You are on page 1of 26

Glossary of Dance Terms and Common Abbreviations Steps, Actions, and Other Notation Acknowledge Description

Recognize your partner with an implied "thank you for gracing me with your company." One standard acknowledgement is an "apart, point." A bit more oldfashioned is the bow and curtsey. Nowadays, we are more and more seeing "together, touch" or "together and shape" or "gather her to closed" (which are much the same thing); box finish; and off we dance. Movement across the direction of dance. The step is taken in front of or behind the supporting foot (usually with "contra" body movement - see below). A movement that does not involve a step or a change of weight, such as a bow, kick, or hip twist. Modifying the size of the step, the amount of turn, or any other feature in order to achieve grace and comfort. One adjusts to the movements of one's partner and in preparation for the next figure. In the air. A position in which the foot is raised from the floor. Low = level with ankle; Medium = level with calf; High = level with knee. Flex supporting knee, extend free foot and point toe, and move free foot forward or back in an arc above the floor. Rondes may be done low, medium, high (see above), or you can raise the foot as far off the floor as conditions allow. In the timing of dance steps and actions, an "a" represents only 1/4 beat. In a fast jive, a basic rock is danced "1, 2, 3/a, 4; 1/a, 2, The third step (count 3) is quick, only 3/4 of a beat, but the fourth step (the "a") really allows you to take only partial weight before you have to bounce off and into the fifth step (count 4). If an "&" is very quick (see below), then an "a" is very very quick.

Across Action Adjust

Aerial Aerial Ronde

Ah

Alignment

The direction of a step or figure in relation to the room (e.g., LOD). Consider alignment in contrast to foot position, which is the direction of a step in relation to the other foot (e.g., forward, side, back). A turn under raised joined hands. In Germany in the 1500s there was a popular dance called the Allemande that used these turns. Was this the source of our Alemana? A sequence of two or more figures. A category of American-style dances in ballroom competitions. It includes cha, rumba, swing, bolero, and mambo. This category loosely corresponds to the Latin category of International Style ballroom, although the dances differ somewhat. A category of American-style dances in ballroom competitions. It includes waltz, tango, foxtrot, and Viennese waltz. This category loosely corresponds to the Ballroom (or Standard) category of International Style. However, unlike ballroom, it allows dancers to open and separate while dancing. A style of ballroom dancing developed in the United States that contrasts with International (or English) Style. It consists of two categories: American Smooth and American Rhythm.

Allemande (ahl-mahnd) Amalgamation American Rhythm

American Smooth

American Style

American Tango And Apart Arch

One of the Smooth Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. In the timing of dance steps and actions, an "&" represents half a beat. A cha measure might be danced 1, 2, 3/&, 4; a step on an "&" count is very quick. Step away from partner and shift weight to that foot without progression. (cf. Away) A hand movement in which the man's and woman's designated hands are joined higher than the head in preparation for one or both partners to pass under the joined hands. One of the Latin Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. To continue a circular pattern in the direction of movement to a specified ending position and facing direction. Lean outside your base of support and rotate the upper body in a broader arc than in a body roll. An individual movement turning from the partner with some progression. (cf. Apart) Step in the direction opposite to that in which you are facing and shift weight to that foot. (In a facing position, the woman would step forward.) The part of the foot just behind the toes. When dancing "up" one would step, "ballflat." Quickly step on ball of free foot and close again on newly free foot; two changes of weight in one beat of music. The correct distribution of the weight of the body when dancing. Standing or moving so that the body is carried in the most economical and graceful manner. (Also a figure used in various rhythms.) Sometimes called Standard, a category of International Style dances in ballroom competitions. It includes waltz, tango, foxtrot, quickstep, and Viennese waltz. This category loosely corresponds to the Smooth category of American Style, although in Ballroom, dancers are always in closed position. One of many possible dance positions. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. A short section of music in the regularly recurring rhythm, usually marked by an initial stronger accent and then one, two, three, or more lesser accents. For instance, a waltz measure consists of one strong downbeat and two lesser beats: 1, 2, 3; 1, 2, 3; A beat or count is one unit or accent in the recurring rhythm of a piece of music. In most dance music, you can count four instances of emphasis per measure. Waltz beats recur in groups of three. One foot or person crossing or standing in back of the other. Gently adjusting to a new dance position. For instance, the cue might be "back half box blending to sidecar." You would dance the half box in closed position and slightly adjust so that you end the figure in sidecar position. Press the finger-tips to your lips, and then move your hand toward your partner, extending the fingers, as if wafting the kiss toward her or him. An alternative acknowledgement at the end of a dance; from open position, you might step side, -,

Argentine Tango Around Around the World Away Back (backward) Ball Ball Change Balance

Ballroom

Banjo Position Bar or Measure

Beat

Behind Blend, blending

Blow A Kiss

rear back with your head.and blow a kiss. Bounce Bow A quick rising and falling movement. A part of the dance routine. hips. One of many possible dance positions. Bolero Banjo Position Bolero Position Bolero Sidecar Position One of many possible dance positions. The first step is typically taken on the first beat and held during the second beat. You lower. One of many possible dance positions. The man stands with his feet together. bring your hips back. toes slightly apart (1st position). Finally. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. and don't get carried away and make the spitting sound. and move your head forward slightly. also considered Latin in round dancing. . and inclines his body gently toward the lady. Now. move the torso back. but it can look like a smooth ripple starting low at your feet and moving steadily up your body I remember one teacher focusing on the middle part of the ripple and saying that you should pretend that you have backed up with your hips against the edge of a low shelf. with two more steps falling on beats three and four. This dance is quite different from the other American Rhythm dances in that it requires not only Cuban motion but also rise and fall and contra-body movement. Another of our teachers suggested that the upper part of the ripple might look like you are spitting watermelon seeds. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. more typically found in dances such as waltz. Yet another style is to cross the left arm in front at the waist and the right arm in back. For a more polished bow. and draw the right arm across the body at waist level as you incline forward.4. connecting major parts of the dance. as you try for good distance. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. hands at his sides. Body Roll Bolero Lean outside your base of support and rotate the upper body in a broad arc. close right to left with right heel to left instep (3rd position). move your knees back. and move your hips forward. Over one measure of music (1. and then throw your head forward. usually on the beat or to a syncopated rhythm. One of the five competition dances in American Rhythm.) you might gracefully present knees.2. Body Ripple or Body Wave Lower your body by flexing your knees. not more than two measures. head. and then step into the next measure. This of course moves your knees forward. — For more.3. This is kind of a tough one. -. step to the side with the left foot. But the head movement is very small. Next. and then slide them back off again. raise your hips up as if you were trying to put them on the shelf. Break Bridge Release your position or hand hold. torso. and move your torso forward.

