growing Free growing Free growing

Associated Features None None None None None Roadside verge Rabbit warren None None

William Davis A079137 July 2013

Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

H10 H11 H12 H13 H14 H15

Hawthorn, elder, dog rose Hawthorn, ash saplings, holly (Ilex aquifolium), elder, dog rose Hawthorn, elder Hawthorn, elder, ash -mature trees, dog rose, crack willow (Salix fragilis) young trees Hawthorn, elder, dog rose Hawthorn, elder, dog rose, blackthorn

1.8m 4m+ 4m+ 4.5m 4m 4m

Trimmed Free growing Free growing Free growing Old laid, free growing Free growing

None Wet ditch None Wet ditch Dry ditch Railway line

Climbers growing in these hedgerows included bramble (Rubus fruticosus agg.), ivy (Hedera helix), white bryony (Bryonia dioica), hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium) and bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara). The ground flora of these hedgerows was considered typical of agricultural land with a high nutrient content and were dominated by ruderal species and coarse grasses; stinging nettles, spear thistle and false oatgrass being typical. Garden hedgerows around the house outside but immediately adjacent to the survey area at the northern end and all of the hedgerows along the western boundary are not included in table 3 above. These hedgerows were all frequently trimmed and largely composed of non-native species along the western boundary. Those around the house were composed of field maple (Acer campestre), hazel (Corylus

avellana) and wayfaring tree (Viburnum lantana). Whilst all three are native to the UK, the latter is not
native to this part of Nottinghamshire and all had been obviously planted. 4.1.4 Introduced Shrub

This occupied a small extent around the house within the site. It was composed of lilac (Syringa vulgaris), a cultivar of shrubby cinquefoil (Potentilla fruticosa var.), cultivated roses (Rosa sp), magnolia (Magnolia sp) and sapling walnut (Juglans regia). 4.1.5 Dense Scrub

This habitat occurred in the triangle of land at the southern end of the site adjacent to the railway line. It was dominated by bramble but also included hawthorn, blackthorn suckers and dog rose.

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4.1.6

Tall Ruderal

There was a large patch of dense stinging nettles in the small field to the north west of the buildings within the site. Tall ruderal vegetation was most evident in the triangle of land adjacent to the railway line and this was also dominated by stinging nettles but also included creeping thistle (Cirsium arvense), broad-leaved dock (Rumex obtusifolius), common ragwort (Senecio jacobaea), hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), rosebay willowherb (Chamerion angustifolium) and hairy willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum). 4.1.7 Wet Ditch

The water within this ditch flowed in a westerly direction adjacent to hedgerows H11 and H13 and entered a culvert at the western end underneath the residential area. It was approximately 2m in width with earth banks up to 1m in height. The angle of the earth banks was approximately 45º. It was extensively overhung with woody vegetation, including brambles, to such an extent that the only aquatic vegetation visible was a small clump of hairy willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum) close to the eastern end of the ditch. Other plants recorded included male fern (Dryopteris felix-mas) and herb-Robert (Geranium robertianum). The water flow was extremely sluggish with a very low water level of approximately 5cms depth on the day of the survey. The substrate was composed of earth and silt although there were a few bricks and stones adjacent to a wooden access bridge at the northern end of hedgerow H13 and again at the southern end of that hedgerow where there was a short section of stone wall, that on the east bank having partially collapsed. There was a brick culvert at the extreme southern end of hedgerow H13 where the water entered the site via a field drain. 4.1.8 Dry Ditch

The dry ditch occupied the southern half of hedgerow H14 and had been recently cleared prior to the survey. It was approximately 1.5m in width and had earth banks of approximately 45º which were completely devoid of vegetation. The substrate was composed of earth. This ditch ended approximately halfway along the hedgerow where two field drains entered it. 4.1.9 Buildings

The buildings are described in Section 4.2.3 Bats.

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4.2 Protected and Notable Species
4.2.1 Great Crested Newts

No ponds were found within the site and examination of the site and relevant maps, revealed no ponds within 500m of the site, although garden ponds in the adjacent residential area (and hence outside the site) cannot be ruled out. Only terrestrial habitat is present on the site with the best quality habitat along the hedgerows and in the semi-improved neutral grassland at the northern end of the site. Two sections of stone wall on either side of a wet ditch adjacent to the active railway line afford any hibernation potential (see target note TN1 on Plan 1). 4.2.2 Reptiles

Only limited habitat suitable for reptiles is present within the site; along the active railway line at the southern end of the site where there is some basking potential at the eastern end of hedgerow H13 on and around the stone walls, which also afford hibernation potential in the crevices between stones (see target note TN1 on Plan 1). The majority of the wet ditch adjacent to hedgerows H11 and H13 is heavily shaded which limits its value as a dispersal corridor. The remainder of the site is considered to be sub-optimal for reptiles due to the lack of basking opportunities and shelter within the grassland sites. 4.2.3 Bats

Roosting Bats: Buildings The buildings within the site have been numbered B1 to B9 on Plan 2; building description, suitable bat roost features and bat roost potential are summarised in Table 5 below: Building No. Description Barn composed of fibre board panels on concrete posts with some breeze blocks, fibre board roof. Barn open to south and well-lit. Interior metal container and separate vestibule. Wooden sheds with either corrugated iron
20

Bat Roost Features

Suitability as Bat Roost

B1

None

Negligible

B2

None

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B3

or fibreboard roof House, brick built with tile roof, windows blocked up. Generally in good condition still. Roof void probably present but interior not accessible to confirm Brick built with fibre board roof, no roof void Brick barn with fibre board roof, no roof void, dark interior but some heavily stained sky lights. Interior not accessible, partly visible through air bricks Cow sheds with breeze block and some brick walls, slate roof but no underfelting, slates attached directly to rafters. Interior accessible, open to north and partly to south (quadrangle), light interior Animal sheds with brick walls and fibre board roof, no under felting, slates attached directly to rafters. Individual compartments divided by wooden panelling. Light interior, open to north Garage with brick walls and slate roof Garage with fibre-board walls and roof and glass / Perspex windows. Wooden doors, light interior

Small gaps between tiles and brick work at gable ends Air bricks with grilles, gaps between bricks at gable ends Air bricks, gaps at top of bricked-up doorway

Moderate

B4

Low

B5

Low

B6

Gaps between slates, some cracks in brick work at gable ends

Low

B7

Gaps between slates, air bricks with open grilles No access points Doors open, no interior features suitable

Low

B8 B9

Low Low

Roosting Bats: Trees There are eight mature trees within the site, comprising six ash trees in the southern boundary hedgerow H13; a walnut tree (Juglans regia) to the south-east of the main block of buildings and a cultivated form of crack willow (var. Tortuosa) planted in the yard to the west of the main block of buildings. All of these trees have been assessed as low (Category 3) bat roost potential due to their general lack of features such as rot holes, cracks or crevices in trunks or major limbs. Foraging Bats The hedgerow network delimiting the site provides bat foraging opportunities with the southern boundary hedgerows (H11, H13 and H15) being the tallest on the site and thus affording the best quality habitat alongside the railway line and connecting with other tall hedgerows alongside the railway to the east. The western boundary hedgerow fronting the back gardens is assessed as of low quality as bat foraging habitat as they are composed of non-native species and are regularly trimmed to approximately 1.5m.
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The surrounding landscape contains blocks of mature woodland along the River Trent escarpment besides tall hedgerows and also mature gardens to the west and north west in Radcliffe on Trent. Hence bat foraging habitat is not a limited resource in the wider landscape. 4.2.4 Badgers

No evidence of badgers was found within the site or within 50m of the site boundaries where access allowed. All of the holes and foraging evidence were considered to relate to rabbits (Oryctolagus

cunniculus).
A small area of disturbed ground adjacent to the railway line was considered to have been made by a fox (Vulpes vulpes) attempting to cache a dead wood pigeon; fresh fox faeces were found nearby. 4.2.5 Otters

The only habitat suitable for otters within the site is the wet ditch along the southern boundary of the site, which forms a sheltered foraging and dispersal corridor although of limited extent as it enters a culvert at its western end underneath the residential area for at least 1km and is not connected to any suitable water course at its eastern end, making it unlikely to be used by otters. No evidence of otters was found along this ditch during the survey. The dry ditch adjacent to hedgerow H14 has been recently cleared of vegetation was dry at the time of the survey and also is not connected to any suitable otter habitat at its northern end. It is considered that this ditch may be only seasonally wet, the water entering the ditch at its northern end through two field drains. 4.2.6 Water Voles

