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Grade Level: Overview

10

Subject:

English Curriculum Objectives

Duration:

Three sixty-minute classes

In this lesson, students will use information they have learned from the text “Matched” by Ally Condie to compare it to the outside world, and to strengthen their understanding of characterization and plot in the novel. The students will have the opportunity to use creativity to represent an object that only exists in the reality of the story. The students will present these objects and view their classmates‟ creative representations as well.

3.1 Demonstrate active listening and respect for others – Analyze the positions of others 5.1 Research information from a variety of sources – Select appropriate information – Analyze and evaluate the information – Effectively integrate information in a way that meets the requirements of a learning task 10.4 Demonstrate commitment to crafting pieces of writing and other representations

“I wish I had a micro-card about Ky” (pg 86)
Teacher Guide Ice Breaker/Opener
(Exercise to introduce the topic/bring in focus)

Student Adaptations Materials Needed  Computers/laptops (provided by teacher)  Shoe boxes, construction paper, and other arts crafts materials. (provided by teacher)  Copy of the novel.

By asking questions about the plot, summarize in a few points what important events have taken place so far.

Introduction
(Give and/or demonstrate necessary introductory info to subject matter)

Ask the students, as a class to define what a micro-card is and what is its purpose. After agreeing on a definition, have the students record it.

Activity
(Describe the independent and/or group activity for students to gain better understanding of material)

Day 1: On your own, find and name two applications or programs from our world similar in nature to a micro-card. Use a TChard to write down what the pros and cons of the program are. Then write down your personal opinions on it. When you are done, share your answers with a partner. Day 2 and 3: Create a proper micro-card for Ky to help define who he is. You can be as creative as you want and there will be laptops and other materials available for you to use, however be prepared to explain your representation. When you are done, display Ky‟s micro-card on your desk. The class will be equally split and half will go around the class viewing their classmates‟ micro-cards while the others explain their representations to visiting students. After ten minutes, the students will switch roles. After completing the micro-card, keep an empty sheet in your portfolio with the name “KY” written on it. With this sheet, you can keep adding information about Ky as the story develops. After you get your microcard back, you can add the information/images to it to better illustrate who Ky is. This can be handed in at the end of the unit for a bonus point. If students complete their micro-card assignments early, they can begin answering the questions for chapter 8 of their writing prompt journal. Whatever is not done in class will be assigned as homework. It will be due at the beginning of class on day four.

Other Resources  School library

Extension
(Activities for further study into content material for students who have completed activities ahead of time.)

Wind-Up/Closure
(Allow for questions/clarification on the subject from students – reinforce original objectives and lesson purpose)

As an exit slip, write your top three favorite micro-cards from your classmates. You must tell me why they are your favorite. Pass them in to me at the end of the third class.

Additional Notes - Give students class time for research. - Students can work on micro-cards at home after the end of the second class.

Assessment
(Assigned work for remaining class period, homework, or following class i.e. test, project etc)

The first section of the activity should be completed in class and will be collected as formative assessment and participation marks. Feedback will be given to the students in the form of commentary. The micro-cards will be handed in at the end of day three and marked according to the instructions given. I will be circulating to make sure students are on-task and explaining their micro-cards to other students. I will also check to make sure writing prompt journals are complete.

Adapted instructions will be given depending on the adaptations that must be made for their learning style. If more time is needed, that will also be provided. Students on adaptations can answer the first question only on the writing prompt for chapter eight. (Instead of all the questions asked for that chapter).

Grade Level: Overview

10

Subject:

English Curriculum Objectives

Duration:

Two sixty-minute class

In this lesson, students will work in groups and collaborate to develop and build opinions on controversial topics. This lesson is also cross-curricular with history, and students will use their knowledge of history to connect ideas from the story with real historical events.

1.1 Examine others‟ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension. 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas. 2.3 Give precise instructions, follow directions, and respond thoughtfully to complex questions 3.1 Demonstrate active listening and respect for others – Analyze the positions of others

Society‟s Control
Teacher Guide Ice Breaker/Opener
(Exercise to introduce the topic/bring in focus)

Student Adaptations Materials Needed  Copy of the novel.  Laptops/desktop computers/iPods/ Phone devices for research.

As a class, have the students vote (by raising their hands) as to whether or not they would want to live in a world where the “society” or government ensures living in an environment where sickness and disease do not exist and everyone is healthy. Have the students take notice of others‟ votes. Summarize in class a few points of what has happened so far in the novel. Have a short class discussion about what the samples are in the novel and what they represent.

Introduction
(Give and/or demonstrate necessary introductory info to subject matter)

Activity
(Describe the independent and/or group activity for students to gain better understanding of material)

Day 1: In groups of four, discuss the idea of giving society our samples. How do you personally feel about this idea of society choosing when you live or die? Discuss this question in groups of four, then discuss this question in detail: Day 2: Give a specific historical example of when a country‟s government decided to control peoples‟ lives and when they die. Feel free to do some research on this realworld event. (Hint: World War, particular battles, Civil war, Bombings, etc). Compare and contrast this event with the way the society controls lives in Ally Condie‟s Matched. Choose one representative in your group to write down your answers. Everyone should be contributing to the group. One person from the group must prepare to share their answers with the rest of the class. We will go around the class to hear what each group has to say.

