You are on page 1of 72

 

WHO methods and data sources for global causes of death 2000‐2011

Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems WHO, Geneva June 2013

Global Health Estimates Technical Paper WHO/HIS/HSI/GHE/2013.3

 

 

Acknowledgments
This Technical Report  was written  by Colin  Mathers, Gretchen Stevens  and Doris  Ma Fat  with inputs  and  assistance from Wahyu Retno Mahanani, Jessica Ho and Li Liu. Estimates of regional deaths by cause for  years  2000‐2011  were  primarily  prepared  by  Colin  Mathers,  Gretchen  Stevens,   Jessica  Ho,  Doris  Ma  Fat  and  Wahyu  Retno  Mahanani,  of  the  Mortality  and  Burden  of  Disease  Unit  in  the  WHO  Department  of  Health  Statistics  and  Information  Systems,  in  the  Health  Systems  and  Innovation  Cluster  of  the  World  Health  Organization  (WHO),  Geneva,  drawing  heavily  on  advice  and  inputs  from  other  WHO  Departments,  collaborating  United  Nations  (UN)  Agencies,  and  WHO  expert  advisory  groups  and  academic collaborators.   Many  of  the  inputs  to  these  estimates  result  from  collaborations  with  Interagency  Groups,  expert  advisory  groups  and  academic  groups.   The  most  important  of  these  include  the  Interagency  Group  on  Child  Mortality  Estimation  (UN‐IGME),  the  UN  Population  Division,  the  Child  Health  Epidemiology  Reference  Group  (CHERG),  the  Maternal  Mortality  Expert  and  Interagency  Group  (MMEIG),  the  International  Agency  for  Research  on  Cancer,  WHO  QUIVER,  and  the  Global  Burden  of  Disease  2010  Study  Collaborating  Group.  While  it  is  not  possible  to  name  all  those  who  provided  advice,  assistance  or  data,  both  inside  and  outside  WHO,  we  would  particularly  like  to  note  the  assistance  and  inputs  provided  by  Kirill  Andreev,  Diego  Bassani,  Bob  Black,  Ties  Boerma,  Phillipe  Boucher,  Freddie  Bray,  Tony  Burton,  Harry  Campbell,  Doris  Chou,  Richard  Cibulskis,  Simon  Cousens,  Jacques  Ferlay,  Marta  Gacic‐ Dobo,  Richard  Garfield,  Alison  Gemmill,  Patrick  Gerland,  Peter  Ghys,  Philippe  Glaziou,    Danan  Gu,  Ken  Hill, Kacem Iaych, Mie Inoue, Robert Jakob, Dean Jamison, Prabhat Jha, Hope Johnson, Joy Lawn, Nan Li,  Li  Liu,  Rafael  Lozano,  Chris  Murray,  Lori  Newman,  Mikkel  Oestergaard,  Max  Parkin,  Margie  Peden,  Francois  Pelletier,  Juergen  Rehm,  Igor  Rudan,  Lale  Say,  Emily  Simons,  Charalampos  Sismanidis,  Thomas  Spoorenberg,  Karen  Stanecki,  Peter  Strebel,  Emi  Suzuki,  Tamitza  Toroyan,  Theo  Vos,  Tessa  Wardlaw,  Richard White, John Wilmoth and Danzhen You.    Estimates and analysis are available at:  http://www.who.int/gho/mortality_burden_disease/en/index.html  For further information about the estimates and methods, please contact healthstat@who.int      In this series 1.  WHO  methods  and  data  sources  for  life  tables  1990‐2011   (Global  Health  Estimates  Technical  Paper  WHO/HIS/HSI/GHE/2013.1)  2. CHERG‐WHO  methods and  data sources  for child  causes of  death 2000‐2011  (Global Health  Estimates  Technical Paper WHO/HIS/HSI/GHE/2013.2)  3.  WHO  methods  and  data  sources  for  global  causes  of  death  2000‐2011  (Global  Health  Estimates  Technical Paper WHO/HIS/HSI/GHE/2013.3)     

i   

 

Table of Contents
  Acknowledgments  .......................................................................................................................................... i  Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................................... ii  1   Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….1  2   Population and all‐cause mortality estimates for years 2000‐2011 ........................................................ 3  2.1   All‐cause mortality and population estimates .................................................................................  3  2.2   Estimation of neonatal, infant and under‐5 mortality rates............................................................ 3  2.3   All‐cause mortality computed from civil registration data .............................................................. 4  2.4   All‐cause mortality projected from civil registration data ............................................................... 4  2.5   Countries with other information on levels of adult mortality ....................................................... 5  2.6   Mortality shocks – epidemics, conflicts and disasters .....................................................................  6  3   Countries with useable death registration data ......................................................................................  7  3.1   Data and estimates ..........................................................................................................................  7  3.2   Inclusion criteria for countries with high quality death registration data ....................................... 7  3.3   Redistribution of unknown sex/age and ‘garbage’ codes and adjustment for incomplete death  registration  ..................................................................................................................................... 12  3.4    Mapping to GHE cause lists............................................................................................................  12  3.5    Interpolation and extrapolation for missing country‐years........................................................... 14  ........................................................................................................  14  3.6   Adjustment of specific causes  3.7   Other national‐level information on causes of death ...................................................................  14  4   Child mortality by cause ........................................................................................................................  19  4.1   Causes of under 5 death in countries with good death registration data ..................................... 19  ..................................................... 19  4.2   Causes of neonatal death (deaths at less than 28 days of age)  4.3   Causes of child death at ages 1‐59 months –low mortality countries  ........................................... 20  4.4   Causes of child death at ages 1‐59 months –high mortality countries ......................................... 20  4.5   Causes of child death for China and India .....................................................................................  21  4.6   Inclusion of WHO‐CHERG estimates in Global Health Estimates 2000‐2011 ................................ 21  5   Methods for specific causes with additional information .....................................................................  22  5.1   Tuberculosis ................................................................................................................................... 22  5.2   HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases .................................................................................  22  5.3   Malaria ........................................................................................................................................... 22  5.4   Whooping cough ............................................................................................................................  23  5.5   Measles .......................................................................................................................................... 23  5.6   Schistosomiasis ..............................................................................................................................  24  ii   

  5.7   Maternal causes of death ..............................................................................................................  24  5.8   Cancers ........................................................................................................................................... 24  5.9   Alcohol use and drug use disorders ...............................................................................................  25  5.10   Epilepsy .......................................................................................................................................... 25  5.11   Road injuries .................................................................................................................................. 25  5.11.1   5.11.2   5.11.3   5.11.4   Countries with death registration data.............................................................................  26  Countries with other sources of information on causes of death .................................... 26  Countries with populations less than 150 000 ................................................................. 26  Countries without eligible death registration data .......................................................... 26 

5.12   Conflict and natural disasters ........................................................................................................  28  6   Other causes of death for countries without useable data ...................................................................  30  7   Uncertainty of estimates .......................................................................................................................  33  References…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….37  ...........................................................................  43  Annex Table A  GHE cause categories and ICD‐10 codes  Annex Table B  First‐level categories for analysis of child causes of death ............................................... 48  Annex Table C  Re‐assignment of ICD‐10 codes for certain neonatal deaths. .......................................... 49  Annex Table D  Country groupings used for regional tabulations ............................................................. 51  D.1   WHO Regions and Member States ................................................................................................  51  D.2   Countries grouped by WHO Region and average income per capita* .......................................... 52  D.3   World Bank income grouping* ......................................................................................................  53  D.4   World Bank Regions .......................................................................................................................  54  D.5   Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Regions ............................................................................  55  Annex Table E  Mapping of India MDS categories to GHE causes ............................................................. 56  Annex Table F  Methods used for estimation of child and adult mortality levels, and causes of death, by  country, 2000‐2011  ...........................................................................................................  58  Annex Table G  Methods used to estimate road traffic deaths for 182 participating countries ............... 64     

iii   

 

1

Introduction

Global,  regional,  and  country  statistics  on  population  and  health  indicators  are  important  for  assessing  development  and  health  progress  and  for  guiding  resource  allocation.  The  demand  is  growing  for  timely  data to  monitor  progress  in health  outcomes  such  as  child mortality,  maternal  mortality,  life  expectancy  and  age‐  and  cause‐specific  mortality  rates.  Much  of  the  current  focus  is  on  monitoring  progress  towards the targets of the (health‐related) Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), including time series  and  country‐level  estimates  that  are  regularly  updated.  But  increasingly,  the  demand  is  for  comprehensive  estimates  across  the  full  spectrum,  including  noncommunicable  diseases  (NCDs)  and  injuries.   WHO  has  previously  published  comprehensive  estimates  of  deaths  by  region,  cause,  age  and  sex  for  years  2000  and  2002  (1),  2001  (2),  2004  (3)  and  2008  (4).  Beginning  with  the  2004  estimates,  WHO  has  also  released  summary  estimates  of  causes  of  death  for  its  Member  States  (5).  These  successive  single  year  estimates  did  not  form  a  time  series,  as  each  revision  involved  revisions  to  data  and  methods  for  a  range  of  inputs.  To  address  the  increasing  demand  for  time  series,  for  country‐level  estimates,  and  for  comprehensive  estimates  across  NCD  and  injury  causes,  as  well  as  the  more  traditional  priorities  in  infectious  and  parasitic  diseases,  updated  Global  Health  Estimates  (GHE)  are  being  released,  commencing with regional‐level estimates of deaths by cause, age and sex for years 2000‐2011 (6).   This  technical  paper  documents  the  data  sources  and  methods  used  for  preparation  of  these  regional‐ level  cause  of  death  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011.  Annex  Table  A  lists  the  cause  of  death  categories  and  their  definitions  in  terms  of  the  International  Classification  of  Diseases,  Tenth  Revision  (ICD‐10)  (7).  These  estimates  are  available  for  years  2000  and  2011  for  selected  regional  groupings  of  countries  (6),  defined in Annex Tables D, at http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_health_estimates/en/.   Comprehensive  estimates  of  mortality,  causes  of  death,  DALYs  for  diseases,  injuries  and  risk  factors  were  released  in  December  2012  (8‐10)  by  the  Institute  of  Health  Metrics  and  Evaluation  (IHME)  as  part  of the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study (GBD 2010). WHO was a collaborator in the study from 2007  to 2011, but did not endorse the final results, as it was unable to obtain full access to the results prior to  publication  or  to  evaluate  them.    In  some  areas,  the  results  of  the  GBD  2010  differ  substantially  from  existing analyses done by WHO and other United Nations agencies at global, regional and country levels.   In  many  other  areas,  the  GBD  2010  results  are  updates  that  are  broadly  similar  to  previous  WHO  analyses.  Further  work  with  IHME  and  expert  groups  is  needed  to  examine  the  reasons  for  current  differences.   One  of  the  six  core  functions  of  WHO  is  monitoring  of  the  health  situation,  trends  and  determinants  in  the world. Over the years it has cooperated closely with other UN partner agencies like UNICEF, UNAIDS,  UNFPA  and  the  UN  Population  Division  to  collect  and  compile  global  health  statistics.  There  are  a  number  of  established  UN  multi‐agency  expert  group  mechanisms  for   cross  cutting  topics  such  as  child  mortality  (the  UN‐IGME  including  UNICEF/WHO/  UNPD/World  Bank  and  the  UN‐IGME  Technical  Advisory  Group)  and  child  causes  of  death  (CHERG,  WHO/UNICEF),  specific  diseases  such  as  HIV/AIDS  (UNAIDS  Reference  Group),  maternal  mortality  (MMEIG  including  WHO/UNICEF/UNFPA/World  Bank),  tuberculosis  (WHO  STAG),  malaria  (Malaria  Reference  Group  and  Roll  Back  Malaria‐  Malaria  Monitoring  and Evaluation Reference Group).   These  WHO  Global  Health  Estimates  provide  a  comprehensive  and  comparable  set  of  cause  of  death  estimates from year 2000 onwards, consistent with and incorporating UN agency, interagency and WHO  estimates for population, births, all‐cause deaths and specific causes of death, including:  o most recent vital registration  (VR) data for all  countries where the VR  data quality is assessed  as  useable;  Page 1

World Health Organization  

  o o o updated  and  additional  information  on  levels  and  trends  for  child  and  adult  mortality  in  many  countries without good death registration data  improvements in methods used for the estimation of causes of child deaths in countries without  good death registration data.   Updated  assessments  of  levels  and  trends  for  specific  causes  of  death  by  WHO  programs  and  interagency groups. These include:           o Tuberculosis –WHO  HIV – UNAIDS and WHO   Malaria – WHO  Vaccine‐preventable child causes – WHO  Other major child causes – WHO and CHERG   Maternal mortality –MMEIG  Cancers – IARC   Road traffic accidents – WHO  Conflict  and  natural  disasters  –  WHO  and  the  Collaborating  Center  for  Research  on  the  Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) 

GBD  2010  study  estimates  for  other  causes  in  countries  without  useable  VR  data  or  other  nationally representative sources of information on causes of death. 

Because  these  estimates  draw  on  new  data  and  on  the  result  of  the  GBD  2010  study,  and  there  have  been substantial revisions to methods for many causes, these estimates for the years 2000‐2011 are not  directly  comparable  with  previous  WHO    estimates  for  2008  and  earlier  years.  These  are  provisional  estimates  and  will  be  further  revised  in  the  process  of  extending    the  series  to  2012  for  release  at  country  level  in  late  2013.  WHO  and  collaborators  will  continue  to  include  new  data  and  improve  methods, and it is anticipated that some causes will be substantially updated in the next revision.  These Global Health Estimates represent the best estimates of WHO, based on the evidence available to  it up until May 2013, rather than the official estimates of Member States, and have not necessarily been  endorsed  by  Member  States.  They  have  been  computed  using  standard  categories,  definitions  and  methods  to  ensure  cross‐national  comparability  and  may  not  be  the  same  as  official  national  estimates  produced using alternate, potentially equally rigorous methods. The following sections of this document  provide explanatory notes on data sources and methods for preparing mortality estimates by cause.   

World Health Organization  

Page 2

 

2

Population and all‐cause mortality estimates for years 2000‐2011

2.1 All‐cause mortality and population estimates
Life  tables  have  been  developed  for  all  Member  States  for  years  1990‐  2011  starting  with  a  systematic  review  of  all  available  evidence  from  surveys,  censuses,  sample  registration  systems,  population  laboratories  and  vital  registration  on  levels  and  trends  in  under‐five  and  adult  mortality  rates.  Annex  table  F  summarizes  the  methods  used  for  preparing  life  tables.  Data  sources  are  documented  in  more  detail in Technical Paper 2013.1 (11).  In  recent  years,  WHO  has  liaised  more  closely  with  the  UN  Population  Division  (on  life  tables  for  countries,  in  order  to  maximize  the  consistency  of  UN  and  WHO  life  tables,  and  to  minimize  differences  in  the  use  and  interpretation  of  available  data  on  mortality  levels.  For  countries  where  WHO  previously  predicted  levels  of  adult  mortality  from  estimated  levels  of  child  mortality,  this  update  has  taken  into  account additional country‐specific sources of information on levels of adult mortality as reflected in the  life tables prepared by the UN Population Division for its World Population Prospects (WPP).  Total deaths by age and sex were estimated for each country by applying the WHO life table death rates  to  the  estimated  de  facto  resident  populations  prepared  by  the  UN  Population  Division  in  its  2010  revision  (12).  They  may  thus  differ  slightly  from  official  national  estimates  for  corresponding  years.  All‐ cause  mortality  and  deaths  by  cause  will  be  updated  in  the   next  WHO  GHE  revision  to  take  account  of  revisions to population estimates included in the WPP 2012 (released mid‐June 2013) (13). 
 

2.2 Estimation of neonatal, infant and under‐5 mortality rates
Methods  for  estimating  time  series  for  neonatal,  infant  and  under‐5  mortality  rates  have  been  developed  and  agreed  upon  within  the  Inter‐agency  Group  for  Child  Mortality  Estimation  (UN‐IGME)  which is made up of WHO, UNICEF, UN Population Division, World Bank and academic groups. UN‐IGME  annually assesses and adjusts all available surveys, censuses and vital registration data, to then estimate  the  country‐specific  trends  in  under‐five  mortality  per  1000  live  births  (U5MR)    over  the  past  few  decades  in  order  to  predict  the  rates  for  the  reference  years  (14).  All  data  sources  and  estimates  are  documented  on  the  UN‐IGME  website.1  For  countries  with  complete  recording  of  child  deaths  in  death  registration systems, these are used as the source of data for the estimation of trends in neonatal, infant  and  child  mortality.  For  countries  with  incomplete  death  registration,  all  other  available  census  and  survey  data  sources,  which  meet  quality  criteria,  are  used.  UN‐IGME  methods  are  documented  in  a  series of papers published in a collection in 2012 (15).  For  data  from  civil  registration,  the  neonatal  mortality  per  1000  live  births  (NMR)  is  calculated  as  the  number  of  neonatal  death  divided  by  the  live  births  reported  from  the  country  when  available.  For  household  surveys,  child  and  neonatal  mortality  rates  are  calculated  from  the  full  birth  history  (FBH)  data,  where  women  are  asked  for  the  date  of  birth  of  each  of  their  children,  whether  the  child  is  still  alive, and if not the age at death FBH data, collected by all Demographic Health Surveys (DHS), allow the  calculation  of  child  mortality  indicators  for  specific  time  periods  in  the  past;  DHS  publishes  child  mortality estimates for five 5‐year periods before the survey, that is, 0 to 4, 5 to 9, 10 to 14 etc.   A  database  consisting  of  pairs  of  NMRs  and  U5MRs  was  compiled.  For  a  given  year,  NMR  and  U5MR  were  included  in  the  database  when  data  for  both  of  these  were  available.  To  ensure  consistency  with 

                                                            
1

www.childmortality.org

World Health Organization  

Page 3

  U5MR  estimates  produced  by  UN‐IGME,  U5MR  and  NMR  data  points  were  rescaled  for  all  years  to  match the UN‐IGME estimates.   For  countries  where  child  mortality  is  strongly  affected  by  HIV,  the  NMR  was  estimated  initially  using  neonatal  and  child  mortality  observations  for  non‐AIDS  deaths,  calculated  by  subtracting  from  total  death  rates  the  estimated  HIV  death  rates  in  the  neonatal  and  1‐59  month  periods  respectively,  and  then  AIDS  neonatal  deaths  be  added  back  on  to  the  non‐HIV  neonatal  deaths  to  compute  the  total  estimated neonatal death rate.  The following statistical model was used to estimate NMR: 
 

log(NMR/1000) = α0+ β1*log(U5MR/1000) + β2*([log(U5MR/1000)] 2)   
 

with  additional  random  effect  intercept  parameters  for  both  country  and  region.  For  countries  with  good  vital  registration  data  covering  the  period  1990‐2011,  random  effects  parameters  for  slope  or  trend  parameters  were  also  added.  Based  on  predictive  performance  evaluation  using  ten‐fold  cross‐ validation,  the  statistical  model  fitted  to  data  point  for  1990  onwards  were  retained  and  only  the  most  recent data point from each survey was included (16). 
 

2.3 All‐cause mortality computed from civil registration data
For  133  Member  States  with  vital  registration  and  sample  vital  registration  systems,  demographic  techniques  (such  as  Brass  Growth–Balance  method,  Generalized  Growth–Balance  method  or  Bennett–  Horiuchi  method)  were  first  applied  to  assess  the  level  of  completeness  of  recorded  mortality  data  in  the  population  above  five  years  of  age  and  then  those  mortality  rates  were  adjusted  accordingly.  The  proportion  of  all  deaths  which  are  registered  in  the  population  covered  by  the  vital  registration  system  (referred  to  as  completeness)  has  been  estimated  by  WHO  and  is  given  for  the  latest  available  years  in  the annex table.   Where  vital  registration  data  for  all  the  reference  years  were  available,  the  age  specific  mortality  rates,  adjusted for completeness if necessary were used directly to construct the life tables.  Death registration  data up to and including year 2011 were available for 53 Member States. 
 