Neither of the two ditches (wet and dry) within the site is considered suitable for water voles; the wet ditch is extensively shaded for the vast majority of its length and only small amounts of vegetation were evident. The earth banks did provide burrowing potential, however the extremely low water level (about 5cms depth at the time of the survey) is considered to discourage water voles from utilising this habitat. The dry ditch had earth banks affording burrowing potential but had been recently cleared of all vegetation and, moreover, this ditch is considered likely to only hold water intermittently. Neither of these ditches is connected to areas of suitable water vole habitat, making periodic colonisation extremely unlikely. No evidence of water voles was found during the survey.
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4.2.7

Birds

A range of farmland birds were recorded on the day of the survey; a dunnock (Prunella modularis) nest was found at the northern end of hedgerow H6 (see target note TN2 on Plan 1). Other species recorded singing and holding territory within the site included lesser whitethroat (Sylvia curruca), chaffinch (Fringilla

coelebs), wren (Troglodytes troglodytes), song thrush (Turdus philomelos) and greenfinch (Carduelis chloris).
Several swallows (Hirundo rustica) were seen around the farm buildings; although old nests considered to be of this species were found in the former cow sheds, no active nests were found in those buildings which were accessible at the time of the survey. Families of rooks (Corvus frugilegus) and starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were recorded with fledged young foraging on the site; it is possible that starlings could have bred within the farm buildings. Two male reed buntings (Emberiza schoeniclus) were singing from arable margins to the east of hedgerow H14, both being approximately 50m away from the site boundary. No evidence of barn owls was found in any of the accessible buildings. Barn owl surveys were carried out alongside the bat emergence surveys of these buildings (including B5) carried out in August and September 2013 and these surveys did not produce any evidence of barn owls although at least one little owl (Athene

noctua) was seen around the buildings at this time.
Two pairs of jackdaws (Corvus monedula) and one pair of feral pigeons (Columba livia) were recorded prospecting for nest sites around the buildings on 17th October.

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4.2.8

Invertebrates

Five moths and two butterfly species were recorded from the site on the day of the survey. Four of the moths are common and widespread in both Nottinghamshire and nationally; these comprise: yellow shell (Camptogramma bilineata ssp bilineata), silver ground-carpet (Xanthorhoe montanata), brimstone moth (Opisthograptis luteolata) and Mother Shipton (Callistege mi). The fifth species, cinnabar (Tyria jacobaeae) was added as a priority species on the National Biodiversity Action Plan in 2007 although it remains widespread in Nottinghamshire. Both butterfly species, comprising speckled wood (Pararge aegeria) and large white (Pieris brassicae), are common and widespread both in Nottinghamshire and nationally and do not have any special habitat requirements. No evidence of white-clawed crayfish was found during the survey and the wet ditch was considered unsuitable habitat for this species due to the prevalence of silt substrate and general lack of suitable refuge areas along the majority of its length. There were only two areas where there were bricks and stones providing potential refugia although these were widely separated. The wet ditch does not connect to any other, more suitable water courses for crayfish, making periodic colonisation extremely unlikely. 4.2.9 Other Species

A grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) was recorded in hedgerow H13 and rabbits were widespread across the site.

4.3 Invasive Species
No invasive plant species were recorded from the site at the time of the survey.

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5.0 Ecological Impacts and Recommendations
5.1 Statutory and Non-statutory Sites
None of the statutory and non-statutory sites will be affected by the proposed works due to the distances involved.

5.2 Habitats
The three small meadows of semi-improved neutral grassland at the northern end of the survey area are comparatively species-rich, especially when compared to those on the remainder of the site. Although they contain some species indicative of less improved swards, they are not of SINC quality. All of the hedgerows are assessed as being species-poor, with at most five locally native woody species within them. None are considered likely to qualify as “important” under The Hedgerows Regulations 1997 (HMSO 1997). They do however provide nesting opportunities for birds and foraging habitat for bats (see Sections 5.3.3 and 5.3.7 below. The remaining habitats are also considered to be of low value to biodiversity, due to the species-poor and grass-dominated nature of the two larger meadows and the general lack of vegetation along the ditches. The buildings provide nesting opportunities for birds and limited roosting potential for bats (see Sections 5.3.3 and 5.3.7 below.

5.3 Protected and Notable Species
5.3.1 Great Crested Newts

The great crested newt and its habitat are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 (see Appendix B). There are no ponds within the site and no potential breeding habitat will be affected. Given this and that only one recent record was returned from the data search (2001 and approximately 200m away), great crested newts (and indeed other amphibian species) are not considered likely to pose a constraint to the proposed development and no further surveys or mitigation is recommended.

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5.3.2

Reptiles

All species of native reptiles are under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended). The sand lizard Lacerta agilis and smooth snake Coronella austriaca are further protected under Conservation of

Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012.
The habitats on site were assessed as being largely sub-optimal for reptiles with only a small section of the wet ditch at the southern end providing suitable basking opportunities in conjunction with suitable shelter and potential hibernation areas. The likelihood of reptiles being present is assessed as “low”. As there is only one historical record of any reptile species (grass snake from 1995), it is considered unlikely that reptiles would pose a constraint to the proposed development and no further surveys or mitigation is considered necessary. 5.3.3 Bats

Breeding, Resting and Hibernating Bats
All species of British bats and their roosts are fully protected under the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 (see Appendix B). Seven of the nine buildings within the site have some potential for roosting bats, the house having the highest potential as it appears to have a roof void and potential access points are present although access into the interior of the house was not possible at the time of the survey. All the remaining buildings, despite some of them having potential bat access points, were assessed as being of low value to roosting bats due to the lack of under felting or boarding between the slates and rafters, light interiors and limited opportunities for roosting, restricted to gaps and cracks between bricks at the gable ends. Two dusk bat emergence surveys were carried out on the buildings (including the house) in August and September 2013 when bat roosts were found. Further details are provided in the bat report. Consideration should be given to incorporating bat access bricks and roost bricks into some of the new buildings. Examples are given in Appendix D. As all of the trees have been assessed as having low bat roost potential, there is no constraint to their removal with relation to roosting bats.

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Foraging and Commuting Bats ODPM 06/2005: Biodiversity and Geological Conservation, the circular that accompanied the now redundant
Planning Policy Statement 9 (PPS9) but which itself is still valid, requests that mitigating for impacts caused by developments to foraging and commuting routes should be considered when determining planning applications. The southern boundary hedgerows (H11, H13 and H15) alongside the railway line provide good quality sheltered bat foraging habitat and are also connected at the eastern end with other tall hedgerows, providing connectivity into the wider landscape. It is recommended that these hedgerows are retained as they will also provide screening from the active railway line. All of the other hedgerows also provide some bat foraging potential although foraging habitat is not a limited resource in the wider landscape as there are arguably better quality bat foraging habitats provided by the River Trent escarpment, tall hedgerows in surrounding farmland and mature gardens within Radcliffe on Trent. Consideration should be given to incorporating bat-friendly plants into the soft landscaping of the proposed development design. Examples are given in Appendix E. 5.3.4 Badgers

Badger and their setts are protected under the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 and the NPPF (see Appendix B) stipulates that considering their welfare and mitigating for damage to their habitat are material considerations when considering planning applications. No evidence of badgers was found on the site and no sett records were returned within the 2km data search area by NBGRC. Badgers therefore do not currently pose a constraint to the proposed development. However, as there are badger records from the surrounding landscape and these are mobile animals, it is recommended that, should the proposed development be delayed by a period exceeding six months from the issue of this update report (October 2013) that an update badger survey is carried out.

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5.3.5

Otters

The otter and its habitat are protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the

Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012. The European sub-species is listed
as globally threatened in the IUCN Red List (see Appendix B). No evidence of otters was found within the site and there are no suitable habitats for them. As the wet ditch is not connected to any other water course, it is considered unlikely that otters could access the site. Otters do not pose a constraint to the proposed development and no further surveys or mitigation is considered necessary. 5.3.6 Water Voles

Water voles and their habitat are protected under Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) (see Appendix B). No evidence of water voles was found within the site and there are no suitable habitats for them. As the wet ditch is not connected to any other water course, it is considered unlikely that water voles could access the site. Water voles do not pose a constraint to the proposed development and no further surveys or mitigation is considered necessary. 5.3.7 Other Species

Birds
All nesting birds are protected from disturbance whilst nesting by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) (see Appendix B). The disused buildings had several old inactive bird nests in them at the time of the survey. No active bird nests were found in the buildings which were accessible at the time of the survey although swallows were frequently seen flying around the buildings. It is considered possible that active swallow nests could be present in the inaccessible parts of the buildings. Two pairs of jackdaws and a pair of feral pigeons were recorded prospecting for nest sites around the buildings during the October update survey and it is considered likely that these species could potentially utilise the buildings for breeding in future years, feral pigeons can breed year-round and are not constrained by season.

