Women’s Siren Ventilator

Women’s-specific technology
and styling for outdoor performance.
Siren selection varies by store.
Estes Park Mountain Shop
2050 Big Thompson Ave.
970.586.6548
Rocky Mountain Connection
141 East Elkhorn Ave.
970.586.3361
Outdoor World
156 East Elkhorn Ave.
970.586.2114
Look for Merrell Apparel
Plum Creek Shoe Station
135 Moraine Ave.
970.586.4061
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 1
Publisher
Bill Ferguson
Vacation Edition
Editor
John Cordsen
Production
Manager
Tony J. Wedick
Advertising
Director
Keith Kratochvil
Contributing
Writers and
Photographers
Janice Mason
Walt Hester
Mike Oatley
Juley Harvey
Madeline Framson
Greg Berman
Advertising Staff
Melissa Rockabrand
Mary D’Ambra
Graphic Designers
Tom McTighe
Julie Skelton
Bookkeeper
Leslie Dawson
Circulation
Manager
Jennifer Wurgaft
Front Desk
Charles Walters
The Vacation Edition is an
annual publication of the Estes
Park Trail-Gazette, a twice-
weekly newspaper. The Vacation
Edition is published in May.
Offices: 251 Moraine Ave.
Mailing address: P.O. Box 1707,
Estes Park, CO 80517.
Telephone: (970) 586-3356. Fax
(970) 586-9532. Web site:
www.eptrail.com. (c) 2008
Visitors’ Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
RMNP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Wines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Dog Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Candy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Friendly Bunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Winter Fun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Shining Mountains . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Waterfall Hikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Fun Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Pathways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Performance Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Music Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Wildside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Scottish Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Observatory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
July 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
On the Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Mid-Summer Festival . . . . . . . . . . .48
Estes Park Museum . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Meet the Artisans . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Flowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Rooftop Rodeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Trail Ridge Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Shuttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
MacGregor Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Alpine Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Scenic Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Calendar of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Camping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Advertising Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
In This Issue
In This Issue
On the cover: Longs Peak
with a splash of fall
colors.
The Keyboard of the
Winds extends southward
from Longs Peak (Right).
Photos by Walt Hester
2 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
First Stop
The Visitors Center
T
he majestic scenery of Rocky Mountain National
Park combined with the home town hospitality of
Estes Park transforms a trip to the Colorado Rockies
into a dream vacation in a corner of paradise. Whether
coming for a day, a week, or more, visiting this eastern gate-
way community to Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes
Park, at 7,522 feet above sea level is an experience you’ll
remember forever.
With world class hiking and climbing, fishing, golfing,
sightseeing, wildlife watching, galleries, unique shopping, an
array of dining choices, options in lodging to meet every
taste and Rocky Mountain National Park out the back door,
there’s something in Estes Park just for you.
Special events at Estes Park and summer-long free out-
door entertainment are set amidst the backdrop of Rocky
Mountain National Park. Hear folk musicians entertain, lis-
ten to a string quartet perform, or tap your toes to a big
band playing favorites. Beginning with Jazz Fest held each
May and continuing through the holiday season’s “Catch
the Glow’ celebration, there are special events here in Estes
Park that will keep you coming back for more.
Here, you can be adventurous all on your own. But when
you want advice or assistance, the Estes Park Visitors
Center, operated by the Estes Park Convention and Visitors
Bureau, is a perfect place to stop. Located at the intersection
of U.S. Highways 34 and 36, the Center provides informa-
tion about every business in Estes Park and things to do in
the area.
When it comes to providing complete visitors services,
the one component of excellence that sets Estes Park apart
from other areas is the contingent of about 70 volunteers
who donate their expertise and time to helping visitors have
an outstanding vacation experience in this area.
Individual Ambassadors work on a rotating basis at the
information desk in the Visitors Center daily during the
summer season and on weekends from October through
mid-May. Ambassadors answer questions about where to
hike, drive, shop, eat and stay in the Estes Park area. They
provide answers to common questions like “where’s a good
place for me to hike?” to more uncommon questions that
deal with everything from human genealogy to botanical
knowledge. The CVB staff provides additional expertise in
planning group gatherings from weddings and reunions to
business meetings.
The Estes Park Visitors Center is open daily except New
Years Day, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Visitors Center Summer Hours
* 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
*Location: 500 Big Thompson Highway at the intersection of U.S. Highways 34 and 36.
*Telephone: 970-577-9900 or 800-44-ESTES
*Website: www.EstesParkCVB.com
CVB Mission Statement
“To support the strength and well being of our community with the year-round promotion of visitation, tourism, and
conferences through comprehensive communications, special events, group sales and visitor service programs.”
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 3
R
ocky Mountain National Park
(RMNP) offers 415 square miles of
dynamic landscape featuring lowland
meadows, numerous lakes and rivers, aspen
and subalpine forests, and towering moun-
tain peaks. All of these aspects of RMNP
create an unparalleled outdoor playground
where the possibilities are endless. Visitors
hike its 360 miles of trails, watch massive
herds of elk, fish for trout in its many
streams and lakes, camp underneath its vast
starry mountain skies, or climb its epic
granite rock walls.
Nearly three million people visit RMNP
each year, making it one of the most popu-
lar National Parks in the country. Maps
and brochures can be obtained at any of
the RMNP visitor centers and for general
information call RMNP HQ at (970) 586-
1206 or visit www.nps.gov/romo.
Visitor Centers
RMNP has four visitor centers where
guests can see nature exhibits, purchase
RMNP books, buy gifts and snacks, use
restrooms, view topographical maps of the
park, and ask the park rangers questions.
Alpine Visitor Center
Open daily, May 25 through June 16,
10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
June 17 through September 3, 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
September 4 through October 8, 10:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Located at Fall River Pass at the junc-
tion of Trail Ridge and Old Fall River
roads
Alpine Visitor Center is open depending
on weather and Trail Ridge road condi-
tions. It is closed in the winter.
Beaver Meadows Visitor
Center
Open Year-Round
October 30, 2006 through April 28,
2007 open daily, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(closed Christmas Day)
April 29 through June 16, open daily, 8
Photo by Walt Hester
A bull elk in velvet works his way across the tundra
above Trail Ridge Road in RMNP.
The Jewel of the
Rockies
Rocky Mountain National Park’s Beauty
Attracts Millions
See Jewel: Page 4
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007
Readers
Choice
Voted Best
Bakery
Best
Brunch &
Best
Desserts
AMERICA’S FINESTSAUSAGE!
Willkommen -
Welcome
Gemithicheit -
Warmth & Friendliness
Schmidt's Bakery & Delicatessen
808 14th St. SW Loveland
970-667-9811
Open Mon-Sat 6am-6pm Sun 7am-5pm
Schmidt's at Estes Park
National Park Village Country Market
900 Moraine Ave. 970-586-2702
Open 7 Days a Week 7am-8pm
Coffee Cakes
Signature Cakes
Beautiful Wedding Cakes
Breads & Rolls
Awesome Tortes
Delicatessen
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Once Upon a Time…
A general book store
featuring…
• Regional History & Nature
• Children’s Books
• Calendars
• Newspapers
• Magazines
We special order
books & ship!
152 E. Elkhorn ~ 970-586-3450 ~ macdonaldbookshop.com
P.O. Box 900 ~ Estes Park, CO 80517
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4 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
a.m. to 5 p.m.
June 17 through August 18, 8
a.m. to 9 p.m. (Thursday, Friday,
Saturday & Sunday)
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Monday,
Tuesday & Wednesday)
August 19 through September 2
8 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday, Saturday
& Sunday)
8 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday)
September 3 through October
27, open daily, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Located on U.S. Route 36, three
miles from the town of Estes Park.
