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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent Landscape & Visual Appraisal

Prepared on behalf of

William Davis Limited

NOVEMBER 2013
085 LVA 221113 FINAL

Define is the trading name of Define Planning and Design Ltd | Registered in England and Wales | Company number 06449768 | VAT number 104 9131 47 Registered office C/O Mazars LLP | Floor 10 | 45 Church Street | Birmingham | B3 2RT

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION 3

2.

METHODOLOGY

5

3.

THE SITE & SURROUNDINGS

11

4.

LANDSCAPE CHARACTER

14

5.

VISUAL AMENITY

19

6.

LANDSCAPE CHARACTER & VISUAL AMENITY APPRAISAL

33

7.

CONCLUSIONS

36

FIGURES & REPRESENTATIVE VIEWPOINTS

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. THE PROJECT
1.1.1. This Landscape and Visual Appraisal (LVA) concerns the proposed development of land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent, Nottinghamshire for residential development, including public open space and associated infrastructure.

The Site
1.1.2. 1.1.3. The application site (refer to Figure 1) is located on the eastern periphery Radcliffe on Trent. Shelford Road delineates the site’s northern boundary with existing residential development beyond (except for an individual dwelling to the south of Shelford Road that is not included within the site). The rear gardens of existing properties along Clumber Drive lie to the west of the western site boundary. A stream marks the site’s southern boundary, with the railway line, sports pitches and residential development beyond. Agricultural land lies to the east of the site. The site area is approximately 19.63ha, and largely comprises of agricultural land sub-divided into regular shaped fields that gently slope down to the stream to the south. However, the northern part of the site also contains a number of agricultural buildings and a farm house that previously formed Shelford Road Farm. The site forms part of the designated Green Belt around Nottingham.

1.1.4.

1.1.5.

The Proposed Development
1.1.6. It is proposed that the former Shelford Road Farm buildings are demolished (the separate residential property will be retained) and the site developed for residential purposes, providing up to 400 dwellings, a primary school, health centre (if required) and associated infrastructure, including highway and pedestrian access, open space and structural landscaping, notably along the southern and eastern boundaries. The dwellings would include a mix of traditional house sizes and types. Vehicular pedestrian and cycle access to the proposed development would be via a new roundabout junction with Shelford Road to the north. The existing access drive to the site would be closed to vehicular movement, but retained for pedestrian and cycle movements. The housing will be arranged in perimeter blocks enclosing the private garden space within the block, and allowing the houses to front onto the streets and public open spaces, providing a permeable layout. Consequently new housing will back onto exposed rear property boundaries to the west (Clumber Drive). Development along the eastern site boundary will be at a lower density and informally arranged to create a soft settlement edge where houses face out to the countryside. A landscape buffer will be provided along this boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and proposed tree planting. Green fingers will extend westwards from this buffer to permeate the development. An area of open space, including equipped children’s play and parkland, is located in the centre of the development. Public open space will also be provided to the south of built the development. This will incorporate the drainage features and allotments. The existing hedgerow corridor will be retained within a central north-south green

1.1.7.

1.1.8.

1.1.9.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

corridor, providing a pedestrian/cycle link to Shelford Road, and convenient access to the central and southern open spaces. 1.1.10. Further details of the proposed development are set out in the Design and Access Statement that also accompanies the planning application.

1.2. LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL APPRAISAL
1.2.1. This report is a Landscape and Visual Appraisal that records the baseline condition of the surrounding landscape character and visual amenity, and considers how the proposed development would relate to this baseline condition. It does not assess in detail the impact of the proposed development (as a full Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (LVIA) would), but does appraise the nature of the landscape and visual receptors (in terms of their value and sensitivity to the proposed development) to guide an appropriate form of development. It is, therefore, a tool to inform and shape the proposed development as part of the iterative design process, predicting key issues and identifying mitigation where required. The appraisal also considers the implications of the proposed development for the purposes of the Green Belt. This appraisal follows the Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment 3rd Edition (2013) as published by the Landscape Institute and Institute for Environmental Management & Assessment (GVLIA3), although it is recognised that the nature of this appraisal is more informal and flexible than a LVIA.1

1.2.2.

1.3. DOCUMENT STRUCTURE
1.3.1. This document is structured to clarify the methodology applied to the study area (section 2), describe the baseline conditions of the site and its surroundings (section 3), establish the baseline landscape character (section 4), establish the existing visual amenity relating to the application site and the Green Belt purposes (section 5), appraise the relationship of the proposed development with the baseline conditions identifying any mitigation required (section 6), and conclude with a summary of the issues raised in this appraisal (section 7).

1

Para 1.11/3.2 GLVIA3

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

2. METHODOLOGY
2.1. GENERAL APPROACH
2.1.1. The extent and depth of the appraisal should be appropriate and proportionate to the scale of the project that is being assessed and the nature of its likely effects.2 A study area based on a 3km distance from the centre of the application site has been identified. This reflects the limit of everyday visibility and comfortably incorporates the general extent of the Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) verified through the fieldwork (see below), taking account of the local topography and urban and landscape features. This appraisal relies on professional judgement. To ensure a consistent and transparent approach, all judgements made are discussed and debated with at least one other Chartered Landscape Architect prior to being fixed. This methodology sets out a concise and transparent method, with matrices used to guide, not determine, professional judgements, and to provide transparency. The appraisal includes reference to both ‘impact’ and ‘effect’. ‘Impact’ is used in reference to the action being taken (such as vegetation loss), whereas the ‘effect’ is defined as the change (positive or negative) that results from that action, or from the whole development.3 The appraisal process considers the ‘nature of the receptor’, specifically its “sensitivity”, whether the receptor is a landscape element or a person experiencing a view. The judgement is based on consideration of both the susceptibility of the receptor to the specific nature of change arising from the proposed development on the site, and the value that should be attached to the receptor.4 To provide clarity in the appraisal, the terms negligible, low, medium and high are used on a 4 point scale. In combining the assessments of susceptibility and value, there is a strong likelihood that a consistent judgement in those regards will result in the same conclusion in respect of overall sensitivity (e.g. medium susceptibility and medium value will result in medium sensitivity). However where there is a differential judgement and there is no compelling case to conclude one way or the other a split judgement will be given.

2.1.2.

2.1.3.

2.1.4.

2.1.5.

2.2. LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL BASELINE
2.2.1. The landscape and visual baseline appraisal has been informed by a desktop appraisal of existing national, regional and local character assessments, and other relevant published reports. This appraisal benefits from the thorough approach Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC) have undertaken with regard to the categorisation and assessment of landscape character contained within the Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment (June 2009). This document provides a well-researched, thorough approach to landscape character in the region and forms a background to the landscape character baseline. Reference is also made to National and Regional Landscape Character Areas. However, due to the scale of the proposed development and the detail provided within this broader landscape study, this appraisal has focussed on the local study.

2.2.2.

2 3

Para 1.17 GLVIA3 Para 1.15 GLVIA3 4 See Box 3.1, page 37 of the GLVIA3!

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

2.2.3.

The desktop exercise was followed by fieldwork to fully consider the baseline condition, and test the accuracy and relevance of the published character assessments to the site specifically5. This exercise included an appraisal of the site’s landscape elements and characteristics, and how these relate and contribute to the wider landscape character and visual amenity. The visual work was undertaken between February and March 2013, and the photographs display clear open views devoid of significant vegetation cover that will provide additional screening in a number of locations during the late spring and summer months.

2.2.4.

2.3. APPRAISING LANDSCAPE CHARACTER
2.3.1. The appraisal of the landscape resource initially considered the susceptibility of the landscape. This term is interpreted as the relative ability of a landscape (whether it be the overall character, a particular area, or a specific element6) to accommodate the proposed development without undue consequences. This was considered by exploring the landscape’s characteristics, elements and patterns. The specific landscape receptors were identified (such as woodland / hedgerows) together with the potential changes to them that would arise from the proposed development. The ability of the landscape character to receive the type of change proposed was identified as being low, medium or high (see Matrix 1). Following the appraisal of landscape susceptibility, the value of the landscape resource has been established. The appraisal of landscape value considered the relative merits of the condition of the landscape and elements within it, its scenic quality, rarity, representiveness, conservation interest, recreational value, perceptual aspects and any other associations. It also considered any formal designations or status the landscape has, and any emphasis placed within such designations. This judgement relied on a balanced and non-formulaic approach, with reference to the written explanation of low, medium or high value below (see Matrix 1). Once the nature of the receptor had been appraised, the type of development proposed was considered against these judgements, and an overall conclusion in respect of sensitivity made (refer to para. 2.1.5 above). Key issues for further consideration within the design solution were identified together with primary mitigation measures (key features and constraints essential to the design solution), and secondary mitigation measures where appropriate (post design measures).

2.3.2.

2.3.3.