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All of the buildings have potential to support nesting birds and it is recommended that, should any need to be demolished or work carried out on them, that this is done outside the bird nesting season. The bird nesting season extends between March and September inclusive in any given year. Should this not be feasible, it is recommended that each building to be demolished / work carried out on is thoroughly checked by an ecologist for active bird nests prior to any work commencing. No evidence of barn owls was found during surveys carried out on the buildings during August and September although at least one little owl was present. Likewise, all of the woody vegetation also has potential to support nesting birds; an active dunnock nest was found in hedgerow H6 on the day of the survey. It is recommended that all woody vegetation, should any need to be removed, that this is done outside the bird nesting season. If this is not possible, any woody vegetation to be removed should be thoroughly checked for active bird nests by a suitably experienced ecologist beforehand. Consideration should be given to erecting bird nest boxes on to trees, tall shrubs and on to the new buildings to provide additional nesting opportunities for birds, potentially including Birds of Conservation Concern Red-List declining species such as house sparrows. Examples are provided in Appendix D.

White-clawed crayfish
The white-clawed crayfish is protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the

Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 (see Appendix B).
No evidence of white-clawed crayfish was found during the survey and there are only very limited areas of suitable habitat along the southern perimeter wet ditch. This ditch is not connected to any other water course and it is considered extremely unlikely that white-clawed crayfish would be present. This species does not pose a constraint to the proposed development and no further surveys or mitigation is considered necessary.

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Invertebrates
A number of invertebrate species are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) and the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012. The current Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) contains 411 invertebrate species (see Appendix B). Cinnabar moth is the only notable invertebrate recorded at the time of the survey, this species being listed as a priority on the National Biodiversity Action Plan. The larvae feed on common ragwort (and other ragwort species) although there was only a very low level of ragwort on the site, restricted to scattered plants in the three smaller meadows and none were seen to have been utilised by cinnabar caterpillars. As such, this site is considered unlikely to be an important breeding site for cinnabar moths and this species does not pose a constraint to the proposed development.

Dormouse
The hedgerows within and adjacent to the site were not considered suitable for dormice due to their frequent management and paucity of shrub species. The site is also outside the known range of dormice within the county and this species was not expected to be present within the site due to this. Dormice are not considered further within this report.

5.4 Invasive Species
No invasive plant species were recorded on the site at the time of the survey. The site is secure and dumping of garden waste is considered unlikely. Invasive plants therefore do not pose a constraint to the proposed development.

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6.0 Summary of Recommendations
• Bats: The majority of the buildings have been assessed as having bat roost potential. Emergence surveys were carried out on two occasions in August and September 2013 when bat roosts were found. Further details are provided in the bat report. • Barn Owl: No evidence of barn owls was found in any of the buildings and no further surveys for this species are considered necessary. • Other Bird Species: The woody vegetation and buildings have potential to support nesting birds. Should any of these need to be removed / demolished then they should be thoroughly checked for active bird nests by a suitably experienced ecologist beforehand. • Biodiversity Enhancements: Consideration should be given to incorporating bat and bird boxes on any new buildings and wildlife-friendly planting into the soft landscaping designs.

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7.0 References
Bat Conservation Trust (2012). Bat Surveys – Good Practice Guidelines. Bat Conservation Trust, London. English Nature (2002). Badgers and Development. English Nature, Peterborough, UK. Chanin, P. (2003). Monitoring the otter. Conserving Natura 2000, Rivers Monitoring Series No. 10, English Nature, Peterborough Eaton, M.A., et al. (2009). Birds of Conservation Concern 3: the population status of birds in the United

Kingdom, Channel Islands and Isle of Man. British Birds 102:296-341
Gent, T. & Gibson, S. (2003). Herpetofauna Workers' Manual. JNCC, Peterborough. Harris, S., Cresswell, P. & Jeffries, D. (1989). Surveying Badgers. An occasional publication of the mammal

society – No. 9. Mammal Society, London.
Institute for Ecology and Environmental Management (2012). Guidelines for Preliminary Ecological

Appraisal.
Joint Nature Conservation Committee (2010). Handbook for Phase 1 Habitat Survey: A technique for

environmental audit. JNCC, Peterborough.
Langton, T.E.S., Beckett, C.L. and Foster, J.P. (2001). Great Crested Newt Conservation Handbook. Froglife, Halesworth. Mitchell-Jones, A.J. & McLeish, A.P. (Eds) (2004). Bat Workers Manual, 3rd Edn. JNCC, Peterborough. Oldham, R.S., Keeble, J., Swan, M.J.S. & Jeffcote, M. (2000). Evaluating the suitability of habitat for the great crested newt Triturus cristatus. Herpetological Journal, 10(4), 143-155. RSPB (2002). The Population Status of British Birds in the UK: Birds of Conservation Concern 2002-2007. Strachan, R. & Moorhouse, T. (2006). Water Vole Conservation Handbook (2nd Edn). Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Oxford.

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Appendix A - Figures

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TN2
R d a o

H6 H7 SI H5
B1

±
H8 A H9 H14 H9 A

Legend
Buildings Hard standing Bare Ground Dense Continuous Scrub Semi-improved Neutral Grassland Amenity Grassland

lf e Sh

d or

H1 H3
B6 B8 B5

SI A

Poor Semi-improved Grassland Arable Tall Ruderal

B2 B4 B7 B3 B9

H4

Introduced Shrub Native Species-poor Hedge Wall Survey Area Boundary Running Water
| | | | | | | | | | | ||

Fence Dry Ditch

H10 A
Ga H en rd s ge ed
! (

Mature Tree Scrub Target Note
Hedgerow Number Target Note Number

A A H12

Radcliffe on Trent

H14

Executive Park Avalon Way Anstey Leicester LE7 7GR

G

! H
H1 TN1

Tel: 0116 2348100 Fax: 0116 2348002 email: midlands.ecology@wyg.com

WYG Environment
Project

............
creative minds safe hands

H13 H11 SI H15
100

TN1
ine L y a Railw
50 0 100 Meters
.

Shelford Road Radcliffe on Trent
Drawing Title:

Plan 1: Extended Phase One Habitat Survey
Scale at A3: Drawn by: Date: Office Type Checked By: Date: Approved By: Date:

1:2,915
Project No:

RJP 28/06/13 DG 28/06/13
Drawing No.

GW 01/07/13
Revision

A079137

45

94 .

01

±
B1 B6 B8 B4 B7 B3 B9 B5 B2

Legend
Buildings Hard standing Bare Ground Survey Area Boundary
B1 Building Number

Executive Park Avalon Way Anstey Leicester LE7 7GR

Tel: 0116 2348100 Fax: 0116 2348002 email: midlands.ecology@wyg.com

WYG Environment
Project

............
creative minds safe hands

Shelford Road Radcliffe on Trent
Drawing Title:

Plan 2: Bat Roost Assessment of Buildings
Scale at A3: Drawn by: Date: Office Type Checked By: Date: Approved By: Date:

10

5

0

10 Meters
.

1:374
Project No:

RJP 28/06/13 DG 28/06/13
Drawing No.

GW 01/07/13
Revision

A079137

45

94 .

01

Shelford Road Farm: Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

Appendix B – Biodiversity and Environmental Legislation, Conventions & Threatened Lists

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Introduction The UK has ratified a number of Conventions and implemented legislation pertaining to the protection of biodiversity and habtiats, either independently or as member state of the European Union. These are defined and summarised below. Lists of theatened, endagered and extinct species are also provided, together with a summary explanation of each. Bern Convention (1982) The Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (the Bern Convention) was adopted in Bern, Switzerland in 1979, and was ratified in 1982. Its aims are to protect wild plants and animals and their habitats listed in Appendices 1 and 2 of the of the Convention, and regulate the exploitation of speices listed in Appendix 3. The regulation imposes legal obligations on participating countires to protect over 500 plant species and more than 1000 animals. To meet its obligations imposed by the Convention, the European Community adopted the EC Birds

Directive (1979) and the EC Habitats Directive (1992 – see below). Since the Lisbon Treaty, in force since
1st December 2009, European legislation has been adopted by the European Union. Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) The UK Biodiversity Action Plan (UKBAP – UK Steering Group, 1995; UK Biodiversity Group, 1998 - 2000) lists and prioritises habitats and species and sets national targets to be achieved. The intent of the UKBAP, however, is much broader than the protection and enhancement of less common species, and is meant to embrace the wider countryside as a whole.

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The UKBAP has recently undergone a review (Biodiversity Reporting and Information Group, June 2007) resulting in the identification of 391 ‘Priority’ Species Action Plans (SAPs), 45 ‘Priority’ Habitat Action Plans and 162 Local Biodiversity Action Plans. Local Biodiversity Action Plans (LBAP) identify habitat and species conservation priorities at a local level (typically at the County level), and are usually drawn up by a consortium of local Government organisations and conservation charities. Birds Directive (BD) The EC Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds (791409/EEC) or ‘Birds Directive’ was introduced to achieve favourable conservation status of all wild bird species across their distribution range. In this context, the most important provision is the identification and classification of Special Protection Areas (SPAs) for rare or vulnerable species listed in Annex 1 of the Directive, as well as for all regularly occurring migratory species, paying particular attention to the protection of wetlands of international importance. Birds of Conservation Concern (BoCC) This is a review of the status of all birds occuring regularly in the United Kingdom. It is regularly updated and is prepared by leading bird conservation organisations, including the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) and The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). The latest report was produced in 2009 (Eaton et al, 2009) and identified 52 red list species, 126 amber species, and 68 green species. The criteria are complex, but generally:

Red list species are those that have shown a decline of the breeding population, non-breeding population or breeding range of more than 50% in the last 25 years.