Quickly close free foot and pont new free foot to side. putting each dancer exactly where the partner used to be. Sometimes progression is involved and dancers move from the inside of the circle to the outside and visa versa. Châiné turns are sharp. toward the center of the room. but we certainly should make use of foot rise so our turns can occur comfortably on the balls of the feet. Transfer body weight from one foot to the other. underturned spiral turn. stretch trail side of body forcefully and so rise and sway toward supported foot. The basic movement in ballet is done en pointe and with alternating forward and closing steps. close. hold. You are stroking the free foot against the floor but also against the supporting foot. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. no weight change. repeated half turns taken on alternating steps and so progressing across the floor. Partners exchange places to a desiganted position. sometimes like a quick. the woman turns under joined hands during the change. we dance 123&4. The direction to the left. Sometimes. A step in which you check your motion and lower into the supporting knee such that the thigh is close to horizontal.Broken Sway Brush Lean or tilt the body from the waist upward.g.Other combinations of forward and closing steps can also be used (e. An aggressive Promenade Sway. The act of transferring weight from one foot to the other. round dancers will not be en pointe. taking two steps in a three-beat measure. lead arms up. step. Of course. If you want to carefully preserve your balance. looking out. There is no weight change unless separately cued. step side and forward on the lead foot. and so describing something like the links of a chain. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. In round dancing. Touch the ball of the free foot to the floor and move it short distance toward supporting foot or move it against the supporting foot. but this change could occur along the line of dance or along a diagonal. Sometimes the change is quite precise. close. as one faces line of dance. usually step. You may brush forward or back. — For more. Bump Butterfly Position Buzz Canter Center Cha Cha Châiné Turn (pronounced shin-ay) Chair Challenge Line Change Feet Change of Weight Change Point Change Sides . and so is sharp and with less progression than a turn or roll that is spread more evenly over the three steps of a measure. The chaine turn is something like a riff turn in bolero. A "touch" is an action with one foot that does not involve a change of weight. all turns to the left or all to the right. Particularly in waltz. you may come close but not actually touch. Rotate on the ball of the supporting foot by pushing with the free foot. Done as one movement in one beat of music. This rhythm was developed from syncopation of the fourth beat: 234&1. roll your hips toward your partner and gently touch hip to hip. One of many possible dance positions. May be done solo or as a couple. Standing side by side. forward). It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrin in 1953. In Promenade position (semi-closed). One of the five dances in both American Rhythm and Latin competitions.

To finish or end. a comma indicates the end of one beat of music. Used in several different rhythms. side. One of many possible dance positions. and usually rotate the body. and ends during yet another Commence Complete Continue . One might clap on certain beats of the music to mark time. a chasse is any step-close-step (not only to the side and facing partner). The arrangement of steps.Change Sway Chase Chasse (shah-say) From any swayed position. and step or take weight. and patterns into a routine to match the phrasing of a piece of music. bk. side. quick. Woman looks left over the man's right shoulder. -. causing the feet to slide back. We sometimes speak of a forward chasse: fwd/cl. 3. One who creates and arranges dance routines. The man leads her to "close her head" with a little right sway. quick. or a back chasse: bk/cl. "fwd. side. the chasse will be used as the last part of a full-measure figure consisting of one step and then the chasse. turning. Bring the palms of your hands together to make a sharp sound. and then close left to right — a forward waltz. close. over 1 1/2 measures. the typical marching tempo renders the chasse as. the Progressive Chasse is timed. tilt in the other direction. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. close. and others. Move forward. Used when a turn or action is begun on one beat of music and finished during another beat. 1. A turn in which the second or third step is a closing step. fwd. as on the circumference of a circle. we speak of the ronde chasse. Check Checking Choreographer Choreography Chug Circle Clap Clockwise Close Closed Head Closed Position Closed Turn Comma A step in which you stop and prepare to change direction. Often." represents three dance steps on three beats of music. close. To start or begin. cl. no additional step. In paso doble. In waltz. One partner pursues the other. With weight on both feet. bend the knees and then straighten sharply. The process of stopping and getting ready to change direction. Used when a turn or action is begun on one beat of music and completed during another beat. Used when a turn or action is begun on one beat of music. the timing would be. One foot "chases" the other. In cha. slow. stretch the opposite side of the body. To proceed or to keep going. For instance. perhaps a waltz measure: step forward on the left foot. -. 2/&. fwd. Contributes to body "fall. the timing would be. the hip-twist chasse. usually in two beats of music: side/close. or step in place. quick/&. In abbreviated descriptions of dance steps (as opposed to complete sentences). Turning to the right Bring the free foot to the supporting foot. quick. the chasse consists of three steps. continues through at least one additional beat. In foxtrot. slow. forward right. In quickstep. More broadly. -. side. side. slow." typical of waltz. change head position (look the other way). figures.

Turning to the left One of many possible dance positions. rec R. but instead of the two-step timeing of qqs. but it had one additional step in the middle (the last & in the first measure): 1&2&3&4&. which used the same two measures as a normal. qqs. (rk sd L. you can count four instances of emphasis per measure. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. rec L. When you step forward right. In Bailamos. cha. XRIF (W XLIF). A count or beat is one unit or accent in the recurring rhythm of a piece of music. Depending upon the dance position and footwork specified. rk sd R. turn right with left shoulder leading.) One of many possible dance positions.beat. In all dance movements. The position your body is in at the end of Contra Body Movement. Two dancers who are partners in a round dance. hips. Continuous An adjective that usually means that steps have been added to the figure being defined and/or the figure is to be executed more quickly. Contrary or Contra Body Movement Position Core Corte Count Counter Clockwise Counter Promenade Position (=Reverse Semi-Closed Position) Counterpart Couple Cross Cross In Back Cross In Front . sd L." The group of muscles in the center of the body. Leave the free leg extended. lower and upper back. the Gosses used Countinuous Double Cubans. Contra Banjo Position Contra Sidecar Position One of many possible dance positions. they used merengue timeing of qqqq. and inner thighs. the beats per measure. encompassing the abdomen." which also take the normal two measures. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. Also. the core must be engaged. turn left with left shoulder back. the DeFores used "Continuous Doors. In La Pura. qqqq. 1&2&3&4. buttocks. take weight. Beginning dancers often have a hard time finding the core in their bodies and engaging it. In most dance music. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. It also creates graceful body lines. CBM puts a twist in your body. but the whole body turns. lowering into that knee and swaying to the right ("dip"). Use CBMP during a Contra Check—you are not turning but are using right-side lead to create the contra body position. In closed position. Use CBM during a Natural Turn (compare CBMP below). Sometimes called "center. Double Cubans. It facilitates smooth turning movements. instead of two. Step in front or behind the supporting foot and beyond the supporting foot such that the thighs cross. Step in front of supporting foot and take weight. the man steps back and to the side. making the figure 2 1/2 measures. Step in back of supporting foot and take weight. Waltz beats recur in groups of three. Contrary or Contra Body Movement Turning the body toward the moving foot. When you step back right. XLIF (W XRIF). A Continuous Hover Cross is a foxtrot figure that has two extra quicks in the middle of a normal Hover Cross. Think also of shoulder or hip leading. cls R. The static position in which one foot is forward or back and the opposite side of the body is turned in that position. Refers to the woman's part. the woman uses the same or opposite foot as the man and moves in the same or opposite direction.

crossing thighs and with a little swagger. A person who prompts round dancers by naming the steps.. The woman will have stepped forward on her right foot. You might begin facing diagonal wall and dance forward. if you are in open position. The Prostrate Curtsy. and perhaps flaring her skirt. Left Cross Walk Cuban Action or Motion Cuddle Step forward and place foot in front of the other. A dance position in which partners are facing. such as facing direction. ends with the legs crossed. for instance. take weight. and amount of turn. and then relaxes both knees." if you are in closed or another facing position. and the curl is a left-face turn 1/2 to 5/8. Move hips side and back as you step. figures. In the Deep-Curtsy. this foot and knee action is what moves the hips in the direction of the stepping foot. process the information. Analagous to the caller of a square dance. Instead. with the woman doing the "natural opposite. neck. Step with the left foot in front of the right foot and take weight. and the woman's hands are on the man's shoulders. Abbreviated instructions. Cues are ordinarily directed to the man. and doing so in a timely manner so that the dancer can hear the cue. looking at partner. Cues can also be directed to both. the lady (usually) places her left toe to the floor. Curve Dance in a small arc but maintain the initial forward or backward direction of dance. heel slightly raised. ending position. Like a relaxed spiral to the left. keeping body and head erect. Cue Sheet Cuer Cues Curl Curtsey . written by a choreographer in a cue sheet or spoken by a cuer during the dance to help dancers remember a dance routine. and cues can be directed to each (e. man chasse woman roll left to shadow). to end facing diagonal center. Alternatively. left in front of the right and somewhat extended to the front. toes out (4th position). in which the lady lowers fully and places her face downward. The written description or instructions for a round dance routine. Left Cross Right In Front Of Step with the right foot in front of the left foot and take weight. and other helpful information. again with body and head erect. the man's hands are loosely on the sides of the woman's waist or on her lower back. In the Demi-Curtsy. rondes the right in a little semi-circle and places it behind the left. she steps to the side with the left foot. lowers well into both knees. Cross Right In Back Of Step with the right foot in back of the left foot and take weight. close to the floor. behind the right foot. curving. as the dancers dance. has little place in ballroom dancing — maybe if your man is royally good. she may lower into the right knee and extend the left leg to the front as she lowers. or face. and then execute the moves in time to the music. straighten that leg and flex the now free leg.g.Cross Left In Back Of Right Cross Left In Front Of Right Step with the left foot in back of the right foot and take weight. step. You don't really move the hips.