2.4. APPRAISING VISUAL AMENITY
2.4.1. The starting point for appraising visual amenity was to identify the study area, and the likely zone of (theoretical) visual influence of the type of development proposed. A Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) was created using Ordnance Survey LIDAR DSM (Digital Surface Model) data for a 5km2 area around the site, which includes terrain features, buildings and vegetation, therefore providing a topographical model of the earth’s surface. Selected key points within the site were chosen, based on the site’s form and topography, and terrain building software was used to produce the ZTV mapping. This was used to confirm the general extent of the site’s visibility from points taken at both ground level and a theoretical point 8.5m high above ground level to represent development on the site.

5 6

Para 5.15 GLVIA3 Para 5.40 GLVIA3

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

2.4.2. 2.4.3.

This exercise was supplemented by a desktop review of local policies and guidance to identify any key viewpoints in the area that need to be specifically considered. That process was followed by fieldwork to confirm the extent of the site’s visibility as shown in the ZTV and to test and confirm the viewpoints to be appraised. Each view was identified in its relevant category as being: Representative viewpoints – these are selected to represent the experience of different types of user, for example a viewpoint representative of views from a certain public footpath, or number of public footpaths. This is often the most common type of viewpoint appraised. Specific viewpoints – these are chosen because they are key and sometimes promoted viewpoints within the landscape, such as visitor attractions or stand out views of noteworthy landscape features. Illustrative viewpoints – these are chosen to demonstrate limited and specific issues that are neither representative of a typical public view, or a specific viewpoint. In this case 11 representative viewpoints were selected from public locations within the ZTV. The viewpoints represent the available views of residents close to the site, travellers (using a variety of modes), and leisure users of public rights of way and recreation facilities.

2.4.4.

Views from private residences are often a matter raised in respect of visual amenity. For private views to be considered in an appraisal, they must be: from rooms occupied during daylight hours; more than views by people passing through an area, and; representative of a wider community, not reflective of individual, private views.7 As is usually the case, in this instance the impact on private residences is better addressed through a residential amenity assessment focussed on standard residential amenity factors such as building separation, gardens sizes etc. The relationship of the site and the proposed development to the existing residences, notably along its western edge, has been addressed within the Design and Access Statement that also accompanies the planning application. That highlights the that development will be limited to a maximum of 2 storeys with longer rear gardens (at least 15.5m) and the inclusion of a vegetated buffer (approx. 5m within the 15.5m). The susceptibility of the viewer to changes in the view and visual amenity arising from the development was then appraised taking account of their activity in each location and their focus on the view or visual amenity8. This was not a case of reviewing susceptibility to change per se, as it must be specific to the development proposed on the site. For example, a leisure walker is a highly susceptible receptor, but when walking along a sunken, tree lined corridor with few references or views towards a particular site, the susceptibility to the type of change proposed on the site is very different from a leisure walker experiencing a more direct view. Therefore, in considering susceptibility, the type of viewpoint, receptor and activity are considered, along with the visual expectation and its popularity or volume of use. These factors led to a conclusion of low, medium or high, or negligible where susceptibility to change would be barely perceptible (see Matrix 2). The value of each view was then established. The assessment of viewpoint value considered the status of the view, whether it is identified in any formal documentation, including planning or heritage studies or designations, but also within general literature such as tourist guides, informal leisure based information

2.4.5.

2.4.6.

7 8

Para 6.17/6.36 GLVIA Paras 6.32-6.35 GLVIA3

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

(local signage) or in other cultural guides. This judgement relied on a balanced and non-formulaic approach, with a reference to the written explanation of value (see Matrix 2). 2.4.7. Once the nature of the receptor had been appraised, the type of development proposed was considered against these judgements and an overall conclusion in respect of sensitivity made (refer to para. 2.1.5 above). Key issues for further consideration within the design solution were identified together with primary mitigation measures (key features and constraints essential to the design solution), and secondary mitigation measures where appropriate (post design measures).

Site Photography
2.4.8. In accordance with current guidance, on-site photography records the position (as a grid reference), height of camera lens, camera used, lens type and focal length, field of view, date, time, weather and light condition. Photographs were recorded at 1.6 metres above ground level to reflect the pedestrian eye height. Photographs are taken with a fixed 50mm focal length lens fitted to a digital camera (Canon EOS 5D MKII SLR) with a full frame sensor and focal length multiplier of x1. Once the panorama is produced it can be set out flat and a viewing distance can be calculated. This is the distance from eye to paper to gain a true representation of the image. For this appraisal, a single image has been taken and presented with a gauge representing the horizontal angle with key indicators showing the field of view (FOV) for a 50mm lens (slightly short of 40º as advised in the Landscape Institute Advice note 01/11). The size of the image was calculated to reflect a viewing distance of 30cm. Extended panoramas are also provided so that the reader can clearly see and understand the location of the site and proposed development within its setting. These were stitched together using photo correction software.

2.4.9.

2.5. APPRAISAL MATRICES
2.5.1. The following matrices summarise the appraisal considerations and judgements made in respect of sensitivity and value for both landscape and visual landscape effects.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Matrix 1 - Landscape
Susceptibility Consideration of the landscape structure, including its characteristics and elements, to identify the capacity of the landscape to receive change without undue consequences leads to the conclusion that the landscape has high susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed on the site. Consideration of the landscape structure, including its characteristics and elements, to identify the capacity of the landscape to receive change without undue consequences leads to the conclusion that the landscape has medium susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed on the site. Value Consideration of the condition of the landscape, its scenic quality, rarity, representiveness, conservation interest, recreational value, perceptual aspects and other associations leads to the conclusion that the landscape has high value. These landscapes are expected to have national designation, or demonstrate very high local value. Consideration of the condition of the landscape, its scenic quality, rarity, representiveness, conservation interest, recreational value, perceptual aspects and other associations leads to the conclusion that the landscape has medium value. These landscapes are expected to have a local designation/policy or notable landscape elements of recognised value. Consideration of the landscape structure, including its characteristics and elements, to identify the capacity of the landscape to receive change without undue consequences leads to the conclusion that the landscape has low susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed on the site. Consideration of the condition of the landscape, its scenic quality, rarity, representiveness, conservation interest, recreational value, perceptual aspects and other associations leads to the conclusion that the landscape has some value but it is categorised as being low. These landscapes are not expected to have formal, character or quality based designations. Consideration of the condition of the landscape, its scenic quality, rarity, representiveness, conservation interest, recreational value, perceptual aspects and other associations leads to the conclusion that the landscape has negligible or no value.

High

Medium

Low

Negligible

Consideration of the landscape structure, including its characteristics and elements, to identify the capacity of the landscape to receive change without undue consequences, leads to the conclusion that the landscape has negligible susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Matrix 2 – Visual
Susceptibility Consideration of the receptor type, activity and expectation, and frequency of use leads to the conclusion that the viewer would have high susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed to the view. Value Consideration of the formal status of the view, reference to the view in published literature and visitor information leads to the conclusion that the view has high value. Such views are expected to be specifically identified in planning documentation or local guides. Consideration of the formal status of the view, reference to the view in published literature and visitor information leads to the conclusion that the view has medium value. Such views might be located within a designated area identified in planning documentation or local guides or be subject to policies that indicate their value. Consideration of the formal status of the view, reference to the view in published literature and visitor information leads to the conclusion that the view has some value but it is categorised as being low. Such views are unlikely to be identified in planning documentation or local guides. Consideration of the receptor type, activity and expectation, and frequency of use leads to the conclusion that the viewer has negligible susceptibility to the type of change proposed to the view. Consideration of the formal status of the view, reference to the view in published literature and visitor information leads to the conclusion that the view has negligible or no value. Such views are highly unlikely to be identified in planning documentation or local guides.

High

Medium

Consideration of the receptor type, activity and expectation, and frequency of use leads to the conclusion that the viewer would have medium susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed to the view.

Low

Consideration of the receptor type, activity and expectation, and frequency of use leads to the conclusion that the viewer would have low susceptibility to the type and degree of change proposed to the view.

Negligible

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

3. THE SITE & SURROUNDINGS
3.1. INTRODUCTION
3.1.1. The application site (refer to Figure 1) comprises 20.7ha of greenfield land located on the eastern periphery of Radcliffe on Trent.

3.2. LANDSCAPE FEATURES
3.2.1. The site largely comprises pasture (the small fields in the northern part of the site) and arable agricultural fields defined by hedgerows, some of which contain trees (refer to Figure 2). A tree and hedgerow survey of the site has, therefore, been completed and accompanies the application. The survey highlights that the hedges are predominantly hawthorn, with some elderberry, ivy and brambles also present. The hedge on the southern site boundary contains some mature trees, mainly ash, and hawthorn. They have all received routine machine maintenance in recent years. The ecological survey that also accompanies the planning application describes all of the hedgerows as species poor, and none are considered to qualify as “important” under the Hedgerow Regulations 1997. The tree assessment has examined a total of 49 trees (many are located off site, but close to the site’s boundaries). There are no category A trees which are considered to be of high quality and value, and in a condition that allows them to make a substantial contribution to the local environment. The trees on the southern boundary, and most of those around the buildings within the site, are category B trees of moderate quality and value, able to make a significant contribution to the local environment. The other trees notably along the western boundary are category C trees of low quality and value and in adequate condition. There are only 2 trees on the northern boundary both of which are Category B trees. Notably there are no trees along the eastern boundary of the site. The other notable landscape feature close to the site is the stream that runs east – west along the southern boundary before entering a culvert under the existing urban form. There are few hedgerow trees or woodlands in the surrounding area, although No Joke Plantation, located on higher ground to the north, and Jubilee Plantation and Dawson’s Plantation, located to the east, are prominent features in the landscape.