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Amber list species are those that have shown a decline of the breeding population, non-breeding population or breeding range of between 25% and 50% in the last 25 years. Species that have a UK breeding population of less than 300 or a non-breeding population of less than 900 individuals are also included, together with those whose 50% of the population is localasied in 10 sites or fewer and those whose 20% of the European population is found in the UK.

Green list species are all regularly occurring species that do not qualify under any of the red or amber criteria are green listed

Bonn Convention

The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals or ‘Bonn Convention’ was
adopted in Bonn, Germany in 1979 and came into force in 1985. Participating states agree to work together to preserve migratory species and their habitats by providing strict protection to species listed in Appendix I of the Convention. It also establishes agreements for the conservation and management of migratory species listed in Appendix II. In the UK, the requirements of the convention are implemented via the Wildlfie & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended), Widlife (Northern Ireland) Order 1985, Nature Conservation and Amenity Lands (Northern

Ireland) Order 1985 and the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (CRoW).
Global IUCN Red List The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Threatended Species was devised to provide a list of those species that are most at risk of becoming extinct globally. It provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution information about threatened taxa around the globe.

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The system catalogues threatened species into groups of varying levels of threat, which are: Extinct (EX), Extinct in the Wild (EW), Critically Endangered (CE), Endangered (EN), Vulnerable (VU), Near Threatened (NT), Least Conern (LC), Data Deficient (DD), Not Evaluated (NE). Criteria for designation into each of the catgories is complex, and consider several principles. Habitats Directive The Council Directive 92/43/EEC on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Fora, or the ‘Habitats Directive’, is a European Union directive adopted in 1992 in response to the Bern Convention. Its aims are to protect approximately 220 habitats and 1,000 species listed in its several Annexes. In the UK, the Habitats Directive is transposed into national law via the Conservation of Habitats and

Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 in England, Scotland and Wales, and via the Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1995 (as amended) in Northern Ireland.
Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (PBA 1992) The main legislation protecting badgers in England and Wales is the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (the 1992 Act). Under the 1992 Act it is an offence to: wilfully kill, injure, take or attempt to kill, injure or take a badger; dig for a badger; interfere with a badger sett by, damaging a sett or any part thereof, destroying a sett, obstructing access to a sett, causing a dog to enter a sett or disturbing a badger while occupying a sett. The 1992 Act defines a badger sett as: “any structure or place which displays signs indicating current use by a badger” National Planning Policy Framework (2012)

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Following the publication of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) in March 2012, Planning Policy

Statement 9 (PPS9): Biodiversity and Geological Conservation (2005) has been withdrawn. However, ODPM 06/2005: Biodiversity and Geological Conservation – Statutory Obligations and their impact within the Planning System (the guidance document that accompanied PPS9) has not been withdrawn and, where
more detailed guidance is required than is given within the NPPF, local planning authorities will continue to rely on ODPM 06/2005. This guidance requires local planning authorities to take account of the conservation of protected species when determining planning applications and makes the presence of a protected species a material consideration when assessing a development proposal that, if carried out, would be likely to result in harm to the species or its habitat. In the case of European Protected Species such as bats, planning policy emphasises that strict statutory provisions apply (including the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012), to which a planning authority must have due regard. Where developments requiring planning permission are likely to impact upon protected species it is necessary that protected species surveys are undertaken and submitted to meet the requirements of paragraph 98 of ODPM Circular 06/2005 which states that: ‘The presence of a protected species is a material consideration when a planning authority is considering a

development proposal that, if carried out, would be likely to result in harm to the species or its habitat.’
General guidance within the body of the NPPF which are also potentially relevant to the possible presence of bats at the site includes the following statements:

"The planning system should contribute to and enhance the natural and local environment by:

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• • •

protecting and enhancing valued landscapes, geological conservation interests and soils; recognising the wider benefits of ecosystem services; minimising impacts on biodiversity and providing net gains in biodiversity where possible, contributing to the Government’s commitment to halt the overall decline in biodiversity, including by establishing coherent ecological networks that are more resilient to current and future pressures"

"Local planning authorities should set criteria based policies against which proposals for any development on or affecting protected wildlife or geodiversity sites or landscape areas will be judged." "When determining planning applications, local planning authorities should aim to conserve and enhance biodiversity by applying the following principles:

if significant harm resulting from a development cannot be avoided (through locating on an alternative site with less harmful impacts), adequately mitigated, or, as a last resort, compensated for, then planning permission should be refused;"

Species of Principal Importance in England Section 41 (S41) of this Act requires the Secretary of State to publish a list (in consultation with Natural England) of habitats and species which are of principal importance for the conservation of biodiversity in England. The S41 list is used to guide decision-makers such as public bodies including local and regional authorities, in implementing their duty under Section 40 of the Natural Environment and rural Communities

(NERC) Act 2006, to have regard to the conservation of biodiversity in England, when carrying out their
normal (e.g. planning) functions. The S41 list includes 65 habitats of principal importance and 1,150 species of principal importance.

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The Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 The Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 came into force on 16th August 2012 and amend the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 to ensure the various provisions of Directive 92/43/EC (‘the Habitats Directive’) are transposed in a clear manner. Regulations place a duty on the Secretary of State to propose a list of sites which are important for either habitats or species (listed in Annexes I or II of the Habitats Directive respectively) to the European Commission. These sites, if ratified by the European Commission, are then designated as Special Protection Areas (SPAs) within six years. The 2012 amendments include that public bodies help preserve, maintain and re-establish habitats for wild birds. The Regulations also make it an offence to deliberately capture, kill, disturb or trade in the animals listed in Schedule 2, or pick, uproot, destroy, or trade in the plants listed in Schedule 5 (see Table B1). Table B1 Schedules of the Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012 Schedule 2 – European Protected Species of Animals Common name Scientific name Horseshoe bats Rhinolophidae all species Common bats Vespertilionidae - all species Wild Cat Felis silvestris Dolphins, porpoises and Cetacea – all species whales Dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius Pool Frog Rana lessonae Sand Lizard Lacerta agilis Fisher’s Estuarine Moth Gortyna borelii lunata Schedule 5 – European Protected Species of Plant Common name Scientific name Dock, Shore Rumex rupestris Killarney Fern Early Gentian Lady’s-slipper Creeping Marshwort Slender Naiad Fen Orchid Plantain, Floating-leaved

Trichomanes speciosum Gentianella anglica Cypripedium calceolus Apium repens Najas flexilis Liparis loeselii Luronium natans

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Schedule 2 – European Protected Species of Animals Common name Scientific name Newt, Great Crested Otter Lesser Whirlpool Ram’shorn Snail Smooth Snake Sturgeon Natterjack Toad Marine Turtles

Triturus cristatus Lutra lutra Anisus vorticulus Coronella austriaca Acipenser sturio Bufo calamita Caretta caretta, Chelonia Lepidochelys mydas, Eretmochelys kempii, imbricata, Dermochelys coriacea

Schedule 5 – European Protected Species of Plant Common name Scientific name water Yellow Marsh Saxifrage Saxifraga hirculus

The Hedgerow Regulations 1997 The Hedgerow Regulations 1997 were made under Section 97 of the Environment Act 1995 and came into force in 1997. They introduced new arrangements for local planning authorities in England and Wales to protect important hedgerows in the countryside, by controlling their removal through a system of notification. Important hedgerows are defined by complex assessment criteria, which draw on biodiversity features, historical context and the landscape value of the hedgerow. Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) This is the principal mechanism for the legislative protection of wildlife in the UK. This legislation is the chief means by which the ‘Bern Convention’ and the Birds Directive are implemented in the UK. Since it was first introduced, the Act has been amended several times. The Act makes it an offence to (with exception to species listed in Schedule 2) intentionally:

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• • •

kill, injure, or take any wild bird, take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while that nest is in use, or take or destroy an egg of any wild bird.