half way between line of dance and wall. The inner or outer side of the foot. "edge-flat. The principally accented note of a measure of music. no weight change. Bring either foot up the supporting leg to the outside of the supporting knee and then extend that free foot forward. center) directions on the dance floor. as one faces reverse line of dance. sd. In the timing of dance steps and actions. Leave the free leg extended. but normally a cut is done on beat 1 (cut. For instance. nothing happening during a beat of music. Normally. swaying to the right. Touch the toe to the floor relatively far from the supporting foot and move it toward that foot. In a stretched up body position. reverse. and turn under and away. draw" or "side. no weight change. Join hands. In closed position. usually Or simply Swing. The direction 1/8 to the right.Cut Cross the free foot around in front of and then back. A cut is like a lock in front. opposite free feet. In abbreviated descriptions of dance steps (as opposed to complete sentences). draw." A direction between two of the "cardinal" (line. draw. The direction 1/8 to the right. touch the toe to the floor relatively far from the supporting foot and move it toward that foot. It is not much used in round dancing. -. the man steps back and to the side." There are four beats in this measure (3 commas and 1 semi-colon) but only three steps. raise joined hands. lowering into that knee. It is as if you are digging your toe into the beach sand. "On the diagonal" means facing or moving along one of these four diagonal directions. With the free foot raised. This is a Lunge back. half way between reverse line of dance and wall. as one faces line of dance. but I'll include it here just for Dishrag Downbeat Drag Draw Drift Apart East Coast Swing Edge Ee . touch") but one could hear: "point. A side step might be taken. The third step (the side step) occurs over beats 3 and 4." An adjustment from a position close to partner to one where partners still have contact but are more separated. It is a graceful "knee" and then "kick. a triple Swing danced at a slower tempo than Jive. See Jive. lock). as one faces line of dance. no weight. rec. The direction 1/8 to the left." especially in a Latin rhythm. half way between reverse line of dance and center. a rumba half basic is "fwd. wall. beyond the supporting foot so tightly that you must move that supporting foot back. one will have taken a side step prior to the draw (cued: "side. Dash or Hyphen Develope Diagonal Diagonal Center Diagonal Reverse and Center Diagonal Reverse and Wall Diagonal Wall Dig Dip The direction 1/8 to the left. an "e" (like the "a") also represents 1/4 beat. a dash usually represents a pause. as one faces reverse line of dance. at least no step. back) whereas a lock is done on beat 2 (back. lower the foot to the floor and touch. and perhaps rotating a little to the left. half way between line of dance and center. toe pointing down. Dancing on the diagonal often flows more smoothly and looks better than dancing squared up.

a. (Whew!) Ending Explode Extend. go back to old-time dancing and ballet. or extending the arms and fingers. facing LOD). having begun in semi-closed. the toe will be brushing the floor. Today. Extension The last steps. holding the e.& . extend free foot and point toe. we might explain that we dance the cha-cha-cha by stepping on the 3. usually with inside hands held.completeness. we step straight forward or back (see "parallel foot position"). To have one's front in the direction of something else. Flex supporting knee. The turned-out foot positions.e . The cue "to face" means to step and then turn toward partner.g.a.& . or rotating a little more. Arms may be swept up or out. from closed position.. and the a of that last beat. holding the a. or position taken at the end of a dance. Again. and forward R to contra banjo diagonal line and wall. and compress upper body. such as "man facing wall. 4 . step back turning LF. Where the "a" represents the fourth quarter of a beat. the "e" represents the second quarter. to end in open or left open position. Also the name of the resulting dance position: SCP with the body angle a little wider than normal and the weighted foot having stepped back. For instance. Lower body with weight centered over the ball and toes of the supporting foot. stepping on the 4. partners in front of each other. or stretching up. and then we could talk about stepping on or holding any of these little quarter-beat moments. first through fifth. Usually. Feather A step outside partner while maintaining parallel shoulders. The last two beats of a measure might then be segmented into a 3 . involving lowering. Involves whole body: lower onto heel. and move free foot forward or back in an arc across the floor. and then holding the e. Usually done to develop a particular body line and to use additional time at the end of a picture figure. trail foot free. figure. side L turning.e . Outside foot moves back in CBMP. Step sharply away from partner. The direction toward which the front of the body is turned (e. Face Facing Fall Or Lower Fallaway Fan Feather Ending Feather Finish Fifth Foot Position . Usually begun in closed position. having begun with a back step. &. With added precision. The heel of one foot is placed close to the toe of the other. usually with the right foot to a contra banjo. a step outside partner to contra banjo. A step outside partner to contra banjo. arching a bit more. leaning back farther. Note that "fan" is also the name of a dance position and a latin figure (or see index). Step back in semi-closed position. The timing of one Cha measure is commonly thought of as 123&4. flex knee." Also. stepping on the &. diagonal reverse and wall. front to front. The exageration of any pose or posture. but also with the left foot to a contra sidecar.

Figure Figure 8 A specific sequence of steps forming a set that is complete in itself..g. toe-heel). where a straight foot position might make us feel as though we are "balancing on a rail. go back to old time dancing and ballet. Today. and back to the starting point again. Move free foot sharply backward. The ability to dance figures and amalgamations without running into other dancers. and then a small clockwise circle. Instead. toe." First Foot Position Flare Flat Flick Flex supporting knee. The turned-out foot positions. However. elevated motion. diagonally forward.g." Depending on the momentum generated by the previous figure. heel-toe. created by erect carriage and passing steps. no weight change. or toes to maintain correct balance and control. The act of responding to the leads (physical or visual) of the man and executing the actions. lengthen them if others are stacking up behind you. first through fifth. extend free foot and point toe. and/or figures that he suggests by his lead. forward. The direction of a step or action in relation to the other foot (e. "heel-flat. ball. the old. go back to old time dancing and ballet. we step straight forward or back (see "parallel foot position"). formal foot positions can still add stability to a position. we step straight forward or back (see "parallel foot position"). Shorten your steps if you are overtaking others. Floor Craft Flourish Follow Foot Position Footwork . often standardized and widely accepted and used as one component of a dance routine." Also a sequence in which there is no rise or fall. Flight The appearance of smooth. This is normally the woman's responsibility. side). Compare to fan. or we angle our step in the direction in which we intend to move. Pretend you have a pebble under your toe and you want to send it flying back. Don't insist on dancing the figures as you know they should be danced. Today. One can also flick across and in front of the supporting foot. A forward step may be taken. continuous.Fifth Foot Position Rear The toe of one foot is placed close to the heel of the other. and shift to an inner or outer circle as appropriate. Body flight softens the appearance of rise and fall. and move free foot forward or back in an arc with the foot slightly off the floor. steps. be considerate of your partner and other couples. first through fifth. The turned-out foot positions. Spread the fingers wide and rotate the hand back and forth on the axis of the forearm. Move on the floor in such a way that your path forms the shape of the numeral "8. back to your starting point (the top of the "8"). The heels are together and the toes are turned out at the angle of 45 degrees from the direction you are facing. The manner in which the foot contacts the floor (e. The use of the heel. or waltz.. prominent in foxtrot. The entire bottom of the foot. you might walk (or two step. or cha …) in a small counter-clockwise circle.