3.2.2.

3.2.3.

3.2.4.

3.2.5.

3.3. TOPOGRAPHY
3.3.1. Radcliffe-on-Trent is elevated above the River Trent and its washlands with a notable cliff face defining the north western settlement boundary (refer to Figure 3). The high point is at Malkin Hill located to the north of Radcliffe (up to approx. 70m AOD). Within the settlement the land generally falls southwards towards the railway line which runs along a valley bottom (approx. 20-30m AOD). To the south of the railway line, the land rises again up to Dewberry Hill on the southern boundary of the settlement (up to approx. 80m AOD). The site itself, is gently sloping with land falling evenly from the north-east (49.5m AOD) to the south-west (33m AOD).

3.3.2.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

3.4. LAND USE
3.4.1. The site itself and the surrounding countryside to the east is largely comprised of arable agricultural land sub-divided into regular shaped fields by hedgerows. However, the northern part of the site also contains a number of agricultural buildings and a farm house that previously formed Shelford Road Farm, and three smaller meadows. The buildings are accessed via a drive from Shelford Road. There are a number of other farmsteads located in the countryside to the north and east. The site is closely related to the urban form of Radcliffe (refer to Figure 4). Existing residential development is located along the Shelford Road corridor to the north and west of the site, including the development along Clumber Drive to the immediate west of the site. There are also a number of individual residential properties to the south of the Shelford Road in close proximity to the site. The village centre is located to the south west of the site, and contains a variety of local shops, eating/drinking establishments and services. Radcliffe-on-Trent train station is also located in the centre of the village. The railway line passes close to the southern boundary of the site. The closest area of informal public open space is situated along the cliff edge to the north west of the site. Wharf Lane Recreation Ground, a more substantial recreation area with sports pitches and children’s play equipment, is located to the north of the village centre. The Bingham Road Playing Fields are situated directly south of the site beyond the railway line.

3.4.2.

3.4.3.

3.4.4.

3.5. MOVEMENT
3.5.1. Shelford Road is a well used 30mph single carriageway road that forms the northern boundary of the application site (refer to Figure 4). It provides a direct connection to the village centre and the train station. Clumber Drive provides access to the residential properties to the west of the site from Shelford Road. Bus services operate along Shelford Road and Clumber Drive. The nearest bus stops are located directly north of the site on Shelford Road. The A52, to the south of the settlement, provides connections to the wider highway network (including the A46 to the east) and neighbouring settlements such as Bingham to the east, and West Bridgeford and Nottingham to the west. Pedestrian movement within the settlement is focused on the highway network, with footpaths usually provided on both sides of the streets. A traffic free cycle route is located along the A52. There are no further dedicated cycle ways within the settlement. There are no public rights of way in the countryside surrounding the site. However, the Trent Valley Way (a long distance path) runs from Holme Pierrepoint (and beyond) to the west, along the northern edge of the settlement on the cliff edge (Radcliffe on Trent FP4 and FP6), and then on to Shelford (and beyond) to the north east (Shelford FP6 and FP1). A public footpath also runs alongside the River Trent (Stoke Bardolph FP2). To the south of the settlement, a public footpath circles a public open space on Dewberry Hill (Radcliffe on Trent FP10), and to the west there are footpaths that run south from the A52 (Radcliffe on Trent FP1, FP2 and FP3).

3.5.2.

3.5.3.

3.5.4.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

3.6. PLANNING & LANDSCAPE DESIGNATIONS
3.6.1. The site forms part of the designated Nottingham Green Belt, within which Radcliffeon-Trent is inset (refer to Figure 5). Therefore, the assessment of selected representative viewpoints below considers the likely perceived impact of the proposed development on the purposes of the Green Belt (set out in the National Planning Policy Framework para. 80) relating to urban sprawl, settlement coalescence, and countryside encroachment (Radcliffe on Trent is not a historic town so there is no need to consider its setting in that respect, and urban regeneration is considered in the Planning Statement that sets out a full assessment of Green Belt matters). The site is not subject to any landscape designation, and the Radcliffe-on-Trent does not contain a conservation area. However, Upper Saxondale to the south east of the site is a designated conservation area.

3.6.2.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

4. LANDSCAPE CHARACTER BASELINE
4.1. EXISTING LANDSCAPE CHARACTER ASSESSMENT REVIEW
4.1.1. The landscape character of the site and surrounding area has already been assessed at a number of levels. However, given the scale and nature of the site, this appraisal has focussed on the local level assessments that have been undertaken.

Strategic
National Character Areas 4.1.2. At a national level, the proposed development site is located within National Character Area 48 – “The Trent and Belvoir Vales”, as defined by Natural England.

East Midlands Regional Landscape Character Assessment (EMRLCA) 4.1.3. At a regional level, the site is located within Group 4a: Unwooded Vales, as classified by the EMRLCA (April 2010). This is one of 31 regional landscape character types that covers a very large area to the east and north east of Nottingham that extends to Lincoln and Gainsborough.

Local
Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment (GNLCA) 4.1.4. The GNLCA sets out the county and local level landscape assessment. Part of the purpose for the study is given as; “The study has identified how well the landscape character areas could adapt to change without severe detrimental effect on their character and integrity. Particular emphasis has been placed on the transition between the settlements to the wider countryside.” 4.1.5. The broader framework is provided by a series of Regional Character Areas (RCAs), which are then sub-divided into more detailed Draft Policy Areas (DPZs). These set out more detailed assessment, strategies and actions that can be applied to specific sites. The application site is located within the ‘South Nottinghamshire Farmlands’ RCA which covers a large area to the east and south of Nottingham (refer to Figure 6). The RCA’s boundary with the smaller ‘Trent Washlands’ RCA is located to the immediate north of Radcliffe on Trent, but is not visible from the site (refer to Section 5). Key characteristics of the South Nottinghamshire Farmlands include: • • fairly uniform gently rolling lowland landform; The highest land is along the edge of the Trent Valley where a line of hills falls sharply to the low-land of the Trent Washlands region; Small nucleated settlements tend to be concentrated on traditionally high mudstone ridges; there is a lack of built form on lower alluvium basins;

4.1.6.

4.1.7.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Closer to Nottingham, villages have expanded considerably which exerts an urbanising influence on the landscape; Arable farmland is predominant although pasture is present along some stream margins, escarpment slopes and village fringes; Uniform, something monotonous character created by large tracts of arable farmland with few other notable features; Strong pattern of medium to large scale hedged fields with smaller village side pasture; Hedgerows of variable condition, they tend to be intact along lanes and in pasture fields and less intact, smaller and often fragmented around arable fields; Hedgerow trees mainly ash with some oak and willow. Frequent young lime and horse chestnut trees have been planted alongside roads and are a notable feature; General lack of woodland within the area with few hedgerow trees enables open extensive views across the area; Trees and woodland along fringes of villages creates an impression of higher tree cover than actually exists; and Frequent overhead lines and pylons are prominent vertical features, their scale emphasised by the lack of other vertical structures.

• 4.1.8.

Selected guidelines and recommendations for the Character Area (relevant to the site) include: • Conserve and enhance the overall structure and traditional agricultural character of the landscape; Identify opportunities for enhancing the structure and unity of the landscape through new tree and woodland planting; Conserve the character and setting of village settlements; Promote measures for achieving better integration of new and existing features in the countryside.

• • 4.1.9.

Radcliffe on Trent itself and the surrounding area to the east of the settlement to the A46, including the application site, are within DPZ SN05 ‘East Bridgford Escarpment Farmlands’ (refer to Figure 6). The surrounding area to the south of Radcliffe on Trent (and the A52) lies within DPZ SN04’.

4.1.10. The following key characteristics (which are of relevance to the site) have been identified in DPZ SN05: • Escarpment with a steeply sloping northern edge down to the Trent Washlands and a more gentle slope to the south to the A46 forming a broad plateau either side of Kneeton Road;

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Rural character with a sense of enclosure created on higher ground through limited views beyond the plateau to adjacent lower ground; on slopes views towards the A46 and Nottingham City Centre provide an urbanising influence; Land use is mainly arable; Field boundaries mainly hedgerows of variable condition. Often intact alongside roads and over 1.5m in height. Within fields there is more evidence of fragmentation; Little woodland cover, but where present it is often prominent – generally irregular shaped blocks; Clumps of woodlands around village fringes help to reduce their prominence within the landscape, although the rising roofline of Radcliffe on Trent remains locally visible in the landscape; Few hedgerow trees and where present they are often in small groups along field boundaries, often close to woodlands; and Few settlements. The largest is Radcliffe on Trent on the gentle slopes of the escarpment.