In addition, the Act makes it an offence (subject to exceptions) to: • • intentionally or recklessly kill, injure or take any wild animal listed on Schedule 5, interfere with places used for shelter or protection, or intentionally disturbing animals occupying such places. • The Act also prohibits certain methods of killing, injuring, or taking wild animals

Finally, the Act also makes it an offence (subject to exceptions) to: • intentionally pick, uproot or destroy any wild plant listed in Schedule 8, or any seed or spore attached to any such wild plant, • • unless an authorised person, intentionally uproot any wild plant not included in Schedule 8, sell, offer or expose for sale, or possess (for the purposes of trade), any live or dead wild plant included in Schedule 8, or any part of, or anything derived from, such a plant. Following all amendments to the Act, Schedule 5 ‘Animals which are Protected’ contains a total of 154 species of animal, including several mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish and invertebrates. Schedule 8 ‘Plants which are Protected’ of the Act, contains 185 species, including higher plants, bryophytes and fungi and lichens. A comprehensive and up-to-date list of these species can be obtained from the JNCC website.

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Part 14 of the Act makes unlawful to plant or otherwise case to grow in the wild any plant which is listed in Part II of Schedule 9. Table B2 provides a comprehensive list of plant species listed in this schedule. It is recommended that plant material of these species is disposed of as bio-hazardous waste, and these plants should not be used in planting schemes. Table B2 Invasive plant species listed in Schedule 9 of the Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 (as amended)
Common name Perfoliate alexanders Red algae Variegated yellow archangel Yellow azalea Himalayan balsam Cotoneaster Entire-leaved cotoneaster Himalayan cotoneaster Hollyberry cotoneaster Small-leaved cotoneaster False Virginia creeper Virginia creeper Purple dewplant Fanwort or Carolina water-shield Water fern Hottentot fig Three-cornered garlic Scientific name

Smyrnium perfoliatum Grateloupia luxurians Lamiastrum galeobdolon subsp. argentatum Rhododendron luteum Impatiens glandulifera Cotoneaster horizontalis Cotoneaster integrifolius Cotoneaster simonsii Cotoneaster bullatus Cotoneaster microphyllus Parthenocissus inserta Parthenocissus quinquefolia Disphyma crassifolium Cabomba caroliniana Azolla filiculoides Carpobrotus edulis Allium triquetrum

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Common name Giant hogweed Water hyacinth Giant kelp Giant knotweed Hybrid knotweed Japanese knotweed Few-flowered garlic Water lettuce Parrot’s-feather Floating pennywort Duck potato Floating water primrose Water primrose Water primrose Rhododendron Rhododendron Giant rhubarb Japanese rose Giant salvinia Green seafingers Californian red seaweed Hooked asparagus seaweed Japanese seaweed Laver seaweeds (except native species) Australian swamp stonecrop or New Zealand pygmyweed Wakame Curly waterweed

Scientific name

Heracleum mantegazzianum Eichhornia crassipes Macrocystis spp. Fallopia sachalinensis Fallopia japonica × Fallopia sachalinensis Fallopia japonica Allium paradoxum Pistia stratiotes Myriophyllum aquaticum Hydrocotyle ranunculoides Sagittaria latifolia Ludwigia peploides Ludwigia grandiflora Ludwigia uruguayensis Rhododendron ponticum Rhododendron ponticum × Rhododendron maximum Gunnera tinctoria Rosa rugosa Salvinia molesta Codium fragile Pikea californica Asparagopsis armata Sargassum muticum Porphyra spp Crassula helmsii Undaria pinnatifida Lagarosiphon major

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Common name Waterweeds

Scientific name

Elodea spp.

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Appendix C – Data Search Results

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Re: 2km radius data search of SK 656 399. Protected species including birds and non-statutory site data request Thank you for consulting Nottinghamshire Biological and Geological Records Centre (NBGRC). Having carried out a search of our records I can provide you with the following information. International and statutory sites are not administered by us. Please check on the MAGIC website for these. There are seven Local Wildlife Sites (were called Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation - SINCs) in your search area. The Nottinghamshire Natural History Site Alert Schedule describes these sites as follows:No. 2/379 Name Netherfield Pits Area 28.567 ha 9.243 ha District Gedling District Grid Ref. SK 638400 Description A series of mature lakes in an area of old gravel workings A length of active railway and a disused side branch and tracksides A linear plantation following the course of an aquatic-rich drain A large pool and associated marshy habitats with notable aquatic communities A large mosaic of semi-natural and successional habitats on a former industrial site A mosaic of scrub and notable grassland on a Mercia Mudstone river bluff A large area of neutral grassland Interest Botanical, Bird, Odonata Botanical, Butterfly

2/913

Saxondale Railway

Rushcliffe District

SK 678401

2/946

Swallow Plantation

2.353 ha

Rushcliffe District

SK 654415

Botanical

2/947

The Avenue Pool

1 ha

Rushcliffe District

SK 649403

Botanical, Water Beetle/Bug Botanical, Butterfly

5/210

Netherfield Dismantled Railway Sidings

32.8 ha

Gedling District

SK 634403

5/214

Trent Bluff Scrub, Radcliffe

3.721 ha

Rushcliffe District

SK 651407

Botanical

5/2176

Dewberry Hill

7.412 ha

Rushcliffe District

SK 656390

Botanical

Enclosed is a map showing the site boundaries and plant species data for these sites where available. We have the following protected and notable species records from your search area. Badger: Square SK6339 SK6340 Grid Ref. Date 21/03/2010 01/03/2009 Location Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Lagoons LNR Newton No. Notes Latrine by Deep Pit. Sett not known. Prints on slurry lagoon 1st March and a possible latrine on the outer bank of the deep pit 2nd April Adult male road death reported at Shelford Tops (Shelford Road)

SK6641

21/02/2008

More information on badgers and other notable mammals may be held on the County Mammal Database for which please contact Michael Walker at Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, The Old Ragged School, Brook Street, Nottingham NG1 1EA. Bat: Our data set now includes Nottinghamshire Bat Group’s records. Species unidentified bat species Common Pipistrelle Square SK6340 SK6340 Grid Ref. Dates 18/11/2011 11/08/2009 Location Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Lagoons LNR No. Notes Type Casual Several detected by the Ouse Dyke, along the lower path and by the riverside One or two picked up during a Bat Patrol reported Casual

Noctule

SK6340

11/08/2009

Netherfield Lagoons LNR

Casual

Common Pipistrelle

SK6340

01/09/2011

Noctule

SK6340

01/09/2011

Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield

5

Casual

2

reported

Casual

Lagoons Common Pipistrelle SK6340 03/09/2011 Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Lagoons 1 reported Casual

unidentified bat species Noctule Soprano Pipistrelle Pipistrelle

SK6340

18/11/2011

1

thought to be a Whiskered Bat Seen. Grid Ref NBGRC Seen. Grid Ref NBGRC Grounded. Found in house on floor of shower cubicle. House had been empty for 6 days Owners discovered bats in loft. Okay with them Found on Roadside. Very weak. Died

Casual

SK6440 SK6440 SK6438

15/05/2010 15/05/2010 01/08/2005

4 1 1

Casual Casual Casual

unidentified bat species

SK6439

27/07/2000

Roost

Pipistrelle

SK6439

24/09/2001

Radcliffe Park

Casual

unidentified bat species Pipistrelle Pipistrelle

SK6439 SK6439 SK6439

1988 12/07/1999 09/09/1988

Radcliffe-on-Trent Orphaned baby 10 Roost in extension to house. Foraging around the grounds of Radcliffe-onTrent, Primary School, Cropwell Road Roost in silla and hanging tiles 2 bats disturbed by roofing contractors. Roost under roof tiles. Droppings found in loft Maternity Roost. Calls at 55 - 56 kHz confirm the species. Droppings seen on wall and window below the access point. Bats roosting in cavity of first floor bedroom. droppings foraging pass 19 Roost under eaves. Access via crack between chimney breast and barge board. Emergence count 55 Khz Pipistrelle from detector. Roost in soffit

Casual Roost Roost

Pipistrelle

SK6438

05/06/2008

Radcliffe-on-Trent

Casual

unidentified bat species Pipistrelle

SK6439

25/07/2009

Roost

SK6439

08/09/2003

Roost

Soprano Pipistrelle

SK6538

11/06/2010

383

Roost

unidentified bat species Common Pipistrelle Pipistrelle

SK6539 SK6539 SK6540

30/05/2012 12/06/2012 24/07/1989

roost casual Roost

Pipistrelle

SK6540

17/07/2002

186

Roost

Pipistrelle unidentified bat species unidentified bat species Brown Long-eared Brown Long-eared

SK6540 SK6540 SK6540

17/07/2002 1989 27/06/2002

Radcliffe on Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe on Trent

Nursery roost

Roost

SK6540 SK6541

18/04/2011 12/12/2001

Bats making a 'mess on window' droppings Droppings found in various parts of the farm buildings Droppings found in various parts of the farm buildings Injured grounded adult male Adult male found roosting under coal house roof Several sighted at dusk Roost in roof void. Droppings

Roost

roost Roost

Pipistrelle

SK6541

12/12/2001

Roost

Pipistrelle

SK6539

24/06/2000

1

Casual

Pipistrelle

SK6539

10/03/1988

1

Casual

unidentified bat species unidentified bat species

SK6639 SK6639

01/06/2009 11/08/2000

Casual Roost

Distance and direction from your site is shown in the attached Excel table. Bird: Bird data, copyright of Nottinghamshire Birdwatchers, is provided as a separate Excel table. Butterfly: Species Dingy Skipper Square SK6340 Grid Ref. SK637405 Dates 2011 Location 5/210 Netherfield Dismantled Railway Sidings (Netherfield) 2/913 Saxondale Railway (Saxondale) 2/913 Saxondale Railway (Saxondale) No. Notes

Grizzled Skipper

SK6840

SK686402

1980-2008

Grizzled Skipper

SK6840

SK682402

2008,2009,2010 and 2011

Crab: Species Chinese Mitten Crab Square SK6440 Grid Ref. SK64944065 Dates 15/10/2008 Location Stoke Lock, River Trent No. 1 Notes

Eriocheir sinensis
adult male. Crab found in dredging hopper at Stoke Lock. However, hopper had previously come from West Burton Power Station (SK 8057 8579) and Hazelford Lock (SK7335 4945).