the man should be in the woman's previous spot and she should be in his. or topline. smooth movement — essential for good dancing. Occurs on "and" and "ah" counts. they are listed in column 2. along with proper position of the lower body (hips. A good and toned frame. legs. and hands. A feature of a forward step in which the heel contacts the floor first. Foxtrot One of only two competition dance rhythms invented in the United States. first with the heel and then with the inside edge of the moving foot. In round dancing. neck. clear lead and follow. the head. because your partner will be moving through the unweighted side (as one pushes Frame Free Foot Free Hand Freeze Front Glide Half Close Head Cues Heel Heel Lead Heel Pivot Heel Pull Heel Turn . One foot or person crossing or standing ahead of the other. Step back and turn on the heel of that supporting foot. (In a facing position. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. then to toe of that foot. the free foot is brought to the supporting foot and weight is completely transfered. The hand not in contact with the partner. not resting on hip (man).) Beginning in first postition.Forward Fourth Foot Position Step in the direction you are facing and shift weight to that foot. It is danced to 4/4 swing-band music with a SQQ or SSQQ rhythm. one foot is moved directly forward. and feet) (good posture) is essential for good balance. no weight. afterwards. but fourth position is used to stabalize the third step of a telemark to semi and also in a contra check. usually in 4-measure groups and in bold print. The cue terms that are spoken by the cuer. In the 3-column table cue-sheet format. the woman would step back. In a closing step. shoulders. feet together. knees soft. no weight change. although the tempo is slower in Ballroom. and ending lowered and with the feet apart. not holding skirt (woman) Stop moving and hold fixed body and foot position. The purpose of a heel turn is to change places. Turn on the heel of the supporting foot. we use the SQQ timing and slower International tempo. shift weight to heel of previously free foot. Move the free foot in a given direction with light contact with the floor and take weight. followed by the rest of the foot. The foot that is not supporting the body's weight. In a half closing step. Same as Slide. as in 3&4 or 1a2. one weight change. one weight change. arms. — For more. They are on the cue sheets above the figure descriptions. The position of the upper body. Extend foot forward and touch back of heel to the floor. the free foot is brought almost to the supporting foot with partial weight on the ball of the foot resulting in a transfer of some weight to the free foot. It is danced in both American Smooth and in International Ballroom. It is important not to change weight early. A type of heel turn in which strong pressure is used. while in dance position. Again. it is the left foot that is placed in front of the right.

The man does a heel turn on step 2 of a closed impetus. Usually the hook does not involve a weight change—one will step during the following action (e. side. -. For instance. and return to the floor on the same foot. your partner won't be able to push through that weighted hip. to refer to the direction toward center of hall. A short series of steps of figures preceding the main part of a dance routine. unwind). The term is used in the United States to distinguish it from the American Style. but a cue such as "forward. at least no step. The hand nearest the partner when not directly facing partner or directly facing away. Hesitation Progression is temporarily suspended and the weight retained on one foot for more than one count. a dash usually represents a pause. rec. such as closed position. Lean or tilt the body from the ankle upward in a direction away from the supporting foot. It consists of two categories. not all movement. a dance position. slow sway. the woman does a heel turn on step 2 of a foxtrot reverse turn. Stretch the supported side of the body. A "bridge" is such a connection only one or two measures long. a hesitation usually involves continued body rotation. Often it is more gentle and elegant to power the hop not with extension of the supporting leg but with a slight lift of the free knee. Ballroom and Latin. Again." There are four beats in this measure (3 commas and 1 semi-colon) but only three steps.through a turnstyle) during the turn. Step to the side and roll hip to the side and back. no weight change. A style of ballroom dance used in competitions throughout the world. The third step (the side step) occurs over beats 3 and 4. Cross the free foot in front or in back of and near the supporting foot. In abbreviated descriptions of dance steps (as opposed to complete sentences). Hop With a soft knee. Also. it is "progression" that is stopped. rise slightly off the floor. a rumba half basic is "fwd. The feet remain stationary. in preparation for the next step. Lightly spring off one foot and land on the other. For instance. A part of the dance routine more than two measures long connecting major parts of the dance. A beat of music during which no step is taken. Used to direct a dancer to approach or to face toward partner. straighten leg. Where a freeze is quite still. nothing happening during a beat of music. sd. Shifting weight from one foot to the other without progression in any direction. If you have taken weight early." This term can also be used to direct one partner (usually the woman) to wrap one foot or leg behind the foot or leg of her partner.. or a drawing of the free foot. hook behind" might well intend a weight change during the "hook. The foot nearest the partner when not directly facing partner or directly facing away. Hip Rock Hold Hook Hover Sway Hovering Action Hyphen In In Place Inside Foot Inside Hand Interlude International Style Introduction Jete . Check the moving or the turning of the body and rise a little.g. also.

you are in left open postion facing line. no weight change. paso doble. and the heel of the front leg is near the toe of the back leg. and return to the floor on the same foot. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. it is danced at a speed of 44 bars per minute. Raise knee straight up and then straighten leg with toe extended. step forward on that foot turning to face partner. straighten leg." (Make sense? ) The woman moves from a designated position." but we abbreviate it "W" because "L" means "left. comprising eight weight changes: QQQ&QQ&Q. no weight change. no weight change. woman's right Man's left. the Swing. much of the effect is created through the action of the feet and knees. One steps ball-flat. Turning to the left or counter-clockwise. rumba. A four-beat action in which you kick with one foot and then dig the toes of the other foot into the floor as you might do into beach sand. which makes it faster than its American Rhythm counterpart. rise higher off the floor than in a hop. See Dance Position and Connection Between Jump Kick Kick & Dig Knee Lady Lady Under Latin Cross Latin Dance Latin Motion Lead Lead Foot Lead Hand Lead In Left Face Left Open Facing Position Left Open Position . see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. under joined hands. which ensures smooth coordination between the two dancers. and then step fwd toward line on the trail foot. In the Easterdays' Boogie Blues. You kick with the lead foot away from your partner.(jhettay) Jive One of the five competition Latin Rhythms. A characteristic type of hip motion found in the technique of performing a step in Latin and in Rhythm dances. It consists of cha. In competition. We cue "lady" because "woman" could be heard as "man. Cross one leg in front or behind the other so that the toe of the back leg is turned out. The basic step is a six-beat pattern. Lead is normally the man's responsibility. The act of directing the woman through a figure or a dance. One of many possible dance positions. and the hip shifts to that side. Man's left. press the toe of the trail foot to the floor and touch free hands. — For more. straightens the knee. to a designated position. Raise knee straight up and across supporting leg. The free foot points down and lies near the supporting leg." One of the two sets of competition dances in International Style ballroom. the lead is still responsible for initiating each move. One of many possible dance positions. If the dance is a choreographed routine. woman's right The music that occurs before the dance introduction begins. at the calf or knee. samba. With a soft knee. and jive. It involves choosing appropriate steps to suit the music and leading by hand and body signals to complete the chosen steps smoothly and safely. the knee of the back leg is just behind the knee of the front leg. as in round dancing. The two feet make a figure "7. Although it is most visible in the hips. usually one or two measures.