• •

4.1.11. It concludes that the landscape condition of the Policy Zone is “Moderate” referring to evidence of hedgerow fragmentation and a loss of field boundaries to enable arable expansion. 4.1.12. It defines the strength of the landscape character as “Moderate” due to the relatively uniform character of arable fields with prominent village fringes. Views to urban elements are frequent and exert an influence on the area, including longer views across the edge of Radcliffe on Trent. There are local variations in the pattern of the landscape where the landform changes to the south, close to Radcliffe on Trent. 4.1.13. The resulting landscape strategy for the Policy Zone is “Enhance”. The DPZ sets out a number of landscape actions to help reinforce this strategy. Those relevant to the site include: Landscape Features: • Enhance field boundaries through the augmentation of hedgerows to reinforce field pattern; Enhance the distribution of hedgerow trees by encouraging planting of (mainly ash and some oak) trees within hedgerows. These should be carefully located to ensure that an open character is retained; Conserve the smaller pockets of permanent pasture around village fringes; Enhance woodland cover, ensuring it is small in size and reflects surrounding field patterns and the character of existing woodlands;

• •

Built Form: • Enhance village fringes through planting small copses to break up the uniform nature of the urban edge, particularly along the fringes of larger settlements such as Radcliffe on Trent; 16

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Conserve the variety of built form and orientation of buildings along roads within villages; Any developments along village fringes should encourage the use of red brick and pantile roofs and make a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness within each individual village; Development along village fringes should aim to provide a dispersed character rather than a sharp continuous built line and incorporate smaller fields or open spaces, to provide a dispersed appearance to village fringes. Other Development/Structures in the Landscape:

Retain and enhance hedgerow boundaries and hedgerow tree boundaries along roads in the area; Conserve the small rural character of roads through the area.

4.2. CONCLUSION
4.2.1. A review of the existing landscape character assessments and on-site field work has concluded that the information contained within the GNLCA is appropriate for providing the landscape character baseline for the site. They also provide a clear indication of the capacity of the landscape to accommodate the proposed development. The site is not subject to any landscape policy designation, but does lie within Policy Zone SN05 in the South Nottinghamshire Farmlands Character Area as defined by the Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment (GNLCA 2009). The GNLCA concludes that the landscape character area has a moderate strength of character and is in moderate condition, with a general strategy to “enhance”. The application site does not contain any particularly significant landscape features, but does reflect some of the general character of the wider landscape in that it is part of a gently rolling lowland landform, where the fields in agricultural use (perhaps smaller in scale than the fields to the east) are divided by hedgerows and slope to the stream to the south. There are few trees in the surrounding area, but where woodland is present it is prominently located in irregular blocks. The prominent village fringes in the area are highlighted in the GNLCA, and there are a number of local urban influences on the site. The site has a rural character, but the influence of the urban area of Radcliffe on Trent is apparent, and indeed recognised in the various studies. The settlement edge, notably the residential properties to the west and north, but also to the south beyond the railway line where the existing urban area also extends beyond the site’s eastern boundary, has a significant influence on the character of the site. Its development for residential purposes would not, therefore, appear incongruous in its surroundings. The railway line to the south is also a prominent feature in the landscape. A review of the list of actions advocated for the character area and the specific land parcels within it have highlighted a number of common themes that should be taken into account in the development of the site. These include enhancing field boundaries by augmenting the hedgerows and adding hedgerow trees and by providing small scale woodland blocks and copses to break up the uniform nature of the urban edge. In terms of built development, the GNLCA refers to the use of red brick and pantile roofs to reflect the local character, and to softening the urban edge 17

4.2.2.

4.2.3.

4.2.4.

4.2.5.

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

by through dispersed development with small open spaces. These actions will be used to inform the developing scheme proposals to ensure that, where possible, any proposals for the site will look to strengthen the prevalent landscape character. Relevant mitigation measures are outlined in more detail in Section 6. 4.2.6. Furthermore, the area is not subject to any landscape designation and the site does not contain any specific landscape elements of acknowledged importance. Whilst the site does form part of the Green Belt in the area, that is not a landscape designation, i.e. it is not determined on the basis of landscape character, quality or value. The landscape character is not rare and the site has no particular scenic quality or recreation or conservation value. Therefore, based on the character assessment and appraisal of the site characteristics outlined above, the landscape character of the area and notable landscape elements within the site are considered to have a susceptibility of “Low” and a value of “Low”, resulting in an overall sensitivity of Low to the change proposed on the site. This reflects the proximity and influence of the adjacent settlement edge, the ability of the existing landscape structure to absorb potential development, the lack of any significant landscape features of importance on the site and the ability to retain those features that do exist.

4.2.7.

4.2.8.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5. VISUAL AMENITY
5.1. INTRODUCTION
5.1.1. The visual amenity of the site and its surroundings has been appraised through the preparation of a Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) (Figure 7) and the identification of 11 representative views (Viewpoint Sheets 1-11). Each view is examined below and within the attached figures, with a description of the existing view, clarification of the relevant receptors, consideration of the sensitivity and value of the view, and confirmation of any key issues relating to the proposed development site.

5.2. ZONE OF VISUAL INFLUENCE
5.2.1. The ZTV is attached at Figure 7. This has been verified through fieldwork, where it became apparent that the site’s ZTV is contained by both the area’s topography and the existing urban form to the north, west and south. The site is, however, more widely visible to the east. The visibility of the site can be summarised as follows. Existing residential properties effectively contain views of the site the east and north west to the immediate surrounds of the site. To the north Malkin Hill limits views of the site from the countryside to approximately 1km from the centre of the site. To the east the site’s ZTV bleeds out along the valley between Malkin Hill to the north and Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale to the south to a distance of approximately 2km from the site. From the south the site is visible from open areas located between the railway line and Grantham Road (A52). The site is also visible from the north facing slopes of Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale south of the Grantham Road (A52) to a distance of approximately 1.5km from the centre of the site. The available public views are, however, severely restricted by existing buildings in the urban area.

5.2.2.

5.2.3.

5.2.4.

5.3. REPRESENTATIVE VIEWPOINTS VP1: SAXONDALE DRIVE
5.3.1. This view is from Saxondale Drive a lightly used minor road running from Upper Saxondale to the A45 (and Viewpoint 2) and towards Radcliffe on Trent. It has a pedestrian path to one side. The representative viewpoint is located close to the edge of Upper Saxondale. The view is west to the site’s south eastern corner, which is approximately 1.1km away. The viewpoint is at approximately 52m AOD which is virtually level with the northern boundary of the site, but elevated above the main part of the site (up to 20m). Open fields either side of Saxondale Road, enclosed by trimmed hedgerows and mature trees, form the foreground to the view. Lighting columns along Saxondale Road and existing properties are prominent elements in the view. In the wider panorama the open countryside up to Malkin Hill in the north and Dewberry Hill to the west frame the view. The urban form of Radcliffe is visible in the middle distance, notably the development to the south of the A52. Although it is not immediately apparent in the photograph, the urban form of Nottingham on higher land above and beyond Radcliffe is visible in the longer distance and forms most of the view’s skyline.

5.3.2.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.3.

The open fields that form the site are clearly visible, marked by the rears of the properties on Clumber Drive rising up to Shelford Road. The existing buildings within the site are also visible (but not clearly). Development on the site would, therefore, be visible from this viewpoint. However, the degree of change at this distance would be limited, and the view of the site is heavily filtered by the mature trees and residential properties on Saxondale Drive. The trees would effectively screen the view of the site in the summer months. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of landscape buffer along the eastern boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and significant tree planting. This view is currently experienced by a relatively small number of motorists and pedestrians using Saxondale Drive. Their expectation is rising as they leave Upper Saxondale and obtain wide views of the surrounding countryside, but is still affected by the immediate juxtaposition with the urban form and the prominence of Radcliffe in the view and Nottingham beyond. There would only be an extremely limited change in the view, particularly in Summer when the existing vegetation will screen the site almost entirely. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change. The viewpoint is located on the edge of Upper Saxondale Conservation Area, but there is no indication that the view has any particular value. It is therefore, concluded that the viewpoint is of “medium” value. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

5.3.4.

5.3.5.

5.3.6.

5.3.7.

Green Belt
5.3.8. This is the only location within or close to another settlement where the application site is visible. However, there is already significant development in Radcliffe on Trent to the south of the A52 that is closer and more visible than the proposed development on the application site would be. Whilst, as described above, the development on the site would be visible, the degree of change would be very limited. The current urban form of Radcliffe already contains the site on three of its sides, and the development would extend no further east than the existing built form. Notably foreshortening of the view to the development along Clumber Drive would be barely noticeable, with the development appearing contiguous with the existing built form. Therefore, from this viewpoint the perception of change in respect of the Green Belt purposes will be negligible. The proposed landscape corridor along the eastern site boundary (see mitigation below) will also help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future and soften the transition of the urban area to the countryside.