Fall River Visitor
Center
Open Year-Round
Oct.30, 2006 through mid-June,
weekends only, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Also: November 24 (Friday),
December 26 through December 29
& February 19
April 30 through Oct. 28, open
daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Located on U.S. Route 34, five
miles west of the town of Estes
Park, near the Fall River Entrance to
the Park.
Kawuneeche Visitor
Center
Open Year-Round
Open daily May 13 through June
16, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
June 17 through Aug. 25, 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m.
Aug.26 through September 22,8
a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sept. 23 through the winter
months, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Located one mile north of the
town of Grand Lake on U.S. Route
34 at the entrance to the park
Fees and Passes
Seven Day Entrance Fee:
Individuals and families in a pas-
senger car: $20
Pedestrians, bicycles, and mope-
ds: $10 per person
Annual RMNP Pass: A $35 pass
that allows unlimited entry to
Rocky Mountain National Park for
a full 12 months from the date of
purchase.
Groups & Organizations:
Members of groups (church, school,
recreation district groups, and orga-
nizations, not qualifying for educa-
tional fee waivers) are charged $10
per person over 15 years of age for
entrance into Rocky Mountain
National Park (no charge for the
vehicle driver).
The National Park Service is an
Jewel
Continued from page 4
Photo by Walt Hester
Hikers make their way along the Flattop Mountain Trail during a fall
hike. The Park has 360 miles of hiking trails.
See Park: Page 5
The Es tes Park Bracelet

The Es tes Park Ri ng

Exclusive to The Village Goldsmith, Inc.
The Village Goldsmith, Inc.
The Es tes Park Bracelet

The Es tes Park Ri ng

Exclusive to The Village Goldsmith, Inc.
www.villagegoldsmith.com • 970-586-5659 • 235 West Elkhorn Avenue
Exquisite Diamonds
Exciting Colored Gems
Exceptional Designs
Handcrafted Artistry Since 1976
all designs copyrighted
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important participant in the new
Interagency Pass Program which was
created by the Federal Lands
Recreation Enhancement Act and
authorized by Congress in
December 2004. Participating agen-
cies include the National Park
Service, U.S. Department of
Agriculture - Forest Service, Fish
and Wildlife Service, Bureau of
Land Management and Bureau of
Reclamation. The pass series, collec-
tively known as the America the
Beautiful – National Parks and
Federal Recreational Lands Pass.
The new passes went on sale Jan. 1,
2007.
America the Beautiful – National
Parks and Federal Recreational
Lands Pass – Annual Pass - Cost
$80.
America the Beautiful –
National Parks and Federal
Recreational Lands Pass – Senior
Pass: this is a lifetime pass for U.S.
citizens or permanent residents age
62 or over.
Golden Eagle Passport and
National Parks Pass: this passes has
been discontinued and replaced by
the America the Beautiful –
National Parks and Federal
Recreational Lands Pass.
Fishing
Fishing is allowed in designated
areas in the Park; however, regula-
tions vary from place to place. It is
required to have a valid Colorado
fishing license at all times. Some
areas are exclusively catch-and-
release. Observe postings carefully.
Hunting
Not allowed in RMNP.
Hiking
Getting out of your car and hik-
ing the 360 miles of trails is the best
way to explore RMNP. Popular trails
range from the easy and handi-
capped accessible paths around Bear
Lake, Lily Lake, and Sprague Lake.
More ambitious climbs up the
fabled Longs Peak are also available
for hikers. For a comprehensive
analysis of the many hikes and
climbs that RMNP has to offer, Lisa
Fosters, “Rocky Mountain National
Park, The Complete Hiking Guide,”
is an excellent resource, as well as
the various informa-
tion pamphlets pro-
vided by RMNP.
Wildlife
The animals that
live in RMNP are
wild. Park visitors
could potentially pose
a threat to their nat-
ural habitat, and in
turn the animals
could harm visitors.
To avoid conflict, do
not feed any wildlife
in the park because
they can become
dependent on human
food, lose the ability
to hunt, and possibly
die.
Animals can also
kick, bite, or gore
you. They can also
carry diseases such as
rabies and bubonic plague, which
can be transmitted to humans.
Photograph all wildlife from the
safety of your vehicle or from the
roadside.
Approaching the animals fright-
ens them and a possible fine may be
issued to those who unnecessarily
disturb the wildlife.
Pets
Pets are not allowed on Park
trails, snowfields, or in the back-
country. A leashed
pet may be walked in
the campgrounds,
picnic areas, and
along roadsides.
Never leave your pet
unattended in a vehi-
cle. Kennels are avail-
able in Estes Park and
other surrounding
communities.
Leave No
Trace
In order to pre-
serve the pristine
beauty of RMNP’s
natural landscape it is
important for visitors
to adhere to the
Leave No Trace out-
door mentality. For
more information,
contact www.lnt.org.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 5
Park
Continued from page 5
Photo by Walt Hester
A bighorn ram stands silhouetted against Longs Peak in the distance.
Photo by John Cordsen
Moose are more com-
monly seen on the Park’s
west side along the
Colorado River.
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D
rink in the brilliant sunlight, the fresh mountain air and the mag-
nificent scenery that combine to make Colorado wines so special.
The Front Range Wine Trail, or the corridor around I-25 on the
east side of the Continental Divide, is home to almost two dozen wineries
and tasting rooms. Short day trips from the major metro areas of
Denver/Boulder, Colorado Springs or Fort Collins allow you to sample
wines from Cañon City to Estes Park, gateway to Rocky Mountain
National Park.
Several wineries in Estes Park offer a taste of the good life in the
Rockies. To whet your appetite, visit Snowy Peaks Winery, Valley of the
Wind Winery and Colorado Winery, as well as the Wine and Cheese
Shop.
Snowy Peaks Winery
Located in the heart of beautiful Estes Park, Snowy Peaks Winery offers
a taste of Colorado. The winery tasting room offers wines made in Estes
Park as well as wines by a number of Colorado’s finest wineries. They have
a wide selection of varieties made from Colorado-grown grapes including
Merlot, Syrah, Viognier and Chardonnay. The tasting room offers sam-
ples, so you can find the wine you like best.
They feature more than 30 different Colorado boutique wines for sam-
pling and sales, including award-winning wines made right here in Estes
Park. Come enjoy a tasting flight or a glass of wine in a low-key, family-
friendly atmosphere. They carry locally-made artisan cheeses, crackers,
sauces and other gourmet foods to compliment your wine selection. Enjoy
these hand-crafted delicacies on a picnic in majestic Rocky Mountain
National Park or sit back and relax with a glass of wine in their dining
area or patio. They are a small, family-owned and -operated winery, using
100-percent Colorado-grown grapes from the Grand Valley and West Elks
AVAs. They also offer tours of their wine-making facilities beneath the
tasting room, where wine is handcrafted in small quantities with love and
care.
Snowy Peaks also carries gourmet foods made by Colorado artisans to
complement your wine selection. A sample of their products includes
handmade cheeses and chocolates, wine jellies and small batch sodas for
the non-wine drinkers.
Relax with a glass of wine and enjoy the views of the Rocky Mountains
from the tasting room or they can pack your wine and cheese selections
into a picnic basket to take to nearby Rocky Mountain National Park.
Bottling Dates
Come watch the bottling line or even try your hand at it. Be among
the first to try and buy the new releases. May 20th — Viognier and Oso
White.
Located in the heart of Estes Park, 292 Moraine Ave., Estes Park, Colo.
80517 Phone: (970) 586-2099 Email: info@snowypeakswinery.com
Web site: www.snowypeakswinery.com
Summer Hours: Monday-Saturday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sunday 12:30
p.m to 6 p.m.
