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DIGITAL STORYTELLING

An exploration in through multiple of craft, 2) the 3) the lens digital storytelling lenses: 1) the lens lens of change, and of convergence

COM 472

CRAFT

CONVERGENCE

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

C HANGE

SJU

Spring 2014

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Section 1 T, Th 9:30-10:45 Section 2 T, Th 2:00-3:15 Office hours 112 Merion: T 10:45 – 11:15; 1:00-2:00 TH 10:45 – 11:15; 1:00-2:00! In this course we will explore digital stories through multiple lenses: 1) The lens of craft (topics include narrative paths, spectatorship, editing and arrangement) 2) The lens of change (topics include first-person narratives, documentaries, and positive social change) 3) The lens of convergence (topics include transmedia storytelling, sensory immersion,and augmented storytelling via games).

GOALS & OBJECTIVES
! To understand the rhetorical role of

narrative paths, structure, time, space, and audience engagement in digital storytelling
! To explore the role of the digital

story in an era of media convergence
! To examine audience engagement in

the context of content strategies, entry-points, immersion, usergenerated content, and games
! To produce narratives by combining

recorded voice, still and moving images, transitions, and sound

THE LENS OF CRAFT SCHEDULE
Week 1 Thursday January 16 classes begin. Introduction to course. Week 2 Tuesday January 21 Reading: Introduction to Transmedia (Phillips) Thursday January 23 Reading: Walter Murch Articles via Transom Week 3 Tuesday January 28 Reading: Maya Deren: An Anagram of Ideas on Art, Form, and Film Thursday January 30 Reading: The Cutting Edge: the Magic of Movie Editing;[Side by Side, 2012] Week 4 Tuesday February 4 Reading: Storytelling (Phillips) Thursday February 6 Sweetgrass 2009 Week 5 Tuesday February 11 Case-study due Thursday February 13 Storyboard due Week 6 Tuesday February 18 Open lab Thursday February 20 – Project due We will begin the course with an examination of the digital storyteller’s craft. We will explore both video and interactive platforms while considering narrative paths, structure, time, space, and audience engagement. We will compare 20th century filmmaking techniques such as the work of Maya Deren and Walter Murch to contemporary online filmmakers, including the work of Tiger in a Jar and Seachant. Required text: A Creator's Guide to Trans-Media Storytelling: How to Captivate and Engage Audiences Across Multiple Platforms, Andrea Philips (2012).

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014

THE LENS OF CHANGE
Mid course - we examine the genre of short, first-person video narratives created by combining recorded voice, still and moving images, transitions, and music or other sounds. We will examine cases from the Center for Digital Storytelling, The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies, as well as the PhotoVoice and VideoVoice collectives. At the core of this work is a respect for the power of individual voices and a deep set of values and principles that recognize how sharing and bearing witness to stories can lead to learning, action, and positive change. Week 7 Tuesday February 25 Reading: Structure (Phillips); [In class - Participatory Politics] Thursday February 27 Reading: Learn Do Share Week 8 Tuesday March 4 Reading: Salt Institute for Documentary Studies Thursday March 6 Reading: Salt Institute for Documentary Studies Week 9 Tuesday March 11 Spring Break Thursday March 13 Spring Break Week 10 Tuesday March 18 Case-study due Thursday March 20 Storyboard due Week 11 Tuesday March 25 Project due/Film Fest Thursday March 27 – (No class, TEDxPhiladelphia prep)

THE LENS OF CONVERGENCE
Finally, we move on to the role of the digital story in an era of media convergence. We will first examine the work of media theorists such as Christy Dena and Henry Jenkins. We will then consider the artful and well planned use of the trans-media story (a story that can travel across multiple media platforms such as print, television, radio, the Internet, as well as portable and interactive technologies). Our focus on audience engagement will lead us to examine content strategies, entry-points, immersion, decentralized authorship, user-generated content, and the concept of play. Week 12 Tuesday April 1 Reading: If it doesn’t spread, it’s dead Thursday April 3 Reading: Storytelling in New Media (First Monday) Week 13 Tuesday April 8 Transmedia/ARG showcase Thursday April 10 Reading: Christy Dena - Alternate Reality Games

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014

THE LENS OF CONVERGENCE (WEEKS 12-16)
Week 14 Tuesday April 15 Case-study due Thursday April 17 Easter Break Week 15 Tuesday April 22 Storyboards due Thursday April 24 Open lab Week 16 Tuesday April 29 Projects due/Game festival Thursday May 1 Projects due/Game festival

EVALUATION
A total of 300 points can be earned in this course. Assignments and evaluation rubrics will be discussed at length in class. Unit 1 40 " Case study/analysis papers (Feb 11) 50 " Project (Feb 20) 10 " Reflection (Feb 20)

Unit 2 40 " Case study/analysis papers (Mar 18) 50 " Project (Mar 25) 10 " Reflection (Mar 25)

Unit 3 40 " Case study/analysis papers (Apr 18) 50 " Project (Apr 29, May 1) 10 " Reflection (Apr 29, May 1)

A " A-" B+" B" B-" C+" C" C-" D+" D" D-"

300-279 278-270 269-261 260-249 248-240" 239-231 230-219 218-210 209-200 199-189 188-180

"

*Please note, I do not round grades up or down. (e.g.,A 278.95 will be an A-.)