but she is to his left. the instructors have some room to demonstrate but all can see. In general. The line of dance is forward. sit in chairs there. One of the Latin Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. Right hands may be joined. the woman to the left and a little in front of the man. Moving with the left side of the body ahead of the right. Direction the movement or flow of the dance is currently moving. where there may be three concentric circles of dancers. bending knee and checking the movement. and take weight. to facilitate lead and follow. and then complain that they cannot see over the looking circle. Keep the free leg straight and the toe pointed. maintaining an upward poise in the torso and head. it is important to follow convention: the outer circle moves in and the inner circle moves out to join the middle circle. Generally. Step side and then cross behind with slight bending of both knees. That way. and compress upper body. It is rude and disturbing for dancers to move to the wall. around the dance floor. the man is "shadowing" the woman. Step forward or side. and are rarely seen in round dance choreography. Lifts are not permitted in ballroom competition. May be line of dance or reverse line of dance. A dance of Cuban origin and one of the five dances of the American Rhythm Left Side Lead Lift Line of Progression Lock Looking Circle Loose Closed Position Lower Or Fall Lunge Mambo . when a dancer's feet (typically the woman's) are both off the floor at the same time. Lower body with weight centered over the ball and toes of the supporting foot. Sometimes referred to as a "slicing" movement. you would raise the free leg to the side. away from your direction of movement. Done while you are stepping forward or side. In both freestyle and rounds. Also. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. and the man's left hand may be placed on the woman's back.Partners. In a big group. The center of the hall will be to his left. flex knee. If you are stepping to the side. the man directs the progression of dance. Involves whole body: lower onto heel. Rise slightly on the ball of the supporting foot. Partners facing center of hall. but no weight change in itself. counter-clockwise. As in shadow position. you would raise the free leg forward. Progression is smoother if you rise on the ball of the supporting foot so that the locking foot can slip under the heel of the supporting foot. go with the flow and avoid interfering with other dancers. place it close so that ankles touch or almost touch. if the couple is in closed position or semiclosed position facing the wall or LOD then the line of progression is counterclockwise or LOD. and the walls of the room will be to his right. the taller dancer standing behind and slightly to one side of his partner to observe while instruction is being given. Cross the free foot in front of or behind the supporting foot. except for cabaret and showdance events. You might simultaneously stretch the body and raise the free leg. One of many possible dance positions. giving a little rise to the body and earlier than usual. If you are stepping forward. Lilt Limp Lindy Line of Dance Step heel to toe. Left Shadow A dance position in which partners are facing the same direction.

2. then she is "mirroring" him. Numbers following cue terms designate the number of steps to be taken. too. 2. Here the woman is "shadowing" the man (is behind him). the man to the left and a little in front of the woman. A style of tango characterized (among other things) by a quick rhythm. the woman to the left and a little behind the man. Mambo music was invented in Havana in the 1930s by Cachao and his contmporaries and made popular around the world. One of the Latin Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. she can be said literally to be "following" him. See the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. dances the mirror image of her partner's steps. Turning right face.) whereas in salsa. two. 3.competition. "maneuver. Note that the man "has a shadow. repeatedly. or more lesser accents. in a clockwise direction Numbers to the left of a description designate the measures being described. with no reference to established dance figures." Usually the man steps forward on his right foot and turns right-face to face the woman and reverse line of dance in closed position. Man Under Man's Left Shadow The man moves from a designated position. A vine is a mirrored figure. 4. the pause is typically on the last step (1. The woman looks right as in semi-closed position. A dance position in which partners are facing the same direction. The man leads her to "open her head" with a little left sway. a waltz measure consists of one strong downbeat and two lesser beats: 1. 1. but he is to her left. to a designated position. A dance during which partners are exchanged. The music was heavily influenced by the jazz musicians brought to entertain American customers in Cuban casinos. 3. As in other Latin rhythms. The figure in Waltz and Foxtrot are considered to consist of three steps. Some Rhythm dances are simply step-cued. side. usually the lady. round dancers dance the pause at the end of the measure: QQS. stepping on each beat (qqqq. A dance position in which partners are facing the same direction. If he dances back and she dances back. three. a twist vine is not. if they step apart. 3. Therefore. 2. 3. but the "maneuver" action is only the one step. pause. Change from a relatively "closed" or facing position to one that is more separated. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. if he steps back and the lady steps forward. A change to a standard figure or to a sequence.). close. 2. except that in mambo the dance pauses on the first step (pause. Also a place where the dancing is done. A Rhythm or Mixed Rhythm dance is one that includes two or more different rhythms. So. under joined hands. It is similar to salsa. usually marked by an initial stronger accent and then one. For instance.). A short section of music in the regularly recurring rhythm." Step in place to the music for a designated number of beats. A specific type of following in which one partner. the full figure is sometimes cued. A dancer usually moves from one partner to the next. Jive involves more mirroring (the rock recover) and West Coast Swing more following (the man draws the lady forward). Man's Shadow Maneuver Mark Time Measure or Bar Merengue Milonga Mirror Mixed Rhythm Dance Mixer Modification Natural Number(s) Open Head Open Out . — For more.

finishing in Fifth Position en l'air with toe pointed down. Contributes to "flight.g. first through fifth." typical of foxtrot. ball-flat. The feet point straight forward instead of being turned out. Slight Plié and Coupé in place.Open Position Open Turn Opposite Footwork Opposition Points One of many possible dance positions. and there is significantly different and less hip movement. Move the free foot past the supporting foot and then step or take weight. point toe. It is the Latin rhythm most resembling the Ballroom style.Jeté to Second Position with Demi-Rondé.g.. and movement of the Spanish bullfight. The hand farthest from the partner when not directly facing partner or directly facing away. sidecar). extend free foot to the side. Or more precisely -. for instance the man's left and the woman's right: both step with the lead. usually the left. to refer to the direction toward the wall. A turn in which the third step is a passing step. instead of a closing step. lower on supporting foot. In semi.. drama. Close R to L with right heel to left toe on the second "and. Turn a bit to the left. The foot farthest from the partner when not directly facing partner or directly facing away. Used to direct a dancer to separate from or to turn away from partner. More than the normal amount of turn. step side and forward on the lead foot. an overturn might take you to reverse and wall. springs onto it. 1967) Paso Doble An International Latin dance. also. A step taken not between partner's feet but to partner's right (e. And finally a little more fancifully -." soften both knees and lift left heel on an "a" count. Partner points in opposite direction. thus man and woman are pointing the same foot. stretch lead side of body and so sway toward free foot but look down line. It actually originated in southern France but is modeled after the sound. and stretch supported side. and step L raising R slightly toe pointing down. Passing Step . Today. swaying toward pointed foot. If the spin turn takes you to the wall. Out Outside Foot Outside Hand Outside Partner Oversway Overturn Parallel or "Sixth" Foot Position Pas-de-Basque (päd-bask or pah-dehbahsk) A step in which the dancer swings one foot to the side. The turned-out foot positions. then both with the trail. we mostly step straight forward or back in a parallel or "sixth" foot position. Stepping with opposite feet free. and swings the other foot against it. Done over two beats of music. in that forward steps are taken with the heel lead. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. Assemblé to Fifth Position Front. — For more. banjo) or left (e.Slight CCW ronde movement with left foot and arched instep on "and" count and step side with slight hop. (such music!) (from Silvester & Whitman. go back to old time dancing and ballet. line. the frame is wider and more strictly kept up. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. In a facing position.