Awards: 2005 Syrah-Gold Medal-2007 International Eastern Wine
Competition
2006 Riesling-Bronze Medal-2007 International Eastern Wine
Competition
2005 Syrah-Silver-2006 Colorado Mountain Winefest.
Valley of the Wind Estes Park
Largest Colorado wine selection in Estes Park, gateway to America’s
snow-capped Rocky Mountain National Park. Buy award-winning
Colorado wine for your mountain meadow picnic, condominium party
and romantic starlight Rocky Mountain dinner. Open Sundays.
They have both inside seating and outside deck seating overlooking the
Big Thompson River and spectacular vistas of the Rocky Mountains.
Reserve the wine-and-bed suite for two people by calling (970) 577-
8800.
Raise a glass —
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KIND
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470 E. ELKHORNAVE. 970.586.5206
552 W. ELKHORNAVE. 970.577.1220
WWW. KINDCOFFEE. COM
FULL ESPRESSO BAR • FREE WI-FI
RIVERSIDE SEATING • BAKED GOODS & MORE
OPEN DAILY AT 6:30 AM
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—www.FineArtsGuild.org—
Talking With...
May 9, 10, 16, 17 7:30 pm
Park Village Playhouse

Incredible Circus Mat
July 19 7:30 pm
Performance Park

Improv in the Mountains
Laura Livingston & Mike Durkin
Adult Improv Workshop in two parts (18yrs. and up)
Wed. /Thurs., August 27 and 28, 7 - 10 pm
Cost: $25
Park Village Playhouse
Student Improv Workshop (10 - 17 yrs)
Fri., August 29
10 - 5 pm with lunch break 1-2 pm
No charge
Park Village Playhouse
Improv in the Mountains Performance
Friday, August 29
7:30 pm
Park Village Playhouse
Register for workshops at Estes Park Public Library
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The Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies, located in Estes Park,
Colorado, brings visual and fine arts to the community.
5 Minutes Max
A fun fundraiser!
August 15, 7:30 pm
American Legion
Fine Arts & Crafts Festival
Sept. 13-14
Bond Park
Bye Bye Birdie
Nov. 7-8, 14-15 7:30 pm
Nov. 9 2:00 pm
Hemple Recital Hall,
YMCA of the Rockies
Supporting the
Arts in Estes Park
since
1958
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 7
Wine is fine at Estes Park wineries
Location: 120 Riverside Dr., Estes
Park, Colo. 80517 Phone: (970) 577-
8800 Email: valleywinery@quest.net
Web site: www.valleyofthewind.com
Summer Hours: 12 noon to 7 p.m.
daily June 1st to October 15th
Call for winter hours (970)577-
8800.
Valley of the Wind’s exclusive “Wine
& Bed Suite” is newly remodeled and
well-appointed with fully equipped
kitchen, full bath, one bedroom and a
sitting room with gas fireplace, a lovely
setting for a romantic vacation. The
Village of Estes Park is within a block
of the Wine & Bed Suite. Stroll along
the Riverwalk for dining and shopping.
Valley of the Wind Wine Tasting Room
also offers an exclusive setting for small,
intimate weddings, rehearsal dinners,
anniversaries and other special events.
Wine and Cheese Shop
Wine and Cheese are two specialty
stores located in Estes Park. Wine offers
hundreds of hand-selected wines from
around the world. They have tasted all
of their wines to ensure quality and
value. Cheese is a bistro-style restaurant
offering hand-cut cheeses and fine
meats served on generous platters with
fine accompaniments. All their cheeses
are also available retail or as to-go plat-
ters. These are perfect for entertaining.
Wine & Cheese is located at 330
and 332 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park,
Colo. 80517 Cheese: (970) 586-5511
Wine: (970) 586-6611
Web site:
www.thewineandcheese.com.
Grape-flavored history
In 1873, English traveler Isabella
Bird first discovered the lush landscape
of the Grand Valley during her ascent
up St. Vincent Canyon on her way to
Estes Park. In 1909, 1,034 Colorado
farms were involved in grape produc-
tion. In 2005, Valley of the Wind
Winery and Snowy Peaks Winery
opened in Estes Park.
Photo by Walt Hester
"LITHIUM AND LITHIUM GIRL - THE CLOTHES YOU SHOULD BE WEARING!" • “FAVORITE STORES OF LOCALS & VISITORS !”
WWW.BELLAGEMSANDGIFTS.COM
skateboards,
skate accessories and apparel,
general young men's clothing,
body jewelry, unique and edgy
gifts, patches, stickers,
posters, great skull
collection, statues, cds, air
soft, year-round costumes and
much more!
off the runway young and
mature women's clothing and
accessories, body jewelry,
sunglasses, trendy hats, year-round
costumes, buttons, huge fairy
collection, cards, cosmetics &
make-up including Burt's Bees, shoes.
hempwear and much more!
204 W. Elkhorn Ave. 970-577-1800 1 28 E. Elkhorn AVE. 970577-9700
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It’s a dog’s life …
D
o you want to bring your
dog? Before you decide, con-
sider the facts of wilderness
life that face dogs who visit our
mountains.
Estes Park has a fenced dog park
where you can exercise your canine
companion. Otherwise, plan to stay
connected with your dog via a leash.
There are new and wonderful scents
that may cause your perfectly
behaved town dog to bolt into the
forest unexpectedly. The call of the
wild may overpower your call to
your pet to come back. Dogs caught
chasing wildlife may be shot by the
wildlife officer as predators.
You can hike with your leashed
dog in Roosevelt National Forest,
but dogs are not allowed on the
Rocky Mountain National Park
trails. Shady parking spots are non-
existent in the summer, so your park
visits may be limited to developed
picnic areas or parking spots.
On walks, human companions
are needed to help their visiting
canines handle encounters with the
residents. Deer, elk, bighorn sheep,
marmots, chipmunks, raccoons and
squirrels may consider them to be
strange, unwelcome intruders;
mountain lion, bear and coyote may
see them as a tasty meal.
If your canine companion is a
full-fledged family member, these
issues won’t be a problem and you
will have a lovely time. Together,
you can all go hiking in the
National Forest, window shopping
in town, picnicking in the park and
driving along scenic byways.
Dog Park
Visit the Dog Park, off US 36,
east of town, just east of the Stanley
Park Fairgrounds.
If you are coming into Estes Park
on US 36 from Boulder, Longmont
or Lyons, turn left onto Community
Drive just before you get to the fair-
grounds.
You’ll see big Estes Lake on your
right and a smaller lake on your
left.That’s when you need to slow
down and get ready to turn left
immediately into the parking lot.
Dog park amenities: Benches,
poop bags, no drinking water.
Opened in the autumn of 2002,
this park has proved to be very pop-
ular. It’s divided into two sections,
one of which has access to the lake.
It is very windy and can get really
cold, so bring warm clothing, and
maybe a peacoat for your pooch.
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Downtown, Next to the
Historic Park Theatre, On the River
email—DeLeosDeliCafe@hotmail.com
website—DeLeosDeli.com 970-577-1134
John Denver
Tribute Concert
John Denver
Tribute Concert
August 23rd, 2008
Brad & Kathy Fitch
Gates Open at 6 p.m. Stanley Park Fairgrounds
$
20
00
Advance
$
25
00
Gate
$
30
00
Premium Box
Kids under 10 Free
For More Information Call 970-586-4611
Sponsored by Estes Park Lions Club
with
and the
Tickets Available Locally on June 1st
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TropiCowboy Band
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 9
... at the Dog Park
Additionally, these
accommodations and
businesses may welcome
you and your dog, but
always call to make sure.
• Castle Mountain Lodge on Fall
River (800) 852-7463 (970) 586
3664. Check the Peripatetic
PetPolicy on their Web site.