2.4 All‐cause mortality projected from civil registration data
For  another  60  Member  States  where  vital  registration  data  for  2011  was  not  available,  life  table  parameters  were  projected  from  those  for  available  data  years  from  1985  onwards.  Adjusted  levels  of  child  mortality  (5q0)  and  adult  mortality  (45q15),  excluding  HIV/AIDS  deaths  where  necessary,  were  used  to estimate levels of two life table parameters (l5, l60) for each available year. The life table parameter l60  was  projected  forward  to  2011  using  a  weighted  regression  model  giving  more  weight  to  recent  years  (using  an  exponential  weighting  scheme  such  that  the  weight  for  each  year  t  was  25%  less  than  the  weight  for  year  t+1).   For  Member  States  with  a  total  population  less  than  750,000  or  where  the  root  mean  square  error  from  this  regression  was  greater  than  or  equal  to  0.011,  a  shorter‐term  trend  was  estimated  by  applying  a  weighting  factor  with  50%  annual  exponential  decay.  These  projected  values  of  l60, together with values of l5 based on 5q0 from UN‐IGME were then applied to a modified logit life table  model, using the most recent national data as the standard, to predict the full life tables in the reference  years (17). Where necessary, HIV/AIDS death rates were then added to total mortality rates.   For two  small  countries  without available  death  registration  data,  Andorra and  Monaco,  life  tables  were  based on mortality rates from neighbouring regions of Spain and France, respectively.  World Health Organization   Page 4

   

2.5 Countries with other information on levels of adult mortality
For 81 Member States without useable death registration data, assessments of mortality rates for ages 5  and  over  were  based  on  life  table  analyses  of  the  UN  Population  Division  (12).  The  sources  of  available  data used in  the WPP  are listed elsewhere  (18). Annual  age‐sex‐specific death rates  for years  1990‐2011  were  interpolated  from  the  WPP  life  tables,  where  necessary  first  subtracting  out  conflict  and  disaster  deaths  occurring  in  each  specific  5‐year  time  period.  Annual  estimates  for  conflict  and  disaster  deaths  were then added back as described below.  For  39  of  these  Member  States,  with  high  levels  of  HIV  mortality,  the  UN  Population  Division  explicitly  estimated  HIV  deaths  in  preparing  life  table  time  series.  For  these  Member  States,  HIV‐free  mortality  rates were computed for interpolation of annual death rates (making use of unpublished supplementary  tabulations  provided  by  the  UN  Population  Division  for  estimated  HIV  deaths  by  age  and  sex  in  these  countries).  The  latest  estimates  of  annual  HIV  death  rates  prepared  by  UNAIDS  (19)  were  then  added  back to the annual mortality rates to compute total all‐cause death rates by year. The high‐HIV countries  for which this method was used are identified in the Annex Table F.  For  six  countries,  additional  data  inputs  for  the  most  recent  period  were  also  taken  into  account  based  on  provisional  analyses  for  the  WPP  2012  provided  by  the  UN  Population  Division  (20).  Data  sources  for  these  countries  are  listed  in  the  Annex  Table  F,  and  the  following  notes  provide  an  overview  of  the  analyses used.  Afghanistan  The  2012  revision  of  child  mortality  estimates  for  Afghanistan  by  UN‐IGME  took  into  account  data  from  the 2010 Afghanistan Mortality Survey (21) and the 2011 UNICEF MICS4 survey (22).   Adjusted estimates of adult mortality (45q15) derived from      recent household deaths data from the 2010 Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS);  parental orphanhood from the 2010 AMS (excluding the Southern region);   siblings  deaths  from  the  2010  AMS  (excluding  the  Southern  region)  adjusted  for  age  misreporting and recall biases 

were  also  considered,  but  the  implied  low  level  of  adult  mortality  could  not  be  reconciled  with  intercensal  survival  between  the  1979  Afghan  census  and  2003‐05  Afghan  household  listing,  or  with   population  estimates  from  2003‐05  Household  listing  and  more  recent  surveys  in  2007‐2008  and  2011,  or  with  intercensal  estimates  of  the  trends  in  fertility,  and  international  migration  based  on  UNHCR  statistics  on  the  number  of  Afghan  refugees.  Additionally,  they  would  imply  that  Afghan  adult  mortality  levels were substantially lower than those in neighboring countries.  As  a  result,  the  life  tables  for  Afghanistan  are  based  on  provisional  analyses  by  UN  Population  Division  using  the  West  model  of  the  Coale‐Demeny  Model  Life  Tables  with  three  parameters:  (1)  estimates  of  infant  mortality,  (2)  estimates  of  child  mortality,  and  (3)  adjusted  estimates  of  adult  mortality  (45q15)  derived  from  (a)  recent  household  deaths  data  from  the  1979  census;  (b)  implied  relationship  between  child  mortality  and  adult  mortality  based  on  the  UN  South  Asian  and  West  model  of  the  Coale‐Demeny  Model  Life  Tables,  and  (c)  levels  of  adult  mortality  based  on  sample  registration  data  from  neighboring  countries for recent years.      

World Health Organization  

Page 5

  China   Life  tables  for  years  since  2000  have  been  revised  to  take  into  account  a  faster  rate  of  decline  for  adult  mortality  than  previously  projected  in  the  World  Population  Prospects  2010  revision.  Unpublished  analyses  of  the  China  2010  census  data  on  adult  mortality  by  UN  Population  Division  have  adjusted  for  under‐reporting  of  deaths  resulting  in  estimates  of  adult  mortality  rates  for  2010  quite  similar  to  those  reported by the China Disease Surveillance Points System (23).   Egypt   Life  tables  have  been  based  on  official  estimates  of  life  expectancy  available  through  2012,  and  in  turn  derived  from  death  registration  data  for  Egypt.  The  age  pattern  of  mortality  is  based  on  official  life  tables  for  various  years  from  1960  to  2010  adjusted  for  infant  and  child  mortality  as  estimated  by  UN‐ IGME, and adult mortality.   Saudi Arabia   The  World  Population  Prospects  2010  revision  based  estimates  of  adult  mortality  for  Saudi  Arabia  using  model  life  tables  with  estimates  of  child  mortality  as  input.  Estimates  of  adult  mortality  have  been  provisionally  updated  using  adjusted  death  rates  by  age  and  sex  from  the  1999  Demographic  Survey,  2004  Census  and  2007  Demographic  Survey  adjusted  for  infant  and  child  mortality,  and  old‐age  mortality. Life tables based on annual deaths from the 2000 Demographic Survey, as well as on 2005 and  2009 registered deaths were also considered.   South Sudan and Sudan   The  former  Sudan  became  two  countries,  South  Sudan  and  Sudan,  on  9  July  2011.  Previously  published  WHO  and  UN  life  tables  refer  to  the  former  Sudan.  Life  tables  for  the  two  Member  States  of  South  Sudan  and  Sudan  are  based  on  provisional  analyses  of  population  and  mortality  rates  for  the  territories  corresponding to the current South Sudan and Sudan over the period 1990 to 2011.   Infant  and  child  mortality  for  South  Sudan  and  Sudan  are  derived  from  UN‐IGME  estimates  published  in  2012  (14).  Life  tables  are  based  on  provisional  unpublished  analyses  of  the  UN  Population  Division,  deriving  adult  mortality  rates  from  estimates  of  infant  and  child  mortality  by  assuming  that  the  age  pattern  of  mortality  conforms  to  the  North  model  of  the  Coale‐Demeny  Model  Life  Tables.  The  demographic impacts of AIDS and conflict have also been factored into the mortality estimates.    

2.6 Mortality shocks – epidemics, conflicts and disasters
Country‐specific  estimates  of  deaths  for  organized  conflicts  and  major  natural  disasters  were  prepared  for years 1990‐2011 using data and methods documented in Section 5.12. For country‐years where total  death  rates  from  these  conflicts  and  disasters  exceeded  1  per  10,000  population,  these  deaths  were  added to the life table death rates for the relevant year.  The  revised  WHO  estimates  for  conflict  deaths  were  taken  into  account  in  preparing  final  life  tables  for  Member  States  for  years  1990‐2011  as  follows.  For  country‐years  where  death  rates  from  conflict  or  disasters  exceeded  1  per  10,000  population,  the  estimated  annual  age‐sex‐specific  conflict  deaths  were  added to the life table death rates for the relevant year. In cases of extended conflicts where death rates  fluctuated  above  and  below  1  per  10,000,  only  the  death  rate  in  excess  of  1  per  10,000  was  added  to  relevant years.  Measles outbreaks and epidemics were identified as described in Section 5.5 below and similarly added  to all‐cause envelopes for relevant country‐years.  World Health Organization   Page 6

 

3

Countries with useable death registration data

3.1 Data and estimates
Cause‐of‐death  statistics  are  reported  to  WHO  on  an  annual  basis  by  country,  year,  cause,  age  and  sex.  Most  of  these  statistics  can  be  accessed  in  the  WHO  Mortality  Database  (24).  The  number  of  countries  reporting  data  using  ICD‐10  has  continued  to  increase.  For  these  estimates,  a  total  of  114  countries  had  data covering 80% or more of deaths in the country, of which 93 countries were reporting data coded to  the third or fourth character of ICD‐10 and 59 countries had data for years 2010 or 2011.   For  countries  with  a  high‐quality  vital  registration  system  including  information  on  cause  of  death,  we  used  the  vital  registration  data  recorded  in  the  WHO  Mortality  Database.  We  analyzed  the  data  using  the following steps:  1) application of inclusion criteria to select countries with high‐quality vital registration data;  2) extraction of deaths by cause group, with a short or a detailed cause list used depending on  the ICD revision used in each country‐year;  3) redistribution of deaths of unknown sex/age and deaths assigned to garbage codes and  adjustment for incomplete registration of deaths in some countries;  4) interpolation/extrapolation of number of deaths for missing country‐years;  5) adjustments for certain specific causes using additional information to adjust for over‐ or  under‐reporting  6) scaling of total deaths by age and sex to previously estimated WHO all‐cause envelopes for  years 2000‐2011  Details are provided below. 

3.2 Inclusion criteria for countries with high quality death registration data
We applied the following inclusion criteria to data in the WHO mortality database:       At least five years of data are available during 1998‐present;  The data are available for 5‐year age groups to ages 85 and over;  The data are for a country whose population in 2008 was greater than 500,000;  The data are for a country that is currently a WHO Member State;  The data fulfill quality criteria pertaining to garbage codes and completeness, as described  below. 

For  131  Member  States  with  vital  registration  systems  who  have  provided  summary  data  to  WHO,  demographic  techniques  (such  as  Brass  Growth–Balance  method,  Generalized  Growth–Balance  method  or  Bennett–  Horiuchi  method)  were  first  applied  to  assess  the  level  of  completeness  of  recorded  mortality  data  in  the  population  above  five  years  of  age.   We  then  calculated  the  proportion  of  deaths  with underlying cause coded to  a short list of so‐called “garbage” codes:       symptoms, signs and ill‐defined conditions (ICD10 codes R00‐R99),  injuries undetermined whether intentional or unintentional (ICD10 Y10‐Y34, Y87.2),   ill‐defined cancers (C76, C80, and C97), and   ill‐defined cardiovascular diseases ( I47.2, I49.0, I46, I50, I51.4, I51.5, I51.6, I51.9 and I70.9). 

World Health Organization  

Page 7

  Table 3.1. Characteristics of useable country vital registration data   (Only  countries  fulfilling  the  first  four  inclusion  criteria  listed  above  are  included  in  this  table.  ICD‐10  codes included in the “garbage” category are given in the text above).  
Country  First year  Last year  Average  1998+  available  usability  available  2000+  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  2004  1998  1998  1998  2000  1998  1998  1998  2004  2010  2011  2011  2011  2007  2009  2009  2010  2011  2009  2009  2009  2011  2011  2010  2011  2011  2011  2010  2011  2009  2011  2011  55%  79%  66%  95%  90%  84%  88%  88%  76%  79%  94%  94%  89%  87%  87%  90%  73%  88%  87%  59%  61%  58%  94%  97%  Range of  completeness  67%  100%  66%  100%  100%  81%  99%  100%  87%  100%  100%  100%  93%  90%  98%  96%  90%  99%  100%  72%  99%  75%  100%  100%  71%  100%  81%  100%  100%  96%  100%  100%  91%  100%  100%  100%  96%  95%  100%  98%  91%  100%  100%  73%  100%  75%  100%  100%  Range of  garbage  fraction  18%  20%  3%  5%  1%  2%  10%  12%  12%  16%  6%  6%  6%  4%  8%  1%  16%  10%  12%  16%  32%  18%  5%  2%  Notes 

Albania  Argentina  Armenia  Australia  Austria  Azerbaijan  Belarus  Belgium  Brazil  Bulgaria  Canada  Chile  Colombia  Costa Rica  Croatia  Cuba  Cyprus  Czech Republic  Denmark  Ecuador  Egypt  El Salvador  Estonia  Finland 

20%  Excluded due to low  usability  22%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  6%  Excluded due to low  usability  6%     14%     34%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  13%  Summarized cause list  used  15%     21%     28%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  8%     11%     8%     7%     17%     9%     24%     15%     14%     23%  Excluded due to low  usability  41%  Excluded due to low  usability  25%  Excluded due to low  usability  8%     3%    

World Health Organization  

Page 8

 
Country  First year  Last year  Average  1998+  available  usability  available  2000+  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  2000  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1999  1998  2004  2009  2010  2011  2010  2009  2011  2009  2010  2010  2010  2011  2010  2011  2010  2010  2010  2011  2010  2009  2011  2009  2011  2009  2008  2011  2011  2009  85%  53%  87%  75%  73%  94%  94%  94%  90%  90%  89%  83%  87%  90%  92%  94%  90%  95%  70%  86%  97%  89%  80%  83%  74%  82%  74%  Range of  completeness  100%  78%  100%  100%  89%  99%  100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  84%  98%  91%  99%  99%  100%  100%  93%  100%  100%  100%  84%  91%  100%  100%  100%  100%  83%  100%  100%  90%  100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  89%  98%  95%  100%  100%  100%  100%  93%  100%  100%  100%  91%  93%  100%  100%  100%  Range of  garbage  fraction  14%  7%  11%  24%  12%  4%  5%  5%  8%  8%  9%  3%  9%  3%  5%  2%  8%  5%  23%  13%  3%  11%  8%  10%  25%  17%  22%  Notes 

France  Georgia  Germany  Greece  Guatemala  Hungary  Iceland  Ireland  Israel  Italy  Japan  Kazakhstan  Kuwait  Kyrgyzstan  Latvia  Lithuania  Mauritius  Mexico  Montenegro  Netherlands  New Zealand  Norway  Panama  Philippines  Poland  Portugal  Qatar 

16%     69%  Excluded due to low  usability  14%     27%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  22%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  7%     6%     8%    14%     12%    13%     11%  Summarized cause list  used  14%     8%     11%     6%     15%    6%     28%  Excluded due to low  usability  15%     4%     12%     14%     13%    28%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage  22%     32%  Excluded due to high  proportion garbage 

World Health Organization  

Page 9

 
Country  First year  Last year  Average  1998+  available  usability  available  2000+  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  1998  2011  2011  2011  2010  2011  2011  2010  2010  2009  2011  2006  2010  2010  2010  2006  2008  2011  2010  2008  2009  2005  2009  85%  88%  92%  95%  72%  74%  94%  89%  68%  89%  55%  89%  89%  84%  48%  95%  96%  93%  93%  83%  83%  86%  Range of  completeness  90%  89%  99%  100%  84%  74%  100%  99%  81%  100%  74%  100%  100%  96%  78%  100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  85%  93%  100%  91%  100%  100%  89%  84%  100%  100%  88%  100%  74%  100%  100%  98%  88%  100%  100%  100%  100%  100%  87%  95%  Range of  garbage  fraction  13%  2%  0%  4%  12%  2%  4%  9%  19%  9%  23%  10%  10%  9%  39%  2%  3%  6%  7%  16%  2%  7%  Notes 

Republic of  Korea  Republic of  Moldova  Romania  Russian  Federation  Serbia  Singapore  Slovakia  Slovenia  South Africa  Spain  Sri Lanka  Sweden  Switzerland  TFYR  Macedonia  Thailand  Trinidad and  Tobago  Ukraine  United  Kingdom  United States  of America  Uruguay  Uzbekistan  Venezuela   (Bolivarian  Republic of) 

21%     7%     8%     6%  Summarized cause list  used  18%     4%    11%     12%     32%  Excluded due to low  usability  13%     32%  Excluded due to low  usability  12%     13%     15%    54%  Excluded due to low  usability  5%     6%  Summarized cause list  used  8%     10%     17%     6%  Summarized cause list  used for some years  9%    

    World Health Organization     Page 10

  A summary usability score was calculated as follows:    (Percent Usable) = Completeness (%) * (1 ‐ Proportion Garbage)  All  countries  with  a  mean  percent  usable  below  70%  during  the  period  2000  to  latest  available  year  were excluded (see Table 3.1).    The quality of cause‐of‐death coding was further investigated in the remaining countries. The proportion  of  deaths  assigned  to  an  expanded  list  of  ill‐defined  causes  (Table  3.2)  was  calculated  for  each  year  in  the  period  2000‐2011.   For  the  period  2005‐2011  countries  had  reported  an  average  of  5  years  of  data.   Data  from  a  country  were  excluded  if  the  average  proportion  of  ill‐defined  causes  was  above  25%  for  2005‐2011  (if  available)  or  2000‐2004  (if  more  recent  data  were  not  available).  Based  on  this  analysis,  data  from  Argentina,  Azerbaijan,  Bulgaria,  Greece,  Guatemala,  Poland,  and  Qatar  were  excluded  (Table  3.1).    Table 3.2. Expanded list of garbage codes 
ICD‐10 code(s)  Description  A40‐A41  D65  E86  I10  I269  I46  I472  I490  I50  I514 I515 I516 I519 I709 I99 J81 J96  K72 N17  N18 N19  P285 Streptococcal  and other septicaemia  Disseminated intravascular coagulation [defibrination syndrome]  Volume depletion  Essential (primary) hypertension  Pulmonary embolism without mention of acute cor pulmonale  Cardiac arrest  Ventricular tachycardia  Ventricular fibrillation and flutter  Heart failure  Myocarditis, unspecified  Myocardial degeneration  Cardiovascular disease, unspecified  Heart disease, unspecified  Generalized and unspecified atherosclerosis  Other and unspecified disorders of circulatory system  Pulmonary oedema  Respiratory failure, not elsewhere classified  Hepatic failure, not elsewhere classified  Acute renal failure  Chronic renal failure  Unspecified renal failure  Respiratory failure of newborn  C76, C80, C97     Ill‐defined cancer sites 

Y10‐Y34, Y872   External cause of death not specified as accidentally or purposely inflicted 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 11

 

3.3 Redistribution of unknown sex/age and ‘garbage’ codes and adjustment for incomplete death registration
First,  deaths  of  unknown  sex  pro‐rata  within  cause‐age  groups  of  known  sexes  were  redistributed,  and  then  deaths  of  unknown  age  pro‐rata  within  cause‐sex  groups  of  known  ages.  Deaths  coded  to  garbage  codes  were  reassigned  using  previously  published  methods    (25).    We  redistributed  deaths  coded  to  symptoms,  signs  and  ill‐defined  conditions  pro‐rata  to  all  non‐injury  causes  of  death,  and  injuries  with  undetermined  intent  pro‐rata  to  all  injury  causes  of  death.    Cancers  with  unspecified  site  were  redistributed  pro‐rata  to  all  sites  excluding  liver,  pancreas,  ovary,  and  lung.    Additionally,  we  redistributed  cancer  of  uterus,  part  unspecified  (C55)  pro‐rata  to  cervix  uteri  (C53)  and  corpus  uteri  (C54).  Ill‐defined  cardiovascular  causes  were  redistributed  to  ischaemic  heart  disease  and  other  cardiovascular  causes  of  death.  Finally,  the  total  number  of  deaths  was  adjusted  for  incomplete  recording of deaths using the completeness estimates described in Section 3.2. 
 

3.4 Mapping to GHE cause lists
Included  vital  registration  data  were  coded  according  to  ICD9,  ICD10,  or  one  of  several  abbreviated  cause  lists  derived  from  ICD9  or  ICD10.    Total  deaths  by  cause,  age  and  sex  were  mapped  to  the  GHE  cause  list  (Annex  Table  A).  We  used  the  complete  cause  list  in  Annex  Table  A  if  the  data  were  coded  using  3‐  or  4‐digit  ICD‐10  codes.   In  other  cases,  we  extracted  the  number  of  deaths  by  cause,  age  and  sex,  using  only  the  broad  cause  categories  listed  in  Table  3.3.   This  shortlist  in  Table  3.3  was  used  for  all  data from the Philippines.  For  Russia,  Belarus  and  Ukraine,  HIV  deaths  recorded  in  the  death  registration  data  were  substantially  miscoded  to  tuberculosis  (GHE3),  lower  respiratory  infections    (GHE39),  other  infectious  diseases   (GHE37),  lymphomas  and  multiple  myeloma  (GHE76),  other  malignant  neoplasms  (GHE78),  and  endocrine,  blood  and  immune  disorders  (GHE81).  Deaths  in  these  categories  falling  in  the  characteristic  HIV  age  pattern  were  recoded  to  HIV  (GHE10),  according  to  the  age‐sex‐specific  HIV  mortality  estimates  from UNAIDS (refer Section 5.2).  For  countries  with  deaths  data  grouped  by  the  shortlist  in  Table  3.3,  shortlist  categories  were  expanded  to  the  full  cause  list  using  the  cause‐fraction  distribution  within  each  shortlist  category  by  year,  age,  sex  and GBD 2010 region from the GBD 2010 study results (26).   Coding of natural causes of death for neonates varies a great deal across countries. Some countries code  these  deaths  to  the  ‘P  chapter’  (conditions  originating  in  the  perinatal  period)  while  others  use  a  combination  of  P  codes  and  other  codes  as  well.  In  some  instances  the  age  of  death  is  not  always  taken  into account. Some conditions, such as septicaemia and pneumonia, have specific codes within P00–P96  which  should  be  used  for  neonates  (0–27 days).  For  countries  with  vital  registration  data,  we  have  recoded  all  the  deaths  aged  0–27 days  from  natural  causes  that  were  initially  coded  outside  the  ‘P  chapter’  to  codes  in  the  ‘P  chapter’  whenever  possible.  In  a  number  of  countries,  neonatal  septicaemia  (P36)  is  frequently  assigned  to  A40  and  A41  (septicaemia).  In  this  case  we  have  recoded  them  back  to  P36, thus identifying more deaths due to causes originating in the perinatal period. 
 