close. then part A of the choreography repeats at that point. often with one more step than is standard. Stepping forward R. Details vary with the choreography. The correct (attractive." An action or movement where the majority of the activity centers around not the steps but the frame of the couples' dance position. step side and forward on the lead foot. A spinning turn of the body while balanced on one foot. Step forward on ball of foot. Movement forward or backward along line of dance. on balance) carriage of the body. A standard couple relationship. unwrap. Part A of the dance is performed to musical phrase A of the song.. Spin in the direction toward the supporting leg. one would turn right. With a double hand hold. e. and/or rewrap one partner at a time using left and right turns. When phrase B occurs. end. so a whole piece might be designated: lead in. but do not step or take weight. Usually as a couple. Spin in the direction away from the supporting leg. A. stretch trail side of body and so sway toward supporting foot. part B of the choreography is performed. you might be looking at your watch to check the time. sidecar. Usually. The free leg is extended forward or back. ankle stretched and instep arched. but take partial weight only. If phrase A recurs in the piece. forward poise to the body. Most pieces of dance music consist of two or more different phrases. Each musical phrase is given its own specific choreography. closed. intro. the inside or the outside edge of the ball of the foot will touch the floor. Amount of turn can be very little or 1/2 turn or more. A. Usually a brief pause with supporting leg straight and pressed leg bent but pressure into the floor. as in Quick Open Reverse in Waltz. lead arms up. a spot dance is mostly danced in one place on the floor. Also used to disignate a figure to be performed more rapidly. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. step and rotate on the ball of the supporting foot by turning the upper body. A progressive dance moves. C. A. But a Pickup seems so much like a "woman's maneuver" that the cue sometimes is used as short for "pickup. banjo. toe to floor. Do not tap.Phrase A passage of two or more measures of music. One of many possible dance positions. The free foot may be held gracefully at the knee of the supporting leg. Extend foot forward side or back. each designated by a capital letter. Stepping back L. and so on. The fitting of the steps and figures of a dance to the recurring patterns of music. wrap. Phrasing Pickup Picture Figure Pirouette Pirouette en dedans Pirouette en dehors Pivot Point Poise Position Press Pretzel Wrap Progressive Promenade Position (=Semi-Closed Position) Promenade Sway Quick . With your lead wrist up. Usually the woman steps forward on her left foot and turns left-face to face the man and reverse line of dance in closed position. In Promenade position (semi-closed).g. B. looking out. Any phrase can repeat within the piece. side. one would turn right. A step taken on a single beat or on a fraction of a beat and followed by another step without pause. A phrase will be perceived as a specific tune or melody. Both the figure (in Waltz) and the action consist of just the one step.

but I had to turn off my tape recorder. The opposite direction the movement or flow of the dance is currently moving. which necessitates that partners stay in closed position throughout the dance. Recover Releve Replace Returning the Lady To Her Seat Reverse Reverse Develope Turning left face. Here the kick (really a swing) comes first and then the knee is bent. In waltz. return weight to the previous supporting foot. One of our Smooth Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. We primarily dance to the rhythm. leaving her alone in the middle of the floor. The direction opposite to line of dance. Well. With the feet apart after a previous step. the gentleman accompanies the lady back to her chair or other place of origin. May be line of dance or reverse line of dance. It is danced to the fastest tempo of the Ballroom dances. and a man's releve puts him onto the ball of his foot. the quickstep has become distinctive for its speed across the floor. in a direction clockwise around the dance floor. in round dancing. no weight change. usually with easy exclamations of pleasure and gratitude. The three dominant elements in music are melody. Some Rhythm dances are simply step-cued. with no reference to established dance figures. a woman's releve puts her onto the tips of her toes. but of course.Quickstep An International Ballroom rhythm that follows a 4/4 time beat. at about 50 bars per minute in competition. Sometimes referred to as a "slicing" movement. See the "browse" navigation bar at the upper left of each page. Turning to the right or clockwise. if the couple is in closed position or semi-closed position facing the center of hall or reverse line of dance then the reverse line of progression is counter-clockwise or line of dance. harmony. Moving with the right side of the body ahead of the left. After a dance is over. with a strong downbeat on the "1. One of many possible dance positions. the rhythm is 123. 123. The Italian school recommends that the move be sharp and with a slight spring. Reverse Line of Dance Reverse Line of Progression Reverse Semi-Closed Position Rhythm Rhythm or Mixed Rhythm Dance Right Face Right Side Lead . no one dances on pointe. and rhythm. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners." and then bound off toward the snack table. the pulsation or throb that is felt under the melody or tune. A ballet term signifying a dramatic lifting of the heel and rising to the ball of the supporting foot. the pattern of accented beats that recurs through the piece and that gives it its musical character. again. From its early beginning as a faster foxtrot. The foot may turn if required. He does not end a dance with a quick "thanks. In ballet. We should try not to desert or abandon our ladies. I may have done that at times." A Rhythm or Mixed Rhythm dance is one that includes two or more different rhythms. Recover or return weight to previous supporting foot. In general. The French school describes the releve as a steady rolling and rising from flat to ball. in a counterclockwise direction Swing either leg forward from the hip and then bring that foot to the supporting knee and slide the free foot down the supporting leg to touch the floor.

Often. Foot rise can be distinguished and separated from body rise. such as 1. one might do the chasse down line of dance while briefly inclining the shoulders toward reverrse with left side stretch. left turning box. Elevate body with weight centered over the ball and toes of the supporting foot. one (usually the Sequence Shadow . Danced in both International Latin and American Rhythm competition. extend free foot and point toe. The specific choreography created for a piece of music. and the third figure took four measures to complete. The turned-out foot positions. Rise Rock Ronde Routine Rumba Run Running Salsa Samba Same Footwork Second Foot Position Semi-Closed Position Semi-colon One of many possible dance positions. go back to old time dancing and ballet. both step with the left feet.Ripple In its simplest form.. Usually a bigger. 3. although round-dance cue sheets are usually written as though the music were 4/4. -. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. In abbreviated descriptions of dance steps (as opposed to complete sentences). In a ripple chasse. Involves whole body: lifting heel off floor. a semi-colon represents the end of a measure of music. In a cue sheet. a step taken on one beat of music. Today." which is another name for a fan. Either foot is placed to the side of the other. higher movement (an "aerial ronde") than a flare or fan. and this action moves that hip to the side (see Cuban Action). Traditional Brazilian samba includes a partner dance but is danced solo at carnivals. one often finds two or more semi-colons together. we step straight forward or back (see "parallel foot position").g. a quick. Rumba) the free leg is bent and straightens as weight is taken. 2/&. a ripple is a tipping of the shoulders away from the direction of movement. There are two major streams of samba that differ considerably: the modern ballroom samba and the traditional samba of Brazil.. in foxtrot. and stretching upper body. For instance. A progressive Latin Rhythm of Brazilian origin in 2/4 time. Change weight to free foot with the intention of returning to the original supporting foot. or dance actions are to be performed. first through fifth. in waltz or S. In Latin dances (e. — For more." the first two figures took one measure apiece. A dance position in which partners are facing the same direction. Both partners using the same feet. figures. used as an adjective to describe a figure executed with an extra step. — For more. The rumba is considered the most romantic of the Latin dances and involves hip action over the standing leg. Q. One of the Latin Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. The Latin version is slower than the Rhythm version. Sometimes. then both right. This is a concise way of saying that the previous figure took two or more measures to execute.. but one can do a "floor ronde. staightening knees. Flex supporting knee. eg. The order in which steps. in the sequence: "waltz away.. Q/&. with syncopated timing. and move free foot forward or back in an arc above the floor. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. pickup. it originated in Cuba based on rhythms brought over by slaves.