• McGregor Mountain Lodge
(800) 835-8439 (970) 586-3457
• Skyline Cottages
(602) 274-6407 (970) 586-2886
• Colorado Cottages (970) 586-
4637
• Braeside Cabin (970) 586-6845
• Lazy R Cottages
(800) 726-3728 (970) 586-3708
• Timber Creek Chalets
(800) 764-4308 (970) 586-8803
• Rustic River Cabins
(800) 530-3942 (970) 586-8493
• National Park Resort Camping
& Cabins (970) 586-4563. RV sites
with hook-ups. Pets welcome.
• Silver Moon Inn
(800) 818-6006 (970) 586-3151
• Discovery Lodge
(800) 354 8253 970 691 7364
• 2 Eagles Resort
(866) 834-4722 (970) 663-5532
• Colorado Cottages
(970) 586-4637
• Stone Mountain Lodge &
Cabins (800) 282 5612 (303) 823-
6091
• Machin’s Cottages in the Pines
(970) 586-4276
• Skyline Cottages
(602) 274-6407 (970) 586-2886
• Columbine Inn
(800) 726-9049 (970) 586 -
4533
• Elk Meadow Lodge and RV
Resort -1665 Hwy. 66 Estes Park
• Estes Park KOA - 2051 Big
Thompson Ave., 586-2888
• Manor RV Park - 815
Riverside Drive Estes Park
• Marys Lake Campground -
2120 Marys Lake Road Estes Park
• Yogi Bear Jellystone Park - 5495
Hwy. 36 Estes Park
Pet supplies and
care
• Linda’s Pet Care Services
(970) 586-0340
• Critters & Crates Inc
(970) 586-844
• The Mutt Hutt
(970) 586-6606
• Animal Medical Center of
Estes Park PC (970) 586-6898
• Estes Park Pet Lodge
(970) 586-6898
• Angie Bryant DVM
(970) 586-6898
• The Animal House
970-586-4703
• Marie C Richardson DVM
(970) 586-4703
• Jeff Fish DVM
(970) 586-6898
Photos by Walt Hester
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
KID COMPANY
A STORE FOR KIDS WHO LOVE NATURE
On the Riverwalk 140 E. Elkhorn, Estes Park, Colorado
Learn How to Become a
Rocky Mountain National Park
Junior Ranger!
Also Offering Great Classes for
kids in Rocky Mtn National Park!
j Young Naturalists Wilderness Exploration
j Animal Tracks Detectives
j Cougar Clues & How to Read Them
j Art Adventures
j Rhymin’ & Rappin’ in the Rockies
j Nature Journaling for Kids
Sign up at the Store, or
Learn more at rmna. org
Games, Puppets, Books, Puzzles & More
Lots of Junior Ranger Stuff, too!
Rocky Mountain Nature Association Nature. Pass It On. Next Generation Fund - rmna.org

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10 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
M
any visitors remember their first taste of
Estes Park taffy. You can watch as it’s
made in the Taffy Shop and then take a
box or two along with you to chew. Vacation
time is so fun. You can stand outside the big
candy-store window and watch as the taffy is
being stretched and pulled on the big taffy-puller
machine. You’ll be amazed it never falls off. Once
you enter the store, the pastel assortment of col-
ors and flavors beckons. The taffy also makes
great souvenirs, as it stays fresh for a very long
time and travels easily through security. The taffy
pull is a strong one, indeed, too strong for many
tourists to resist.
It has become a staple, a tradition for families
who return to Estes Park year after year, with the
idea of fresh taffy melting in their mouths as solid
as the mountain scenery.
In Estes Park, elk wander downtown along
with weekenders carrying hiking gear in one hand
and saltwater taffy in the other. After a day of
horseback riding, hiking, fishing, swimming,
snowshoeing, whitewater rafting, bird watching,
shopping and scenic driving through Rocky
Mountain National Park, you’ll probably be hun-
gry. Taffy may be one way to soothe the savage beast.
Taffy is a type of chewy candy that is made by stretching or pulling a
sticky mass of boiled sugar, butter, flavorings and coloring until fluffy.
When this process is complete, the taffy is rolled, cut into small pastel-col-
ored pieces and wrapped in wax paper to keep it soft. It usually has a fruity
flavor, but other flavors are common as well.
Saltwater taffy was a noted invention of Atlantic City, N.J., beginning in
the late 19th century, and it became a common souvenir of many coastal
resort towns. Modern commercial taffy is made primarily from corn syrup,
glycerin and butter. The “pulling” process, which makes the candy lighter
and chewier, consists of stretching out the mixture, folding it over and
stretching it out again. Caramel candies are sometimes referred to as taffy
(taffy apples, taffy-colored hair), but are very different from common salt-
Mountain dote —
Photo by Walt Hester
Miniature Golf • GO Karts
2 Giant Slides • Bungee Tramp
Bumper Cars & Boats
Arcades & Games • Snacks
Miniature Golf • GO Karts
2 Giant Slides • Bungee Tramp
Bumper Cars & Boats
Arcades & Games • Snacks
www.funcityofestes.com
20-16787
Rock Shop
Red Rose Red Rose
& Dick’s Rock Museum
Selling rocks, gems and minerals
from Colorado and around the
world since 1939. We carry
decorative landscaping, fountain,
aquarium & metaphysical rocks,
crystals, fossils, polishing
materilas, rough for cabbing,
slabs, bookends, candle holders,
unique specimens,
crafts and jewelry
made by local
artists.
Free Museum!
Next to Coffee on the Rocks!
Open Year-Round & Open Late in the Summer!
490 Moraine Avenue, Estes Park, CO
970-586-4180 • RedRoseRockShop.com
Stop in and see us on your way in and out of the Rocky Mountain National Park!
We have lots of parking available.
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water taffy.
The origins of the name are unknown. The name could refer to the
recipe that contains both salt and water. The most popular story, although
probably apocryphal, concerns a candy-store owner, David Bradley, whose
shop was flooded during a major storm in 1883 that soaked his entire
stock of taffy with salty Atlantic Ocean water. He offered “saltwater taffy”
to a young girl who asked if he had any taffy for sale. The girl was delight-
ed, bought the candy and took her prize down to the beach to show her
friends. Bradley’s mother, in the back of the store, heard the exchange. She
loved the name; Saltwater Taffy was born. Whatever the origins, Joseph
Fralinger boxed the candy and sold it as an Atlantic City souvenir. Candy
maker Enoch James refined the recipe, making it less sticky and easier to
unwrap, cut it into bite-sized pieces, and is credited with mechanizing the
“pulling” process. In the early 1920s, enterprising John Edmiston
obtained a trademark for the name “original saltwater taffy,” demanding
royalties from companies using the name. He was sued over this demand.
In 1923, the Supreme Court of the United States decided that the phrase
had been in common use too long for him to claim royalties. Saltwater
taffy is still sold widely on the boardwalk in Atlantic City, and in other
tourist beachfront areas throughout the United States, as well as in Estes
Park.
Saltwater taffy is not made from saltwater (hence, the Estes Park good-
ies). You do need some salt and some water to make a batch of taffy, how-
ever. Just as no one knows who first called the sweet candy “saltwater
taffy,” there is no record of who boiled the first vat of sugar, corn syrup,
water, cornstarch, butter and salt to make the first taffy. Taffy is thought
to have been a popular confection at country fairs in the Midwest by the
1880s and it was sold in America’s first seaside resort —Atlantic City —
by that time.
Today, although it probably wasn’t invented at the seashore and it does-
n’t contain any saltwater, saltwater taffy is available wherever vendors set
up shop, and is gobbled up, despite its fake name.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 11
soft and chewy fresh Estes Park taffy
1640 BIG THOMPSON AVENUE
ESTES PARK, CO 586-8583
RAMBO’S
LONGHORN
LIQUOR MART
YOU’RE THE OF OUR BUSINESS!
Kegs Available
Come Check Out
Our Wine Cellar!