VP2: GRANTHAM ROAD (A52)
5.3.9. This view is from Grantham Road (the A52) a heavily used trunk road that links the east coast to Nottingham, and provides the main approach to Radcliffe from the east. It has pedestrian paths to both sides. The view is available along a 400m length of the A52 where it is not lined on the north side by a hedgerow. The representative viewpoint is at the junction of Saxondale Drive with the A52, and there are also a small number of residential properties on the northern part of Saxondale Drive in this location. The view is west to the site’s south-eastern corner, which is approximately 0.75km away from the viewpoint. The viewpoint is at

20

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

approximately 44m AOD which is level with the approximate centre of the south sloping site. 5.3.10. The A52 extending into Radcliffe, an unused access from it, and associated urban elements form the immediate foreground in the view. It is a very busy road and the movement and noise is intrusive. Beyond the A52, flat, open fields along the valley bottom form the main part of the view, enclosed by the slightly raised railway line and associated vegetation along it. In the wider panorama the edge of Radcliffe’s urban form is prominent in the view (left of photograph). The flat perspective means that less of the settlement and the city beyond is visible in the view than at VP1, although they still form the skyline in the majority of the view. To the north (right of photo) Malkin Hill forms the skyline, and Shelford Lodge Farm is prominent, surrounded by arable fields. 5.3.11. The central and northern part of the site are visible in the view, again marked by the rears of the properties on Clumber Drive, but the southern part is screened by the railway line and associated vegetation. Indeed, the flatter perspective means that it is largely the hedgerows within and around the site that are visible, rather than the ground surface. The existing buildings on the site are clearly visible, but appear contiguous with buildings along Shelford Road. The trees would effectively screen the view of the site in the summer months. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of landscape buffer along the eastern boundary. 5.3.12. The view is experienced by a large number of people travelling along the A52. However, the vast majority are motorists, whose focus is on the road and who are aware they are about to enter a significant urban area. The existing development to the south of the A52 in particular is already visible in views along the road corridor and there would only be a limited degree of change in the view. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.13. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.14. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

Green Belt
5.3.15. As described above, whilst the development on part of the site would be visible, the degree of change would be limited. The current urban form of Radcliffe already contains the site on three of its sides, and the development would extend no further east than the existing built form. Similar to VP1, whilst there would be some foreshortening of the view to the development along Clumber Drive, the change would be barely noticeable and, because of the site’s containment within the visible urban form, the development would appear contiguous with the existing built form. Furthermore, no other settlements are visible in the view so there would be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development. Therefore, from this viewpoint the perception of change in respect of the Green Belt purposes will be negligible. The proposed landscape corridor along the eastern site boundary (see mitigation below) will also help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future, and soften the transition of the urban area to the countryside.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

VP3: RADCLIFFE ON TRENT FP10
5.3.16. This view is from Radcliffe on Trent FP10 which runs from Woodland Close in the residential area to the south of the A52 to and around an elevated informal public open space on Dewberry Hill on the southern edge of the settlement. The viewpoint is located on the public footpath link from the public open space to Woodland Close. The view is north to the site’s south western corner, which is approximately 600m away. The viewpoint is elevated at approximately 67m AOD, which is approximately 17m above the highest part (north east) part of the site. 5.3.17. It is a publicly accessible view that is almost directly aligned with the site, but is only available for a very short section of the footpath on exiting the public open space. Glimpse views of the site are available from the north edge of the informal public open space, but are significantly screened by the surrounding vegetation. Similar views may be available from the upper floors of properties in this part of Radcliffe that are orientated towards the site. 5.3.18. The vista is enclosed by the close boarded fence and vegetation on either side of the footpath as it descends the slope to Woodland Close. Residential properties fill the foreground of the view, descending down the slope and along the valley bottom. The A52, formal recreation area and the railway line with its associated vegetation are visible horizontal elements through the view in the valley bottom to the south of the site. In the long distance the open arable fields rising up to Malkin Hill are clearly visible, with countryside above and beyond Radcliffe visible in the vista. 5.3.19. The elevated viewpoint means that the open fields in the site are prominent on the facing slope in the middle ground of the vista, together with existing residential properties to the west. Indeed, the somewhat abrupt interface between the two is apparent. The site appears as an extension of the countryside into the urban form of the settlement. The hedgerow framework in and around the site is clearly visible. The existing buildings are prominent, but appear contiguous with the residential properties that line Shelford Road to the north. 5.3.20. The entirety of the proposed development would be prominent in the view. However, the development would be set within the context of the existing urban form to the south, west and north. In that respect it would neither foreshorten the view or break the skyline. 5.3.21. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the retention of the existing hedgerow structure, the provision of a landscaped area in the southern part of the site and green fingers running east west from the eastern boundary landscape buffer, stepping up the slope to Shelford Road. 5.3.22. The view is experienced by a relatively small number of people exiting the informal public open space for only a very short stretch of the footpath, and those occupying the properties that are orientated towards the site. However, whilst the degree of change in the view as a result of the development would be substantial, the expectation of the viewer would be significantly mitigated by both the immediate residential context to the footpath and the existing urban setting of the site. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “medium” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.23. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, however, a public right of way and, therefore, it is concluded that the view is of “medium” value.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.24. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “medium”.

Green Belt
5.3.25. As described above, from this viewpoint the site appears as an extension of the countryside into the urban form of the settlement. The development on the site would be prominent in this view and the degree of change substantial, appearing as countryside encroachment (although it is a very worse case representation of views from this locality). However, the development would be set within the context of the existing urban form to the south, west and north, and extend no further east than the existing development. In that respect the development will represent a rounding off of the urban form rather than urban sprawl. Furthermore, no other settlements are visible in the view so there would be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development. Again the proposed landscape corridor along the eastern site boundary (see mitigation below) will help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future, and soften the transition of the urban area to the countryside.

VP4: COVERT CRESCENT
5.3.26. This view is from the residential area to the south of the A52 and the site. The viewpoint is located on Covert Crescent; a residential road. The view is north to the site’s southern boundary, which is approximately 400m away. The viewpoint is elevated at approximately 54m AOD, which is marginally (4m) higher than the highest part (north east) part of the site. It is a publicly accessible vista that is directly aligned with the site, but is only available for a short section of the road where the alignment, topography and built form allow. Similar views may be available from the upper floors of properties in this part of Radcliffe that are orientated towards the site. 5.3.27. The vista is enclosed by residential properties either side of the crescent. Residential properties fill the foreground of the view, descending down the slope and along the valley bottom. The open fields in the site are visible on the facing slope in the middle ground of the vista, together with existing residential properties to the west, although the flat perspective means that they are less prominent than from Viewpoint 3. The site appears as an extension of the countryside into the urban form of the settlement. The hedgerow framework in and around the site is visible. The existing buildings are clearly visible, but appear contiguous with the residential properties that line Shelford Road to the north. In the long distance the open arable fields rising up to Malkin Hill are clearly visible, with countryside above and beyond Radcliffe visible in the vista. 5.3.28. The entirety of the proposed development would be visible in the view. However, the development would be set within the context of the existing urban form to the south, east and north. In that respect it would neither foreshorten the view or break the skyline. 5.3.29. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the retention of the existing hedgerow structure, the provision of a landscaped area in the southern part of the site and green fingers running east west from the eastern boundary landscape buffer, stepping up the slope to Shelford Road. 5.3.30. The view is experienced by a relatively modest number of people travelling around the residential area and occupying the properties that are orientated towards the site. However, the view only occurs occasionally in the area where the topography 23

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

and existing built form allow. Furthermore, whilst the degree of change in the view as a result of the development would be substantial, the expectation of the viewer would be significantly mitigated by both the immediate residential context to the footpath and the existing urban setting of the site. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “medium” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.31. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.32. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “medium”.

Green Belt
5.3.33. As described above, from this viewpoint the site appears as an extension of the countryside into the urban form of the settlement. The development on the site would be prominent in this view and the degree of change substantial appearing as encroachment (although it is a very worse case representation of views from this locality). However, like VP4, the development would be set within the context of the existing urban form to the south, west and north, and extend no further east than the existing development. In that respect the development will represent a rounding off of the urban form rather than urban sprawl. Furthermore, no other settlements are visible in the view so there would be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development. Again the proposed landscape corridor along the eastern site boundary (see mitigation below) will help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future, and soften the transition of the urban area to the countryside.