Crayfish: We have no crayfish records from your search area. Fish: Species Ten-spined Stickleback Three-spined Loach Square SK6340 Grid Ref. SK639401 Dates 07/08/2011 Location Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons No. Notes found whilst pond dipping found whilst pond dipping

SK6340

SK639401

07/08/2011

Herpetofauna: Species Common Frog Square SK6339 Grid Ref. SK636399 Dates 2000-2011 Location Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent 9 No. Notes Breeding frogs in ditch along lower path. tadpoles seen tadpole caught whilst pond dipping seen

Newt species Smooth Newt

SK6340 SK6340

SK639400 SK639401

12/08/2012 2011

Common Frog

SK6340

SK639401

31/08/2011 18/12/2011 17/08/2011 23/11/2011 03/2003 15/05/1994 1995

Common Toad

SK6340

SK639401

seen

Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog

SK6438 SK6438 SK6439

SK640387 SK641388 SK642392

Common Toad Smooth Newt

SK6439 SK6439

SK642392 SK642392

1995 1995

Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent

Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog Smooth Newt Common Toad Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog

SK6438 SK6441 SK6441 SK6439 SK6439 SK6439 SK6440 SK6440 SK6541 SK6538

SK644388 SK646415 SK646415 SK648392 SK648393 SK649390 SK649404 SK649404 SK650415 SK6538

03/04/1995 1988 1991 03/1994 1994 24/04/1993 1993 1990 23/06/2004 1993

Radcliffe-on-Trent Stoke Bardolph Stoke Bardolph Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent 2 45 15+

Adults, 7, Jasper Close 20, Prince Edward Crescent Adults, Tudor Nursing Home, Main Road Tudor Nursing Home, Main Road Adult, Tudor Nursing Home, Main Road 12, Whitworth Drive Adults, 6, Stanhope Crescent Adults, 6, Stanhope Crescent Adults, 8, Manver's Grove 6, Cropwell Road Adult, 27, Cropwell Road Slack Hollow Slack Hollow Marsh, Avenue Pond Adults, Barn Farm Cottage, Cropwell Road Introduced from Keyworth Nature Reserve. Not seen since introduction up to Aug., 1995, Barn Farm Cottage Adult, Barn Farm Cottage, Cropwell Road Found on Cropwell Road Adult and eggs, 32, Newstead Avenue 32, Newstead Avenue 32, Newstead Avenue 93, Clumber Drive Night counts, 93, Clumber Drive 93, Clumber Drive 93, Clumber Drive 15, Woodland Close Adults, 30, Covert Crescent Adults, 47, Morton Gardens

Great Crested Newt

SK6538

SK6538

1993

Radcliffe-on-Trent

Smooth Newt

SK6538

SK6538

05/2003

Radcliffe-on-Trent

Grass Snake Common Toad Great Crested Newt Smooth Newt Common Toad Great Crested Newt Common Frog Smooth Newt Common Frog Common Frog Common Frog

SK6538 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK6639

SK6538 SK6539 SK6539 SK6539 SK655396 SK655396 SK655396 SK655396 SK658392 SK659393 SK662393

1995 2001 2001 2001 1989 01/06/1989 1989 1989 1994 1990 1990

Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent 20+ 130 8 15

Common Frog Smooth Newt

SK6639 SK6639

SK6639 SK6639

05/09/1999 05/09/1999

Radcliffe-on-Trent Radcliffe-on-Trent

~10

23, Thomas Avenue 23, Thomas Avenue

Invasive Plant Species: We have no invasive plant species records from your search area. Mammal: Species Bank Vole Square SK6339 Grid Ref. SK637397 Dates 02/01/2010 Location Netherfield Lagoons Habitat A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass No. 1 Notes One beneath railway bridge. Grid Ref NBGRC

Common Shrew

SK6340

SK637403

18/06/200920/12/2009

Netherfield Lagoons LNR

8

Brown Hare

SK6340

28/04/2009

Netherfield Lagoons LNR Netherfield Lagoons LNR

1

Stoat

SK6340

SK637403

11/04/2009

Weasel

SK6340

SK637403

19/04/200911/2009

Netherfield Lagoons LNR

Field Vole Brown Hare

SK6340 SK6340

SK637403

23/02/2009 03/08/2002

Netherfield Lagoons LNR Netherfield Lagoons

1 Disused slurry lagoons, Agricultural land

Harvest Mouse Harvest Mouse Stoat

SK6340 SK6340

SK638402 SK639401

1999 03/10/2011

SK6340

SK639401

14/08/2011

Weasel

SK6340

SK639401

10/04/2011

Mink

SK6340

SK639401

30/08/2011

Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons

Eight dead and three live seen between the given dates Adult seen in the triangular field Eight recorded with four together on the causeway on 19th April. Also recorde Summer Six seen between these dates, two together on 19th April 2009 Dead adult found Seen in all months March-August inclusive but none outside these dates. Present nest found

2

two reports on this day. Same animal? seen

Weasel

SK6340

SK639401

30/08/2011

Brown Hare

SK6340

11/04/2005

Netherfield Pits/Netherfield Lagoons Netherfield

2

swimming across a gap in the reeds on the Causeway 2 kits seen playing Adults adjacent to Netherfield Lagoons, running along by the Ouse Dyke Adults

Fields

1

Brown Hare

SK6440

23/03/2004

Stoke Bardolph

Agricltural

2

Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Brown Hare Bank Vole

SK6441 SK6541 SK6540 SK6540 SK6541 SK6540 SK6541 SK6540 SK6541 SK6641 SK6641 SK6340 SK637403

08/08/2004 11/08/2004 01/06/2005 30/04/2003 15/06/2005 29/04/2002 24/07/2002 30/04/2001 16/02/2004 16/07/2000 17/02/2003 18/06/2009

Stoke Bardolph Shelford Farm Field, Radcliffe-On-Trent Shelford Shelford Radcliffe on Trent Radcliffe on Trent Shelford Shelford Shelford Shelford Netherfield Lagoons LNR Hedgerow Hedgerow Arable Improved grassland B42 Arable Set aside Farmland Arable

1 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1

Adult Adult Adult on Shelford Road Adult Adults Adult Adults Adult Adults boxing in cereal field Adult Adults Adult seen

Moth: There are no Local Wildlife Sites for moth interest in your search area. Odonata: There is one Local Wildlife Site for odonata interest in your search area. The first location name is our Local Wildlife Site name. If there is a second different name, in brackets, this is the recorder’s name for the same site. Species Square SK6340 Grid Ref. SK639401 Dates 1995-2000 Location 2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site)) Habitat A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel Grade No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

Erythromma najas

Orthetrum cancellatum

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

Sympetrum sanguineum

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna mixta

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one. This species was not recorded in 2010 No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

Anax imperator

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid

No graded species recorded but 16 in

Ref. is centre point of site))

Libellula quadrimaculata

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Orthetrum cancellatum

SK6340

SK639401

1995-2000

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna cyanea

SK6340

SK639401

16/07/201010/10/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna grandis

SK6340

SK639401

16/06/201012/09/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna mixta

SK6340

SK639401

01/08/201029/10/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Anax imperator

SK6340

SK639401

12/06/201022/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Calopteryx splendens

SK6340

SK639401

15/05/2010 27/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion

assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including

Coenagrion puella

SK6340

SK639401

20/05/2010 02/06/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Enallagma cyathigerum

SK6340

SK639401

15/05201007/10/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Erythromma najas

SK6340

SK639401

20/05/201022/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Erythromma viridulum

SK6340

SK639401

31/07/201022/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Ischnura elegens

SK6340

SK639401

19/05/201008/09/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Lestes sponsa