Located West of Lake Estes
Marina on your way into town 2
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Other treats for the tourists and locals may be
enjoyed at the following establishments:
• Caramel Crisp, 108 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park, Colo. 80517, (970)
586-9927
• Chocolate Drop, 1751 N. Lake Ave., Suite #110, Estes Park, Colo.
80517, (970) 586-2194
• Estes Park Times & Old Fashioned Candy, 102 W. Elkhorn Ave.,
Estes Park, Colo. 80517, (970) 586-3623
• Grandma’s Mountain Cookies, 217 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park,
Colo. 80517, (970) 577-0967
• Hayley’s Homemade Ice Cream, 102 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park,
Colo. 80517, (970) 586-4207
• Laura’s Fudge Shop, 129 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park, Colo. 80517,
(970) 586-4004, (866) 586-4004
• Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, 517 Big Thompson Ave.., Estes
Park, Colo. 80517, (970) 586-6601
• Taffy Shop, 121 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park, Colo. 80517, (970)
586-4548
• Caramel Corn, 140 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park, Colo., 80517, (970)
577-1216
• Donut Haus, 342 Moraine Ave., Estes Park, Colo. 80517, (970) 586-
2988.
One visitor said she equates Estes Park with the taffy shop and the cozy
souvenir shops, a toy store, candy stores, hometown pizza parlors and ice
cream shops. It’s like visiting a European village,“Little Switzerland.”
Photos by Sandi
“You Pick The Spot, I’ll Take The Shot”
144 W. Elkhorn
West of Moraine Avenue
Certified to
photograph in
Rocky Mountain
National Park
PHOTO TOURS
PHOTO GALLERY
Wildlife &
Scenic
(Framed and Unframed)
GIFT SHOP
Wildlife Gifts
Unique Frames
Scrapbook Supplies
970-577-8187
Nationally Published Photographer
www.photosbysandi.com
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NEW LOCATION NEW LOCATION
12 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
T
he Friendly Bunch of the Shining
Mountains Group is just that, a
friendly group with a heavy leaning
toward singles.
A high percentage of the Shining
Mountains Group (SMG) are singles, and
the Friendly Bunch is a section of SMG that
was organized to help singles of all ages get
acquainted with each other in a fun outdoor
setting.
Outdoor activities include hiking, biking,
volleyball, tennis, skiing, snowshoeing and
car camps. Members and participants in
Friendly Bunch activities don’t have to be
skilled outdoor enthusiasts, all that’s needed
is the desire to have fun. The outdoor activi-
ties are planned for beginning to intermedi-
ate skill categories.
The mountain trails near Estes Park pro-
vide opportunities for enjoyable outdoor
activities. Friendly Bunch activities are listed
each week in the Trail Plus on page two as
part of the Shining Mountains hiking trips.
If one is not an outdoor person, the
Friendly Bunch offers plenty of indoor activi-
ties, including socials, potlucks, picnics,
game nights, dining out groups, a travel and
slideshow night, attending movies, plays,
concerts and other such activities.
For more information, contact Madeline
Framson at 586-6623. Sign-up information
on the hikes is posted at the library or
Komito Boots.
The Friendly Bunch
Photo by the Shining Mountains Group
Hiking is a great way to meet people. The Friendly Bunch of the Shining Mountains Group
brings people together.
DAILY TOURS — 9:30 AM
and 2 PM.
EVENING TOURS — 6 PM.
Charbroiled dinners with
all the fixins’, entertainment
& campfire sing-a-long.
Reservations required.
PRIVATE TOURS —
Family Reunions, Company
Picnics, Weddings, etc.
American
WILDERNESS TOURS
586-1626 • 586-4237
American Wilderness Tours operates under a special-use permit from the
Roosevelt National Forest, USDA Forest Service. Summers only.
DEPARTS FROM 875 MORAINE
PRIVATE HUMMER TOURS AVAILABLE
ESTES PARK
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GET OFF THE BEATEN PATH AND
REALLY SEE THE ROCKIES!
Our all wheel drive vehicles will take you where your car can’t go -
where nature remains untouched. Elk meadows, virgin forest,
abundant wildflowers, wildlife and the majestic Rockies!
Since 1955
OVER
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P.O. Box 316 • Estes Park, Colorado 80517
342 W. Riverside, Piccadilly Square
www.rangeprop.com • (970) 586-7626 • 888-433-5211
Let us arrange your stay
Cabins • Homes • Condos
Rockies!
Rockies!
Come “Home”
After a Day in the
Come “Home”
After a Day in the
Short Term
Vacation &
Year Round
Rentals.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 13
Rocky Mountain, REALTORS
®
970-586-3838
800-607-3838
Estes Park is the way Colorado used to be. It is the home to year-round splendors of the
Rocky Mountains, special festivals and cultural experiences. This delightful mountain village welcomes
visitors of all ages with downtown gardens and grassy picnic parks, playgrounds, aspen groves, beds of
wildflowers, fishing, hiking, biking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and river-walks. Victorian lights and
sidewalk benches add an old-fashioned note to the array of charming shops and restaurants.
Prudential Rocky Mountain, REALTORS
®
offers you your choice of the perfect setting for your
vacation home, primary residence or investment.
www.prudentialrockymountain.com
457 East Wonderview ~ 551 South St. Vrain
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Call Now 800-607-3838 Buy Now
Prices begin at $390,000 Prices begin at $334,900
Prices begin at $259,000
On the River On the River
Prices begin at $345,000
14 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
J
ust because the temperature has
dropped and most of the festivals
are done, does not mean all the
fun stops during the winter. The
Estes Park and Rocky Mountain
National Park areas still have plenty to
offer the outdoor fun-seeker.
Counter-clockwise from above,
when the snow flies, the Hidden
Valley snowplay area offers many
sledding possibilities: Snowshoers
hike across Dream Lake: Family
inner tubing is in style at Hidden
Valley: Skiers head for the back-
country in Rocky: The Frost Giant
satisfies the competitive urge every
January: Multiple adventures await
folks at the Bear Lake Trailhead:
Hidden Valley from above.
Winter
Wonder
Land
Winter
Wonder
Land
Photo and text
by
Walt Hester
Photo and text
by
Walt Hester
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 15
By Madeline Framson
T
he Colorado Mountain Club offers a
myriad of year-round opportunities for
adventure. There are a multitude of ways
to experience the wilderness inhabited by
nature’s creatures in the ongoing quest to dis-
cover a sense of self. Thus, the Shining
Mountains Group of the Colorado Mountain
Club welcomes everyone to share in the beguil-
ing mystique of the Rockies.
The CMC is the largest and oldest moun-
taineer organization still existing in this part of
the country.
People in all walks of life and from all 50
states and countries abroad are members of the
CMC. The members all believe in courtesy
toward each other and nature - that’s the true
mountain club spirit.
Members are generally those who plan to visit
and revisit the Rockies and want to participate
in the mountaineering activities the club offers.
It was natural that the lure of the Colorado
Rockies would inspire 25 stalwart individuals,
who shared a love of the mountains, to band
together and charter the CMC in 1912. The
group recognized the need to preserve a unique,
pristine treasure. Its first goal was to see Rocky
Mountain National Park established - a shining
achievement in 1915.
The club sponsors trips to all sorts of
enchanting vistas. They range from leisurely
nature walks in the Estes Valley and Rocky
Mountain National Park, to expeditions climb-
ing Mount Everest and the highest peaks of the
world.
The more than 3,000 recreational opportuni-
ties sponsored annually offer a kaleidoscope of
outings. Each of the adventures is responsibly led
along the sound principles of safety.
The locations range from plains and foothills
to high alpine lakes and peaks towering more
than 14,000 feet. The outings scheduled offer
opportunities for anyone’s interests and capabili-
ties; from easy to moderate to much more chal-
lenging adventures.
The dimensions of the CMC are manifold. In
addition to hiking and backpacking, add bike
touring and mountain biking, technical climb-
ing, canoeing, wilderness trekking, horseback
trips, birding and nature walks, llama trips, pho-
tography hikes, historic hikes, picnics and socials.