Other Resources

Extension
(Activities for further study into content material for students who have completed activities ahead of time.)

Students can take notes of what other groups say and use them to help complete their writing prompt journal on samples and death. Whatever is not completed in class is for homework. Have students discuss with a partner sitting next to them what they would do if the government (our form of the society) were able to control when they will get to live or die. How would that change the way they live? They must also respond to what their partner comments on this proposal. Additional Notes

Wind-Up/Closure
(Allow for questions/clarification on the subject from students – reinforce original objectives and lesson purpose)

Assessment
(Assigned work for remaining class period, homework, or following class i.e. test, project etc)

Students will be assessed in their ability to contribute to the group along with their answers to the questions. I will check for completion of answers and of accurate comparison between historical events discussed and that of the events in Matched. There is no formal and concrete marked evaluation.

Adapted instructions will be given depending on the adaptations that must be made for their learning style.

Grade Level: Overview

10

Subject:

English Curriculum Objectives

Duration:

Two sixty-minute classes

In this lesson, students will conduct fishbowl discussions where conversations will include active listening, critical thinking, inquiring, and learning from others. They will reflect on what they have discussed in the fishbowl setting and write a brief but detailed response to one of the questions asked, demonstrating a greater knowledge of the subject as well as input from others points of view or opinions.

1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully. 10.2 Consistently use the conventions of written language in final products. 7.7 Demonstrate awareness that texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions. 2.2 Recognize that communication involves an exchange of ideas and awareness of the connections, and to adapt the message, language, and delivery to the context. 2.1 Differentiate between formal and informal speech, participating in a variety of speaking situations.

Fishbowl- Analyzing character decisions in Matched
Teacher Guide Ice Breaker/Opener
(Exercise to introduce the topic/bring in focus)

Student Adaptations

By asking questions about the plot, summarize in a few points what important events have taken place so far.

Introduction
(Give and/or demonstrate necessary introductory info to subject matter)

Read chapter thirteen in class. Quickly remind students of important events to keep in mind from previous chapters. Hand out the instructions for the „fishbowl‟ activity. Read, clarify, and explain any questions or concerns the students may have: Five students arrange themselves in a circle in the center of a room. This small group will conduct a discussion together while the rest of the students watch, take notes, and later pose questions and give comments about what they observed. Ground rules include:  Students should only state supported ideas, agree with a speaker and add supporting information, disagree with a speaker and offer refuting information, or connect contributions.  No one may interrupt a speaker.  No one may speak a second time until everyone has had a chance.

Activity
(Describe the independent and/or group activity for students to gain better understanding of material)

After reading and discussing the idea of the fishbowl discussion, I will assign five students to go into the middle circles. Each discussion will last for approximately fifteen minutes including questions. Students outside the circle are expected to participate and ask questions when the inner circle conversation is done: In chapter 12, we find out that Cassia‟s father purposely destroys the sample from her grandfather because grandfather had asked him to. He wanted to have the final say in when he gets to die and perish forever, rather than the society controlling his “life after death”. Points of reference for the fishbowl: Do you agree with grandfather‟s decision to have the sample destroyed? Discuss the final goodbye scene. What did you like about it? What did you not like about it? How does the society view the grandfather? How does Cassia react to finding out that her grandfather‟s sample is destroyed? Why? Describe the relationship between Cassia and her grandfather. How does Condie paint the image of their relationship?

If students have high anxiety levels in terms of speaking in front of a class, they will be able to answer these questions individually with me during a lunch hour or scheduled offblock. However, I still expect them to have their readings done and be prepared for the conversations. The student would then be expected to engage in a six-minute conversation with me on the topic or question at hand, and respond to my questions and prompts.

Other Resources

Day two: We will finish the fishbowl discussions for the students who did not enter a discussion last class, and the rest of class will be dedicated to their extension and closing activities.

Extension
(Activities for further study into content material for students who have completed activities ahead of time.)

Students are to complete writing prompts up to chapter thirteen after all fishbowl discussions are complete. Whatever is not done in class will be homework. Students are to choose one of the fishbowl questions and write a paragraph on what they personally believe the answer is. This answer should be handed it by the end of the second class. Students will be assessed on their willingness to participate in the fishbowl and on their listening skills. I will observe how they work in groups and take note of their participation, and they will get a mark out of five points based on what they bring inside and outside of the fishbowl discussion: Speaking, listening, and responding to others‟ points of view are crucial. Students will also be assessed on their writing prompts. Adapted instructions will be given depending on the adaptations that must be made for their learning style. If more time is needed, that will also be provided. Additional Notes

Wind-Up/Closure
(Allow for questions/clarification on the subject from students – reinforce original objectives and lesson purpose)

Assessment
(Assigned work for remaining class period, homework, or following class i.e. test, project etc)