VP5: BINGHAM ROAD PLAYING FIELDS
5.3.34. This view is from the Bingham Road Playing Fields to the south of the site between the railway line and the A52. The viewpoint is located on the pitch to the immediate south of the site, close to the rear of the properties that back on to the playing fields. The view is north to the site’s southern boundary, which is approximately 140m away. The viewpoint is at approximately 39m AOD, which is marginally (5m) higher than the lowest part of the site (south west). It is a publicly accessible view for users of the recreation area. 5.3.35. A wide view is available, but it is enclosed by the robust vegetation that lines the railway line bordering the playing fields to the north. Recent residential development encloses the view to the east (right of photograph), and ultimately also to the west. The roofs of the existing residential properties in the area to west of the site are discernable through above the vegetation climbing the facing slope. Properties to the north of Shelford Road, Shelford Lodge Farm and No Joke Plantation on the higher ground to the north of the site are also visible on the skyline above the vegetation. 5.3.36. The railway vegetation effectively filters the view of the site in the winter, and screens the view in the summer. The farm buildings within the site are visible through the vegetation, but the fields are not discernable. Once development takes place on the site, the properties in the southern part of the site nearest to the viewpoint, notably their roofs, will be visible in a similar manner to the existing properties to the west. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of a landscaped area in the southern part of the site.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.37. The view is experienced by a relatively modest number of people using the playing fields. That type of user will tend to be focussed on their activity, and not on their surroundings, which are in any case largely urban in character. Moreover, the change in the view as a result of the development would be slight, and reflect the existing urban context to the north of the railway line. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.38. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.39. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

VP6: BINGHAM ROAD
5.3.40. This view is from the Bingham Road to the south of the site. Bingham Road is one of the main routes to and from the centre of Radcliffe on Trent and connects to the A52. It has footpaths to both sides. The viewpoint is close to the junction of the A52, where the elevated position of the road provides a view across the playing fields to the site, for a stretch of approximately 175m. The view is north to the site’s southern boundary, which is approximately 230m away. The viewpoint is at approximately 41m AOD, which is marginally (7m) higher than the lowest part of the site (south west). 5.3.41. A wide view is available, but is ultimately enclosed by existing residential development both to the east and west. The playing fields and associated infrastructure fill the foreground of the view, enclosed by the vegetation along the railway line which runs through the view. The slight elevation means that the residential area to the west of the site is more prominent from this viewpoint than Viewpoint 5, although the trees lining Bingham Road provide some further filtering. Properties to the north of Shelford Road, Shelford Lodge Farm and No Joke Plantation on the higher ground to the north of the site are visible on the skyline beyond the site. The slight elevation and angle of view means that a wider perspective of the open countryside to the east of the site is also available, albeit still enclosed by urban development to the north and east. 5.3.42. The railway vegetation effectively filters the view of the southern part of the site in the winter and screens the view in the summer. The farm buildings within the site are discernable through the vegetation, and the fields in the northern part of the site are visible. Development on the site will, therefore, be visible in a similar manner to the existing properties to the west, but extending across the majority of the view and closing the vista to the open countryside to the east. 5.3.43. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of a landscaped area in the southern part of the site and green fingers running east west from the eastern boundary landscape buffer and stepping up the slope. 5.3.44. The view is experienced by a relatively high number of motorists, and a modest number of cyclists and pedestrians using Bingham Road. The views of the site are limited to a short section of the road, and they will also be influenced by the existing busy (movement and noise) urban context, with prominent urban elements in the view. Whilst, the development would reflect the existing urban context to the north of the railway line, there would be a significant degree of change in the view. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “medium” susceptibility to the proposed change. 25

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.45. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.46. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low/medium”.

VP7: OATFIELD LANE
5.3.47. This view is from Oatfield Lane an extremely lightly used minor road running from the A45 to Shelford Road. It is a narrow lane without footpaths that runs through the large open arable fields to the east of Radcliffe on Trent. The viewpoint is approximately midway along the lane as it climbs up to Shelford Road. The view is west to the site’s eastern boundary approximately 1.2km away. 5.3.48. Large open arable fields fill the foreground of the view and forms the horizon on the higher ground to the north (right of photograph), although Shelford Lodge Farm and the tops of the trees in the No Joke Plantation are visible above the horizon. To the south (left of photograph) the rising land to Dewberry Hill to the south of Radcliffe on Trent forms the skyline. Radcliffe is visible in the distance on the facing slopes and along the valley bottom. Although it is not immediately apparent in the photograph, the urban form of Nottingham on higher land above and beyond Radcliffe is visible in the longer distance. 5.3.49. The open fields that form the site are not discernable because of the flat perspective and intervening vegetation. The farm buildings on the site, and the rears of the dwellings along Clumber Drive which marks the site’s eastern boundary, are discernable in the view. They are not prominent, because of the distance and use of neutral material colours, but the abrupt interface between current urban form and countryside is apparent. The development on the site would, therefore, also be visible, but the change in the view would be extremely limited. That is, there would be some foreshortening of the view to the urban area, but at this distance it would be to a barely perceptible degree. 5.3.50. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of landscape buffer along the eastern boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and significant tree planting to soften the urban interface with eth countryside. 5.3.51. This view is currently experienced by a very small number of motorists, who are traveling in a direction that is perpendicular to the view and will be focussed on the road and, therefore, away from the direction of the view. There would be an expectation of an open view that is rural in character albeit with urban elements set within the landscape, but the development will result in a barely perceptible change at this distance. It is therefore, concluded that the viewpoint has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change to the view. 5.3.52. Their expectation is rising as they leave Upper Saxondale and obtain wide views of the surrounding countryside, but is still affected by the immediate juxtaposition with the urban form and the prominence of Radcliffe in the view and Nottingham beyond. There would only be an extremely limited change in the view, particularly in Summer when the existing vegetation will screen the site almost entirely. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.53. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 26

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.54. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

Green Belt
5.3.55. As described above, the development on part of the site would be visible in the distance, but the degree of change would be extremely limited. That is, there would be some foreshortening of the view to the urban area, but at this distance it would be to a barely perceptible degree and, because of the site’s containment within the visible urban form, appear contiguous with the existing urban form not as urban sprawl or countryside encroachment. The only other visible settlement from this view is Upper Saxondale to the south (not in photograph). However, the viewpoint highlights that there is already significant visible development to the south of the A52 in Radcliffe on Trent that appears much closer to Upper Saxondale. There would, therefore, be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development. Therefore, from this viewpoint the perception of change in respect of the Green Belt purposes will be negligible.

VP8: SHELFORD ROAD (AT ENTRANCE TO SHELFORD LODGE FARM)
5.3.56. This view is from Shelford Road a well used road that forms the site’s northern boundary and links to the centre of Radcliffe on Trent. At this point Shelford Road has no footpaths. The viewpoint is close to the entrance to Shelford Lodge Farm on the approach to Radcliffe. The view is west to the site’s northern boundary which is only approximately 50m away. 5.3.57. The road is framed by an established trimmed hedgerow that forms the site’s northern boundary and directs the view along the road to the entrance to Radcliffe. The dwellings on the south side of Shelford Road (left of photograph) and the associated frontage vegetation are a prominent urban element in the view. The residential properties to the north of Shelford Road, that forms the eastern extent of Radcliffe’s current urban form are also prominent features, beyond the arable field in the foreground (right of photograph). 5.3.58. The view of the site is aligned with the direction of travel along Shelford Road, but the roadside hedgerow screens the fields and buildings within the site. Indeed, the further extent of the site to the south is not apparent as the land drops away from Shelford Road. However, the construction of the access roundabout on the edge of the settlement will require the removal of approximately 100m of the hedgerow and, therefore, open up views into the site, and of the proposed residential development. 5.3.59. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of a hedgerow around the roundabout and the provision of a landscape buffer along the eastern boundary, incorporating significant tree planting. 5.3.60. This view is experienced by a reasonably large number of people travelling along Shelford Road and entering Radcliffe. The vast majority are motorists whose expectation is moderated by the awareness that they are approaching the urban area, but also the prominence of existing urban elements in the view. However, given the proximity to the site and the degree of change in the view that will arose from the development, it has been concluded that the viewpoint has a “medium/high” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.61. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 27

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.62. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “medium”.

Green Belt
5.3.63. As described above, whilst the construction of the access roundabout will open up views of the site and proposed development from this locality. The change in view will be significant. The development will, however, be viewed in the context of the existing urban form that encloses the site appearing as a consolidation of that rather than urban sprawl or encroachment on the countryside. Furthermore, no other settlements are visible in the view so there would be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development.