In the winter there is Nordic and downhill
skiing, snowshoeing, ice climbing, ice skating,
technical climbing, winter hiking and more back-
packing.
Many of the activities include interpretations
by experts on wildlife, biology, geology, history,
flora and fauna and ecosystems.
Family trips including children and adults of
all ages are very popular. Several events even
allow sociable dogs to tag along.
Within the club’s emphasis upon safety, the
CMC sponsors many schools to help members
improve their outdoor skills while having a good
time doing it.
Socials and potlucks are scheduled throughout
the year and the annual dinner in November is
always a highlight.
While CMC membership is not required to
participate in many of the trips, free literature
covering CMC membership, details of the out-
ings, degrees of physical demand, conditioning
and qualification information is available by
calling 586-6623.
The Shining Mountains Group of the Colorado Mountain Club offers hundreds of
hikes and other outdoor adventures
Off the Beaten Path
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16 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
By Mike Oatley
As it is everywhere else, five percent of the fishermen catch 95 percent of
the fish here, too. The guy at the trailhead with the surfcasting gear, for
instance, is going to have a long day, and the truth is that anyone carrying a
tackle box along a mountain creek is not going to generate much concern
among those who worry that our trout streams are overfished.
But let’s say you’ve arrived on one of the local streams with fly rod in the
three- to five-weight range and a box full of flies. Now what? The small
creeks of Rocky Mountain National Park and the surrounding wilderness
areas and national forests can confound anglers the first time they see it.
“There are fish in there?” the unbelieving will ask.
Of course there are. Not necessarily big ones, but mostly wild ones and,
in plenty of places, plenty of them, thanks to the catch-and-release ethic
that is the norm. Finding trout is not the problem.
Catching them can be. Good flyfishers are almost always goof flycasters
as well, but just about anybody can learn to cast well enough in 15 minutes
to catch a small-stream trout. Rather than fancy casting and canny fly selec-
tion, the emphasis around here is on stealth, fly placement and line control.
It’s a matter of figuring out where trout will hold in a tumbling stream,
putting something buggy looking into those places and getting a natural,
drag-free drift. The trout in fast streams tend to be more opportunistic than
selective when it comes to eating. The growing season is short and they
have to make hay. They eat what the river brings them.
Beaver ponds and logjams will create opportunities for distance casting
and delicate presentations with a long, fine leader but most of your trout
will come from “pocket water,” small pockets of calm water amid the rush,
created by rocks, roots, indentations in the bank, fallen trees or turns in the
river. A trout doesn’t need much water for a place to hold, it just needs a
spot where it doesn’t have to work too hard, with food-delivering current
and cover both nearby. The leap from finding them, which is easy, to catch-
ing them is the tricky part.
“The problem my guides see most people make is trying to fish too
much line,” a local fly shop owner said. “You have to have as little line on
the water as possible to catch fish around here.”
The first thing to do on a Park stream is to shorten your leader to about
seven feet in length and forget the “River Runs Through It” casting, with
the gossamer line floating high in the air and backlit by the setting sun.
That’s trouble on a narrow creek choked with willows and birch. There is
an inverse relationship between the number of false casts an angler makes
here and the number of trout he will catch. Shorten your leader, shorten the
line you are working, minimize false casting, and keep your fly on the
water.
It is both possible and essential to get as close as possible to a good-look-
ing pocket. It is essential because the fly must float naturally on the surface
in a drag-free drift. Now and then a trout will run down a fly skated across
the water, but they’ll also usually refuse to eat it at the last moment, too. A
natural, drag-free drift is far more important than the choice of the fly pat-
tern.
And the fly can’t be made to drift naturally from any distance because
any distance at all will put any number of conflicting currents between the
caster and the target and they will all conspire to grab your fly line and pull
the fly out of the pocket.
The answer is to creep in as close as possible, using the cover of white
water, boulders, and vegetation — anything that might be available to
increase your stealth (which includes not wearing your brightest yellow t-
shirt and orange ball cap).
Once in casting position, the actual cast is short and simple. A good roll
cast, which keeps the line in front of the caster, is indispensable on a small
stream. Tower casts, with the line being cast upward rather than behind, can
also be effective. Where there’s room for a back cast, one false cast should be
enough to extend the line to the target.
Where anglers who get this far lose it is after the fly hits the water. The
drifts are often short, two or three feet in many cases, and everything hap-
pens fast — and remember that you are fishing as soon as fly hits the water,
and the take may come as fast.
The line must be controlled at both ends of the rod. Get in the habit of
hooking the fly line on a finger of your casting hand as your fly is falling to
the water. If it’s a downstream drift, with the current bringing the fly back
down to you, strip up the slack line as the current creates it. On either a
downstream or cross-stream drift, follow the fly with the rod tip. Keep rod,
line and fly in as straight a line as possible without dragging the fly.
There is a trick to this
To catch trout here, get close and get a good drift
Photo by Mike Oatley
To catch fish in small mountain streams, you have to get close to them.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 17
On Your
Way to
Rocky
Mountain
National
Park
Open Year
Round,
Serving
Estes Park
and Its
Many
Visitors
Natural & Organics Full Service Grocer
Easy Access - Picnic Supplies
Fresh Meats & Produce
Schmidt’s Bakery Items
586-2702
Estes Park's Largest Selection
of Gifts, Souvenirs, T-Shirts,
Fine Men's & Women's Apparel
586-2776
Located at the Corner of
Moraine Avenue at Marys Lake Road
Serving Meals For All
Tastes & Budgets
Plus Our Lakeside Setting
Lets You Relax & Enjoy The
Beauty of the Rockies...
For Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
586-2171
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18 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Controlling the drift in conflicting currents can be tricky. A reach cast,
which builds upstream slack into the cast, is handy, and mending — with-
out moving the fly, moving the body of the fly line against the flow in order
to negate the effect of current— is a required skill.
But you should often get close enough to a pocket to control the drift by
simply extending your casting arm and holding the rod high, following the
drift of the fly with the rod.
One of the hardest parts, most find, is actually hooking a fish. More
trout will try to eat a fly than are ever hooked for several reasons. It takes
some practice setting the hook to get the timing right, but the main reason
most strikes don’t turn into hook-ups is because the angler has slack line on
the water and/or doesn’t see the trout take the fly.
The first condition, slack line, can be corrected with good mending,
stripping as necessary and shortening the cast as much as possible by getting
close to the target. But you won’t always see your fly, especially if you are
fishing ants or midges. You should, though, always know roughly where it is
— where it landed and how fast it should be moving with a dead-drift on
the current. In this case, you have to rely on seeing a fish move to take
something in the area your fly should be in.
Your reflexes and concentration will need to be sharp, and your patience
steady, to turn looks into hook-ups, but if you wade with stealth and get in
close, you will have lots of opportunities to hone those skills to a fine edge.
Picking flies
There’s a fishing guide in town who, when asked what the fishing are bit-
ing on, likes to say, “A good drift.”
What he means is that trout in the small streams with short seasons are
opportunistic feeders rather than selective ones. Just about anything that
looks buggy and is presented well — without drag in a natural drift — can
draw a rise.
But there are times when even trout in the Park can get selective, and
then it’s good to know what they are feeding on.
When the streams are first shedding ice, the trout are going to be feeding
on small midges. This fishing can be challenging and frustrating, as the fish
can be a little sleepy in the cold, low and clear water, or they can be jumpy
when still packed into their over-winter holes. Longer leaders, small fly pat-
terns (a Griffith’s Gnat is still hard to beat), stealthy wading and careful pre-
sentations are the keys to hooking fish when they are feeding on midges.