 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 12

  Table  3.3.  Short  cause  list  used  for  vital  registration  data  coded  using  ICD‐9  or  ICD‐10  abbreviated  cause  lists 
GHE  code  1  3  9  20  38  39  42  49  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  68  70  71  72  80  110  117  121  126  140  151  152  153  160  161  162  163  Shortlist cause category  I.  Communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions      A1. Tuberculosis  A3. HIV/AIDS 

A. Infectious and parasitic diseases  B. Respiratory infections    B1. Lower respiratory infections  C. Maternal conditions  D. Neonatal conditions  II. Noncommunicable diseases  A. Malignant neoplasms                    A1. Mouth and oropharynx cancers  A2. Oesophagus cancer  A3. Stomach cancer  A4. Colon and rectum cancers  A5. Liver cancer  A7. Trachea, bronchus and lung cancers  A9. Breast cancer  A10. Cervix uteri cancer  A13.  Prostate cancer               

C. Diabetes mellitus  H. Cardiovascular diseases  I. Respiratory diseases  J. Digestive disorders  K. Genitourinary diseases  N. Congenital anomalies  III. Injuries  A. Unintentional injuries          A1. Road injury  B1. Self‐harm  B2. Interpersonal violence  B3. Collective violence and legal intervention  B. Intentional injuries 

82+94  E/F. Mental and neurological disorders 

  World Health Organization   Page 13

 

3.5 Interpolation and extrapolation for missing country‐years
For  many  countries,  data  were  missing  for  some  years.   In  order  to  create  a  continuous  time‐series  of  data,  we  interpolated  mortality  rates  for  each  country  and  cause,  and  then  extrapolated  up  to  three  years  of  data  at  the  beginning  and  end  of  the  data  series.  To  interpolate,  a  logistic  regression  was  fitted  for  each  missing  country‐sex‐cause  group,  using  death  rates  six  years  prior  and  six  years  after  the  missing  data  year  as  the  dependent  variable  and  year  as  the  independent  variable.   In  some  cases,  few  deaths  were  recorded  for  a  specific  country‐sex‐cause  group  and  the  logistic  regression  did  not  converge.   In  that  case,  the  death  rate  was  estimated  as  the  average  rate  in  the  three  years  prior  and  three  years  following  the  missing  data  year.  To  extrapolate  for  up  to  three  years,  a  logistic  regression  was  fitted  to  the  first  or  the  final  six  years  of  data  (including  interpolated  estimates)  for  each  country‐ sex‐cause. Again, if the logistic regression did not converge due to the small number of deaths recorded,  the death rate was estimated as the average of the first or last three years’ death rates. 
 

3.6 Adjustment of specific causes
Estimates  for  HIV  deaths  were  compared  with  UNAIDS/WHO  estimates  for  46  countries  where  fewer  HIV  deaths  were  recorded  in  the  death  registration  data  than  estimated  by  UNAIDS/WHO  (19).  UNAIDS/WHO  estimates  were  used  except  in  the  cases  of  Australia,  Chile,  Costa  Rica,  France,  Trinidad  and Tobago, Uruguay and USA.  Estimates  for  malaria  deaths  were  compared  with  WHO  estimates  (see  Section  5.3)  and  replaced  by  WHO  estimates  for  63  country  years  where  the  WHO  estimates  were  larger  than  those  from  the  death  registration  data.  This  affected  malaria  deaths  for  Brazil  (12  years),  Columbia  (10),  Venezuela  (9),  Philippines (8) and Panama (3).  WHO  estimates  for  maternal  deaths  include  an  upwards  adjustment  for  under‐recording  of  maternal  deaths  in  death  registration  data  (27).  Maternal  deaths  were  adjusted  using  these  country‐specific  factors, and all other causes adjusted pro‐rata.  Deaths  due  to  alcohol  and  drug  use  disorders  include  alcohol  and  drug  poisoning  deaths  coded  to  the  injury  chapter  of  ICD  (see  Annex  Table  A).  Further  adjustments  for  under‐reporting  in  some  countries  will be undertaken in the next revision of these estimates.   Where  necessary,  road  injury  deaths  were  adjusted  upwards  to  take  account  of  additional  surveillance  data provided by countries (see Section 5.11).  Estimates  of  deaths  due  to  conflicts  (see  Section  5.12)  were  compared  with  estimates  from  the  death  registration  data  year  by  year  and  added  “outside‐the‐envelope”  for  country‐years  where  they  are  not  included in death registration data. 
 

3.7 Other national‐level information on causes of death
Cause  of  death  estimates  for  a  number  of  countries  drew  on  non‐national  death  registration  data  or  other data sources with cause of death information as follows.  China   Cause‐specific  mortality  data  for  China   were  available  from  two  sources  –  the  sample  vital  registration  system data for years 1987 to 2010 (28) and summary deaths tabulations from the Diseases Surveillance  Points  (DSP)  system  for  years  1995‐1998  and  2004‐2010  (29,  30).  Table  3.4  summarizes  the  deaths  and  World Health Organization   Page 14

  population  covered  by  these  two  systems.   The  sample  vital  registration  system  data  for  years  1987  to  2010  was  provided  in  separate  tabulations  for  urban  and  rural  sampled  populations,  with  more  urban  than  rural  sampling.  The  urban  and  rural  crude  deaths  rates  by  age,  sex  and  cause  were  weighted  for  each  year  using  the  UN  Population  Division’s  estimated  urban  and  rural  population  fractions,  and  the  resulting  death  rates  re‐applied  to  the  UN  total  estimated  population  by  age  and  sex.  The  DSP  sample  sites  are  considered  to  be  nationally  representative  and  the  resulting  total  deaths  by  age,  sex  and  cause  were  not  reweighted.   For  both  sets  of  data,  annual  data  were  rescaled  so  total  deaths  by  age  and  sex  matched the estimated all‐cause envelopes for China (see Section 2.5).    Table  3.4.  Total  deaths  and  population  covered  by  the  Chinese  vital  registration  system  (VR)  and  the  Disease Surveillance Points system (DSP)  
  

Vital registration  system  Year  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009  2010 
… data not available. 

Disease Surveillance  Points  …  …  …  …  430,994  437,490  347,057  401,008  424,683  437,550  453,211 

Vital registration  system  117,183,678  …  …  102,889,945  55,288,841  57,272,144  72,240,261  79,101,646  …  …  90,158,748 

Disease Surveillance  Points  …  …  …  …  71,173,205  71,487,277  66,012,299  71,476,477  73,928,499  75,020,489  78,766,626 

Number of deaths  711,946  …  …  626,392  295,906  310,826  379,057  475,289  471,219  505,021  558,915 

Population 

  Both  sets  of  data  were  assessed  and  compared  for  suitability  in  estimating  2000‐2011  cause‐specific  mortality for  China at  the national  level. As  seen in  Figure 3.1,  both sets  of data  gave quite  similar  cause  distributions  at  major  cause  group  level  by  age,  across  the  period  2000‐2010.  Additionally,  comparison  for  more  detailed  major  causes  of  death  did  not  give  any  clear  indication  that  one  data  set  was  of  systematically higher quality than the other. We therefore based the update of cause of death estimates  for China on an average of the estimates from the two systems.   For  all  except  the  leading  causes  of  death,  there  are  considerable  fluctuations  across  5‐year  age  groups  and  year  in  numbers  of  deaths,  due  to  stochastic  variation  and  perhaps  also  variations  in  recording  cause of death from year to year or sample site to sample site. In order to smooth these fluctuations and  to  estimate  underlying  trends,  cubic  spline  smoothing  was  used  as  follows.  For  the  VR  data,  cubic  spline  curves were fitted to age‐sex‐cause specific deaths for years 1987‐2010 using a negative binomial model  with  population  as  offset  and  with  knot  points  at  years  1992,  1997,  2003,  and  2007.   For  the  DSP  data,  cubic  spline  curves  were  fitted  to  age‐sex‐cause  specific  deaths  for  years  1995‐2010  using  a  negative  binomial  model  with  population  as  offset  and  with  knot  points  at  years  2004,  2007  and  2010.    Final  estimates  for  China  were  calculated  as  the  average  of  the  fitted  spline  estimates  from  VR  and  DSP  for  years 2000‐2011.  World Health Organization   Page 15

  Figure  3.1.    Sample  vital  registration  data  (VR)  and  Disease  Surveillance  Points  data  (DSP),  China:  comparison of cause fractions for three major cause groups by age, late 1990s, 2005 and 2010 

    The  resulting  cause‐specific  estimates  were  further  adjusted  with  information  from  WHO  technical  programmes  and  UNAIDS  on  specific  causes  (see  Section  5)  and  from  the  GBD  2010  for  certain  specific  subcause  categories  where  deaths  were  either  not  recorded  or  recorded  to  only  selected  categories  in  the  DSP  and/or  VR  datasets.  GBD  2010  analyses  were  used  for  GHE  causes  5‐9  (STDs),  20  (hepatitis  C),  26  (leishmaniasis),  34‐36  (intestinal  nematode  infections),  115  (inflammatory  heart  diseases),  and  119  (asthma).  Additionally,  DSP  broad  cause  group  totals  were  redistributed  to  detailed  subcauses  using  GBD  2010  cause  fractional  distributions  for  the  following  categories:  82+94  (mental  and  behavioural  disorders and neurological conditions), 134 (musculoskeletal disorders) and 147 (oral conditions). Rabies  deaths  were  revised  using  data  on  reported  human  rabies  deaths  from  the  Chinese  Center  for  Disease  Control and Prevention (31).  For  estimates  of  causes  of  death  under  age  5,  a  separate  analysis  was  undertaken  based  on  an  analysis  of  206  Chinese  community‐based  longitudinal  studies  that  reported  multiple  causes  of  child  death  (see  Section  4.5  below.  The  CHERG  conducted  a  systematic  search  of  publically  available  Chinese  databases  in  collaboration  with  researchers  from  Peking  University.  Information  was  obtained  from  the  Chinese  Ministry  of  Health  and  Bureau  of  Statistics  websites,  Chinese  National  Knowledge  Infrastructure  (CNKI)  database  and  Chinese  Health  Statistics  Yearbooks  published  between  1990‐2008.  A  model  was  developed  to  assign  the  total  number  of  child  deaths  to  provinces,  age  groups  and  main  causes  of  child  death.  

World Health Organization  

Page 16

  India  Analysis  of  causes  of  death  for  India  was  based  on  data  over  a  period  of  3 years  (2001–2003)  recorded  by the Million Death Study (32,33), a comprehensive study based on verbal autopsy that assigned causes  to  all  deaths  in  areas  of  India  covered  by  the  Sample  Registration  System.  The  Sample  Registration  System  monitors  a  representative  sample  population  of  6.3  million  people  in  over  1  million  homes  in  India.  The  1991  census  was  used  to  randomly  select  6671  areas  from  approximately  1  million  having  about 1000 inhabitants in each.  In  2001  the  Indian  Registrar  General  Surveyor  introduced  an  enhanced  form  of  verbal  autopsy  for  assessing  the  cause  of  death.  Verbal  autopsy  is  a  method  of  ascertaining  the  cause  of  death  by  interviewing  a  family  member  or  caretaker  of  the  deceased  to  obtain  information  on  the  clinical  signs,  symptoms  and  general  circumstances  that  preceded  the  death.  Details  of  methods  and  validation  have  been  reported  elsewhere  (33).  Verbal  autopsy  reports  were  independently  coded  to  ICD‐10  categories  by at least  two of a  total of 130  physicians trained in  ICD‐10 coding. In  case of disagreement  on the  ICD‐ 10  codes  at  the  chapter  level,  reconciliation  between  reports  was  conducted,  followed  by  a  third  senior  physician’s adjudication.   A  total  of  136,000  deaths  were  enumerated  between  January  2001  and  December  2003.  Verbal  autopsies  could  not  be  conducted  for  12%  of  the  deaths  for  reasons  such  as  family  migration  or  change  of  residence.  An  additional  9%  of  the  reports  could  not  be  coded  because  of  data  quality  problems,  resulting a final dataset of 122,848 coded records.   The cause‐specific proportion of deaths in each five‐year age category from 0 to 79 years and for people  aged  80  years  and  over  was  weighted  by  the  inverse  probability  of  a  household  being  selected  within  rural  and  urban  subdivisions  of  each  state  to  account  for  the  sampling  design.  National  estimates  for  deaths and mortality rates were based on United Nations 2005 estimates for India, by age, sex and area.       Figure  3.2.    Percentage  of  deaths  by  cause  and  age  for  India:  comparison  of  final  GHE  estimates  for   year 2002 with national‐level results from the Million Death Study, 2001‐2003 
Global Health Estimates: India, 2002
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 Age (years) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Age (years)

Million Death Study: India, 2001‐2003

Suicide, homicide and conflict Other unintentional injuries Road injury Other noncommunicable Chronic respiratory diseases Cancers Cardiovascular diseases Maternal, neonatal, nutritional Other infectious diseases Lower respiratory infections Diarrhoeal diseases HIV, TB and malaria

World Health Organization  

Page 17

  The GHE analysis is based on the resulting national‐level cause‐specific mortality proportions derived for  GHE  cause  categories  from  the  Million  Death  Study.  The  mapping  of  the  MDS  cause  categories  to  GHE  cause  categories,  and  the  use  of  GBD  2010  analyses  to  redistribute  deaths  to  detailed  subcause  categories  is  summarized  in  Annex  Table  E.  GHE  cause  categories  26  (leishmaniasis)  and  124  (appendicitis) were also estimated using GBD 2010 results.  The  resulting  cause‐specific  estimates  were  further  adjusted  with  information  from  WHO  technical  programmes  and  UNAIDS  on  specific  causes  (see  Section  5)  and  adjusted  to  match  WHO  estimates  of  age‐sex  specific  all‐cause  mortality  for  India    in  2002.  Cause‐specific  trends  for  India  estimated  in  the  GBD 2010 study (26) were used to project cause‐fractions forwards to 2011 and backwards to 2000.  Figure  3.2  provides  a  comparison  of  the  final  proportional  distributional  estimates  of  deaths  by  cause  and  age  for  India  in  the  year  2002  with  the  original  distributions  in  the  Million  Death  Study  for  2001‐ 2003.  

World Health Organization  

Page 18

 

4

Child mortality by cause  

Cause‐specific  estimates  of  deaths  for  children  under  age  5  were  estimated  for  17  cause  categories  using  methods  described  elsewhere  by  Liu  et  al.  (34)  and  on  the  WHO  website  (35).  These  previously  published  estimates  for  years  2000‐2010  were  updated  to  take  account  of  revisions  in  child  mortality  levels  (14),  as  well  as  cause‐specific  estimates  for  HIV,  tuberculosis,  measles  and  malaria  deaths  (as  described  in  Section  5).  Inputs  to  the  multivariate  cause  composition  models  were  also  updated  as  described below.  

4.1 Causes of under 5 death in countries with good death registration data
Death  registration  data  were  used  directly  for  estimating  causes  of  neonatal  and  under  5  child  deaths  for  countries  with  good  quality  vital  registration  (VR)  data  with  population  coverage  of  >80%.  VR  data  were  considered  as  of  good  quality  if  the  following  criteria  were  met:  (a)  reasonable  distribution  of  deaths  by  cause  were  reported  without  excessive  use  of  implausible  codes  or  certain  codes,  and  (b)  sufficient  details  of  the  coding  was  provided  so  that  deaths  could  be  grouped  into  appropriate  categories  used  in  the  analysis.  For  countries  with  adequate  death  registration,  data  on  causes  of  child  deaths  were  extracted  from  the  WHO  mortality  database,  adjusted  for  coverage  incompleteness  where  needed,  and  grouped  according  to  the  standard  International  Classification  of  Diseases,  10th  revision  (ICD‐10).  For  earlier  years  when  ICD‐9  codes  were  used,  a  mapping  system  was  applied  to  convert  them  into  ICD‐10  codes  (34,webappendix).  Certain  neonatal  codes  were  re‐assigned  from  ill‐defined  codes  to  more  plausible  codes  (see  Annex  Table  C).  Annual  data  for  years  2000  to  the  latest  available  year  were  included  with  data  closest  to  the  estimating  year  used  where  possible.  Where  the  latest  year  available  was  earlier  than  2011,  the  cause  distribution  for  the  latest  available  year  was  assumed  to  apply  for  subsequent year(s), which was then applied to the age‐specific total number of child deaths. 

4.2 Causes of neonatal death (deaths at less than 28 days of age)
The CHERG neonatal working group undertook an extensive exercise to derive mortality estimates for six  causes  of  neonatal  death,  including  preterm  birth,  asphyxia,  severe  infection,  diarrhoea,  congenital  malformation and other causes (36). These cause categories are defined in Annex Table B.   Death  registration  data  were  used  directly  for  61  countries  considered  to  have  reliable  information.  For  another  51  low  mortality  countries,  the  cause  distribution  was  estimated  using  a  multinomial  model  applied  to  death  registration  data.  For  80  high  mortality  countries  the  cause  distribution  was  estimated  using  a  multinomial  model  applied  to  (largely)  verbal  autopsy  (VA)  data  from  research  studies  (34).  A  total  of  90  studies  in  34  countries  in  high  mortality  populations  met  the  inclusion  criteria.  The  multinomial model  for  high  mortality countries  was  generally  used for  countries  with  average  U5MR>35  for the period 2000‐2010.  A  separate  cause  category  for  neonatal  pneumonia  is  included  in  the  model,  and  the  neonatal  sepsis  category  includes  a  number  of  neonatal  infections,  such  as  meningitis  and  tetanus,  not  separately  identified.  The  number  of  tetanus  deaths  was  also  modeled  separately  in  a  single  cause  model  using  using a logistic regression model with percent of women who were literate, percent of births with skilled  attendant,  and  percent  protected  at  birth  by  tetanus  toxoid  vaccine  as  covariates.  The  resulting  cause‐ specific  inputs  were  adjusted  country‐by‐country  to  fit  the  estimated  neonatal  death  envelopes  for  corresponding years.   Pending  further  revisions  of  the  neonatal  tetanus  model  to  estimate  longer‐term  trends  in  neonatal  tetanus  deaths,  estimates  for  2011  and  2000  were  based  on  projection  and  back‐projection  of  the  2008  estimates using estimates of trends in tetanus deaths from the GBD 2010 study (26).  World Health Organization   Page 19

 

4.3 Causes of child death at ages 1‐59 months –low mortality countries
For  51  low  mortality  countries  without  VR  data  or  with  VR  data  not  meeting  quality  criteria  (see  Section  4.1), the  cause  distribution  was  estimated  using  a  multinomial  model  applied  to  death  registration  data.  This multinomial model applied to death registration data was generally used for countries with average  U5MR<35 for the period 2000‐2010.  For the estimates for years 2000‐2011, the previous vital registration‐based multicause model (VRMCM)  model  was  revised  to  include  additional  death  registration  data  and  to  update  time  series  for  covariates  and  extend  them  to  2011.  The  choice  of  covariates  included  in  the  model  was  not  revisited  for  this  regional‐level  update.  The  multinomial  logistic  regression  model  was  estimated  using  death  registration  data  from  countries  with  >80%  complete  cause  of  death  (CoD)  certification  for  years  1990‐2011  to  estimate the proportion of deaths due to pneumonia, diarrhea, meningitis, injuries, perinatal, congenital  anomalies, other NCDs and other causes.   The  current  version  of  the  model  used  death  registration  data  for  the  years  1990  to  2011,  including  1,123  data  points,  representing  63  countries.  The  model  included  the  following  covariates  that  were  determined a priori: U5MRs, GNI per capita (PPP, $international), WHO European and American regions.  Adjustments  for  the  scaling‐up  of  Hib  vaccine  occurred  within  the  model.  The  proportional  distribution  of causes of death was then applied to the HIV‐free and measles‐free envelope for children 1‐59 months  of age. Jack‐knife and Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to estimate uncertainty.  

4.4 Causes of child death at ages 1‐59 months –high mortality countries
For 79 high mortality countries (average U5MR>35 for the period 2000‐2010), the cause distribution was  estimated using a multinomial model applied to (largely) verbal autopsy (VA) data from research studies  (34,36,37). The multicause model for deaths at ages 1‐59 months was used to derive mortality estimates  for  seven  causes  of  postneonatal  death,  including  pneumonia,  diarrhea,  malaria,  meningitis,  injuries,  congenital  malformations,  causes  arising  in  the  perinatal  period  (prematurity,  birth  asphyxia  and  trauma,  sepsis  and  other  conditions  of  the  newborn),  and  other  causes,  based  on  113  data  points  from  74  studies  of  postneonatal  deaths  from  33  countries  that  met  inclusion  criteria2.  Studies  were  predominantly  from  lower  income  high  mortality  countries.  Malnutrition  deaths  were  included  in  the  other  cause  of  death  category.  Deaths  due  to  unknown  causes  were  excluded  from  the  analysis.  Deaths  due to measles and HIV/AIDS were estimated separately.  The  resulting  cause‐specific  inputs  were  adjusted  country‐by‐country  to  fit  the  estimated  1‐59  month  death  envelopes  (excluding  HIV  and  measles  deaths)  for  corresponding  years  and  then  estimates  were  further adjusted  for  intervention  coverage (pneumonia  and  meningitis  estimates adjusted  for  use  of  Hib  vaccine;  malaria  estimates  adjusted  for  insecticide  treated  mosquito  nets  (ITNs)).  This  method  was  used  for  countries  without  useable  death  registration  data  and  with  U5MR>26  and  gross  national  income  per  capita less than $7,510.     

                                                            
Studies conducted in year 1980 or later, a multiple of 12 months in study duration, cause of death available for more than a single cause, with at least 25 deaths in children <5 years of age, each death represented once, and less than 25% of deaths due to unknown causes were included. Studies conducted in sub-groups of the study population (e.g. intervention groups in clinical trials) and verbal autopsy studies conducted without use of a standardized questionnaire or the methods could not be confirmed were excluded from the analysis.
2

World Health Organization  

Page 20

 

4.5 Causes of child death for China and India
In  order  to  estimate  trends  in  under  5  causes  of  death  for  India,  the  previously  developed  subnational  analyses  were  further  refined  and  used  to  develop  national  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011  (38).  For  neonates,  a  verbal  autopsy  multi‐cause  model  (VAMCM)  based  on  37  sub‐national  Indian  community‐ based VA studies was used to predict the cause distribution of deaths at state level. The resulting cause‐ specific  proportions  were  applied  to  the  estimated  total  number  of  neonatal  deaths  to  obtain  the  estimated number of deaths by cause at state level prior to summing to obtain national estimates.   For  children  who  died  in  the  ages  of  1‐59  months  in  India,  the  previously  developed  multicause  model  was rerun for years 2000‐2011 using a total of 23 sub‐national community‐based VA studies plus 22 sets  of  observations  for  the  Indian  states  derived  from  the  Million  Death  Study  (39).  Nine  cause  categories  were  specified,  including  measles  plus  the  eight  specified  in  the  post‐neonatal  VAMCM  for  other  countries.  State‐level  measles  deaths  were  then  normalized  to  fit  the  national  measles  estimates  produced  by  the  WHO  IVB.  State‐level  AIDS  and  malaria  estimates  were  provided  by  UNAIDS  and  WHO  malaria program, respectively. All cause fractions were adjusted to sum to one. The state‐level estimates  were collapsed to obtain national estimates at the end.   For  China,  updated  IGME  U5MR  estimates  in  2000‐2011  were  applied  to  the  VA‐based  national  cause‐ specific  models  developed  by  Rudan  and  colleagues  (40)  to  derive  cause‐fractions  annually  in  this  period.  Together  with  cause‐specific  inputs  from  WHO  technical  programmes  and  UNAIDS  for  measles,  meningitis,  malaria  and  AIDS,  the  resulting  cause‐specific  inputs  for  China  were  adjusted  to  fit  the  estimated total deaths at ages 0‐1 month and 1‐59 months, respectively.   
 