straighten leg. Then both recover to their trail feet (releasing the slingshot). This move gives a little more propulsion or drama to the next figure— maybe a throwaway in jive or a throwout in west-coast—than a tamer entry. Partners are beside each other and are usually facing the same direction. rise. 4. A step on the diagonal between a side step and a forward step. left-face body rotation. two things are happening on beat 3 (the "side/close"). and touch. "skate" diagonally or even side left. 3/&. The man is "shadowing" or following the woman. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. forward-and-back movement of the shoulders. With the left foot free. One of many possible dance positions. slide Side and Forward Side by Side Sidecar Position Skate Skaters Position Skip Slap Slash Slip . Sometimes a distinction is made between "side and forward" (a little more side) and "forward and side" (a little more forward). rise slightly off the floor. such as a walk two or rock recover. Left hands may be joined. the man lunges to the side L and extends his arms to lead the woman to rock back R (this is pulling back the slingshot). sd/cl. is your "cha-cha-cha. Move in a stylized manner by swiveling on the weighted foot toward the free. The "count" is 1. Step forward and with a soft knee. Shake Shimmy Side (sideward) Side and Back A body movement usually described in more detail by the choreographer. Sometimes a distinction is made between "side and back" (a little more side) and "back and side" (a little more back). Then one would probably swivel 1/4 or more right and skate right. Quickly and momentarily touch the palm(s) of the hand(s) to your thigh(s) or other body part to make a sharp sound. usually a quick. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. In abbreviated descriptions of dance steps (as opposed to complete sentences). sd. and return to the floor on the same foot.man) to the left and a little behind the woman. rotational. hop. Same as Glide. pushing off on that weighted foot. 4. rec. and bringing the original weighted foot up to a touch position. One of many possible dance positions. sliding forward and taking weight. For instance a cha half basic is "fwd. one would swivel left. A step on the diagonal between a side step and a back step. 2. On lead foot and slightly lowered. a kind of syncopation. It is a step. two steps or actions occuring in a single beat. See also left shadow and man's shadow. begin a small. In an L-position with the man maybe facing wall and the woman facing LOD. a slash is used to indicate a split beat of music. The 3/&. and the man's right hand may be placed on the woman's back." In this 4-beat measure. A body movement. The Two Step figure consists of this step left and then right." Slide Slingshot Move the free foot in a given direction with light contact with the floor and take weight. Step to the side (in the direction of the free foot) and shift weight to that foot. to facilitate lead and follow.

with left hands above the head (like a hat). Dance the figure without contact with your partner. get your body stably balanced over that supporting foot. and with left arms curved up and inward. Slow Slow Two Step Smile Snap Solo Sombrero Spin Spot Spot Pivot Spot Turn . As he slips his foot across the surface of the floor. that motion draws her foot forward. Jive is a more circular rhythm and does not confine either dancer in a slot. It is usually slightly wider than the woman's shoulders and several feet long. A step taken on two beats of music (in 4/4 timing. with right arms in front of partner at waist level. One of the stumbling blocks to a good spin is the tendency for the man to pull his lady to him in a desperate attempt to get far enough around. ankles together. Slot The rectangular area on the floor in which the couple dances. The free leg is usually held under the body. This will allow him to turn LF and end in closed position. You can imagine a cord connecting his right toe to her left toe. If the man wants to turn the partnership more. and only then sharply turn on that spot. with no progression. which we don't usually want. NOTE: As the level of concentration increases. but don't make it a lunge back such that you fall into a deep hole. Usually. or one beat in 2/4). Extra momentum will actually help you around. no progression. In both pivots and spins. ends with the legs quite tightly twisted. Spiral A solo action. say. May involve any number of steps. and take weight so woman swivels LF and steps on her left foot just outside man's right foot. One of the Latin Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. but the truth is that you need to extend yourselves and seperate your top lines even more. A dance position in which partners face opposite directions with right hips adjacent. often danced as a step followed by a pause before the next step is taken. Rotate on the ball of the supporting foot. then he will guide her to step L between his feet. this action may become more difficult to perform. (a special thanks to RAL for this entry :-) Slide your middle finger from the tip of that thumb to the base of the thumb in a way to make a sharp sound. turn right).free foot back. it feels as though you will be better off if you make yourselves as small as possible. no progression. the turn would have put them in banjo. pivot about one point. 1/4 LF. Turn in place on ball of supporting foot in direction opposite to supporting foot (on left foot. Dance the figure on one point on the floor. turn or pivot about one point. If she had slipped outside his feet. Step. The raising of the corners of the mouth. you will take a "step/spiral. Also a solo action. As a couple. A full spiral is 7/8 turn. ending in closed position." Don't make the mistake of anticipating the turn. The amount of turn varies up to a full turn and sometimes more. Also use conventionally to designate a figure performed over a longer time than is standard. So. As an individual (solo). it is important for the man to take a clear back step and so lead the lady's slip. West Coast Swing is a rhythm that makes conspicuous use of a slot.

The amount of sound made may vary.Spotting During turning actions. Lean or tilt the body from the ankle upward in a direction to the side. The position taken by a couple at the beginning of a dance or at the start of any figure in the dance. or body swing. but only as a consequence of stretch. hips. The amount of noise can vary. with gaze fixed on a single spot. Step with a swaggering upper body sway. Sharp. or it will topple. touch. point. until the last possible moment of the body's turn. but don't take weight. The hips lead the movement.during a right lunge we sway right. and the need to keep the pile neatly aligned. or head. We can distinguish between "pendular swing" when the fixed point is at the top of the movement and "metronomic swing" when the fixed point is at the bottom. Don't look down. rather than from the ankles up. Rather than a smooth arc to the body. the basic unit of each dance figure. fwd L with right-shoulder lead. Walk in a stylized manner with upper body sway—fwd R with right-shoulder lead. Unexpectedly. when the head whips around and the gaze focuses again on the dancer's "spot. the head is the heaviest box. The foot that is bearing the body's weight. torso. Take a step by moving suddenly and rapidly. The shoulder on the stretched side rises. body. you will be pushing your partner off balance or asking him or her to support some of your weight—not good. Move the free foot in a given direction and change weight to this foot. Keep it up. swing. The details of movement and position that accompany the actual steps and that make the dancing more comfortable and more attractive. One of the challenges in dance is to keep all your weight balanced over that foot. You'll pull the pile over. generally one side more than the other. The manner in which figures are danced. If you don't. A two measure wait or lead in and two measures for (in the appropriate rhythm) a step apart. rapid movement in the feet. Stretch the opposite side of the body. Also used to create "pictures" -. Maybe a little more easy-going than Strut. Teachers talk about the body as a pile of boxes: the head. Close the free foot sharply. holding the head steady. Right stretch produces left sway. . and then the upper body follows. Stretch is accomplished by raising one hip and rib cage without collapsing the other side. You might step fwd R with left-shoulder lead. step together to designated dance position and facing direction. there is a break or kink at the waist." This snapping of the head not only prevents the dancer from getting dizzy but also gives multiple turns a pronounced rhythm . The elongation of the body. Broken Sway is sway from the hips up. during a promenade sway we sway left. Commonly used during turns when one sways toward the center of the arc to counteract a falling away from the turn. Spring Staccato Action Stamp Standard Introduction Starting Position Step Stomp Stretch Stroll Strut Styling Supporting Foot Sway Swing In general. is any free movement around a fixed point. proud. Don't look around. legs. One does not "lift" the shoulder. marching feel. Touch the flat of the foot to the floor sharply and then raise it. fwd L with left-shoulder lead.