SK6340

SK639401

27/07/201029/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Libellula depressa

SK6340

SK639401

21/06/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush,

this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one seen close

Libellula quadrimaculata

SK6340

SK639401

23/05/201019/07/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Orthetrum cancellatum

SK6340

SK639401

16/06/201008/08/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Pyrrhosoma nymphala

SK6340

SK639401

2008

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Sympetrum striolatum

SK6340

SK639401

29/07/201017/10/2010

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna cyanea

SK6340

SK639401

06/07/2011 21/08/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna grandis

SK6340

SK639401

27/06/2011 27/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Aeshna mixta

SK6340

SK639401

14/08/2011 01/11/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet

to railway embankment No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 16 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

Grass

Anax imperator

SK6340

SK639401

27/06/2011 14/08/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Calopteryx splendens

SK6340

SK639401

25/04/2011 07/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Coenagrion puella

SK6340

SK639401

01/05/2011 11/06/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Enallagma cyathigerum

SK6340

SK639401

23/04/201101/10/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Erythromma najas

SK6340

SK639401

01/05/2011 02/07/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Erythromma viridulum

SK6340

SK639401

30/07/2011 01/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Ischnura elegens

SK6340

SK639401

25/04/201111/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

Lestes sponsa

SK6340

SK639401

28/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Sympetrum striolatum

SK6340

SK639401

26/07/2011 28/09/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Libellula quadrimaculata

SK6340

SK639401

06/06/2011 02/07/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

Orthetrum cancellatum

SK6340

SK639401

11/06/2011 19/08/2011

2/379 Netherfield Pits (Netherfield Lagoons (Grid Ref. is centre point of site))

A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass A complex of slurry lagoons and disused flooded gravel pits. Marginal vegetion primarily Bulrush, Common Reed and Reed Sweet Grass

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

No graded species recorded but 14 in assemblage including this one

Otter: Square SK6541 Grid Ref. Date 31/01/2001 Location Stoke Bardolph, River Trent

Water Beetle: There is one Local Wildlife Site for water beetle interest in your search area. The first location name is our Local Wildlife Site name. If there is a second different name, in brackets, this is the recorder’s name for the same site. This site is also a botanical Local Wildlife Site. Species Square SK6440 Grid Ref. SK649403 Date 2000 Location 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs No. Grade Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from

Cercyon tristis

Hydraena testacea

SK6440

SK649403

2001

common

Hydraena testacea

SK6440

SK649403

2000

present 21100

Hydraena testacea

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hygrotus versicolor

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Ilybius fenestratus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Anacaena bipustulata

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Anacaena bipustulata

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Anacaena bipustulata

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Cercyon convexiusculus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Cercyon ustulatus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Cymbiodyta marginellus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Enochrus testaceus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Enochrus testaceus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Enochrus testaceus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Gyrinus marinus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Helochares lividus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hydroglyphus geminus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Ilybius quadriguttatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Ilybius quadriguttatus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Laccobius colon

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Noterus crassicornis

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Noterus crassicornis

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Agabus bipustulatus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

(pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent)

1 female

1 female

1 present

adult Common

Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Scarce (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Scarce (from Sorby Atlas 2006)

Agabus sturmii

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Agabus sturmii

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Anacaena limbata

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Anacaena limbata

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Anacaena limbata

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Anacaena limbata

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Colymbetes fuscus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Colymbetes fuscus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Dytiscus marginalis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Haliplus immaculatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Haliplus immaculatus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Haliplus immaculatus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Haliplus ruficollis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Haliplus ruficollis

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Helophorus aequalis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Helophorus brevipalpis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Helophorus grandis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydraena riparia

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydraena riparia

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hydraena riparia

SK6440

SK649403

2000

2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs

1 female [caught in baited bottle-trap]

Hydraena riparia

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydrobius fuscipes

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hydrobius fuscipes

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Hydroporus angustatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydroporus palustris

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hydroporus palustris

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydroporus palustris

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hydroporus palustris

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Hydroporus planus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Hydroporus planus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hygrotus impressopunctatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hygrotus inaequalis

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Hygrotus inaequalis

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hyphydrus ovatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hyphydrus ovatus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Hyphydrus ovatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Hyphydrus ovatus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Laccobius bipunctatus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Laccobius bipunctatus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

(pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent)

Laccobius bipunctatus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Laccophilus minutus

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Laccophilus minutus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Laccophilus minutus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Noterus clavicornis

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Noterus clavicornis

SK6440

SK649403

1997

Noterus clavicornis

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Ochthebius minimus

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Ochthebius minimus

SK6440

SK649403

2001

Chaetarthria seminulum s. lat.

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Enochrus melanocephalus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Hydraena testacea

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Hygrotus versicolor

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Limnebius nitidus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Anacaena bipustulata

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Cercyon convexiusculus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Cercyon ustulatus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Enochrus testaceus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Anacaena limbata

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Haliplus immaculatus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs

2 present

1 present

present 620

2 present

Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006)

Hydraena riparia

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Hydrobius fuscipes

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Hydroporus palustris

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Hydroporus planus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Laccobius bipunctatus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Noterus clavicornis

SK6540

SK650404

2000

Ochthebius minimus

SK6540

SK650404

2000

(pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent)

Water Bug: There is one Local Wildlife Site for water bug interest in your search area. This is the same site as for water beetles. Species Square SK6440 Grid Ref. SK649403 Date 2000 Location 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) No. Grade Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006)

Corixa panzeri

Cymatia coleoptrata Cymatia coleoptrata Ilyocoris cimicoides Ilyocoris cimicoides Callicorixa praeusta Gerris lacustris

SK6440

SK649403

1997

6 adults

SK6440

SK649403

2000

SK6440

SK649403

1997

1 adult

SK6440

SK649403

2000

SK6440

SK649403

2000

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Gerris odontogaster Gerris odontogaster Hesperocorixa sahlbergi Hydrometra stagnorum Notonecta glauca Notonecta glauca

SK6440

SK649403

1997

SK6440

SK649403

2000

SK6440

SK649403

1997

SK6440

SK649403

1997

SK6440

SK649403

1997

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Plea minutissima

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Sigara dorsalis

SK6440

SK649403

2000

Sigara falleni Cymatia coleoptrata Ilyocoris cimicoides Microvelia reticulata Gerris odontogaster Nepa cinerea Notonecta glauca

SK6440

SK649403

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

SK6540

SK650404

2000

2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent) 2/947 The Avenue Pool (The Cliffs (pond), Radcliffe on Trent)

Local A (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006) Local B (from Sorby Atlas 2006)

Water Vole: Square SK6340 Grid Ref. Dates 22/12/2002 Location Netherfield Lagoons Habitat Disused slurry lagoon No. 1 Notes First record for several years

The information provided is copyright of Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire Bat Group.

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Appendix D – Wildlife Boxes

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Introduction The information in this appendix relates to bat and bird boxes that can be easily incorporated into building and landscape plans. The information provided is not exhaustive and provides examples of some of the types of boxes available. Including bat and bird boxes throughout the development site has a number of benefits: • • • Bats For Buildings The inclusion of a variety of bat bricks, tubes and boxes for buildings is recommended to encourage a diversity of bat species. Bat bricks and tubes require no maintenance. Any roosting or resting places lost as a result of the work will be replaced; The ecological value of the site will be enhanced; Priority species within the UK and local Biodiversity Action Plans (BAPs) will be encouraged.

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Bat Access and Roost Bricks Source: Marshalls Clay Products (approved by the Bat conservation Trust) ‘… Marshall Clay Products have been producing a Bat Access Brick specially designed to help the country’s badly depleted bat population by provided access to wall cavities or roof spaces where most bat colonies tend to be (see diagram). In recent years bats have been declining at an alarming rate. Nearly all colonies tend to be on the outside of houses, in wall cavities, under slates, flashing or tiles, et c. … Contrary to popular opinion, bats do not make pests and do absolutely no damage to buildings or roof timbers, indeed many people encourage bat colonies in their area because of the large number of insect pests, woodworm, et c. which they eat. Most colonises will use a house for only a few weeks in summer before dispersing in autumn.’

A Bat Brick should ideally be placed as high as possible at the gable apex or close to the soffit.
Marshalls Clay Products - Quarry Lane,

Howley Park, Woodkirk, Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, WF12 7JJ – Tel: (01132) 203535,

Marshall’s Bat Access Brick, which is now also available in stone.

Fax: (01132) 203555.