4.6 Inclusion of WHO‐CHERG estimates in Global Health Estimates 2000‐ 2011
The  seventeen  cause  categories  used  for  the  WHO‐CHERG  estimates  of  under  5  deaths  for  years  2000‐ 2011 (see Annex Table B) include all the major causes of neonatal, postneonatal and 1‐4 year deaths and  two  residual  categories  containing  all  remaining  causes  of  death.  These  residual  categories  (“Other  Group  1”  and  “Other  Group  2”)  and  cause  groups  such  as  “Congenital  malformations”  and  “Injuries”  were  expanded  to  the  full  GHE  cause  list  (Annex  Table  A)  for  neonatal  and  under  5  deaths  using  cause  distributions  derived  from  VR  data  for  countries  with  useable  VR  data  (see  Annex  Table  F)  and  from  the  GBD 2010 estimates for other countries (26).    

World Health Organization  

Page 21

 

5

Methods for specific causes with additional information

5.1 Tuberculosis
For countries with death registration data, tuberculosis mortality estimates were generally based on the  most  recently  available  vital  registration  data.  For  other  countries,  total  tuberculosis  deaths  were  derived  from  latest  published  WHO  estimates  (41),  together  with  more  detailed  unpublished  age  distributions based on the  VR data and notifications data.  

5.2 HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases
For  countries  with  death  registration  data,  HIV/AIDS  mortality  estimates  were  generally  based  on  the  most  recently  available  vital  registration  data  except  where  there  was  evidence  of  misclassification  of  HIV/AIDS  deaths.  In  such  cases,  a  time  series  analysis  of  causes  where  there  was  likely  misclassified  HIV/AIDS  deaths  was  carried  out  to  identify  and  re‐assign  such  deaths.  For  other  countries,  estimates  were  based  on  UNAIDS  estimated  HIV/AIDS  mortality  (19).    It  was  assumed  based  on  advice  from  UNAIDS that 1% of HIV deaths under age 5 occurred in the neonatal period. 

5.3 Malaria

Countries outside the WHO African Region and low transmission countries in Africa3.  Estimates  of  the  number  of  cases  were  made  by  adjusting  the  number  of  reported  malaria  cases  for  completeness  of  reporting,  the  likelihood  that  cases  are  parasite‐positive  and  the  extent  of  health  service  use.   The  procedure,  which  is  described  in  the  World  Malaria  Report  2012  (42),  combines  data  reported  by  National  Malaria  Control  Programs  (reported  cases,  reporting  completeness,  likelihood  that  cases  are  parasite  positive)  with  those  obtained  from  nationally  representative  household  surveys  on  health  service  use.   If  data  from  more  than  one  household  survey  was  available  for  a  country,  estimates  of  health  service  use  for  intervening  years  were  imputed  by  linear  regression.    If  only  one  household  survey  was  available  then  health  service  use  was  assumed  to  remain  constant  over  time;  analysis  summarized  in  the  World  Malaria  Report  2008  (43)  indicated  that  the  percentage  of  fever  cases  seeking  treatment  in  public  sector  facilities  varies  little  over  time  in  countries  with  multiple  surveys.    Such  a  procedure results in an estimate with wide uncertainty intervals around the point estimate.  The  number  of  deaths  was  estimated  by  multiplying  the  estimated  number  of  P.  falciparum  malaria  cases  by  a  fixed  case  fatality  rate  for  each  country  as  described  in  the  World  Malaria  Report  2012  (42).   This  method  is  used  for  all  countries  outside  the  African  Region  and  for  countries  within  the  African  Region  where  estimates  of  case  incidence  were  derived  from  routine  reporting  systems  and  where  malaria  causes  less  than  5%  of  all  deaths  in  children  under  5.    A  case  fatality  rate  of  0·45%  is  applied  to  the  estimated  number  of  P.  falciparum  cases  for  countries  in  the  African  Region  and  a  case  fatality  rate  of  0·3%  for  P.  falciparum  cases  in  other  Regions.  In  situations  where  the  fraction  of  all  deaths  due  to  malaria  is  small,  the  use  of  a  case  fatality  rate  in  conjunction  with  estimates  of  case  incidence  was  considered  to  provide  a  better  guide  to  the  levels  of  malaria  mortality  than  attempts  to  estimate  the  fraction of deaths due to malaria.  Somalia, Sudan and high transmission countries in the WHO African Region.    Child  malaria  deaths  were  estimated  using  the  VAMCM  described  in  Section  4.4.  The  VAMCM  derives  mortality  estimates  for  malaria,  as  well  as  7  other  causes  (pneumonia,  diarrhea,  congenital                                                              
3

Botswana, Cape Verde, Eritrea, Madagascar, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa, and Zimbabwe

World Health Organization  

Page 22

  malformation,  causes  arising  in  the  perinatal  period,  injury,  meningitis,  and  other  causes)  using  multinomial  logistic  regression  methods  to  ensure  that  all  8  causes  are  estimated  simultaneously  with  the  total  cause  fraction  summing  to  1.  Malaria  deaths  were  retrospectively  adjusted  for  coverage  of  insecticide‐treated  nets  (ITNs)  and  use   of   Haemophilus  influenzae  type  b  vaccine  (34).  The  bootstrap  method    was  employed  to  estimate  uncertainty  intervals  by  re‐sampling  from    the  study‐level  data  to  estimate the  distribution  of  the predicted   percent  of  deaths due  to  each  cause.    The  estimated  malaria  mortality  rate  in  children  under  5  years  for  a  country  was  used  to  determine  malaria  transmission  intensity and the corresponding malaria‐specific mortality rates in older age groups (43). 

5.4 Whooping cough
An updated  model  of  whooping  cough  (pertussis)  mortality is  being  developed  by  the  WHO  Department  of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals (IVB). This model has not been finalized in time for the release  of  these  regional‐level  estimates  but  will  be  used  to  update  the  GHE  estimates  at  country  level  later  in  2013. In the interim, whooping cough mortality estimates from the GBD 2010 (26) have been used as an  input to the WHO‐CHERG analysis of child causes of death under age five (see Section 4).  

5.5 Measles
To  estimate  deaths  attributable  to  measles,  a  new  model  of  measles  mortality  developed  by  WHO  Department  of  Immunization,  Vaccines  and  Biologicals  (IVB)  was  used  to  first  estimate  country‐and‐ year‐specific  cases  using  surveillance  data  (44).  The  improved  statistical  model  firstly  estimates  measles  cases  by  country  and  year  using  surveillance  data  and  making  explicit  projections  about  dynamic  transitions over time as well as overall patterns in incidence.   The  age  distribution  of  measles  cases  are  then  estimated  using  a  logistic  regression  function  fitted  to   172,191  measles  cases  with  data  on  age  at  infection  from  102  countries  over  2005‐2009  extracted  from  WHO's  monthly  measles  case‐based  reporting  system.  Two  explanatory  variables  were  included  in  the  regression: 1) the 5 year rolling average of estimated MCV1 coverage, categorized in <60%, 60‐84%, and  85‐100%; and 2) geographic region classified in to 7 groups.   Country‐specific  measles  case‐fatality  ratios  (CFRs)  for  children  1‐4  years  of  age  were  taken  from  a  comprehensive  review  of  community‐based  studies  (45).    This  review  included  102  field  studies  conducted  in  29  countries  during  the  period  1974‐2007.   The  set  of  CFRs  were  revised  for  two  countries  (India  and  Nepal)  where  additional  studies  have  been  published  subsequent  to  the  review  (46,  47).  The  same CFRs were used for infants and for children aged 1‐4 years. For the period 2000‐2011, we assumed  that age‐specific CFRs are not declining over time.   Age‐specific  deaths  are  aggregated  to  derive  measles  deaths  for  all  children  below  five  and  for  ages  five  and  over.  The  new  method  takes  into  account  herd  immunity  and  produces  results  that  are  fairly  consistent  with  previous  ones  (48).    Uncertainty  is  estimated  by  bootstrap  sampling  from  the  distribution  of  incidence  and  age  distribution  estimates.  Updated  estimates  of  measles  deaths  by  age  and  country  for  years  2000‐2011  were  prepared  using  the  above  methods  at  the  end  of  2012  and  summary  results  published  in  the  Weekly  Epidemiological  Record  (49).These  were  used  for  this  update  of GHE causes of death for years 2000‐2011.  For countries experiencing measles outbreaks, the measles deaths were split into outbreak and endemic  deaths,  the  latter  of  which  were  smoothed  using  local  regression  (50).  For  the  ages  of  1‐59  months,  the  endemic measles deaths and AIDS deaths were added to the measles‐ and AIDS‐free all‐cause deaths for  which the VAMCM derived cause fractions were applied. The measles outbreak deaths were added back  at the end. In places where the outbreak deaths resulted in an increase in the all‐cause deaths by 10% or  World Health Organization   Page 23

  more,  the  original  survey  data  were  screened  to  examine  whether  a  real  increase  in  child  mortality  was  indicated  for  the  outbreak  year.  If  there  were  survey  data  available  for  the  years  around  the  outbreak  but  no  evidence  of  an  increased  mortality,  the  measles  outbreak  deaths  were  truncated  at  10%  of  the  all‐cause  deaths.  This  was  only  necessary  in  few  countries,  almost  all  of  which  are  in  Africa  and  all  occurred in the early 2000s when more measles deaths were estimated.  

5.6 Schistosomiasis
For the last WHO update of burden of disease for year 2004 (3), the incidence and prevalence of cases of  schistosomiasis  infection  were  separately  estimated  by  country  for  S. mansoni,  S. haematobium  and  S. japonicum plus  S. mekongi.   The  GBD  2004  estimated  that  schistosomiasis  was  responsible  for  around  41 000 deaths globally (excluding attributable cancer deaths) and 36 000 in sub‐Saharan Africa, although  others  have  argued  that  the  figure  should  be  much  higher  (51).  Van  der  Werf  et  al  (52),  using  limited  data  from  Africa,  estimated  that  schistosomiasis  caused  210 000  deaths  annually.  For  the  GBD  2004  update  (3),  very  limited  available  data  was  used  to  conservatively  estimate  annual  case  fatality  rates  for  prevalent  cases  at  0.01%  for  S. mansoni,  0.02%  for  S. haematobium,  and  0.03%  for  S. japonicum  and  S. mekongi. There were estimated to be 261 million prevalent cases of schistosomiasis infection in 2004.  The  GBD  2010  study  estimated  that  there  11,650  deaths  due  to  schistosomias  in  2010,  of  which  1,813  were  in  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa,  and  only  61  in  sub‐Saharan  Africa  in  2010.  Divided  by  the  numbers  of  prevalent  cases  estimated  by  the  GBD  2010,  the  implied  case  fatality  rates  for  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa,  and  for  Latin  America  are  0.01%  and  0.02%  respectively.  In  comparison,  the  implied  African  case  fatality  rate  is  almost  400  times  smaller.  Implied  case  fatality  rates  for  non‐African  regions in the GBD 2010 were generally consistent with those previously estimated by WHO for the year  2004. Revised  case  fatality  rates of  0.0075%  for  S. mansoni,  0.015% for  S. haematobium  were  applied  to  the  prevalence  rates  estimated  by  GBD  2010  (53)  to  revise  the  estimates  of  schistosomiasis  deaths  for  GHE.  This  resulted  in  an  estimate  of  17,600  deaths  in  sub‐Saharan  Africa  and  23,300  deaths  globally  in  2011. 

5.7 Maternal causes of death
Country‐specific  estimates  for  maternal  mortality  were  based  on  the  recent  Interagency  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011  (27,54).  For  62  Member  States  with  relatively  complete  data  from  national  death  registration  systems,  these  data  were  used  directly  for  estimating  and  projecting  maternal  mortality  ratios.  For  other  Member  States,  a  multilevel  regression  model  was  developed  using  available  national‐ level  data  from  surveys,  censuses,  surveillance  systems  and  death  registration.  This  regression  model  included  national  income  per  capita,  the  general  fertility  rate  and  the  presence  of  a  skilled  attendant  at  birth (as a proportion of total births) as covariates to predict trends in maternal mortality.  Note that numbers of maternal deaths were adjusted upwards by a country‐specific fraction, or by 50%,  for  countries  with  useable  death  registration  data  but  without  country‐specific  data  on  misclassification  of  maternal  deaths,  to  allow  for  under‐identification  of  maternal  deaths.  Note  also  that  the  maternal  mortality  estimates  include  those  HIV  deaths  occurring  in  pregnant  women  or  within  42  days  of  end  of  pregnancy  which  were  considered  to  be  indirect  maternal  deaths  rather  than  incidental.  These  HIV  maternal deaths were subtracted from total HIV deaths as estimated by UNAIDS.

5.8 Cancers
Cause‐specific  estimates  for  cancer  deaths  were  derived  from  Globocan  2008  (55)  for  countries  without  useable  death  registration  data.  Site‐specific  deaths  were  projected  back  to  year  2000  and  forwards  to  year 2011 using trend estimates from the GBD 2010 (26).  World Health Organization   Page 24

  Karposi  sarcoma  was  excluded  from  the  Globocan  estimates  as  this  is  almost  entirely  a  manifestation  of  HIV/AIDS,  already  included  in  the  estimates  for  HIV/AIDS  deaths.  Deaths  due  to  non‐melanoma  skin  cancers were included in these estimates along with melanoma, unlike in Globocan 2008. 

5.9 Alcohol use and drug use disorders
The  injury  codes  for  accidental  poisoning  by  alcohol  and  by  opioids  are  now  used  to  code  acute  intoxication  deaths  from  alcohol  and  acute  overdose  deaths  by  opioids.  These  deaths  have  been  remapped  to  alcohol  use  disorders  and  drug  use  disorders  respectively  (see  Annex  Table  A).  WHO  estimates  of  direct  deaths  associated  with  alcohol  use  disorders  and  total  deaths  attributable  to  alcohol  consumption  are  under  revision  for  a  forthcoming  report.  The  interim  estimates  included  here  for  alcohol use disorders will be revised in the next revision to take these updates into account.  GBD  2010  estimates  of  deaths  due  to  drug  use  disorders  were  revised  to  correct  an  extremely  low  implied  case  fatality  rate  for  opioid  dependent  drug  users  in  South  Asia  and  for  consistency  with  estimates of  prevalence  and  mortality  associated use  of  illicit  opiate  drugs reported  by  the  UN  Office  on  Drugs  and  Crime  (UNODC)  (56).    UNODC  estimated  that  there  were  around  17  million  opiate  users  globally in 2010, with higher than average prevalence of opioid users in North America, Oceania, Eastern  Europe  and  South  East  Europe.  These  estimates  were  quite  similar  to  those  of  the  IHME‐GBD  2010,  which  estimated  a  global  prevalence  of  17.3  million  for  opioid  dependence  in  2010  (53).  The  IHME‐GBD  2010 estimated  a total  of 77,615  deaths for  drug use  disorders in  2010, of  which 43,000  were for  opioid  use  disorders.  The  implied  case  fatality  rate  of  opioid  use  was  0.25%  globally,  0.23%  in  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa,  and  just  under  0.1%  in  East  and  South  East  Asia.  In  contrast,  the  implied  case  fatality  rate of 0.025% in South Asia was only 1/10th of the global average. Estimated opioid dependence deaths  were conservatively revised upwards for South Asia to give an implied case fatality rate similar to that of  the other Asian regions. The resulting GHE estimate of 91,900 deaths for all drug use disorders in 2011 is  similar  to  the  UNODC  estimate  of  around  100,000  total  direct  drug  use  deaths  in  2010  (with  an  additional  100,000  deaths  from  other  causes,  such  as  infectious  diseases,  also  attributable  to  drug  use  disorders).

5.10 Epilepsy
The  Million  Death  Study  for  India  (32,33)  recorded  relatively  high  proportions  of  epilepsy  deaths,  resulting  in  an  initial  GHE  estimate  of  73,600  epilepsy  deaths  in  India  in  2010  compared  to  an  estimated  21, 650 by the GBD 2010. GBD 2010 estimates of untreated idiopathic epilepsy prevalence were used to  calculate  implied  regional  case  fatality  rates  (CFR)  and  the  implied  Indian  CFR  of  0.34  was  substantially  higher  than  those  for  South  East  Asia  (0.09)  or  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa  (0.05).  Indian  epilepsy  deaths  were  adjusted  downwards  to  give  an  implied  case  fatality  rate  of  0.17  (close  to  the  global  average), resulting in an estimated 35,480 epilepsy deaths for India in 2010.   

5.11 Road injuries
For  the  second  WHO  Global  status  report  on  road  safety   (57),    updated  estimates  of  road  injury  deaths  were  prepared  for  182  Member  States  for  the  year  2010.  These  estimates  drew  on  death  registration  data,  on  reported  road  traffic  deaths  from  official  road  traffic  surveillance  systems  (collected  in  a  WHO  survey  of  Member  States  for  the  report),  and  on  a  revised  regression  model  for  countries  without  useable death registration data.  The same methods were used to develop time series estimates of  road  injury deaths for years 2000‐2011 for all Member States.  The  methods  used  for  four  groups  of  countries  are  summarized  below  and  the  method  used  for  each  country is documented in Annex Table G.   World Health Organization   Page 25

  5.11.1 Countries with death registration data This  group  includes  87  countries  with  death  registration  data  meeting  one  of  the  following  completeness  criteria,  viz.  completeness  for  the  year  estimated  at  80%  or  more,  or    average  completeness for the decade including the country‐year was 80% or more.   These countries fell into three categories:  1. For countries with death registration data for the year 2010 which exceeded the number of road  traffic  deaths  reported  in  the  survey  –  death  registration  data  was  used.  There  were  33  countries in this category.   2. For countries where the latest death registration data submitted to WHO was earlier than  2010,  but  not  earlier  than  2005  –  deaths  for  2010  were  estimated  based  on  a  projection  of  the  most  recent  death  registration  data  using  the  trends  obtained  through  the  survey.  There  were  40  countries in this category.  3. For  countries  where  the  reported  road  traffic  deaths  for  2010  obtained  through  the  survey  exceeded  the  estimate  based  on  death  registration  data:  The  reported  road  traffic  deaths  (adjusted  to  the  1  year  definition)  were  used.  There  were  12  countries  in  this  category.  There  were an additional 2 countries where reported data for earlier years were projected to 2010 and  used because they exceeded the death registration numbers.  5.11.2 Countries with other sources of information on causes of death For  India,  Iran,  Thailand  and  Viet  Nam,  data  on  total  deaths  by  cause  were  available  for  a  single  year  or  an  earlier  recent  single  year  or  group  of  years  (33,58‐60).  For  these  countries,  the  regression  method  described  below  was  used  to  project  forward  from  the  most  recent  year  for  which  an  estimate  of  total  road traffic deaths were available.   5.11.3 Countries with populations less than 150 000 For  13   small  countries  with  populations  of  less  than  150  000  people  the  deaths  reported  in  the  survey  were used directly without adjustment.   5.11.4 Countries without eligible death registration data For  78  countries  which  did  not  fall  into  any  of  the  above  groups,  a  regression  model  was  used  to  estimate  total  road  traffic  deaths.   The  regression  model  produced  estimates  of  total  road  traffic  deaths  according to the accepted  International Classification of Disease definition, which counts all deaths that  follow  from  a  road  traffic  death,  regardless  of  the  time  period  in  which  they  occur  (unlike  many  official  road  traffic  surveillance  data  sources,  where  road  traffic  death  data  is  based  on  a  30‐day  definition  following  a  road  traffic  crash).  Where  total  deaths  reported  by  Member  States  surveillance  systems  were greater than the deaths estimated from the regression, these were used.  Three classes of models were tested and a negative binomial counts model was chosen: 

ln N  C  1 X 1   2 X 2  ....   n X n  ln Pop  

 

(1) 

where  N    is  the  total  road  traffic  deaths  (for  a  country‐year),  C    is  a  constant  term,  Xi  are  a  set  of  explanatory  covariates,  Pop  is  the  population  for  the  country‐year,  included  as  an  offset,  and  ε  is  the  negative  binomial  error  term.  This  model  was  estimated  using  death  registration  data  for  the  period  1950–2010  that  were  80%  or  more  complete  for  a  given  year  or  where  the  average  completeness  for 