The first mayfly hatches of the season are the Baetis (also known as blue-
winged olives), a hatch that begins on the lowest reaches of our streams as
early as late March and gradually works its way uphill. Olives can be found
coming off in the Park into June. This hatch tends to get rolling in the
afternoon, and the mayflies will emerge in greater numbers on overcast
days. Any of the proper imitations in a size 18 will serve, as will a small
Parachute Adams. A Pheasant Tail is a good choice for a nymph fishing
below the surface.
The big stonefly hatches are unpredictable around here. You may run
into one or two during run-off. Having a few adult and few nymph pat-
terns in your box is a good idea, especially if you are trying to fish water
affected by snow-melt and running high, cold and off-color.
As snow-melt begins to taper off in late June, the predominant mayfly
hatch becomes that of the Pale Morning Dun, which can produce good
fishing to emergers and also a fall of Rusty Spinners in the evening that
trout will take advantage of. The imitations for this hatch are pale yellow in
color.
Along with the Pale Morning Duns, the Green Drakes begin to come off
in late June and early July. The drakes are the most exciting, if also elusive,
Photo by Mike Oatley
Rainbow trout are still found in some streams, but brown trout have
taken over lower elevation streams in recent years while brooks and
cutthroats dominate higher elevation waters.
Aspen Brook Vacation Homes
*
Luxurious 3-6 Bedroom Vacation Homes along the
Big Thompson River (accomodating up to 22 people)
*
River and Mountain Views
*
Some Homes Offer Private Hot Tubs or Jacuzzi Tubs
*
All Homes Offer Full Kitchens, Living Rooms with
Fireplaces, Deck with Gas Grills, Washer & Dryer,
Cable TV, VCRs or DVD Players and high speed
wireless Internet access
*
Picnic Area with Campfire Pit. Volleyball and Cookout Area
*
Walk right into Rocky Mountain National Park
*
Non-smoking property
*
No pets please
2343 Aspen Brook Drive, P.O. Box 3837
Estes Park, CO 80517 (970) 586-3748
www.AspenBrook.com
Ask about our properties for sale.
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 19
Photo by Mike Oatley
There are some nice trout in the Park, like this brown, but expect
most fish to be between six inches and a foot in length.
of local mayfly hatches, a big mayfly that brings all a river’s trout out to
feed. The hatch can be spooky, coming off on one stretch of river one day,
but not the next. The mayflies seem to make a break for it whenever a
cloud passes in front of the sun, making for sudden fast action with a stop
just as sudden. The spinners fall mainly overnight, but you will sometimes
find egg-laying flights and spinner falls first thing in the morning. A size 12
Royal Wulff is perfect if you happen to stumble into Green Drake spinners,
and the same fly will also work just fine through the hatch.
Around the same time, various caddis hatches get seriously underway.
Covering them is mainly a matter of carrying a couple colors — tan and
black, mainly — in a range of sizes and matching to what you find. Early
in the summer, keep an eye out for large tan caddis that have a greenish
body.
As water temperatures rise, aquatic insect activity slows through the mid-
dle of the day and terrestrial imitations become increasingly important in
getting fish to eat when the sun is overhead and bright. Ants, grasshoppers
and beetles are deadly patterns then.
Later in the summer, as the Green Drakes taper off, the Red Quill
mayfly hatch kicks in. These mayflies are smaller than the Drakes, but still
pretty big, about a size 14, and the hatch tends to happen late in the after-
noon. The Red Quills emerge in the greatest numbers late in the afternoon
after a thunderstorm has passed through and the air is crisp and damp. The
spinners fall at dusk, but finding water to fish them effectively can be chal-
lenging.
By the end of August, Yellow Sally stoneflies are coming off and signal-
ing that the summer is winding down, which it does in mirror image of the
spring start up: blue-winged olive mayflies come on again, and then fade
into the midges that carry through the winter wherever there is open water.
Lakes present different problems. True high elevation lakes can be sparse
in terms of trout food. Some, you should note, are barren and fishless.
Midges, caddis and terrestrials like beetles and ants are good choices for
searching patterns. The best approach is to try to get on them early in the
day, before the wind rises, or late in the evening after the wind settles out.
Glassblowing Demonstrations
323 West Elkhorn Ave. • 970-586-8619 • www.epglassworks.com
Paperweights • Goblets • Bowls • Vases • Plus Much More
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• Hiking Boots
• Trail Running Shoes
• Kids’ Boots
• Huge Pack Selection
• Tents/Bags
• Guidebooks & Maps
• Outdoor Clothing
RENTALS
• Boots
• Bags
• Child
Carriers
• Tents
• Service Repair
• Bike Accessories
• Mountain Bikes
• Road Bikes
• Flyfishing Lessons
• Rentals
• Tackle
• Licenses
• Bait
• Rods & Reels
• Guidebooks
• Flies - Huge Selection
• Indoor Climbing Gym
• Outdoor Climbing Lessons
• Climbing Gear
• Rental Gear
• Guidebooks
• Clothing
RENTALS
• Downhill Skis
• Snowshoes
• X-Country Skis
• Sleds/Tubes
• Winter
Clothing
• Discount
LIft Tickets
Winter
Bicycling
Hiking
Climbing
COUPONS
COUPON
3
CLIMBS
W/ Instruction
1st Climber
$10
2nd Climber
1/2 Price
COUPON
$
10
OFF
Rock
Climbing
Lesson
COUPON
$
10
OFF
Flyfishing
Lesson
COUPON
Bike Rental
$
2
OFF
Any Bike Rental
COUPON
Hiking Boots
$
5
OFF
Any Pair of
Hiking Boots
COUPON
Snow Shoes
$
5
/Day
Snow Shoe
Rental
2 Floors
Over 15,000
Square Feet
of Deals!
Sales Tax 3.7%
STES PAR
E K
MOUNTAIN SHOP
Fishing
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ESTES PARK MOUNTAIN SHOP
2050 Big Thompson Ave.
Estes Park, CO
970-586-6548
www.EstesParkMountainShop.com
Low
est
Rates!
RENTALS
• Mountain
Bikes
• Road Bikes
• Kids’ Bikes
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 21
R
ocky Mountain National Park offers
many beautiful and diverse destina-
tions. Among the more scenic are the
Park’s many waterfalls.
Visitors find the soothing sounds of
falling water mesmerizing, refreshing and
very photogenic.
The Park has a number of waterfalls, with
most on the east side of the Park.
The waterfalls on the Estes Park side of
the Park are well worth the hike. There are
approximately 20 major falls on the east side
of the Park. Many of these waterfalls are list-
ed on the official map visitors receive when
they enter the Park. To locate those not on
this map may require a more detailed map
such as the Department of Interior geological
survey map of Rocky Mountain National
Park.
This detailed map is available at most
book or sporting stores in Estes Park, or at
one of the Park’s visitor centers.
The waterfalls on the Estes Park side of
RMNP are all worth the hike, but, the size
of the waterfall depends on water volume
and in dry time such as this year, this can
vary. Seasonal flow of water also impacts the
waterfalls. The spring melt is the best time
for heavier water flow.
For those who are limited to a vehicle for
viewing a waterfall, the only one visible from
the road is Chasm Falls. Viewers can also see
the cascades at the Alluvial Fan. Both are
located in Horseshoe Park on the Old Fall
River Road and they can be viewed by walk-
ing only a few yards. The Alluvial Fan was
once the location of Horseshoe Falls. The
Falls were essentially eroded to their present
appearance by the Lawn Lake Flood in 1982.