VIEWPOINT 9: SHELFORD ROAD (CLOSE TO NO. 112)
5.3.64. This view is from Shelford Road a well used road that forms the site’s northern boundary and links to the centre of Radcliffe on Trent. At this point Shelford Road has footpaths to both sides. The viewpoint is close to number 112, at approaching the exit from Radcliffe on Trent. The view is east to the site’s northern boundary which is only approximately 50m away. 5.3.65. The view of the site is aligned with the direction of travel along Shelford Road. The road is framed by the vegetation and front boundaries of existing properties that extend further along the north side of Shelford Road and enclose the view to the north. However, beyond the last property on the south side on Shelford Road, a wider panoramic view is available above the trimmed hedgerow that lines the road. 5.3.66. The farm buildings in the site and the adjacent residential properties are prominent urban elements in the view beyond the small pasture field in the immediate foreground. However, longer distance views to the countryside are available between Shelford Road and the site’s farm buildings. Upper Saxondale is visible on the horizon. To the south, the relatively recent development on Hudson Way is visible beyond the site, with the older dwellings in the residential area to the south of the A45 climbing the facing slope up to Dewberry Hill. 5.3.67. The development on the site will be prominent within the view and enclose the views to the surrounding countryside at this point. However, the access roundabout on Shelford Road will be located beyond the curve in the road, and screened by the existing dwelling on the south side of Shelford Road. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below. 5.3.68. This view is experienced by a reasonably large number of people travelling along Shelford Road. The vast majority are motorists whose expectation is rising as they leave Radcliffe, but is still affected by the immediate urban context, and the prominence of existing urban elements in the view. However, given the proximity to the site and the degree of change in the view, it has been concluded that the viewpoint has a “medium/high” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.69. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.70. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “medium”.

28

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Green Belt
5.3.71. As described above, the development on the site will be prominent within the view and enclose the views to the surrounding countryside and Green Belt at this point. In that respect there will be a significant urbanising effect, but as the site is already enclosed by the existing urban form to the north, west and south, the development will appear as a consolidation of the urban form in this location rather than sprawl or indeed encroachment on the countryside. Upper Saxondale is visible in the longer distance, that is likely to be screened in the future, and the existing development to the south of the A52 already appears much closer. There would therefore, be no perception of coalescence.

VP10: SHELFORD ROAD
5.3.72. This view is from Shelford Road to the north of Radcliffe on Trent. At this point Shelford Road has no footpaths. The viewpoint is located on the high ground close to the No Joke Plantation. The view is south to the site’s northern boundary which is approximately 470m away. The viewpoint is at 63m AOD which is approximately 13m above the highest point of the site. 5.3.73. Open views across the agricultural land to both the north and south of Shelford Road are available to receptors as they pass No Joke Plantation at the top of Malkin Hill. However, further south at the Viewpoint the robust trimmed hedgerow on the north side of Shelford Road (right of photograph) effectively screens views of the arable fields to the north. A short distance further south, a hedgerow starts on the south side of Shelford Road and directs the receptor’s view along the road as it descends the hill to Radcliffe. 5.3.74. At the viewpoint a wide view of the countryside to the south Shelford Road is available. Arable fields fill the foreground of the view, but the rising land to Dewberry Hill is visible in the distance and forms the skyline. Consequently the residential development to the south of the A45 in Radcliffe, is prominent in the view. 5.3.75. The southern part of the site is visible in the middle distance, but is difficult to discern. The site farm buildings are just visible above the hedgerow, and whilst the fields in the site cannot be seen, the upper storeys of the properties on the southern part of Clumber Drive, beyond the site, are identifiable. Consequently, the development proposed on the site will also be visible, but the change in the view would be extremely limited. That is there would be some foreshortening of the view to the urban area, but to a barely perceptible degree at this distance. 5.3.76. Suggested mitigation is set out in Section 6 below, but notably includes the provision of landscape buffer along the eastern boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and significant tree planting to soften the urban interface with the countryside. . 5.3.77. This view is currently experienced by a reasonably large number of motorists and cyclists, who are traveling in a direction that is aligned with a view of the site, but the view is only available for a relatively short stretch of the road (approximately 300m). There would be an expectation of an open view that is rural in character. However, the existing urban form of Radcliffe is already prominent in the view and the development will result in a barely perceptible change at this distance. It is therefore, concluded that the viewpoint has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change to the view.

29

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.78. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, therefore, concluded that the view is of “low” value. 5.3.79. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

Green Belt
5.3.80. As described above, the development on part of the site would be visible, but the degree of change would be extremely limited. That is, there would be some foreshortening of the view to the urban area, but at this distance it would be to a very limited degree and, because of the site’s containment within the visible urban form, would appear contiguous with the existing urban form, not as urban sprawl or countryside encroachment. The proposed landscape corridor along the eastern site boundary (see mitigation below) will also help to contain the further growth of the urban form of Radcliffe in the future, and soften the transition of the urban area to the countryside. The only other visible settlement from this view is Upper Saxondale to the south. However, the viewpoint highlights that there is already significant visible development to the south of the A52 in Radcliffe on Trent that appears much closer to Upper Saxondale than the development on the site would. There would, therefore, be no perception of coalescence arising from the proposed development. Therefore, from this viewpoint the perception of change in respect of the Green Belt purposes will be negligible.

VP11: RADCLIFFE ON TRENT FP2
5.3.81. This view is from Radcliffe on Trent FP2 which runs south from the A52 on open rising land. The viewpoint is located on the public footpath, approximately 500m south of the A52. The view is north east to the site’s western boundary, which is approximately 1.75km away. The viewpoint is at approximately 47m AOD, which is approximately level with the highest point of the site. 5.3.82. It is a publicly accessible view with open panoramic views towards Nottingham and across Radcliffe on Trent round to Dewberry Hill. Higher ground in the very long distance forming the majority of the skyline. The urban form of Radcliffe, particularly that on the higher ground in the northern part of the settlement, is prominent in the view as the receptor walks northwards. 5.3.83. In the view towards the site, No Joke Plantation on Malkin Hill forms the skyline in the long distance and the arable land on the higher ground to the north east provides the background to the urban form of the settlement. The site itself is not visible in the view, but the upper parts of the farm buildings and dwellings on Shelford Road beyond the site are visible, albeit not easy to identify amongst the roofline of the surrounding development and intervening vegetation. Consequently, the development of the site will have a barely perceptible impact on the nature of this view, and no further mitigation is required. 5.3.84. The view is experienced by a relatively small number of people using the public right of way there would be a negligible degree of change in the view as a result of the development. Therefore, it is considered that the view has a “low” susceptibility to the proposed change. 5.3.85. The viewpoint has no formal status in planning documentation or local guides, nor does the visual experience indicate particular value. It is, however, a public right of way and, therefore, it is concluded that the view is of “medium” value. 30

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.3.86. Taking the above factors into account it has been concluded that this representative view has an overall sensitivity of “low”.

5.4. CONCLUSION
5.4.1. The site’s ZTV is contained by both the area’s topography and the existing urban form to the north, west and south. Whilst the site is more widely visible to the east there are relatively few visual receptors in that area. The representative viewpoints within the ZTV have been considered with regard to the value of the viewpoint and the susceptibility of the viewpoint and receptor to change in the view following the proposed development of the site. The findings are summarised in the following table:
Location & Direction Of View Saxondale Drive West 2 Grantham Road West 3 FP10 North 4 Covert Crescent North 5 Bingham Road Playing Fields North 6 Bingham Road North 7 Oatfield Road West 8 Shelford Road (East) West 9 Shelford Road (West) East 10 Shelford Road (North) South 11 FP2 North east 1.75 Recreational walkers Low Medium Low 470m 50m Motorists, pedestrians & residents Motorists & cyclists Medium / High Low Medium 50m 1.2km 230m Motorists & pedestrians Motorists & cyclists Motorists & cyclists Medium Low Low / Medium Low 140m 400m 0.6km 0.75km Distance Receptors Suscep. Value Sensitivity

5.4.2.

VP

1

1.1km

Motorists & pedestrians Motorists, pedestrians & residents Recreational walkers & residents Motorists, pedestrians & residents Recreational walkers

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium / High

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

5.4.3.

The general sensitivity of the identified viewpoints to the proposed development is considered to be low to medium, based on the very limited extent of the site’s visibility, it’s relationship with the existing urban form and the visibility of urban elements within Radcliffe on Trent and the wider Nottingham urban area. The above analysis highlights that the location and aspect of the site combined with the urban and landscape structure mean that it does not form a particularly sensitive part of the Green Belt. In terms of the impact on the Green Belt, and specifically the purposes relating to urban sprawl, coalescence and countryside encroachment the development will have a limited impact, which will often be barely perceptible, largely as a result of the enclosure of the site by the existing urban form and the limited intervisibility between the site and other settlements.

5.4.4.