World Health Organization  

Page 26

  the last decade was greater or equal to 80%. It also included nationally representative verbal autopsy or  sample death registration data for India, China and Vietnam.  Three models (A, B and C) were chosen that had good in‐sample‐ and out‐of‐sample fit, and for which all  the  covariates  (see  Table  5.1)  were  statistically  significant  at  the  95%  level.  The  final  estimates  were  based on the average predictions of these three best models.  Age  distributions  for  road  injury  deaths  were  based  on  regional  age  distributions  estimated  in  the  GBD  2010 study (26).    Table 5.1. Covariates used in the model for road injury deaths
Independent  variables  ln(GDP)  Description  WHO estimates of Gross Domestic Product  (GDP) per capita (international dollars or  purchasing power parity dollars, 2005 base)   Total vehicles per 1000 persons   Total roads (km) per 1000 hectares  The maximum national speed limits on rural  roads (km/h) from WHO questionnaire  The maximum national speed limits on urban  roads (km/h) from WHO questionnaire  Health system access variable (principal  component score based on a set of coverage  indicators for each country)  Liters of alcohol (recorded plus unrecorded)  per adult aged 15+   Proportion of population aged 15‐16 years  Per cent of total vehicles that are motorbikes  Control of corruption index (units range from  about ‐2.5 to +2.5 with higher values  corresponding to better control of corruption  Existence of national policies  that encourage  walking and / or cycling  Total population (used as offset in negative  binomial regression  Source of information   WHO database  Included  in models  A, B, C 

ln(vehicles per  capita)  Road density  National speed limits  on rural  roads  National speed limits  on urban roads  Health system access 

GSRRS surveys  and WHO database  International Futures database (63)  GSRRS survey (57)  GSRRS survey (57)  Institute for Health Metrics and  Evaluation dataset (61)  WHO database  World Population Prospects 2010  revision (UNDESA)   GSRRS survey (57)  World Bank (62), International  Futures database (63)  GSRRS survey (57)  World Population Prospects 2010  revision (12)  

A, B, C  A, B, C  A, B, C  A, B, C  A, B, C 

Alcohol apparent  consumption  Population working  Percentage  motorbikes  Corruption index 

A, B, C  A, B, C  B  B 

National policies for  walking /cycling   Population  

C  A, B, C 

   

World Health Organization  

Page 27

 

5.12 Conflict and natural disasters
Estimated  deaths  for  major  natural  disasters  were  obtained  from  the  CRED  International  Disaster  Database  (64).  For  country‐years  where  disaster  death  rates  exceeded  1  per  10,000  population,  these  deaths  were  added  to  the  life  table  death  rates  for  the  relevant  year.  Age‐sex  distributions  were  based  on a number of studies of earthquake deaths (65,66) and tsunami deaths (67,68).  Country‐specific  estimates  of  war  and  conflict  deaths  were  updated  for  the  entire  period  1990‐2011  using  revised  methods  together  with  information  on  conflict  intensity,  time  trends,  and  mortality  obtained from a number of war mortality databases (described below). These estimates relate to deaths  for which the underlying cause (following ICD conventions) was an injury due to war, civil insurrection or  organized  conflict,  whether  or  not  that  injury  occurred  during  the  time  of  war  or  after  cessation  of  hostilities.  The  estimates  include  injury  deaths  resulting  from  all  organized  conflicts,  including  organized  terrorist  groups,  whether  or  not  a  national  government  was  involved.  They  do  not  include  deaths  from  other  causes  (such  as  starvation,  infectious  disease  epidemics,  lack  of  medical  intervention  for  chronic  diseases), which may be counterfactually attributable to war or civil conflict.  Methods  used  previously  by  WHO  for  estimation  of  direct  conflict  deaths  were  developed  in  the  early  2000s  and  applied  adjustment  factors  for  under‐reporting  to  estimates  of  battlefield  or  conflict  deaths  from  a  variety  of  published  and  unpublished  conflict  mortality  databases  (69‐72).  Murray  et  al.  (73)  summarized  the  issues  with  estimation  of  war  deaths,  and  emphasized  the  very  considerable  uncertainty  in  the  original  Global  Burden  of  Disease  estimates  (74)  and  subsequent  WHO  estimates  for  conflict  deaths.  WHO  published  estimates  for  the  years  2000  through  2008  used  adjustment  factors  based  on  conflict  intensity  developed  from  an  analysis  of  likely  levels  of  under‐reporting  (1‐4).  These  adjustment factors ranged from around 3 to higher than 4 in sub‐Saharan Africa.   Obermeyer,  Murray  and  Gakidou  (75)  more  recently  analyzed  data  on  deaths  due  to  conflict  from  post‐ conflict  sibling  histories  collected  in  the  2002  to  2003  WHO  World  Health  Survey  (WHS)  program.  They  used  data  from  13  countries  with  more  than  5  reported  sibling  deaths  from  war  injuries   in  at  least  one  10‐year  period  to  estimate  total  war  deaths  for  these  countries  for  the  period  1955‐2002.  The  authors  then compared their estimates of war deaths to the number of war deaths estimated in the UCDP Battle  Deaths database (76) to derive an average adjustment factor of 2.96.  Garfield and Blore (77) noted that  a  very  small  number  of  war  deaths  for  Georgia  resulted  in  an  outlier  ratio  of  12.0  which  heavily  influenced  the  overall  ratio  of  2.96.  They  reanalyzed  the  WHS‐derived  war  deaths  dataset  excluding  Georgia, to obtain an overall revised adjustment factor of 2.21.  The  revised  WHO  country‐specific  estimates  of  war  and  conflict  deaths  for  the  period  1990‐2011  make  use  of  estimates  of  direct  deaths  from  three  datasets:  Battle‐Related  Deaths  (version  5),    Non‐State  Conflict  Dataset  (UCDP  version  2.4),  and  One‐sided  Violence  Dataset  (UCDP  version  1.4)  from  1989  to  2011  (78‐80).  Using  these  three  datasets,  instead  of  focusing  solely  on  battle‐related  deaths,  reduces  the  likelihood  that  overall  direct  conflict  deaths  are  underestimated.  However,  it  likely  that  a  degree  of  undercounting  still  occurs  in  the  count‐based  datasets,  and  the  adjusted  ratio  obtained  by  Garfield  and  Blore  (77)  of  2.21  is  applied  to  the  annual  battle  death  main  estimates  for  state‐state  conflicts  (78).  No  adjustments  were  applied  to  estimated  conflict  deaths  (main  estimates)  for  non‐state  conflict  deaths  (79), and one‐sided violence (80).   Additional  information  from  epidemiological  studies  and  surveys  was  also  used  for  Iraq  (81,82).  Deaths  due  to  landmines  and  unexploded  ordinance  were  estimated  separately  by  country  (83).  Age‐sex  distributions  for  conflict  deaths  were  revised  based  on  available  distributions  of  conflict  deaths  by  age  and sex for specific conflicts (73,75,81‐86).    The following tables summarizes and compares various time series of conflict deaths estimates.   World Health Organization   Page 28

  Table  5.2.  Estimated  total  global  injury  deaths  (thousands)  due  to  conflict:  comparison  of  various  time  series and WHO estimates 
Year  GBD 1990 (a)  WHO 2000‐2008  UCDC‐PRIO  WHO 2013 (i)  (h)  95      85  30  18  34  28  138      122  95  69  84  57  IHME‐GBD 2010 (j) 

1990  2000  2000  2000  2004  2005  2008  2010 

502  656            834 

‐  310 (b)  230 (c)  187 (d)  182 (e)  238 (f)  182 (g)   

63      53    26    18 

(a) Estimates and projections by Murray and Lopez (74)  (b) World Health Report 2001 (87) and World report on violence and health (88).   (c) World Health Report 2002 (1)  (d) Revision for Disease Control Priorities Study (2)  (e) Global burden of disease: 2004 update (3)  (f) World Health Statistics 2007 (89)  (g) WHO estimates of causes of death for year 2008 (4)  (h) Sum of main estimates of conflict deaths for state‐state, state‐nonstate and one‐sided conflicts (78‐80)  (i) Revised WHO estimates for years 1990‐2011 as documented here.  (j) IHME Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (26).   

The  revised  WHO  estimates  for  total  conflict  deaths  (in  the  column  WHO  2013)  are  considerably  lower  than  the  previous  WHO  estimates  for  years  2000‐2008  which  used  the  earlier  higher  adjustment  factor  for  under‐reporting,  which  in  turn  are  lower  than  the  previous  estimates  and  projections  in  the  original  GBD  study  (74).  The  recently  estimates  for  conflict  deaths  published  by  IHME  in  the  GBD  2010  study,  shown  in  the  rightmost  column,  are  considerable  lower  than  the  revised  WHO  estimates.  For  the  year  2010,  the  IHME  estimates  are  also  lower  than  the  main  estimate  from  the  UCDC‐PRIO  databases  for  the  same  year.  The  IHME  methods  were  based  on  a  regression  analysis  of  available  all‐cause  mortality  data  for  country‐years  in  which  battle  deaths  were  reported  in  various  databases.  Lozano  et  al  (26)  cite  (90)  for more detailed documentation of their methods.  The  revised  WHO  estimates  for  conflict  deaths  were  taken  into  account  in  preparing  final  all‐cause  mortality  envelopes  for  Member  States  for  years  1990‐2011  as  follows.  For  country‐years  where  death  rates from conflict or disasters exceeded 1 per 10,000 population, the estimated annual age‐sex‐specific  conflict  deaths  were  added  to  the  life  table  death  rates  for  the  relevant  year.  In  cases  of  extended  conflicts  where  death  rates  fluctuated  above  and  below  1  per  10,000,  only  the  death  rate  in  excess  of  1  per 10,000 was added to relevant years.  

World Health Organization  

Page 29

 

6

Other causes of death for countries without useable data

Previous  WHO  comprehensive  estimates  of  causes  of  death  have  relied  on  cause‐of‐death  modelling  and  available  data  on  cause  of  death  distributions  within  each  analysis  subregion  to  estimate  causes  of  death  for  countries  without  useable  data  and  where  WHO  cause‐specific  analyses  were  not  available  (2,  3).  The    IHME  developed  covariate  based  estimation  models  for  a  large  number  of  single  causes  as  inputs to its overall estimation of numbers of deaths by country, cause, age and sex for years 1990‐2010  in  the  GBD  2010  study  (8‐10).  Results  from  these  models  are  used  as  inputs  to  WHO  Global  Health  Estimates  for  causes  of  death  not  addressed  by  WHO  and  UN  Interagency  estimation  processes  and  where countries did not have useable death registration data, as described below.  Six different modelling strategies were used by IHME for causes of death depending on the availability of  data  (26,webappendix).  For  all  major  causes  of  death  except  HIV/AIDS  and  measles,  IHME  used  ensemble  modelling  to  create  a  weighted  average  of  many  individual  covariate‐based  models  (ranging  from  hundreds  to  thousands  in  some  cases)  for  each  specific  cause  (26,91).  IHME  cause  of  death  estimation  methods  are  thus  complex  and  highly  computer‐intensive.  The  overall  out‐of‐sample  predictive  validity  of  the  ensemble  is  usually  not  much  different  to  that  of  the  top‐ranked  model,  but  uncertainty ranges are generally much wider and more plausible than for single models.  IHME  results  for  priority  causes  such  as  HIV,  TB,  malaria,  cancers,  maternal  mortality,  child  mortality  differ to varying degrees from those of WHO and UN agency partners. In part, this reflects differences in  modelling  strategies,  but  also  the  inclusion  by  IHME  of  data  from  verbal  autopsy  (VA)  studies  which  has  been  mapped  to  ICD  categories  using  IHME‐developed  computer  algorithms.  WHO  aims  to  work  with  IHME  and  expert  groups  to  further  improve  data  and  methods,  which  requires  that  all   input  data  and  detailed  analysis  methods  and  results  are  made  available.    Figure  6.1  provides  a  comparison  of  major  cause  group  death  rates  for  the  GBD  2010  and  WHO  GHE  results  for  year  2010  for  seven  broad  regional  groupings.  To  ensure  that  the  results  of  all  the  single‐cause  models  summed  to  the  all‐cause  mortality  estimate  for  each  age‐sex‐country‐year  group,  IHME  applied  a  final  step  called  CoDCorrect  to  rescale  the  cause‐ specific  estimates.  This  was  done  using  repeated  random  draws  from  the  uncertainty  distributions  of  each  single  cause  and  from  the  all‐cause  envelope,  and  proportionately  rescaling  each  single  cause  estimate  so  they  collectively  summed  to  the  envelope  estimate.  The  overall  effect  is  to  “squeeze”  or  “expand” causes with wider uncertainty ranges more than those with narrower uncertainty ranges.  GBD 2010 results, post‐CoDCorrect, were used as inputs to estimate cause fractions by country, age, sex  and year for causes of death at ages five years and above for which death registration data and/or WHO  and  UN  Interagency  analyses  (described  in  Section  5)  were  not  available.  For  this  set  of  causes,  GBD  2010  country‐level  estimates  for  death  rates  at  ages  5  and  over  for  years  1990,  1995,  2000,  2005  and  2010  were  interpolated  to  death  rates  for  all  years  in  the  range  2000‐2011  using  cubic  spline  interpolation  of  log(death  rates.  Cause  fraction  distributions  were  then  computed  for  the  set  of  causes  excluding  WHO/Interagency  cause‐specific  estimates.  For  countries  where  these  cause  fractions  were  used  (see  Annex  Table  G),  they  were  applied  to  the  country‐level  residual  mortality  envelopes  by  age  and  sex  after  the  WHO/Interagency  cause‐specific  estimates  were  subtracted  from  the  WHO  all‐cause  envelopes.   Table  6.1  summarizes  the  overall  percentage  change  in  the  GBD  2010  estimates  for  each  of  these  residual  causes  resulting  from  the  above  process.  This  provides  a  rough  metric  of  how  much  inconsistency  there  is  between  the  GBD  2010  and  the  GHE  2010  estimates  for  ages  five  and  over  as  a  result of differences in all‐cause envelopes and WHO/Interagency estimates for specific causes.     World Health Organization   Page 30

  Figure 6.1.  Comparison of GHE and IHME death rates per 100,000 population, major cause groups, 2010 

World Health Organization  

Page 31

  Table  6.1.  Ratio  of  GHE  total  deaths  for  residual  causes  to  GBD  2010  total  deaths  for  residual  causes,   low‐  and  middle‐income  countries  without  useable  death  registration  data,  by  WHO  Region  and  age  group, 2000 and 2011  5‐14  3.70  1.75  1.48  0.95  1.29  1.38  2.47  Ratio 2000  15‐49  50‐69 1.50  1.36 1.25  1.10 0.91  0.84 0.89  0.98 1.09  1.04 0.78  0.77 1.20  1.06 70+ 1.44 1.01 1.09 1.11 1.11 1.00 1.16 5‐14  4.15  2.05  1.65  0.54  1.05  1.21  2.77  Ratio 2011  15‐49 50‐69  1.57 1.23  1.28 1.14  0.81 0.88  0.62 0.83  0.83 1.02  0.58 0.68  1.12 1.02  70+ 1.36 1.07 1.12 1.08 1.10 0.95 1.15

AFR  AMR  EMR  EUR  SEAR  WPR  World       

World Health Organization  

Page 32

 

7

Uncertainty of estimates

Country‐level  estimates  of  mortality  for  2004  and  2008  previously  released  on  the  WHO  website  included  guidance  to  users  on  the  data  sources  and  methods  used  for  each  country,  in  terms  of  four  levels of evidence. Comprehensive uncertainty ranges have not yet been addressed for the GHE cause of  death  estimates  although  uncertainty  ranges  are  available  for  many  of  the  component  analyses  for  specific  causes  (refer  to  the  detailed  documentation  of  sources  in  Sections  4  and  5).  General  guidance  on  the  quality  and  uncertainty  of  these  cause  of  death  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011  is  provided  in  terms of  the  quality  of data  inputs  and  methods used.  These  are  broadly summarized  for  WHO  Member  States in Annex Table F for general mortality and cause‐of‐death methods.   WHO’s adoption  of  health estimates  is  affected by  a  number of  factors,  including a  country  consultation  process  for  country‐level  health  estimates,  existing  multi‐agency  and  expert  group  collaborative  mechanisms,  and  compliance  with  minimum  standards  around  data  transparency,  data  and  methods  sharing.    More  detailed  information  on  quality  of  data  sources  and  methods,  as  well  as  estimated  uncertainty intervals, is provided in referenced sources for specific causes (Sections 4 and 5).  Calculated  uncertainty  ranges  depend  on  the  assumptions  and  methods  used.  In  practice,  estimating  uncertainty  in  a  consistent  way  across  health  indicators  has  had  limited  success  (i.e.,  estimates  with  uncertainty  typically  reflect  some,  but  not  all,  source  of  uncertainty).  Most  methods  for  estimation  of  uncertainty  rely  on  statistical  techniques  to  assess  variations  across  observations  and  take  into  account  sampling  error  but  are  less  successful  in  dealing  with  unknown  systematic  bias  in  observations.  In  particular,  there  is  not  yet  sufficient  research  or  consensus  on  the  interpretation  and  use  of  verbal  autopsy  studies  to  ensure  that  systematic  bias  in  assigning  underlying  cause  of  death  can  be  fully  addressed or resulting uncertainty fully quantified.  The  type  and  complexity  of  models  used  for  global  health  estimates  varies  widely  by  research/institutional group and health estimate. More complex models are necessary to generate more  accurate  uncertainty  intervals.  As  expected,  these  are  more  difficult  to  transfer  across  research  groups  and  require  greater  researcher  expertise  and  time  and  computational  resources  to  run. Where  data  are  available  and  of  high  quality,  estimates  from  different  institutions  are  generally  in  agreement.   Discrepancies  are  more  likely  to  arise  for  countries  where  data  are  poor   and  for  conditions  where  data  are sparse and potentially biased. This is best addressed through improving the primary data. Country  health  information  systems,  including  vital  registration,  need  to  be  strengthened  as  a  matter  of  priority,  in  order  to  provide  a  more  solid  empirical  basis  for  monitoring  health  situation  and  trends  is  essential. Such data are also crucial for Member States’ monitoring of local trends in order to respond to  the changing needs of their populations.  To  improve  monitoring  of  mortality,  morbidity  and  risk  factors  the  improving  health  information  systems should focus on strengthening:        Although  the  GHE  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011  have  large  uncertainty  ranges  for  some  causes  and  some  regions,  they  provide  useful  information  on  broad  relativities  of  disease  burden,  on  the  relative  World Health Organization   Page 33 Death  registration  through  civil  registration  and  vital  statistics  systems  (CRVS),  local  health  and  demographic studies and other sources  Cause of death data collection through vital registration and verbal autopsy in communities  Regular household health surveys that include biological and clinical data collection  Complete facility recording and reporting with regular quality control 

  importance  of  different  causes  of  death,  and  on  regional  patterns  and  inequalities.  The  data  gaps  and  limitations  in  high‐mortality  regions  reinforces  the  need  for  caution  when  interpreting  global  comparative  cause  of  death  assessments  and  the  need  for  increased  investment  in  population  health  measurement systems. The use of verbal autopsy methods in sample registration systems, demographic  surveillance  systems  and  household  surveys  provides  some  information  on  causes  of  death  in  populations  without  well‐functioning  death  registration  systems,  but  there  remain  considerable  challenges in the validation and interpretation of such data.  Figure 7.1 summarizes the proportional distributions of deaths by age, sex and cause for years 2000 and  2011.  More  detailed  regional  tabulations  of  deaths  by  cause,  age  and  sex  for  years  2000  and  2011  are  available  in  the  WHO  Global  Health  Observatory  (www.who.int/gho)  and  as  downloadable  Excel  spreadsheets at http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_health_estimates/en/.  Figure 7.1  Percentage of deaths by cause  for global age‐sex groups, 2000 and 2011. 
Males, 2000
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Age (years)

Females, 2000
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Age (years)

Suicide, homicide and conflict Other unintentional injuries Road injury Other noncommunicable Chronic respiratory diseases Cancers Cardiovascular diseases Maternal, neonatal, nutritional Other infectious diseases Lower respiratory infections Diarrhoeal diseases HIV, TB and malaria

Males, 2011
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Age (years)

Females, 2011
100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Age (years)

Suicide, homicide and conflict Other unintentional injuries Road injury Other noncommunicable Chronic respiratory diseases Cancers Cardiovascular diseases Maternal, neonatal, nutritional Other infectious diseases Lower respiratory infections Diarrhoeal diseases HIV, TB and malaria

World Health Organization  

Page 34

    These  estimates  for  years  2000‐2011  supercede  and  replace  all  previous  estimates  for  global  and  regional  causes  of  death  published  by  WHO.  They  are  not  directly  comparable  with  previous  WHO   estimates  for  2008  and  earlier  years  and  differences  should  not  be  interpreted  as  trends.    Figures  7.2  and  7.3  provide  summary  comparisons  of  the  GHE  estimates  for  year  2008  with  the  previous  WHO  estimates for year 2008 published in 2011 (4,5). These figures illustrate that there has been little change  in  the  relative  ranking  for  the  leading  causes  of  death,  although  estimated  numbers  of  deaths  are  somewhat  lower  for  most  causes.  This  partially  reflects  downwards  revision  of  all‐cause  envelopes  in  recent  successive  revisions  by  UN‐IGME  and  UN  Population  Division,  but  also  reflects  accelerating  declines in child mortality, and to a lesser extent, adult mortality in recent years.  These are provisional estimates and will be further revised in the process of updating to 2012 for release  at  country  level  in  late  2013.  WHO  and  collaborators  will  continue  to  include  new  data  and  improve  methods, and it is anticipated that some causes will be further updated in the next revision.    Figure 7.2.  Change in 10 leading causes of death at global level, GHE estimates for 2011 compared with  previous WHO cause of death (COD) estimates for year 2008 (4,5) 
COD08 (a)
Disease or injury Is cha emi c hea rt di s ea s e Cerebrovas cul a r di s ea s e Lower res pi ratory i nfecti ons COPD Di a rrhoea l  di s ea s es HIV/AIDS Lung  ca ncer Di a betes  mel l i tus Road  i njury Hypertens i ve  heart di s eas e Total  deaths  (millions) Rank 7.25 6.15 3.46 3.28 2.46 1.78 1.39 1.26 1.21 1.15 1.00 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 13

GHE 2011 (b)
Total  deaths  Rank (millions) Disease or injury 1 7.02 Is cha emi c heart di s eas e 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6.25 Cerebrova s cul a r di s eas e 3.20 Lower res pi ra tory i nfecti ons 2.97 COPD 1.89 Di a rrhoea l  di s ea s es 1.59 HIV/AIDS 1.48 Lung ca ncer 1.39 Di a betes  mel l i tus 1.26 Roa d  i njury 1.17 Preterm  bi rth  compl i ca ti ons 1.06 Hypertens i ve  hea rt di s ea s e

Preterm  bi rth  compl i ca ti ons

 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 35

  Figure 7.3.  Comparison of death rates per 100,000 for nine major cause groups, GHE estimates for year  2008 and previous WHO COD estimates for year 2008, for world, high income countries, and low‐ and  middle‐income countries grouped by WHO region 
1400

1200

1000

Suicide, homicide and conflict Other unintentional injuries

800

Road injury Other noncommunicable

600

Cancers Cardiovascular diseases Maternal, neonatal, nutritional

400

Other infectious diseases HIV, TB and malaria

200

0 COD08 GHE COD08 GHE COD08 GHE COD08 GHE

World                               Africa                            Americas                          Eastern                                                                                                                          Mediterranean
1400

1200

1000

Suicide, homicide and conflict Other unintentional injuries

800

Road injury Other noncommunicable

600

Cancers Cardiovascular diseases Maternal, neonatal, nutritional

400

Other infectious diseases HIV, TB and malaria

200

0 COD08 GHE COD08 GHE COD08 GHE COD08 GHE

High income                          Europe                     South East Asia             Western Pacific 

World Health Organization  

Page 36

 

References
(1)   (2)   (3)   (4)   (5)   World  Health  Organization.  World  health  report  2002.  Reducing  risks,  promoting  healthy  life.  Geneva, World Health Organization, 2002.  Lopez, A.D., Mathers, C.D., Ezzati, M., Murray, C.J.L., & Jamison, D.T. Global burden of disease and  risk factors. New York, Oxford University Press, 2006.  World  Health  Organization.  The  global  burden  of  disease:  2004  update.  Geneva,  World  Health  Organization, 2008.  World Health Organization. Causes of death 2008: data sources and methods.  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/cod_2008_sources_methods.pdf .  World Health Organization. Country‐level mortality estimates by cause, age, and sex for the year  2008. Geneva: WHO.  Available at  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/estimates_country/en/index.html  World Health Organization. Global health estimates for deaths by cause, age, and sex for years  2000‐2011. Geneva: WHO.  Available at  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_health_estimates/en/  International Classification of Diseases – 10th Revision. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1990.  Murray  CJ,  Ezzati  M,  Flaxman  AD,  et  al.  GBD  2010:  a  multi‐investigator  collaboration  for  global  comparative descriptive epidemiology. Lancet, 2012, 380(9859):2055‐8. 