Step forward on ball of foot and rotate on that point of contact. One of our Smooth rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. unlike Argentine tango. If you are in semi-closed position.g. To lean or slant the body. on an & count. (in foxtrot). usually sideways. Q/&. Displacement of either the normal beat or the normal accent. (Compare to kick. "Normal" is the regularly recurring groups of 2 or 3 beats. but do not step or take weight. Q. Involves no weight change. the man's right foot will precede the woman's left foot. The rotation can be slight or up to 1/2 turn or more. Compare to sway. or emphasis on the 2-count.) Also a dance rhythm—see Jive or West Coast Swing in the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. American. (in waltz) or S. and competitive influences into the style and execution of the dance. 3. go back to old time dancing and ballet. 123) or foxtrot (1234. bring that free foot between you and your partner and take weight. Sometimes given as beats per minute. The number of beats per measure of music. first through fifth. 1234). Most common. A collection of cue sheets and other educational material provided at a dance event. If the listener or dancer feels any irregularity. See Dance Position and Connection Between Partners. The speed at which music is played. This position represents a nice tango closing step. figure. One of many possible dance positions.. Through With the free foot being the inner or the one nearer your partner. as in waltz (123. although we tend not to use this much turn-out. such as 1. the first of each group being emphasized. keeping the leg straight. use of eighth notes or rests. no weight change.e. Waltz music is 3/4 time or three quarter- Tag Tandem Position Tango (International) Tap Tempo Third Foot Position Tilt Time . or position taken at the end of a dance. we step straight forward or back (see "parallel foot position"). or a foxtrot measure danced QSQ. 2/&. Dance partners hold the classic dance position. in which heads and bodies may be close and legs held away. Today. it is stepping or acting between two beats of music.A common example of swing (pendular) is movement of the free foot forward and up to a point about three inches above the floor. that is syncopation -. the number of measures or bars per minute. Third Foot Position Rear The instep of one foot is placed close to the heel of the other. with top line held away and legs and hips held close. Syncopation is any kind of emphasis on a part of the measure not expected to be emphasized. The turned-out foot positions. -. The heel of one foot is placed against the instep of the other. The last steps. Touch the toe to the floor sharply. Swivel Swivel Walk Syllabus Syncopation A change of direction and position made while the weight is on the ball of the foot. An International Ballroom dance that branched away from its original Argentine roots by allowing European. Hollywood.

leaving the second beat undivided for a time value of 1/8. Tipple Toe Toe Spin Together Top Line Touch Trail Foot Trail Hand Transition Traveling Triple ." Also. woman's left In a figure. and the time value of a "QaQ" triple is 3/16. 2/3 (in 4/4 music). The "Q&" divides one beat evenly. 1/16. 1/4 (in 4/4 time). A couple transitions from opposite footwork to same footwork or from same to opposite. shoulders." The second step of a chasse is given 1/2 beat and is designated as an "&. Sometimes used as an adjective to describe a figure executed with extra progression and/or with an extra step. The first step of most foxtrot figures is given two beats and is designated as a "slow. an extra step or one fewer steps by the man or woman. (See "triple" above. touch the toe to the floor. The most forward part of the foot. like the chasses in Waltz and Foxtrot. and touch the floor at the instep or ball of the supporting foot. spin on the right toe/ continue to spin on 2. woman's left Man's right.) From a strong "up" or toe position. In a tipple chasse. or with syncopated timing. such as 1. The time value of these three steps would be 2/3. The cue "together" would ask you to two-step back toward partner. and close to left toe/ and finally step forward on right toe on 3. arms. The "a" is a shorter interval. and other rhythms. One weight change only. From a position in which your are some distance from your partner. neck. Q/&. Do not step or take weight." The timing of this whole figure might be "sq&q. In a dance position.notes per measure. 3. the line created by the head. checking. Also used to refer to multiple steps. As in a heel turn. "toe-flat. are not considered to be triples. Notice that the timing of these three steps is not even. Timing The number of beats of music devoted to a dance step. 1/4. Counting the beats. Triplet Tumble Three steps taken evenly over two beats of music. A backward step might be taken. you might "circle away" from your partner a short distance (3 weight changes). slip small forward L (W bk R) turning LF to closed position with slight right sway. Syncopations. Rise to toe of supporting foot." A tipple is a tipping of the shoulders toward the direction of movement. Lower dramatically and change to strong left sway. 2/&. 1/8. in foxtrot (see "running") The portion of the standard timing of a rhythm consisting of three steps taken over two beats of music (Q&Q or QaQ) as is characteristic of Jive. delay the weight change. Bring free foot to the supporting foot. no weight change. step toward partner and shift weight to that foot. Q. and hands. continue turning on toes. completing the circle. one might do the chasse down line of dance while briefly inclining the shoulders toward line with right side stretch. -. bring free foot to supporting foot." The second step is usually given one beat and is designated as a "quick. Cha Cha. 2/3. commence turn. you will step heel to toe on beat 1. In a Two Step. Progressing or moving forward or in any direction. Man's right. in waltz or S. one weight change.

" One of the Smooth Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. and it is danced primarily in a slotted area on the dance floor. traveling forward on counts 1 and 2 of each basic pattern. A change to a standard figure or to a sequence. One can also take partial weight. a slow. it is characterized by a distinctive elastic look that results from its basic extension-compression technique of partner connection. toward the near wall of the room. An unaccented beat in a musical measure. usually on one beat. Less than the normal amount of turn. One of our Smooth Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. A twodirectional chasse and a 1/4 to 1/2 change of facing direction. much faster than the waltz.Turn Turn Away Turn In Turn Out Turn Toward Twinkle Twist Two Step Underturn Unwind Step and change your facing direction. woman in front. it was the first ballroom dance performed in the closed hold or "waltz" position. An individual movement involving a step and a turn to partner. Beginning with legs crossed and weight on the heel of the forward foot and on the ball of the back foot. Also a couple action. "unwinding" him. Or rotate the hips independently of the upper body—puts a "twist" in the torso—as in a "hip twist" or a "lunge and twist. The specified weight distribution causes the feet to end parallel and together. To change weight or to take weight is to transfer the weight of the body from one foot to the other. in banjo or sidecar. Sometimes. specifically the direction in which your feet are pointing. Then close and step in another direction. Usually. Generally. at only 30. The original form of the waltz." to place the foot or a part of the foot but not transfer weight to that foot. One of the Latin Walk Wall Waltz Weight West Coast Swing . One of the Smooth Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. rather than rocking back. release lead hands. you will change weight to the foot that initially moved to the crossed position. a step taken on two beats of music. An individual action. At clubs. the man will be in the hooked position. Typically the follower walks into new patterns. as one faces line of dance. An individual movement involving a step and a turn away from partner. It is danced at about 60 measures per minute. Turn the upper body. The alternative is to "touch. The direction to the right. no weight change. Step in a given direction. An individual movement involving a step and a turn away from partner. and the woman will walk around him. as in East Coast Swing and Jive. preparatory to taking full weight on the next beat. the dance allows for both partners to improvise steps while dancing together. and the woman turns right face to a designated position. especially the last beat of the measure. Unwrap Up beat Variation/ Modification Viennese Waltz From wrapped position. rotate the body to uncross the legs. Derived from the Lindy Hop. An individual movement involving a step and a turn to partner.

the lady turns left face to face the same direction as the man. In an open or butterfly position. . and the woman's left arm is wrapped in front of her body. Wiggle Wrap Move the hips rapidly side to side or in a figure-eight movement. Join the free lead hands in front about chest height. so the man's right arm is wrapped around her back.Rhythms — see the navigation bar at the upper left of each page. This is Wrapped Position. Hold trail hands.