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Bat Tube Brick bat tubes are designed for buildings, or underneath bridges, arches or tunnels, where conditions are relatively humid. They are particularly useful for new buildings or bridges to attract bats, or to provide new roost sites where existing buildings with bats are being renovated. This long box can be installed within brick masonry, beneath plasterwork or wood panelling, or incorporated into concrete structures such as factory buildings or bridges. Inside it contains a woodcrete surface, a roughened wood board, and a metal mesh, providing a choice of roosting areas depending on the weather conditions and the bats' habits. This box is maintenance-free as the entrance slit is at the bottom. No painting required, but if painting is necessary a natural breathable paint should be used. Width: 20cm; Height: 47.5cm; Depth: 12.5cm; Entrance Width: 15cm; Entrance Depth: 2cm; Weight: 13kg

Bat Box This type of box is made of woodcrete and is expected to last approximately 25 years. It has a narrow crevice-like internal space to attract Pipistrelle and Noctule bats. Woodcrete (75% wood sawdust, concrete and clay mixture). Width: 27cm; Height: 43cm; Weight: 8.3kg.

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For Trees Woodcrete boxes have the highest rates of occupation of all box types. The 75% wood sawdust, concrete and clay mixture allows natural respiration, stable temperature, and durability. They are long lasting (approx. 25 years) and are rotand predator-proof. Hang from a tree branch near the trunk, or fix to a trunk with the supplied 'tree-friendly' aluminium nail. Attractive to smaller British bats. Material: Woodcrete (75% wood sawdust, concrete and clay mixture); Diameter: 16cm; Height: 33cm; Weight: 4kg.

Bird Boxes A variety of bird box designs could be installed throughout the development site to attract a diversity of species. Open fronted boxes will attract species such as robins, pied wagtails and spotted flycatchers, while boxes with entrance holes will attract tits, wrens and tree sparrows. Roost pockets will be used by roosting birds over the winter and by smaller species, such as wrens, for nesting in the spring. Open Fronted Boxes This box is attractive to robins, pied wagtails, spotted flycatcher, wrens and black redstarts and is best sited on the walls of buildings with the entrance on one side. These woodcrete boxes are designed to mimic natural nest sites and provide a stable environment for chick rearing and winter roosting. They can be expected to last 25 years or more without maintenance.

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Boxes with Entrance Holes This box is attractive to smaller birds such as tits, wrens and tree sparrows. Sparrow terraces are also available.

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Appendix E – Wildlife-friendly Planting

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Table E1 Shrub species of native origin or generally thought to be beneficial to wildlife (Source: ‘Gardening with wildlife in mind’, Natural England, 2008)

Common name Hazel Elder Goat willow Hawthorn Dog rose Butterfly bush Guelder rose Gorse Broom Wayfaring tree Shrubby cinquefoil Raspberry Alder buckthorn Wild privet Barberry Barberry Bell heather Bilberry Black currant Blackthorn Buckthorn Butcher’s-broom Cherry laurel Cowberry Cross-leaved heath New Zealand holly Daphne Dogwood Field rose Firethorn Flowering Currant Gooseberry Hebe ‘Midsummer Beauty’ Hedgehog Rose Himalayan honeysuckle Holly Japanese quince Lilac Mexican orange Mezereon Midland Hawthorn Oregon Grape Osier Portugal laurel Privet Purple Willow

Scientific name

Corylus avellana Sambucus nigra Salix caprea Crataegus monogyna Rosa canina Buddleia davidii Viburnum opulus Ulex europaeus Cytisus scoparius Viburnum lantana Potentilla fruticosa Rubus idaeus Frangula alnus Ligustrum vulgare Berberis × stenophylla Berberis vulgaris Erica cinerea Vaccinium myrtillus Ribes nigrum Prunus spinosa Rhamnus catharticus Ruscus aculeatus Prunus laurocerasus Vaccinium vitis-idaea Erica tetralix Olearia macrodonta Daphne odora Cornus sanguinea Rosa arvensis Pyracanthus angustifolia Ribes sanguineum Ribes uva-crispa Hebe species Rosa rugosa Leycesteria formosa Ilex aquifolium Chaenomeles japonica Syringa vulgaris Choisya ternata Daphne mezereum Crataegus laevigata Mahonia aquifolium Salix viminalis Prunus lusitanica Lustrum ovalifolium Salix purpurea

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Common name Snowy Mespilus Spindle Spurge laurel Sweet briar Wild privet

Scientific name

Amelanchier canadensis, Amelanchier lamarckii Euonymus europaeus Daphne laureola Rosa rubiginosa Ligustrum vulgare

Table E2 Tree species of native origin or generally thought to be beneficial to wildlife (Source: ‘Gardening with wildlife in mind’, Natural England, 2008)
Common name Pedunculate oak Ash Wych Elms Whitebeam species Rowan Aspen Apple Bird Cherry Common Alder Crab apple Crack Willow Downy Birch False Acacia Field Maple Hornbeam Juniper Large-leaved lime Small-leaved lime Pear Scots Pine Sessile oak Silver birch Sweet chestnut Wild Cherry Wild service-tree Yew Scientific name

Quercus robur Fraxinus excelsior Ulmus glabra Sorbus aria agg. Sorbus aucuparia Populus tremula Malus domestica Prunus padus Alnus glutinosa Malus sylvestris Salix fragilis Betula pubescens Robinia pseudoacacia Acer campestre Carpinus betulus Juniperus communis Tilia platyphyllos Tilia cordata Pyrus communis Pinus sylvestris Quercus petraea Betula pendula Castanea sativa Prunus avium Sorbus torminalis Taxus baccata

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Table E3 Gardening for bats Aim at having flowers in bloom throughout the year, including both annuals and herbaceous perennials. Below are some suggestions, but this is not an exhaustive list. Flowering times are approximate, varying dependent on region. Regular dead-heading extends flowering period in many flowers. A=annual, HA= hardy, annual, HHA=half-hardy annual, P=perennial, W=wild flower. Flowers for borders St. John’s Wort Marigolds Aubrietia Honesty Forget-me-not Elephant ears Wallflowers Cranesbills Yarrow Poppies Dames violet Red Valerian Poached egg plant Knapweed Phacelia Ox-eye daisy Evening primrose Candytuft Sweet William Blanket flowers Verbena Scabious Night-scented stock Pincushion flower Cherry pie Mexican aster Cone flower Mallow

Hypericum Calendula Aubrietia deltoidea Lunaria rediviva Myosotis sp. Bergenia Erysimum Geranium sp. Achillea Papaver sp. Hesperis matronalis Centranthus rubber Limnanthes Centaurea nigra Leucanthemum vulgare Oenothera biennis Iberis umbellate Dianthus barbatus Gaillardia Verbena bonariensis Knautia arvensis Mattiola bicornia Scabious sp. Heliotrope Cosmos sp. Rudbeckia sp. Lavateria sp.

P H/A P HB A/P P B P P A P P HA P HA P B HA B P HHA P HA A/P HHA A/P A/P P

March March-October March-June March March-May April April-June May-September MayMay- July May-August May-Sept June-August June-September June-September June-August June-September June-September June-July June June-October July-August July-August July-September July-October July-October August-November August-October

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Michaelmas daisy Ice plant ‘Pink lady’ Fennel Bergamont Sweet Cicely Hyssop Feverfew Borage Rosemary Lemon balm Coriander Lavenders Marjoram Oak
Silver birch Common alder Hazel Elder Goat willow Hawthorn Honeysuckle Dog rose Bramble Ivy Buddleia Guelder rose Gorse Purple loosestrife Meadow sweet Lady’s smock Water mint Angelica Hemp agrimony

Aster sp. Sedum spectabile Foeniculum vulgare Monarda didyma Myrrhis odorata Hyssopus officinalis Tanacetum parthenium Borago officinalis Rosmarinus officinalis Melissa officinalis Coprianrum sativum Lavendula sp. Origanum sp. Quercus sp. Betula pendula Alnus glutinosa Corylus avellana Sambucus nigra Salix caprea Crataegus monogyna Lonicera sp. Rosa canina Rubus fruticosus Hedera helix Buddleja davidii Vibernum opulus
Ulex sp.

P P

August-September September July-September June-September April-June July-September June-September May-September March-May June-August

Herbs – both leaves and flowers are fragrant

Trees, shrubs and climbers important to insects large gardens only Suitable for coppicing Suitable for coppicing Small Suitable for coppicing Suitable for coppicing Grow a variety for succession Climber Climber Climber Shrub Shrub Shrub W W W W W W June-August June-September April-June July-September July-September March-May

Plants for pond edges and marshy areas

Lythrum salicaria Filipendula ulmaria Cardamine pratensis Mentha aquatica Angelica sylvestris Eupatorium cannabinum

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Marsh marigold Creeping Jenny Fringed water lily Water forget-me-not

Caltha palustris Lysimachia nummularium Nymphoides peltata Myosotis scorpioides

W W W W

June-September May-August June-September June-September

Allow part lawns to grow long in summer and cut in autumn, removing the clippings. Avoid using fertilisers. Compost heaps are food producers of insects too. (Source: ‘Gardening for bats’, Bat Conservation Trust, 2004)

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