(6)  

(7)  (8) 

 (9)   Wang  H,  Dwyer‐Lindgren  L,  Lofgren  KT,  et  al.  Age‐specific  and  sex‐specific  mortality  in  187  countries,  1970–2010:  a  systematic  analysis  for  the  Global  Burden  of  Disease  Study  2010.  The  Lancet. 2012 Dec 13; 380: 2071–2094.  (10)  Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation 2013. GBD Compare. Available at  http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd‐compare/ (accessed 24 June 2013).  (11)   World Health Organization. WHO methods and data sources for life tables 1990‐2011.  Global  Health Estimates Technical Paper WHO/HIS/HSI/GHE/2013.1)  (12)   United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. World Population  Prospects ‐ the 2010 revision. New York, United Nations, 2011.  (13)    United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. World  Population Prospects ‐ the 2012 revision. New York, United Nations, 2013.  (14)   UNICEF,  WHO,  The  World  Bank  and  UN  Population  Division.  Levels  and  Trends  of  Child  Mortality ‐  Report  2012,  Estimates  developed  by  the  UN  Inter‐agency  Group  for  Child  Mortality  Estimation.  UNICEF, New York, 2012.  (15)   The PLoS Medicine Collection on Child Mortality Estimation Methods. PLoS Medicine, 2012.  Available at: 
http://www.ploscollections.org/article/browseIssue.action?issue=info:doi/10.1371/issue.pcol.v07.i19. 

(16)   Oestergaard MZ, et al. Neonatal Mortality Levels for 193 Countries in 2009 with Trends since 1990:  A Systematic Analysis of Progress, Projections, and Priorities. PLoS Medicine, 2011,  8(8):  e1001080. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001080  (17)   Murray  CJL,  Ferguson  BD,  Lopez  AD,  Guillot  M,  Salomon  JA,  Ahmad  O.  Modified  logit  life  table  system: principles, empirical validation and application. Population Studies, 2003, 57(2):1‐18.  World Health Organization   Page 37

  (18)   United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. File 0‐2 Latest  data sources used to derive estimates for total population, fertility, mortality and migrations by  countries or areas in World Population Prospects – the 2010 revisions. New York, United Nations  Population Division, 2012. Available at: http://esa.un.org/wpp/Excel‐ Data/WPP2010_F02_METAINFO.xls  (19)   UNAIDS. 2012 UNAIDS Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2012.  (20)   United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. World Population  Prospects: The 2012 Revision, Provisional results (unpublished).  (21)  Afghan Public Health Institute, Ministry of Public Health, Central Statistics Organization , ICF  Macro, Indian Institute of Health Management Research, and World Health Organization.  Afghanistan Mortality Survey 2010. Calverton, Maryland, USA: APHI/MoPH, CSO, ICF Macro,  IIHMR and WHO/EMRO, 2011.  (22)  Central Statistics Organisation (CSO) and UNICEF. Afghanistan Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey  2010‐2011: Final Report. Kabul, Central Statistics Organisation and UNICEF, 2012.  (23)  Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. National Disease Surveillance System  monitoring causes of death 2010.  Beijing, Military Medical Science Press, 2012.  (24)   World Health Organization. Mortality Database. Available at:  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/mortality_data/en/index.html   (25)   Mathers CD, Lopez AD, Murray CJL, Ezzati M, Jamison DT. The burden of disease and mortality by  condition: data, methods and results for 2001. Global burden of disease and risk factors. New York,  Oxford University Press, 2006. p. 45–240.  (26)   Lozano R, et al. Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990  and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Lancet, 2012,  380(9859):2095‐128.  (27)   WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank. Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2010. Geneva: World  Health Organization; 2012.  (28)    China Ministry of Health‐Unpublished tabulations ‐‐ Vital Registration System cause‐of‐death data  submitted annually to WHO.  (29)   全国疾病监测系统死因监测数据集 [National Disease Surveillance System monitoring causes of  death 2010]. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, Military Medical Science  Press, 2012, ISBN 978‐7‐80245‐827‐7.   (30)   中国疾病监测报告[Cause‐of‐death data from Chinese Disease Surveillance Points], China  Ministry of Health, 2004‐2009.    (31)   Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.  CDC. Reported human rabies deaths 1950‐ 2010. Chinese CDC: Beijing.  (32)    Registrar General of India. Causes of Death in India in 2001‐2003. New Delhi, Registrar General of  India, Government of India, 2009.  (33)   Jha P, Gajalakshmi V, Gupta PC, Kumar R, Mony P, Dhingra N et al. Prospective study of one  million deaths in India: rationale, design, and validation results. PLoS Med 2006 February;3(2):e18. 

World Health Organization  

Page 38

  (34)  Liu  L,  Johnson  HL,  Cousens  S,  Perin  J,  Scott  S,  Lawn  JE,  Rudan  I,  Campbell  H,  Cibulskis  R,  Li  M,  Mathers  C,  Black  RE,  for  the  Child  Health  Epidemiology  Reference  Group  of  WHO  and  UNICEF.  Global,  regional,  and  national  causes  of  child  mortality:  an  updated  systematic  analysis  for  2010  with time trends since 2000. Lancet, 2012, 379:2151‐61.    (35)   World  Health  Organization.  Methodology  for  WHO  mortality  estimates.  Available  at:  http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/mortality/en/index2.html   (36)   Black RE, Cousens S, Johnson H et al. Global, Regional and National Causes of Child Mortality,  2008. Lancet, 2010, 375(9730):1969‐87.  (37)  Johnson  H,  Liu  L,  Walker  CF,  Black  RE.  Estimating  the  distribution  of  causes  of  child  deaths  in  high  mortality countries with incomplete death certification. Int J Epidemiol, 2010, 39(4):1103‐1114.  (38)  Liu  et  al.  National,  regional  and  state‐level  causes  of  child  mortality  in  India  in  2000‐2010:  a  systematic sub‐national analysis. Under preparation, 2013.  (39)  Bassani  DG,  Kumar  R,  Awasthi  S  et  al.  Causes  of  neonatal  and  child  mortality  in  India:  a  nationally  representative mortality survey. Lancet, 2010, 376(9755):1853‐1860.   (40).  Rudan  I,  Chan  KY,  Zhang  JS  et  al.  Causes  of  deaths  in  children  younger  than  5  years  in  China  in  2008. Lancet, 2010, 375(9720):1083‐1089.  (41)  World Health Organization. Global Tuberculosis Report 2012. Geneva, WHO, 2012.  (42)  World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2012. Geneva, WHO, 2012.  (43)   World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2008. Geneva, WHO, 2008.  (44)   Chen  S,  Fricks  J,  Ferrari  MJ.  Tracking  measles  infection  through  non‐linear  state  space  models.  Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, 2011, 61 (1).  (45)   Wolfson  LJ,  Grais  RF,  Luquero  FJ,  Birmingham  ME,  Strebel  PM.  Estimates  of  measles  case  fatality  ratios: a comprehensive review of community‐based studies. Int J Epidemiol, 2009, 38(1):192‐205.   (46)   Joshi  AB,  Luman  ET,  Nandy  R,  Subedi  BK,  Liyanage  JBL,  Wierzba  TF.  Measles  deaths  in  Nepal:  estimating  the  national  case–fatality  ratio.  Bulletin  of  the  World  Health  Organization,  2009,  87(6):456–465.  (47)   Sudfeld  CR,  Halsey  NA.  Measles  case  fatality  ratio  in  India  a  review  of  community  based  studies.  Indian Pediatr, 2009, 46(11):983‐9.  (48)   Wolfson  LJ,  Strebel  PM,  Gacic‐Dobo  M,  Hoekstra  EJ,  McFarland  JW,  Hersh  BS.  Has  the  2005  measles  mortality  reduction  goal  been  achieved?  A  natural  history  modelling  study.  Lancet,  2007,  369(9557):191‐200.  (49)   World  Health  Organization.  Progress  in  global  control  and  regional  elimination  of  measles,  2000‐ 2011. Weekly epidemiological record, 2013, 88(3):29‐36.  (50)  Cleveland  WS,  Loader  CL.  Smoothing  by  local  regression:  principles  and  methods.  In:  Haerdle  W,  Schimek  MG,  editors.  Statistical  theory  and  computational  aspects  of  smoothing.  New  York,  Springer, 1996, 10‐49.   (51)    Hotez  PJ,  Bundy  DA,  Beegle  K,  Brooker  S,  Drake  L,  de  Silva  NR  et  al.  Helminth  infections:  soil‐ transmitted  helminth  infections  and  schistosomiasis.  In:  Jamison  DT,  Breman  JG,  Measham  AR,  Alleyne  G,  Evans  D,  Claeson  M  et  al.,  eds.  Disease  control  priorities  in  developing  countries,  2nd  edit. New York, Oxford University Press, 2006: 467‐482.  World Health Organization   Page 39

  (52)   Van  der  Werf  MJ,  de  Vlas  SJ.  Morbidity  and  infection  with  schistosomes  or  soil‐transmitted  helminths. Rotterdam, Erasmus University, 2001.  (53)   Vos  T,  Flaxman  AD,  Naghavi  M,  et  al.  Years  lived  with  disability  (YLDs)  for  1160  sequelae  of  289  diseases  and  injuries,  1990–2010:  a  systematic  analysis  for  the  Global  Burden  of  Disease  Study  2010. The Lancet. 2012 Dec 13; 380: 2163–2196.  (54)   Wilmoth JR, Mizoguchi N, Oestergaard MZ,  Say L, Mathers CD, Zureick‐Brown S, Inoue M, Chou D.  A  New  Method  for  Deriving  Global  Estimates  of  Maternal  Mortality.  Statistics,  Politics,  and  Policy.  3(2), DOI: 10.1515/2151‐7509.1038, July 2012   (55)   Ferlay  J,  Shin  H,  Bray  F,  Foreman  D,  Mathers  CD,  Parkin  DM.  Estimates  of  worldwide  burden  of  cancer in 2008: Globocan 2008. International Journal of Cancer 2010;127(12):2893‐917.  (56)   United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. World Drug Report 2012. UNODC: Vienna. 2012  (57)   World Health Organization 2013. Global status report on road safety 2013: supporting a decade of  action. Geneva, WHO, 2013.  (58)   Khosravi  A,  Taylor  R,  Naghavi  N,  Lopez  AD.  Mortality  in  the  Islamic  Republic  of  Iran,  1964–2004.  Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2007, 85:607‐14  (59)   Porapakkham  Y,  Rao  C,  Pattaraarchachai  J,  Polprasert  W,  Vos  T,  Adair  T  et  al.  Estimated  causes  of  death in Thailand, 2005: implications for health policy. Population Health Metrics, 2010, 8:14.  (60)   Ngo  AD,  Rao  C,  Hoa  NP,  Adair  T,  Chuc  NTK.  Mortality  patterns  in  Vietnam,  2006:  findings  from  a  national verbal autopsy survey. BMC Research Notes, 2010, 3:78.  (61)   IHME. Health system access ref  (62)   Kaufmann  D,    Kraay  A,  Mastruzzi  M.  ,  Massimo.  Governance  Matters  VIII  :  Aggregate  and  Individual Governance Indicators 1996–2008. World Bank 2009.  (63)   Hughes  BB,  et  al.  The  International  Futures  (IFs)  modeling  system,  version  6.54.  Frederick  S.  Pardee Center for International Futures, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of  Denver, www.ifs.du.edu.  (64)   CRED. EM‐DAT: The CRED International Disaster Database.  Belgium, Université Catholique de  Louvain, 2012.  (65)    He H, Oguchi T, Zhou R, Zhang J, Qiao S. Damage and seismic intensity of the 1996 Lijiang  earthquake, Vhina: a GIS analysis. Technical report. Tokyo, Center for Spatial Information Science,  University of Tokyo, 2001. Available at: http://www.csis.u‐tokyo.ac.jp/english/dp/dp.html  (accessed 18 January 2008).  (66)  Naghii MR. Public health impact and medical consequences of earthquakes. Pan American Journal  of Public Health, 2005, 18:216–221.  (67)  Nishikiori N, Abe T, Costa DG, Dharmaratne SD, Kunii O, Moji K. Who died as a result of the  tsunami? Risk factors of mortality among internally displaced persons in Sri Lanka: a retrospective  cohort analysis. BMC Public Health, 2006, 6:73.  (68)  Doocy S, Rofi A, Moodie C, Spring E, Bradley S, Burnham G et al. Tsunami mortality in Aceh  Province, Indonesia. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2007, 85:273–278. 

World Health Organization  

Page 40

  (69)  Heidelberg Institute on International Conflict Research. Conflict barometer. Department of  Political Science, University of Heidelberg, 2012. Available at:  http://www.hiik.de/en/konfliktbarometer/.   (70)  Project Ploughshares. Armed conflicts report. Waterloo, Canada, Project Ploughshares, 2005.  Available at:  http://www.ploughshares.ca/.   (71)  Marshall MG, Gurr TR. Peace and conflict 2005: a global survey of armed conflicts, self‐ determination movements, and democracy. University of Maryland, Center for International  Development and Conflict Management, 2005.   (72)  International Peace Research Institute. UCDP/PRIO Armed Conflict Dataset. Oslo, PRIO, 2009.  Available at: http://www.prio.no/CSCW/Datasets/Armed‐Conflict/ (accessed 2 November 2009).  (73)  Murray CJ, King G, Lopez AD, Tomijima N, Krug EG. Armed conflict as a public health problem.  British Medical Journal, 2002, 324(7333):346‐349.  (74)  Murray CJL, Lopez AD. The Global Burden of Disease: a comprehensive assessment of mortality  and disability from diseases, injuries and risk factors in 1990 and projected to 2020. Cambridge,  Harvard School of Public Health, 1996.  (75)   Obermeyer Z, Murray CJL, Gakidou E. Fifty years of violent war deaths from Vietnam to Bosnia:  analysis of data from the world health survey programme. British Medical Journal, 2008,  336:1482‐6.  (76)  Lacina B, Gleditsch NP. Monitoring trends in global combat: a new dataset of battle deaths. Eur J  Popul, 2005, 21:145‐166.  (77)  Garfield, R, Blore J. Direct Conflict Deaths. Unpublished report prepared on behalf of the  Collective Violence Expert Group for the Global Burden of Disease Study, 2009.  (78)   International Peace Research Institute 2012. UCDP/PRIO Battle‐Related Deaths Dataset v. 5‐2012b,  1989‐2011. Oslo, PRIO, 2013. Available at:  http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/datasets/ucdp_battle‐related_deaths_dataset/  (accessed 4  February 2013).  (79)   International Peace Research Institute 2012. UCDP/PRIO Non‐State Conflict Dataset v. 2.4‐2012,  1989‐2011. Oslo, UCDP, 2013. Available at:  http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/datasets/ucdp_non‐state_conflict_dataset_/  (accessed 4  February 2013).  (80)   International Peace Research Institute 2012. UCDP/PRIO One‐Sided Violence Dataset v. 1.4‐2012,  1989‐2011. Oslo, PRIO, 2013. Available at:  http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/datasets/ucdp_one‐sided_violence_dataset/  (accessed 4  February 2013).  (81)  Iraq Family Health Survey Study Group. Violence‐Related Mortality in Iraq from 2002 to 2006. N  Engl J Med, 2008, NEJMsa0707782.  (82)   Iraq Body Count. Iraqi deaths from violence 2003–2011.  Available at:  http://www.iraqbodycount.org/  (83)  International Campaign to Ban Landmines. Landmine monitor. Available at: http://www.the‐ monitor.org/ 

World Health Organization  

Page 41

  (84)  Hoeffler A. Dealing with the consequences of violent conflicts in Africa. Background Paper for the  African Development Bank, 2008. Available at:  http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ball0144/consequences.pdf  (85)  World Health Organization. European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training.  Retrospective mortality survey among the internally displaced population, Greater Darfur, Sudan,  August 2004. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2004. Available at:  http://www.who.int/disasters/repo/14652.pdf  (86)  Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs ‐ Occupied Palestinian Territory. Protection of  Civilians: Casualty Database.  Available at:     http://www.ochaopt.org/poc.aspx?id=1010002  (87)  World Health Organization. World health report 2001. Mental Health: New Understanding, New  Hope. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2001.   (88)  Krug EG, et al. World Report on violence and health. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2002.  (89)  World Health Organization.  World Health Statistics 2007. Geneva: World Health Organization,  2007.   (90)  Murray C, Lopez AD, Wang H. Mortality estimation for national populations: methods and  applications. Seattle, University of Washington Press, 2012.  (91)  Foreman KJ, Lozano R, Lopez AD, Murray CJL. Modeling causes of death: an integrated approach  using CODEm. Population Health Metrics. 2012; 10:1.     