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014

POLICIES
Expectations I expect you to come to class on time, fully prepared to engage in the exchange of ideas. It is your responsibility to bring the necessary materials to class each week. Attendance Be here, on time. Because this a class that requires collaboration and discussion. You are expected to attend class each week and be prepared. We will often work on projects, watch videos, conduct group work, and other activities during class time. There is no substitute for your presence during class. Significant absences will hurt your grade because you will not be in class to participate and collaborate. I take attendance. After your third absence, I will deduct a full letter grade from your final grade (this means an A turns into a B) and so on. Lateness or leaving early is considered unprofessional and will also affect your participation grade; please show respect by being on time. Group work Group work is often assigned. This is your responsibility as a student and as a member of our learning community. If you are having a significant problem in your group, (e.g. a member cannot find time to meet, etc) be proactive and talk to me as soon as possible. If a student is unable to arrange meetings outside of class, an alternative reading assignment/test may be arranged. Late work Late work for major projects is deducted 1.0/day (24 hours). This means your "A" project will become a "B" within 24 hours. This includes days we do not meet in class, since you may always turn things in digitally. This policy stands, even when your technology crashes. (Always back-up your work.) That is not an excuse. The only excuse from this policy is a note from your Dr., an advisor, Barack, etc. Please note: late work for weekly reading responses is not accepted. Office hours and after hours My office hours for Spring 2013 are Tuesdays from 1:00-2:00pm and Thursdays from 3:30-5:00pm in Merion Hall 112. I hope you will take advantage of my office hours. I am always available to offer extended feedback on your projects (beyond the written feedback you formally receive). You don’t have to have a problem or issue to come visit, but if you do find yourself having some difficulty, then I certainly want to see you sooner rather than later. If you cannot make scheduled office hours, arrange to see me at another time. In addition to my office hours, make use of “after hours” in Merion 174 open lab or with digital consultants from the Writing Center Make an appointment with a digital consultant and engage them in a conversation about your work: http://www.sju.edu/int/academics/cas/english/writingcenter/appointments.html

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014

POLICIES
Digital Media Zone The Digital Media Zone in the Post Learning Commons is another place for you to become familiar with new software and resources. This is the place for you to experiment, collaborate, and learn. All the software you need is loaded and ready to go. For more information, visit this link. http://librarytoolkits.sju.edu/content.php?pid=304999&sid=2499873 Other rooms of interest in the Post Academic Learning Commons include Group Study Rooms, Video Capture Room and Audio and Video Editing Rooms. For more information, visit this link. http://librarytoolkits.sju.edu/content.php?pid=304999&sid=2499872 Equipment to check out In the IT office in the basement of Merion Hall (directly below Merion 150) COM students have access to a variety of audio/visual equipment. Check-out time is 48-hours. Equipment includes individual Flip cameras (HD), Mino cameras (HD), GoPro Hero cameras, Kodak Zi6 pocket video cameras (HD), and Canon Vixia cameras (HD). There are also COM kits which include Vixia video cameras (HD), Canon still cameras, and Zoom audio recorders. Tripods are also available upon request. A USB drive or an external hard drive is highly recommended !(to save your work and transport it to class as needed). You will also need to access (and use) Blackboard and email. Save and backup all work at all times. If you have concerns regarding technology, please see me.

Academic honesty If you use ideas or information that are not common knowledge, you must cite a source. This rule applies to all the course activities and projects including reading responses, multimedia projects, essays, and TED Talks. How to cite a source will be discussed in class. St. Joseph’s University’s academic honesty policy can be found here: http://www.sju.edu/int/resources/ registrar/ahpolicies.html The penalty for plagiarism is an automatic Fail for this class and a letter of notification to the Committee on Discipline. If you are suspected of plagiarism or an act of dishonesty, action will be taken. In all courses, each student has the responsibility to submit work that is uniquely his or her own. All of this work must be done in accordance with established principles of academic integrity. Specific violations of this responsibility include, but are not limited to, the following: A.! Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information in examinations, tests, quizzes, reports, assigned papers, or special assignments, as in computer programming, studio work, and the like.

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014

POLICIES

B. The fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports Any action which destroys or alters the work of another student; D.! The multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without the prior written permission of each instructor; E.! Plagiarism, the appropriation of information, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own to satisfy the requirements of a course. Plagiarism thus constitutes both theft and deceit. Compositions, term papers, or computer programs acquired, either in part or in whole, from commercial sources or from other students and submitted as one's own original work shall be considered plagiarism. All students are directed to the standard manuals of style or reference guides for discussions of plagiarism and the means by which sources are legitimately acknowledged, cited, quoted, paraphrased, and footnoted—whether presented in an oral report or in writing. F. Unauthorized Collaboration Rules regarding the use of information in this course: 1) If you use the language of your source, you must quote it exactly, enclose it in quotation marks, and cite the source - even in your weekly reading responses and your blog posts. If you use the language of your source, quote the wording exactly. This is called a direct quotation. A direct quotation is either enclosed in quotation marks or indented on the page. If you omit part of the wording, use an ellipsis (three periods, four if necessary for punctuation to indicate the omission). In any case, several words in succession taken from another source constitute direct quotation and must be acknowledged. 2) A paraphrase employs source material by restating an idea in an entirely new form that is original in both sentence structure and word choice. Taking the basic structure from a source and substituting a few words is an unacceptable paraphrase and may be construed as plagiarism. Creating a new sentence by merging the wording of two or more sources is also plagiarism.

Aimée Knight

aknight@sju.edu

Communication Studies

SJU

Spring 2014