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Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

6. LANDSCAPE CHARACTER & VISUAL AMENITY APPRAISAL
6.1. LANDSCAPE CHARACTER
6.1.1. The site lies within Policy Zone SN05 in the South Nottinghamshire Farmlands Character Area as defined by the GNLCA. The site and immediately surrounding area contains some elements that have been identified as general characteristics of this character area. The site is characterised by agricultural land that slopes to the stream to the south, and the rectilinear fields within it are divided by hedgerows. There are few trees in the surrounding area, but where woodland is present it is prominently located in irregular blocks. The urban fringe of Radcliffe, notably the residential properties to the east, has a significant influence on the character of the site, and therefore, its development would not, necessarily appear incongruous in its surroundings. The development of the site will result in the loss of agricultural land on the edge of the settlement, and in that respect fundamentally change the character of the site. However, the impact on the wider character area (SN05) is much less profound as the current urban area already has a significant influence on the site and wider area. The development of the site for residential purposes would not, therefore, appear incongruous in its surroundings. Moreover, the existing landscape features within the site can be retained, most notably the hedgerows and existing trees. Furthermore, the development is able to respond to the wider landscape character by: • Enhancing field boundaries through the augmentation of hedgerows to reinforce the field pattern albeit within the development; Planting additional hedgerow trees increase the number of higher quality and valued trees around the site boundaries; Providing small scale woodland blocks and copses to break up the uniform nature of the urban edge; and Providing a more appropriately designed urban edge (see below) softening the somewhat abrupt juxtaposition between the existing edge of the Clumber Drive development and the countryside.

6.1.2.

6.1.3.

6.2. VISUAL AMENITY APPRAISAL
6.2.1. Analysis of the ZTV and the individual viewpoints has identified a number of repetitive themes and conclusions: • The site is visually well contained. Views of the site from the surrounding area are limited by the urban form, topography and vegetation, notably to the north, west and south Where the ZTV does extend further eastwards there are limited receptors as there few publically accessible vantage points. There are no views of particular value that should be retained or protected, and the views of the site tend to incorporate prominent existing urban elements within Radcliffe (often on the skyline) and in some cases the wider Nottingham urban area. Receptors in the area will generally have a low to medium sensitivity to change on the site. 33

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

Development on the site would be seen in front of and below the existing urban form of Radcliffe or be enclosed by it. The development would extend the built form eastwards but no further than the existing extent of development to the south and north. Whilst some of the views of the urban area from the east would be foreshortened, it would be to an extremely small degree in visual perception terms. Again the treatment of the development edge will be important, and the development provides an opportunity to soften the somewhat abrupt juxtaposition between the existing edge of the Clumber Drive development and the countryside. The location and aspect of the site combined with the urban and landscape structure mean that it does not form a particularly sensitive part of the Green Belt. The development will have a limited impact on the Green Belt purposes relating to urban sprawl, coalescence and countryside encroachment, largely as a result of the enclosure of the site by the existing urban form and the limited intervisibility between the site and other settlements.

6.3. MITIGATION
6.3.1. The following mitigation measures are proposed to avoid, reduce and where possible remedy or offset any adverse impacts the proposed development of the site may have on the landscape character and visual amenity of the area and provide a sensitive urban edge: • The existing hedgerow structure around and within the site should be retained and reinforced wherever possible to provide structure for the development and help integrate it into the landscape. A landscape buffer (minimum 10m in depth) will be provided along the eastern boundary, incorporating retained hedgerows and significant tree planting in small pockets. The planting will strengthen the landscape character and filter and screen views into the development and towards Radcliffe. Green fingers will extend west from this buffer to permeate the development, creating woodland blocks and green streets that step up the slope hill. This will help integrate the development into its surroundings by filtering views and breaking up the roofline. Development on the eastern part of the site should be provided at a relatively low density, with the blocks arranged to face out to the countryside in an informal arrangement, served by lanes or private drives, This will present a more visually sympathetic settlement edge, which in places will help to soften the existing abrupt transition between the urban area and countryside. There should be a greater variety of dwelling typologies, with a staggered buildings line, gables and a varied roofscape. Building heights should be generally limited to 2 storeys and darker muted natural colours (red bricks, roof tiles and dark window and door frames, bargeboards and rainwater goods) should be used to allow the buildings to effectively merge into their backdrop. There should be larger front gardens containing tree and shrub planting. Development adjacent to the existing residential properties to the west of the application site should be limited to 2 storeys and include longer rear gardens

34

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

(at least 15.5m) and a vegetated buffer (approx. 5m within the 15.5m or separately in relation to the school/health centre).

35

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

7. SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS
7.1. LANDSCAPE CHARACTER
7.1.1. The site is not subject to any landscape policy designation, but does lie within Policy Zone SN05 in the South Nottinghamshire Farmlands Character Area as defined by the Greater Nottingham Landscape Character Assessment (GNLCA 2009). The GNLCA concludes that the landscape character area has a landscape condition of “Moderate” and landscape strength of “Moderate”. The overall landscape strategy is to “Enhance”. The landscape character is not rare and the site is not subject to any landscape designation. Nor does it have any recognised scenic quality or recreation or conservation value. The site and surrounding area contains some elements that have been identified as general characteristics of this area. The site is characterised by agricultural land that slopes to the stream to the south. The rectilinear fields are divided by hedgerows. There are few trees in the surrounding area, but where woodland is present it is prominently located in irregular blocks. The prominent village fringes in the area are highlighted in the GNLCA, and there are a number of local urban influences on the site, notably the residential development to the north, west and south. The railway line to the south is also a prominent feature in the landscape. In the wider area the landscape is characterised by a gently rolling landform of predominately arable farmland in medium to large scale fields, with a more abrupt escarpment to the River Trent to the north. The landscape character of the site and its immediate surrounds is considered to have a susceptibility of “Low” and a value of “Low”, resulting in an overall sensitivity of Low to the change proposed on the site. This reflects the proximity and influence of the adjacent settlement edge, the ability of the existing landscape structure to absorb potential development, the lack of any significant landscape features of importance on the site and the ability to retain those features that do exist. The development of the site will result in the loss of agricultural land on the edge of the settlement, and in that respect fundamentally change the character of the site. However, the impact on the wider character area (SN05) is much less profound as the current urban area already has a significant influence on the site and wider area. The development of the site for residential purposes would not, therefore, appear incongruous in its surroundings. Moreover, the existing landscape features within the site can be retained, most notably the hedgerows and existing trees, and the site is able to respond to the wider landscape character through the proposed landscape scheme (see mitigation below), and treatment of the urban edge in accordance with the GNLCA recommendations.

7.1.2.

7.1.3.

7.1.4.

7.2. VISUAL AMENITY
7.2.1. Views of the site from the surrounding area are generally limited by the urban form and topography. Existing residential properties effectively contain views of the site from the west and north west to the immediate surrounds of the site. To the north Malkin Hill limits views of the site from the countryside to approximately 1km from the centre of the site. Site visibility extends further east along the valley between Malkin Hill to the north and Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale to the south, but there is a flat perspective and the intervening vegetation filters views to the site. From the south the site is visible from open areas located between the railways line and Grantham Road (A52). The site is also visible from the north facing slopes of Dewberry Hill and Upper Saxondale south of the Grantham Road (A52). The 36

Land off Shelford Road, Radcliffe on Trent: Landscape and Visual Appraisal

available public views are, however, severely restricted by existing buildings in the urban area. 7.2.2. There are no views of particular value that should be retained or protected, and the views of the site from the surrounding area tend to incorporate urban elements within Radcliffe itself, and in some cases elsewhere in the surrounding area. The general sensitivity of the identified viewpoints to the proposed development is considered to be low to medium, based on the very limited extent of the site’s visibility, it’s relationship with the existing urban form and the visibility of urban elements within Radcliffe on Trent and the wider Nottingham urban area. Development on the site would be seen in front of and below the existing urban form of Radcliffe or be enclosed by it. The development would extend the built form eastwards but no further than the existing extent of development to the south and north. Whilst some of the views of the urban area from the east would be foreshortened, it would be to an extremely small degree in visual perception terms.

7.2.3.

7.2.4.

Green Belt
7.2.5. The location and aspect of the site combined with the urban and landscape structure mean that it does not form a particularly sensitive part of the Green Belt. In terms of the impact of the proposed development on the Green Belt, and specifically the purposes relating to urban sprawl, coalescence and countryside encroachment, the development will have a limited impact, which will often be barely perceptible, largely as a result of the enclosure of the site by the existing urban form and the limited intervisibility between the site and other settlements.

7.3. MITIGATION
7.3.1. The following mitigation strategy has directly shaped the proposed development proposals to ensure the proposed development positively responds to its existing landscape character and visual amenity: • The development of the site will result in the loss of agricultural land. However, the essential landscape features within the site can be retained, most notably the hedgerows and existing trees to provide structure for the development and help integrate it into the landscape. Furthermore, the development is able to respond to its landscape character by enhancing the hedgerow field boundaries, planting additional hedgerow trees and small woodland blocks. The planting will strengthen the landscape character and filter and screen views into the development and towards Radcliffe. The treatment of the proposed development edge will be important, and provides an opportunity to soften the somewhat abrupt juxtaposition between the existing edge of Radcliffe and the countryside. The development blocks should be arranged to face out on to the countryside in an informal arrangement. Building heights should be limited to 2 storeys at the countryside edge and darker muted material colours should be used. Development adjacent to the existing residential properties to the west of the application site should be limited to 2 storeys and include longer rear gardens (at least 15.5m) and a vegetated buffer (approx. 5m within the 15.5m or separately in relation to the school/health centre). 37