World Health Organization  

Page 42

 

Annex Table A GHE cause categories and ICD‐10 codes
Code
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

GHE cause name
I. Communicable, maternal, perinatal and a nutritional conditions A. Infectious and parasitic diseases 1. Tuberculosis 2. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) excluding HIV a. Syphilis b. Chlamydia c. Gonorrhoea d. Trichomoniasis e. Other STDs 3. HIV/AIDS 4. Diarrhoeal diseases
b

ICD-10 code
A00-B99, G00-G04, N70-N73, J00-J22, H65-H68, O00-O99, P00-P96, E00-E02, E40-E46, E50-E64, D50-D53, D64.9, U04 A00-B99, G00, G03-G04, N70-N73 A15-A19, B90 A50-A64, N70-N73 A50-A53 A55-A56 A54 A59 A57-A58, A60-A64, N70-N73 B20-B24 A00, A01, A03, A04, A06-A09 A33-A37, B05 A37 A36 B05 A33-A35 A39, G00, G03
b

5. Childhood-cluster diseases a. Whooping cough b. Diphtheria c. Measles d. Tetanus 6. Meningitis 7. Encephalitis 8. Hepatitis B 9. Hepatitis C 10. Parasitic and vector diseases a. Malaria b. Trypanosomiasis c. Chagas disease d. Schistosomiasis e. Leishmaniasis f. Lymphatic filariasis

A83-A86, B94.1, G04 B16-B19 (minus B17.1, B18.2) B17.1, B18.2 A30, A71, A82, A90-A91, B50-B57, B65, B73, B74.0-B74.2 B50-B54, P37.3, P37.4 B56 B57 B65 B55 B74.0-B74.2 B73 A30 A90-A91 A71 A82 B76-B77, B79 B77 B79 B76 A02, A05, A20-A28, A31, A32, A38, A40-A49, A65-A70, A74A79, A80-A81, A87-A89, A92-A99, B00-B04, B06-B15, B25-B49, B58-B60, B64, B66-B72, B74.3-B74.9, B75,B78, B80-B89, B91B99 (minus B94.1)

g. Onchocerciasis h. Leprosy i. j. Dengue Trachoma

k. Rabies 11. Intestinal nematode infections a. Ascariasis b. Trichuriasis c. Hookworm disease 12. Other infectious diseases

World Health Organization  

Page 43

 
Code
38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 47 58 59 60

GHE cause name
B. Respiratory infections
b

ICD-10 code
J00-J22, H65-H68,P23, U04 J09-J22, P23, U04 J00-J06 H65-H68 O00-O99 O44-O46, O67, O72 O85-O86 O10-O16 O64-O66 O00-O07 O20-O43, O47-O63, O68-O71, O73-O75, O87-O99 P00-P96 excl P37.3, P37.4
b b

1. Lower respiratory infections 2. Upper respiratory infections 3. Otitis media C. Maternal conditions 1. Maternal haemorrhage 2. Maternal sepsis 3. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy 4. Obstructed labour 5. Abortion 6. Other maternal conditions D. Neonatal conditions 1. Preterm birth complications

P05, P07, P22, P27-P28 P03, P10-P15, P20-P21, P24-P26, P29 P35-P39 (excluding P37.3, P37.4) P00-P02, P04, P08, P50-P96 E00-E02, E40-E46, E50-E64, D50-D53, D64.9 E40-E46 E00-E02 E50 D50, D64.9 D51-D53, E51-E64 C00-C97, D00-D48, D55-D64 (minus D 64.9), D65-D89, E03E07, E10-E16, E20-E34, E65-E88, F01-F99, G06-G98, H00H61, H68-H93, I00-I99, J30-J98, K00-K92, N00-N64, N75-N98, b b L00-L98, M00-M99, Q00-Q99, X41-X42 , X45 C00-C97
d

2. Birth asphyxia and birth trauma 3. Neonatal sepsis and infections 4. Other neonatal conditions E. Nutritional deficiencies 1. Protein-energy malnutrition 2. Iodine deficiency 3. Vitamin A deficiency 4. Iron-deficiency anaemia 5. Other nutritional disorders II. Noncommunicable diseases
a

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78

A. Malignant neoplasms 1. Mouth and oropharynx cancers 2. Oesophagus cancer 3. Stomach cancer
d d d

C00-C14 C15 C16 C18-C21 C22 C25 C33-C34 C43-C44 C50 C53
d

4. Colon and rectum cancers 5. Liver cancer 6. Pancreas cancer

7. Trachea, bronchus and lung cancers 8. Melanoma and other skin cancers 9. Breast cancer
d d d

10. Cervix uteri cancer

11. Corpus uteri cancer 12. Ovary cancer 13. Prostate cancer 14. Bladder cancer
d d d

C54-C55 C56 C61 C67
d

15. Lymphomas and multiple myeloma 16. Leukaemia
d

C81-C90, C96 C91-C95 C17, C23, C24, C26-C32, C37-C41, C45-C49, C51, C52,C57C60, C62-C66, C68-C80, C97

17. Other malignant neoplasms

World Health Organization  

Page 44

 
Code
79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 I.

GHE cause name
B. Other neoplasms C. Diabetes mellitus D. Endocrine, blood, immune disorders E. Mental and behavioural disorders 1. Unipolar depressive disorders 2. Bipolar affective disorder 3. Schizophrenia 4. Alcohol use disorders 5. Drug use disorders 6. Anxiety disorders 7. Eating disorders 8. Pervasive developmental disorders 9. Childhood behavioural disorders 10. Idiopathic intellectual disability

ICD-10 code
D00-D48 E10-E14 D55-D64 (minus D64.9), D65-D89, E03-E07, E15-E34, E65-E88 F04-F99, X41-X42 , X45 F32-F33, F34.1 F30-F31 F20-F29 F10, X45
c c c c

F11-F16, F18-F19, X41-X42 F40-F44 F50 F84 F90-F92 F70-F79

11. Other mental and behavioural disorders F. Neurological conditions 1. Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias 2. Parkinson disease 3. Epilepsy 4. Multiple sclerosis 5. Migraine 6. Non-migraine headache 7. Other neurological conditions G. Sense organ diseases 1. Glaucoma 2. Cataracts 3. Refractive errors 4. Macular degeneration 5. Other vision loss 6. Other hearing loss 7. Other sense organ disorders H. Cardiovascular diseases 1. Rheumatic heart disease 2. Hypertensive heart disease 3. Ischaemic heart disease 4. Stroke 5. Cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, endocarditis 6. Other cardiovascular diseases Respiratory diseases 1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 2. Asthma 3. Other respiratory diseases J. Digestive diseases
e e

F04-F09, F17, F34-F39 (minus F34.1), F45-F48, F51-F69, F80F83, F88-F89, F93-F99 F01-F03, G06 -G98 F01-F03, G30-G31 G20-G21 G40-G41 G35 G43 G44 G06-G12, G23-G25, G36-G37, G45-G98 H00-H61, H69-H93 H40 H25-H26 H49-H52 H35.3 H30-H35 (minus H35.3), H53-H54 H90-H91 H00-H21, H27, H43-H47, H55-H61, H69-H83, H92-H93 I00-I99 I01-I09 I10-I15 I20-I25 I60-I69 I30-I33, I38, I40, I42 I00, I26-I28, I34-I37, I44-I51, I70-I99 J30-J98 J40-J44 J45-J46 J30-J39, J47-J98 K20-K92

World Health Organization  

Page 45

 
Code
122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163

GHE cause name
1. Peptic ulcer disease 2. Cirrhosis of the liver 3. Appendicitis 4. Other digestive diseases K. Genitourinary diseases 1. Kidney diseases 2. Hyperplasia of prostate 3. Urolithiasis 4. Other genitourinary disorders 5. Infertility 6. Gynecological diseases L. Skin diseases M. Musculoskeletal diseases 1. Rheumatoid arthritis 2. Osteoarthritis 3. Gout 4. Back and neck pain 5. Other musculoskeletal disorders N. Congenital anomalies 1. Neural tube defects 2. Cleft lip and cleft palate 3. Down syndrome 4. Congenital heart anomalies 5. Other chromosomal anomalies 6. Other congenital anomalies O. Oral conditions 1. Dental caries 2. Periodontal disease 3. Edentulism III. Injuries A. Unintentional injuries 1. Road injury 2. Poisonings 3. Falls 4. Fire, heat and hot substances 5. Drownings 6. Exposure to forces of nature 7. Other unintentional injuries B. Intentional injuries 1. Self-harm 2. Interpersonal violence 3. Collective violence and legal intervention
f g f

ICD-10 code
K25-K27 K70, K74 K35-K37 K20-K22, K28-K31, K38-K66, K71-K73, K75-K92 N00-N64, N75-N76, N80-N98 N00-N19 N40 N20-N23 N25-N39, N41-N45, N47-N51 N46, N97 N60-N64, N75-N76, N80-N96, N98 L00-L98 M00-M99 M05-M06 M15-M19 M10 M45-M48, M50-M54 M00, M02, M08, M11-M13, M20-M43, M60-M99 Q00-Q99 Q00, Q05 Q35-Q37 Q90 Q20-Q28 Q91-Q99 Q01-Q04, Q06-Q18, Q30-Q34, Q38-Q89 K00-K14 K00-K04, K06-K14 K05 — V01-Y89 V01-X40, X43-X44, X46-59, Y40-Y86, Y88, Y89 V01-V04, V06, V09-V80, V87, V89, V99 X40, X43-X44, X46-X49 W00-W19 X00-X19 W65-W74 X30-X39 Rest of V, W20-W64, W75-W99, X20-X29, X50-X59, Y40-Y86, Y88, Y89 X60-Y09, Y35-Y36, Y870, Y871 X60-X84, Y870 X85-Y09, Y871 Y35-Y36

World Health Organization  

Page 46

 
—, not available

Deaths coded to “Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions” (R00-R99) are distributed proportionately to all causes within Group I and Group II.
b

a

For deaths under age 5, refer to classification in Annex Tables B and C.

As from 2006, deaths from causes F10-F19 with fourth character .0 (Acute intoxication) are coded to the category of accidental poisoning according to the updated ICD-10 instructions. Cancer deaths coded to ICD categories for malignant neoplasms of other and unspecified sites including those whose point of origin cannot be determined, and secondary and unspecified neoplasms (ICD-10 C76, C80, C97) were redistributed pro-rata across the footnoted malignant neoplasm categories within each age–sex group, so that the category “Other malignant neoplasms” includes only malignant neoplasms of other specified sites (Ref Mathers et al 2006 DCP chapter). Ischaemic heart disease deaths may be miscoded to a number of so-called cardiovascular “garbage” codes. These include heart failure, ventricular dysrhythmias, generalized atherosclerosis and ill-defined descriptions and complications of heart disease. Proportions of deaths coded to these causes were redistributed to ischaemic heart disease as described in (GPE discussion paper). Relevant ICD-10 codes are I47.2, I49.0, I46, I50, I51.4, I51.5, I51.6, I51.9 and I70.9. Injury deaths where the intent is not determined (Y10-Y34, Y872) are distributed proportionately to all causes below the group level for injuries. For countries with 3-digit ICD10 data, for “Road injury” use: V01-V04, V06, V09-V80, V87, V89 and V99. For countries with 4-digit ICD10 data, for “Road injury” use: V01.1-V01.9, V02.1-V02.9, V03.1-V03.9, V04.1-V04.9, V06.1-V06.9, V09.2, V09.3, V10.3-V10.9, V11.3-V11.9, V12.3-V12.9, V13.3V13.9, V14.3-V14.9, V15.4-V15.9, V16.4-V16.9, V17.4-V17.9, V18.4-V18.9, V19.4-V19.9, V20.3-V20.9, V21.3-V21.9, V22.3-V22.9, V23.3-V23.9, V24.3-V24.9, V25.3-V25.9, V26.3-V26.9, V27.3-V27.9, V28.3-V28.9, V29.4-V29.9, V30.4.V30.9, V31.4-V31.9, V32.4V32.9, V33.4-V33.9, V34.4-V34.9, V35.4-V35.9, V36.4-V36.9, V37.4-V37.9, V38.4-V38.9, V39.4-V39.9, V40.4-V40.9, V41.4-V41.9, V42.4-V42.9, V43.4-V43.9, V44.4-V44.9, V45.4-V45.9, V46.4-V46.9, V47.4-V47.9, V48.4-V48.9, V49.4-V49.9, V50.4-V50.9, V51.4V51.9, V52.4-V52.9, V53.4-V53.9, V54.4-V54.9, V55.4-V55.9, V56.4-V56.9, V57.4-V57.9, V58.4-V58.9, V59.4-V59.9, V60.4-V60.9, V61.4-V61.9, V62.4-V62.9, V63.4-V63.9, V64.4-V64.9, V65.4-V65.9, V66.4-V66.9, V67.4-V67.9, V68.4-V68.9, V69.4-V69.9, V70.4V70.9, V71.4-V71.9, V72.4-V72.9, V73.4-V73.9, V74.4-V74.9, V75.4-V75.9, V76.4-V76.9, V77.4-V77.9, V78.4-V78.9, V79.4-V79.9, V80.3-V80.5, V81.1, V82.1, V82.8-V82.9, V83.0-V83.3, V84.0-V84.3, V85.0-V85.3, V86.0-V86.3, V87.0-V87.9, V89.2-V89.3, V89.9, V99 and Y850.
g f e d

c

 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 47

 

Annex Table B First‐level categories for analysis of child causes of death
GBD cause name
All causes I. Communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional a conditions HIV/AIDS Diarrhoeal diseases Pertussis Tetanus Measles Meningitis/encephalitis Malaria Acute respiratory infections Prematurity Birth asphyxia & birth trauma Sepsis and other infectious conditions of the newborn Other Group I II. Noncommunicable diseases
a

ICD-10 code
A00-Y89 A00-B99, D50-D53, D64.9, E00-E02, E40-E64, G00, G03-G04, H65-H66, J00J22, J85, N30, N34, N390, N70-N73, O00-P96, U04

B20-B24 A00-A09 A37 A33-A35 B05 A39, A83-A87, G00, G03, G04 B50-B54, P37.3, P37.4 H65-H66, J00-J22, J85, P23, U04 P01.0, P01.1, P07, P22, P25-P28, P61.2, P77 P01.7-P02.1, P02.4-P02.6, P03, P10-P15, P20-P21, P24, P50, P90-P91 P35-P39 (exclude P37.3, P37.4)

Remainder C00-C97, D00-D48, D55-D64 (exclude D64.9), D65-D89, E03-E34, E65-E88, F01F99, G06-G98, H00-H61, H68-H93, I00-I99, J30-J84, J86-J98, K00-K92, L00-L98, M00-M99, N00-N28, N31-N32, N35-N64 (exclude N39.0), N75-N98, Q00-Q99 Q00-Q99 Remainder V01-Y89

Congenital anomalies Other Group II III. Injuries
a

Deaths coded to “Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions” (780-799 in ICD-9 and R00-R99 in ICD-10) are distributed proportionately to all causes within Group I and Group II.

World Health Organization  

Page 48

 

Annex Table C Re‐assignment of ICD‐10 codes for certain neonatal deaths.
 

Cause A153 A162 A165 A169 A170 A180 A320 A321 A327 A328 A329 A35 A40 A401 A402 A403 A408 A409 A41 A410 A412 A413 A415 A418 A419 B00 B000 B004 B007 B008 B009 B01 B010 B011 B012 B018 B019 B059 B060 B068 continued 

Recode P370 P370 P370 P370 P370 P370 P372 P372 P372 P372 P372 A33 P36 P360 P361 P361 P361 P361 P36 P362 P363 P368 P368 P368 P369 P35 P352 P352 P352 P352 P352 P35 P358 P358 P358 P358 P358 P358 P350 P350

Cause D649 D65 D696 D699 E101 E102 E110 E112 E116 E117 E140 E144 E145 E147 E149 E343 E86 E87 E870 E871 E872 E874 E875 E876 E877 E878 F322 F328 F329 F439 G91 G911 G912 G913 G919 G930 G931 G936 G952 I050

Recode P614 P60 D694 P549 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P702 P051 P74 P74 P742 P742 P740 P748 P743 P743 P744 P744 P914 P914 P914 P209 Q03 Q039 Q039 Q039 Q039 Q046 P219 P524 P025 Q232

Cause I471 I472 I479 I48 I490 I494 I498 I499 I50 I500 I501 I509 I517 I518 I519 I60 I603 I607 I608 I609 I61 I610 I612 I615 I616 I618 I619 I620 I629 I632 I633 I634 I635 I638 I639 I64 I671 J12 J120 J121

Recode P291 P291 P291 P29 P291 P291 P291 P291 P29 P290 P290 P290 Q248 Q248 Q249 P52 P525 P525 P525 P525 P52 P524 P524 P524 P524 P524 P524 P528 P529 P529 P529 P529 P529 P529 P529 P52 I607 P23 P230 P230

Cause J698 J70 J709 J80 J840 J841 J848 J849 J85 J850 J851 J852 J860 J869 J90 J930 J931 J938 J939 J940 J941 J942 J948 J96 J960 J961 J969 J980 J981 J982 J984 J985 J986 J988 J989 K220 K311 K44 K440 K441

Recode P249 P24 P249 P22 P258 P258 P258 P258 P28 P288 P288 P288 P288 P288 P28 P251 P251 P251 P251 P288 P288 P548 P288 P28 P285 P285 P285 P288 P281 P250 P288 P288 P288 P288 P289 Q395 Q400 Q79 Q790 Q790

Cause K760 K761 K762 K763 K767 K768 K769 K819 K82 K828 K830 K831 K838 K839 K85 K868 K869 K904 K909 K920 K922 K928 K929 N133 N139 N17 N170 N171 N172 N179 N180 N188 N189 N19 N359 N390 N433 N883 R001 R011

Recode P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P78 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P78 P788 P788 P788 P788 P540 P543 P788 P789 Q620 Q623 P96 P960 P960 P960 P960 P960 P960 P960 P96 Q643 P393 P835 P010 P209 P298

  World Health Organization  

  Page 49

  Annex Table C (continued): Re-assignment of ICD-10 codes for certain neonatal deaths.
 

Cause B069 B09 B25 B250 B251 B258 B259 B270 B370 B371 B372 B373 B374 B375 B376 B377 B378 B379 B509 B54 B582 B589 D500 D609 D62

Recode P350 P35 P35 P351 P351 P351 P351 P358 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P375 P373 P37 P371 P371 P549 D610 P61

Cause I059 I071 I080 I340 I348 I35 I350 I351 I352 I359 I370 I379 I38 I42 I420 I421 I422 I429 I442 I443 I455 I458 I459 I460 I469

Recode Q238 Q228 Q238 Q233 Q238 Q23 Q230 Q231 Q238 Q238 Q221 Q223 I42 I42 I424 Q248 I424 I424 Q246 Q246 Q246 Q246 Q246 P291 P291

Cause J128 J129 J13 J14 J15 J150 J151 J152 J153 J154 J155 J156 J157 J158 J159 J16 J18 J180 J181 J188 J189 J386 J439 J69 J690

Recode P230 P230 P23 P23 P23 P236 P235 P232 P233 P236 P234 P236 P236 P236 P236 P23 P23 P239 P239 P239 P239 Q318 P250 P24 P249

Cause K449 K561 K562 K565 K566 K57 K593 K625 K631 K633 K65 K650 K659 K660 K661 K720 K729 K732 K745 K746 K750 K752 K758 K759

Recode Q790 Q438 Q438 Q433 P769 Q43 Q431 P542 P780 P788 P78 P781 P781 Q433 P548 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788 P788

Cause R030 R040 R042 R048 R049 R05 R060 R064 R068 R090 R092 R160 R162 R230 R509 R568 R571 R58 R601 R628 R629 R630 R638 R75

Recode P292 P548 P269 P548 P548 P28 P228 P228 P228 P219 P285 Q447 Q447 Q249 P819 P90 P741 P54 P833 P059 P059 P929 P929 B24

 

World Health Organization  

Page 50

 

Annex Table D Country groupings used for regional tabulations
D.1 WHO Regions and Member States
WHO African Region Algeria,  Angola,  Benin,  Botswana,  Burkina  Faso,  Burundi,  Cameroon,  Cape  Verde,  Central  African  Republic,  Chad,  Comoros,  Congo,  Côte  d'Ivoire,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Equatorial  Guinea,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Gabon,  Gambia,  Ghana,  Guinea,  Guinea‐Bissau,  Kenya,  Lesotho,  Liberia,  Madagascar,  Malawi,  Mali,  Mauritania,  Mauritius,  Mozambique,  Namibia,  Niger,  Nigeria,  Rwanda,  Sao  Tome  and  Principe,  Senegal,  Seychelles,  Sierra  Leone,  South  Africa,  Swaziland,  Togo,  Uganda,  United  Republic  of  Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe  WHO Region of the Americas Antigua  and  Barbuda,  Argentina,  Bahamas,  Barbados,  Belize,  Bolivia  (Plurinational  State  of),  Brazil,  Canada,  Chile,  Colombia,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba,  Dominica,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  El  Salvador,  Grenada,  Guatemala,  Guyana,  Haiti,  Honduras,  Jamaica,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  Saint  Lucia,  Saint  Vincent  and  the  Grenadines,  Suriname,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  United States of America, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)   WHO South-East Asia Region Bangladesh,  Bhutan,  Democratic  People's  Republic  of  Korea,  India,  Indonesia,  Maldives,  Myanmar,  Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor‐Leste  WHO European Region Albania,  Andorra,  Armenia,  Austria,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Belgium,  Bosnia  and  Herzegovina,  Bulgaria,  Croatia,  Cyprus,    Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  France,  Georgia,  Germany,  Greece,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Luxembourg,  Malta,  Monaco,  Montenegro,  Netherlands,  Norway,  Poland,  Portugal,  Republic  of  Moldova,  Romania,  Russian  Federation,  San  Marino,  Serbia,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Spain,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  Tajikistan,   The  former  Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan  WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region Afghanistan,  Bahrain,  Djibouti,  Egypt,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Iraq,  Jordan,  Kuwait,  Lebanon,  Libya,  Morocco,  Oman,  Pakistan,  Qatar,  Saudi  Arabia,  Somalia,  South  Sudan,  Sudan,  Syrian  Arab  Republic,  Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen  WHO Western Pacific Region Australia,  Brunei  Darussalam,  Cambodia,  China,  Cook  Islands,  Fiji,  Japan,  Kiribati,  Lao  People's  Democratic  Republic,  Malaysia,  Marshall  Islands,  Micronesia  (Federated  States  of),  Mongolia,  Nauru,  New  Zealand,  Niue,  Palau,  Papua  New  Guinea,  Philippines,  Republic  of  Korea,  Samoa,  Singapore,  Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam   

World Health Organization  

Page 51

 

D.2 Countries grouped by WHO Region and average income per capita*
High income Andorra,  Australia,  Austria,  Bahamas,  Bahrain,  Barbados,  Belgium,  Brunei  Darussalam  Canada,  Croatia,  Cyprus,   Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  France,  Germany  Greece,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Japan,  Kuwait,  Luxembourg,  Malta,  Monaco,  Netherlands,  ,New  Zealand,  Norway,  Oman,  Poland,  Portugal,  Qatar,  Republic  of  Korea,  Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  San  Marino,  Saudi  Arabia,  Singapore,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Spain,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  United  Arab  Emirates,  United  Kingdom, United States of America  Low and middle income WHO African Region Algeria,  Angola,  Benin,  Botswana,  Burkina  Faso,  Burundi,  Cameroon,  Cape  Verde,  Central  African  Republic,  Chad,  Comoros,  Congo,  Côte  d'Ivoire,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Equatorial  Guinea**,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Gabon,  Gambia,  Ghana,  Guinea,  Guinea‐Bissau,  Kenya,  Lesotho,  Liberia,  Madagascar,  Malawi,  Mali,  Mauritania,  Mauritius,  Mozambique,  Namibia,  Niger,  Nigeria,  Rwanda,  Sao  Tome  and  Principe,  Senegal,  Seychelles,  Sierra  Leone,  South  Africa,  Swaziland,  Togo,  Uganda,  United  Republic  of  Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe  WHO Region of the Americas Antigua  and  Barbuda,  Argentina,  Belize,  Bolivia  (Plurinational  State  of),  Brazil,  Chile,  Colombia,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba,  Dominica,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  El  Salvador,  Grenada  Guatemala,  Guyana,  Haiti,  Honduras,  Jamaica,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Saint  Lucia,  Saint  Vincent  and  the  Grenadines, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)  WHO South-East Asia Region Bangladesh,  Bhutan,  Democratic  People's  Republic  of  Korea,  India,  Indonesia,  Maldives,  Myanmar,  Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor‐Leste  WHO European Region Albania,  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Bosnia  and  Herzegovina,  Bulgaria,  Georgia,  Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Montenegro,  Republic  of  Moldova,  Romania,  Russian  Federation,  Serbia,  Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan  WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region Afghanistan,  Djibouti,  Egypt,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Iraq,  Jordan,  Lebanon,  Libya,  Morocco,  Pakistan,  Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Yemen  WHO Western Pacific Region Cambodia,  China,  Cook  Islands,  Fiji,  Kiribati,  Lao  People's  Democratic  Republic,  Malaysia,  Marshall  Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Nauru, Niue, Palau ,Papua New Guinea, Philippines,  Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam 
*  This  regional  grouping  classifies  WHO  Member  States  according  to  the  World  Bank  income  categories  for  the  year  2011  (World Bank list of economies, July 2012) and the WHO region.  ** Equatorial Guinea is classified by the World Bank  as high income, it is kept here with upper middle income to avoid a  regional grouping containing only one country and because its mortality profile is not dissimilar to neighbouring countries.

World Health Organization  

Page 52

 

D.3 World Bank income grouping*
Low income Afghanistan,  Bangladesh,  Benin,  Burkina  Faso,  Burundi,  Cambodia,  Central  African  Republic,  Chad  Comoros,  Democratic  People's  Republic  of  Korea,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia  Gambia, Guinea, Guinea‐Bissau, Haiti, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania,  Mozambique,  Myanmar,  Nepal,  Niger  Rwanda,  Sierra  Leone,  Somalia,  Tajikistan,  Togo,  Uganda,  United  Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe  Lower middle income Albania,  Armenia,  Belize,  Bhutan,  Bolivia  (Plurinational  State  of),  Cameroon,  Cape  Verde,  Congo,  Côte  d'Ivoire,  Djibouti,  Egypt,  El  Salvador,  Fiji,  Georgia,  Ghana,  Guatemala,  Guyana,  Honduras,  India,  Indonesia,  Iraq,  Kiribati,  Lao  People's  Democratic  Republic,  Lesotho,  Marshall  Islands,  Micronesia  (Federated  States  of),  Mongolia,  Morocco,  Nicaragua,  Nigeria,  Pakistan,  Papua  New  Guinea,  Paraguay,  Philippines,  Republic  of  Moldova,  Samoa,  Sao  Tome  and  Principe,  Senegal,  Solomon  Islands,  South  Sudan,  Sri  Lanka,  Sudan,  Swaziland,  Syrian  Arab  Republic,  Timor‐Leste,  Tonga,  Ukraine,  Uzbekistan,  Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Yemen Zambia  Upper middle income Algeria,  Angola,  Antigua  and  Barbuda,  Argentina,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Bosnia  and  Herzegovina,  Botswana,  Brazil,  Bulgaria,  Chile,  China,  Colombia,  Cook  Islands,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba,  Dominica,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  Equatorial  Guinea**,  Gabon,  Grenada,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Jamaica,  Jordan,  Kazakhstan,  Latvia,  Lebanon,  Libya,  Lithuania,  Malaysia,  Maldives,  Mauritius,  Mexico  Montenegro,  Namibia, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Panama,  Peru, Romania, Russian Federation,  Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent  and  the  Grenadines,  Serbia,  Seychelles,  South  Africa,  Suriname,  Thailand,  The  former  Yugoslav  Republic  of  Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)  High income Andorra,  Australia,  Austria,  Bahamas,  Bahrain,  Barbados,  Belgium,  Brunei  Darussalam  Canada,  Croatia,  Cyprus,   Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  France,  Germany  Greece,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Japan,  Kuwait,  Luxembourg,  Malta,  Monaco,  Netherlands,  ,New  Zealand,  Norway,  Oman,  Poland,  Portugal,  Qatar,  Republic  of  Korea,  Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  San  Marino,  Saudi  Arabia,  Singapore,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Spain,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  United  Arab  Emirates,  United  Kingdom, United States of America   
* This regional grouping classifies WHO Member States according to the World Bank income categories for the year 2011  (World Bank list of economies, July 2012)  ** Equatorial Guinea is classified by the World Bank  as high income, it is kept here with upper middle income to avoid a  regional grouping containing only one country and because its mortality profile is not dissimilar to neighbouring countries.

 

World Health Organization  

Page 53

 

D.4 World Bank Regions
High income Andorra,  Australia,  Austria,  Bahamas,  Bahrain,  Barbados,  Belgium,  Brunei  Darussalam  Canada,  Croatia,  Cyprus,   Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  France,  Germany  Greece,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Japan,  Kuwait,  Luxembourg,  Malta,  Monaco,  Netherlands,  ,New  Zealand,  Norway,  Oman,  Poland,  Portugal,  Qatar,  Republic  of  Korea,  Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  San  Marino,  Saudi  Arabia,  Singapore,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Spain,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  United  Arab  Emirates,  United  Kingdom, United States of America  East Asia and Pacific Cambodia,  China,  Cook  Islands,  Democratic  People's  Republic  of  Korea,  Fiji,  Indonesia,  Kiribati,  Lao  People's  Democratic  Republic,  Malaysia,  Marshall  Islands,  Micronesia  (Federated  States  of),  Mongolia,  Myanmar,  Nauru,  Niue,  Palau,  Papua  New  Guinea,  Philippines,  Samoa,  Solomon  Islands,  Thailand,  Timor‐Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam  Europe and Central Asia Albania,  Armenia,  Azerbaijan,  Belarus,  Bosnia  and  Herzegovina,  Bulgaria,  Georgia,  Kazakhstan,  Kyrgyzstan,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Montenegro  Republic  of  Moldova,  Romania,  Russian  Federation,  Serbia,  Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan  Latin America and Caribbean Antigua  and  Barbuda,  Argentina,  Belize,  Bolivia  (Plurinational  State  of),  Brazil,  Chile,  Colombia,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba,  Dominica,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  El  Salvador,  Grenada,  Guatemala,  Guyana,  Haiti,  Honduras,  Jamaica,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Saint  Lucia,  Saint  Vincent  and  the  Grenadines, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)  Middle East and North Africa Algeria,  Djibouti,  Egypt,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Iraq,  Jordan,  Lebanon  ,Libya,  Morocco,  Syrian  Arab  Republic, Tunisia, Yemen  South Asia Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka  Sub-Saharan Africa Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad,  Comoros,  Congo,  Côte  d'Ivoire,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Equatorial  Guinea**,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Gabon,  Gambia,  Ghana,  Guinea,  Guinea‐Bissau,  Kenya,  Lesotho,  Liberia,  Madagascar,  Malawi,  Mali,  Mauritania,  Mauritius,  Mozambique,  Namibia,  Niger,  Nigeria,  Rwanda,  Sao  Tome  and  Principe,  Senegal,  Seychelles,  Sierra  Leone,  Somalia,  South  Africa,  South  Sudan,  Sudan,  Swaziland,  Togo,  Uganda,  United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe    
** Equatorial Guinea is classified by the World Bank  as high income, it is kept here with upper middle income to avoid a  regional grouping containing only one country and because its mortality profile is not dissimilar to neighbouring countries.

  World Health Organization  

  Page 54

 

D.5 Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Regions
Developed regions Albania,  Andorra,  Australia,  Austria,  Belarus,  Belgium,  Bosnia  and  Herzegovina,  Bulgaria,  Canada,  Croatia,  Cyprus,  Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Estonia,  Finland,  France,  Germany,  Greece,  Hungary,  Iceland,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Japan,  Latvia,  Lithuania,  Luxembourg,  Malta,  Monaco,  Montenegro,  Netherlands,  New  Zealand,  Norway,  Poland,  Portugal,  Republic  of  Moldova,  Romania,  Russian  Federation,  San  Marino,  Serbia,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Spain,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  The  former  Yugoslav  Republic  of  Macedonia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States of America  Developing regions Caucasus and Central Asia Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan  Eastern Asia China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Mongolia, Republic of Korea Latin America and the Caribbean Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Chile,  Colombia,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba,  Dominica,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  El  Salvador,  Grenada,  Guatemala,  Guyana,  Haiti,  Honduras,  Jamaica,  Mexico,  Nicaragua,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  Saint  Lucia,  Saint  Vincent  and  the  Grenadines,  Suriname,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  Uruguay,  Venezuela  (Bolivarian Republic of)  Northern Africa Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia Oceania Cook  Islands,  Fiji,  Kiribati,  Marshall  Islands,  Micronesia  (Federated  States  of),  Nauru,  Niue,  Palau,  Papua  New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu  South-eastern Asia Brunei  Darussalam,  Cambodia,  Indonesia,  Lao  People's  Democratic  Republic,  Malaysia,  Myanmar,  Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor‐Leste, Viet Nam  Southern Asia Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka  Sub-Saharan Africa Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad,  Comoros,  Congo,  Côte  d'Ivoire,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Djibouti,  Equatorial  Guinea,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Gabon,  Gambia,  Ghana,  Guinea,  Guinea‐Bissau,  Kenya,  Lesotho,  Liberia,  Madagascar,  Malawi,  Mali,  Mauritania,  Mauritius,  Mozambique,  Namibia,  Niger,  Nigeria,  Rwanda,  Sao  Tome  and  Principe,  Senegal,  Seychelles,  Sierra  Leone,  Somalia,  South  Africa,  South  Sudan,  Sudan,  Swaziland,  Togo,  Uganda,  United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe  Western Asia Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar Saudi Arabia, Syrian Arab  Republic, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Yemen World Health Organization   Page 55

 

Annex Table E Mapping of India MDS categories to GHE causes
 MDS  Cause  1A01  1B01  1B02  1C01  1D01  1E01  1E02  1E03  1F01  1F02  1G01  1H01  1I01  1I02  1I03  1I04  1I05  1J01  1K01  1K02  1L01  1M01  1M02  1M03  1M04  1M05  1M06  1N01  1N02  1N03  1O01  1O02  1P01  Million Death Study Cause Category  Tuberculosis  Syphilis  Other  sexually  transmitted  infections  (excl. HIV/AIDS)   HIV/AIDS  Diarrhoeal diseases   Tetanus  Measles  Other vaccine preventable diseases  Meningitis/encephalitis  Rabies  Hepatitis  Malaria  Protozoal diseases   Leprosy  Arthropod‐borne viral fevers   Trachoma  Helminthiases  Acute respiratory infections  Severe Systemic Infection  Severe Localized Infection  Other infectious diseases  Maternal haemorrhage  Maternal sepsis  Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy  Obstructed labour  Abortion  Other maternal conditions  Low birth weight/preterm  Birth asphyxia and birth trauma  Other perinatal conditions  Protein‐energy malnutrition  Iron,  vitamin  deficiencies  nutritional anaemias  Fever of unknown origin  and  GHE  causes  3  5  9  10  11  16  15  13, 14  17, 18  32  19, 20  22  26  29  30  31  34  39‐41  37  37  37  43  44  45  46  47  48  50  51  52, 53  55  56‐59  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Redistributed pro‐rata across infectious disease categories  Apportioned using WHO‐CHERG cause fractions  Acute bacterial sepsis  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  WHO malaria mortality estimates used  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Other STDs estimated according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Comment   

  Communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions 

 

Noncommunicable diseases  2A  2B01  2C01   Neoplasms  Diabetes mellitus  Endocrine and immune disorders  62‐79  80  81  Replaced by WHO/IARC cancer estimates 

World Health Organization  

Page 56

 
2D01  2D02  Epilepsy  Other neuropsychiatric disorders  97  83‐93,  95,  96,  98‐101  133  135‐139  103‐109  150  111  113  112  114  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions 

2F01  2F02  2F03  2F04  2G01  2G02  2G03  2G04  2G05  2G06  2H01  2H02  2J01  2J02 

Skin diseases  Musculoskeletal disorders  Sense organ disorders  Oral conditions  Rheumatic heart disease  Ischaemic heart diseases  Hypertensive heart diseases  Cerebrovascular disease  Heart failure  Other cardiovascular diseases  Asthma  and  chronic  pulmonary disease  obstructive 

 
115, 116  118, 119  120  122  86,  123,  125, 154  124, 125   127  128‐132  141‐146 

Redistributed pro‐rata across cardiovascular cause categories excluding  cerebrovascular disease  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions 

Other chronic respiratory diseases  Gastro‐oesophageal diseases  Lliver and alcohol related diseases 

Apportioned  to  alcohol  use  disorders,  liver  cirrhosis,  other  gastrointestinal, and accidental poisoning according to GBD 2010 cause  fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions 

2J03  2K01  2K02  2L01   Injuries  3A01  3A02  3A03  3A04  3A05  3A06  3A07  3B01  3B02  3C01 

Other digestive diseases  Nephritis and nephrosis  Other genitourinary system diseases  Congenital anomalies 

Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions  Apportioned to according to GBD 2010 cause fractions 

Transport accidents  Poisonings  Falls  Fires  Drownings  Venomous snakes, animals and plants  Other unintentional injuries  Self‐inflicted injuries (suicide)  War,  violence  and  other  intentional  injuries  Undetermined Intent 

153, 159  154  155  156  157  159  159  161  162 

Non‐road transport injury estimated using GBD 2010 analysis 

Redistributed pro‐rata across intentional & unintentional injury causes. 

 Symptoms, signs and Ill‐defined conditions  4A01  4A02  4A03  Senility  Other  Ill‐defined  and  abnormal  findings  Unspecified deaths  Redistributed pro‐rata across non‐injury cause categories.  Redistributed pro‐rata across non‐injury cause categories.  Redistributed pro‐rata across all cause categories. 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 57

 

Annex Table F Methods used for estimation of child and adult mortality levels, and causes of death, by country, 2000‐2011
  Mortality method groups: A:   B:   Life tables based on death rates computed from vital registration data.    Projection  of  life  table  parameters  l5  and  l60  from  adjusted  vital  registration  data,  smoothed  with  moving  average,  projected  using  modified  logit  system  with  latest  available  year's  lx  as  standard;  child mortality from the UN‐IGME.    Life tables based on death rates computed from neighbouring regional vital registration data.  Life  tables  based  on  UNPD’s  World  Population  Prospects  –  the  2010  revision,  and  child  mortality  estimates from the UN‐IGME.    Life  tables  based  on  UNPD’s  World  Population  Prospects  –  the  2010  revision,  updated  with  the  latest HIV/AIDS mortality from UNAIDS and child mortality estimates from the UN‐IGME.   Life  tables  using  method  E  together  with  unpublished  draft  updates  provided  by  UN  Population  Division (see text). 

C:   D:   E:   F:  

Abbreviations VA  VR  Verbal autopsy  Vital (death) registration 

Note  (a):  WHO  and  UN  Interagency  cause‐specific  estimates  for  all  Member  States  as  documented  in  Section X above. 
 

Country Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus

All-cause mortality method F A D C E A B A B B A B B D B B

Under 5 child cause of death method VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VR data VR multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data

Latest available VR data

Average useability 2000+

2004

55%

        2010  2011  2011  2011  2007 

79%  66%  95%  90%  84% 

2009 

88% 

World Health Organization  

Page 58

 
All-cause mortality method B B E D D B E A A B E E D E B A E E B Latest available VR data Average useability 2000+

Country Belgium Belize Benin Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Chile

Under 5 child cause of death method VR data VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data National VA model based on subnational Chinese studies only VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR data VR data VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VR multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data

2009     

88%     

2010    2011 

76%    79% 

2009        2009    2009        2011    2011  2010  2011  2011 

94%        94%    89%        87%    87%  90%  73%  88% 

China Colombia Comoros Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic People's Republic of Korea Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt

F A D E B A E B B B B D E B E B A A B

GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a)

2011 

87% 

2010  2011 

59%  61% 

World Health Organization  

Page 59

 
All-cause mortality method A E E B E D B B E E A B E B B A E E A E D B B A D D D B B B A B D A E A B A D Latest available VR data Average useability 2000+

Country El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Grenada Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic

Under 5 child cause of death method VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR data State-level Indian-specific VA model VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR data VR multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a)

2009 

58% 

2011      2011  2009 

94%      97%  85% 

2010  2011    2010  2009   

53%  87%    75%  73%   

2011  2009          2010  2010  2010    2011    2010      2011  2010   

94%  94%          94%  90%  90%    89%    83%      87%  90%   

World Health Organization  

Page 60

 
All-cause mortality method B D E E D B B D E A A E B A D B B D C B B D E D D D B B A D E A B D D B A D A A Latest available VR data Average useability 2000+

Country Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Lithuania Luxembourg Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia (Federated States of) Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay

Under 5 child cause of death method VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a)

2010   

92%   

2010 

94% 

2011  2010      2009   

90%  95%      70%   

2011  2009          2011        2009     

86%  97%          89%        80%     

World Health Organization  

Page 61

 
All-cause mortality method A B B B B B B B E B B B D B D D D B B E B B B D D A #N/A B A D B E B B D A A B D Latest available VR data Average useability 2000+

Country Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Republic of Korea Republic of Moldova Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Tajikistan Thailand The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Timor-Leste

Under 5 child cause of death method VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR multicause models VR data VR data VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR data VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR data VR data VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR data VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a)

  2008  2011  2011  2009  2011  2011  2011  2010 

  83%  74%  82%  74%  85%  88%  92%  95% 

2011      2011  2010  2010      2009  2011  2006      2010  2010 

72%      74%  94%  89%      68%  89%  55%      89%  89% 

2006  2010   

48%  84%   

World Health Organization  

Page 62

 
All-cause mortality method E A B A D A A E B D B E B B A D A D D E E Latest available VR data Average useability 2000+

Country Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United Republic of Tanzania United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

Under 5 child cause of death method VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VA multicause models VR multicause models VR multicause models VR data VA multicause models VR data VR data VA multicause models VR multicause models VR data VR multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models VA multicause models

Cause of death methods for ages 5+ GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data VR data VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) VR data GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a) GBD 2010 plus (a)

    2008            2011    2010    2008  2009  2009  2009 

    95%            96%    93%    93%  83%  86%  86% 

 

World Health Organization  

Page 63

 

Annex Table G Methods used to estimate road traffic deaths for 182 participating countries
 
Country
Afghanistan Albania Andorra Angola Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bhutan Bolivia (Plurinational State of) Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia

Group
4 4 3 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 1

Method
Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Regression estimate Projected death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Death registration data Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Death registration data Death registration data (refer to section 3.5) Projected death registration data

Latest VR data

2009

2006 2010 2007 2008 2009

2008 2009 2006 2009

2009 2009 2010

2010

2010 2010 2008

World Health Organization  

Page 64

 

Country
Comoros Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Korea People's Republic of

Group
4 4 3 1 4 1 1 1 1 4 4 1 3 4 1 1 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 2 4

Method
Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Projected death registration data Death registration data Death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Projected death registration data Reported deaths (small population) Regression estimate Projected death registration data Death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Regression estimate Projected death registration data Death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Projected death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate projected from 2001-2003 data (32, 33) Regression estimate

Latest VR data

2010

2010 2009 2010 2010

Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia

2006 2010

2009 2010 2009

2010

2010 2010 2008

2009 2010

2009 2009

2008

2010 2009 2010

World Health Organization  

Page 65

 

Country
Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Lithuania Luxembourg Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia (Federated States of) Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands

Group
2 4 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 4 3 1 1 4 1 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 3 4 1 1 3 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1

Method
Projected death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Projected reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Reported deaths(replacing death registration estimate) Regression estimate Death registration data Reported deaths (small population) Regression estimate Death registration data Projected reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Reported deaths (small population) Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Regression estimate Death registration data

Latest VR data
2006

2010 2009 2009 2006 2010

2010

2009 2009

2010

2010 2009

2008

2010

2010 2010

2009

2010

World Health Organization  

Page 66

 

Country
New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Republic of Korea Republic of Moldova Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands South Africa Spain

Group
1 4 4 4 3 1 1 4 3 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 3 4 3 4 4 4 1 3 4 1 1 1 4 1 1

Method
Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Death registration data Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Projected death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Death registration data Death registration data Death registration data Projected death registration data Death registration data Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Reported deaths (replacing death registration estimate) Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Projected death registration data Reported deaths (small population) Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Regression estimate Death registration data Reported deaths (small population) Regression estimate Death registration data Death registration data Death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Reported deaths (replacing death registration est.)

Latest VR data
2008

2010 2010

2009

2009

2008 2010 2010 2010 2009 2010 2010 2010

2008 2006 2010

2010 2009

2010 2010 2010

2009 2009

World Health Organization  

Page 67

 

Country
Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Tajikistan Thailand The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Timor-Leste Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United Republic of Tanzania United States of America Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) Viet Nam West Bank and Gaza Strip Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

Group
4 4 1 4 1 1 4 4 2 1 4 4 3 1 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 2 1 4 4 1

Method
Regression estimate Regression estimate Projected death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Projected death registration data Death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (small population) Projected death registration data Regression estimate Regression estimate Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Projected death registration data Regression estimate Projected death registration data Projected national verbal autopsy survey data Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate) Regression estimate Regression estimate Reported deaths (replacing regression estimate)

Latest VR data

2009

2010 2007

2008 2010

2007

2010

2010

2008 2009 2005

2007 2006 2010

   

World Health Organization  

Page 68