Waterfall hikes to soothe the soul
Cascades of Adventure
Miles Starting
One Way Trailhead
Alberta Falls .6 Glacier Gorge Junction
Bridal Veil Falls 2.5 Cow Creek
Chasm Falls .5 Endovalley
Copeland Falls .2 Wild Basin
Fan Falls 7.2 Wild Basin
Fern Falls 1.5 Fern Lake
Glacier Falls 1.3 Glacier Gorge Junction
Grace Falls 4.0 Bear Lake
MacGregor Falls 1.5 Twin Owls
Lost Falls 5.5 Cow Creek or North Fork
Lyric Falls 4.2 Wild Basin
Marguerite Falls 4.4 Fern Lake
Mertensia Falls 4.5 Wild Basin
Ouzel Falls 3.0 Wild Basin
Ribbon Falls 4.5 Glacier Gorge Junction
Thousand Falls .2 Endovalley
Thunder Falls 6.5 Wild Basin
Timberline Falls 6.5 Glacier Gorge Junction
Trio Falls 5.0 Wild Basin
West Creek Falls 2.0 Cow Creek or North Fork
Waterfalls and where they are
Photo by Walt Hester
Chasm Falls is next to the historic Fall River Road.
Photo by Shining Mountains Group
A hiker enjoys a sojourn at the base of
Fern Falls.
Marys Lake Lodge & Resort—Estes Park’s Unsurpassed Getaway
Two Distinct Restaurants
2625 Marys Lake Road
3 Miles South on Highway 7
Lodge:970-586-5958
Toll Free: 877-442-6279
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Grandmaison’s Chalet Room
Experience elegance matched with phenomenal food.
The Tavern
Hearty meals in a fun-filled atmosphere. Best outdoor heated deck!
Live music year round!
Great facility for weddings or special events.
Luxurious Overnight Accomodations
Lodge suites & condos—some with private hot tubs or Jacuzzis!
Hot tub & outdoor heated pool on property.
The Escape Spa and Salon World-Class Spa
located on property— 970-577-9495
22 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
By Greg Berman
Colorado weather analyst
http://www.destinationestepark.com
Estes Park is on an island when it comes
to weather. Most high-elevation cities
endure, on a daily basis, severe weather
such as intense lightning-infested thunder-
storms in the summer and bitter cold, bliz-
zard-like conditions in the winter.
Estes Park, a town that’s rooted into the
ground at approximately 7,500 feet above
sea level, has a weather pattern all its own.
With the grand peaks of Rocky Mountain
National Park rising up to the west of
town, Estes is actually protected from the
intensely severe weather on a year-round
basis.
Resting in the shadows of this beautiful
park, the bulk of the bad stuff hangs on the
hilltops, with the town receiving the tail
end of almost every storm.
With each season having a mind of its
own, Estes Park does have its share of
weather changes. These changes, though,
are palatable and don’t take away from the
grandeur of the town and those who live
here.
Winter
Estes is not as cold as you might think,
and better yet, not as wet. Rocky Mountain
National Park creates such a stir in the win-
tertime with its brutal cold and regular
snowfalls measured in feet, that Estes gets a
bad rap for the icy chills floating over the
higher peaks west of town.
Many times while below-zero tempera-
tures and blizzards are wrecking havoc at
elevations over 10,000 feet, the town will
be basking under sunny skies and 55 degrees.
Such is the anomaly that is created by this
vast change in elevation. And it is one that
creates nightmares for those forecasters who
don’t bother to delineate between what is
transpiring up high and what is happening
in town. This is not to say that Estes does
not cash in on its fair share of snow.
However, for a town that rests at such a high
elevation, the average snowfall of 80 inches a
winter is not all that bad when you consider
it is not unusual for the higher peaks west of
the town to top the 3,000-inch mark each
winter.
The biggest headache in the winter is the
wind. This is probably considered a negative
by many, and yet, believe it not, the wind is
the reason Estes is not buried under multiple
feet of snow all winter. While the west winds
bring heavy snows to the higher peaks, they
also warm up and dry out as they float down
the mountainside. As a result, town folks are
left to battle the leftovers of what was once a
mighty storm.
Spring
The shortest season in Estes just might
be spring when you take into consideration
Changing Seasons —
Photo by Walt Hester
Estes Park’s climate is mild most of the year.
(800) 832-8980 • (970) 586-8410
117 E. Elkhorn Ave • PO Box 3945 • Estes Park, CO 80517
www.serendipitytrading.com
Summer Show
Schedule
Gibbs Othole and Dee Edaakie
Zuni Fetish Carvers
Friday, July 4th and Saturday, July 5th 10 am to 4 pm
Watson Honanie
Hopi Goldsmith
Saturday, July 12th 10 am to 4 pm
Pahponee
Kickapoo-Potawatami Potter
Saturday, July 26th 10 am to 4 pm
(800) 832-8980 • (970) 586-8410
117 E. Elkhorn Ave • PO Box 3945 • Estes Park, CO 80517
www.serendipitytrading.com
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Celebrating our 35th year offering the finest authentic
Native American jewelry, arts, and crafts at the same downtown location.
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that a greedy Old Man Winter
rarely packs his bags just because of
the official change in seasons.
A good example of this occurred
in April 1997, when February-like
chills snuck into town riding the
crest of a snowfall measuring in
excess of two feet. The good news is
that winter’s trespassing at this time
of year is usually of short duration,
and spring will usually rise up off
the carpet and elevate temperatures
to a more seasonal flavor.
If you are looking for the thun-
derstorms typical in most other
U.S. cities this time of year, then
you best suppress that urge until
after mid to late May. Estes is usu-
ally battling the prospects for snow
at least until mid-May, with the
potential for snow in the summer
months not completely out of the
question. However, this is a once-
in-a-blue-moon scenario, with
snow usually not infiltrating the
town beyond the spring season.
Summer
The summer months are filled
with the sunniest days and rainiest
months. Usually we can find a
microcosm of this all in one day,
with the sun shining majestically
until around 1 to 2 p.m. Then,
like magic, the benign, puffy white
cumulus that have been so inno-
cently floating in scattered num-
bers all join together and wage
their usual afternoon battle over
town.
You can almost set your watches
by the thunderboomers every after-
noon; however, don’t get discour-
aged. The sun is only a black cloud
away and usually makes several
more appearances before punching
the clock on another day’s work.
The thunderstorms that do blow
up over town can carry dangerous
lightning, heavy rains, and strong
winds. So the best advice is that
when this inclement weather does
emerge, simply take safe cover
until the storm is over. Always
head for higher ground when
caught out in the mountains dur-
ing heavy rains. Given that advice,
the summer months are simply
marvelous in Estes, and a time to
get out and enjoy the friendly folks
and the town’s events.
Fall
Now, for the time of year that is
absolutely the most colorful of all:
autumn. The fall is surely a time of
year that looks as if the giant artist
in the sky went a little wild with
the colors. From bright yellow and
gold to the different shades of red,
the Park region is transformed into
a myriad of colors that shine even
brighter because of the many days
of sun.
This time of year can be the
most benign, as the cold and
snows usually leave Estes alone, at
least on a consistent basis, until
after the middle of October. Many
times they even wait until
November to rev their icy motors.
This allows the town to revel in
days and days of pleasant tempera-
tures and dry conditions. This
weather pattern is a perfect one for
driving up Trail Ridge Road, the
highest continuous highway in the
U.S., and for viewing the many
autumnal delights in the area.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 23
— What to Expect
Photo by Walt Hester
Winter snows blanket downtown Estes Park.
Rocky
Mountain
National
Park
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• Clothing
• Outdoor Gear
• Souvenirs
• Home Decor
• Furniture
• Books
• Jewelry
• Grocery Store
• Ice Cream Shop
(970) 577-0043
Adjacent to Fall River Visitor Center
Hwy 34 @ North Entrance to Park
Plenty of Parking
Buses Welcome
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Estes Park Estes Park
BLACK MOUNTAIN TRADERS
WAREHOUSE
BLACK MOUNTAIN TRADERS
Come See Exotic Items
We Import From Central Asia:
Swat Valley, N. Pakistan And Afghanistan,
From Many Areas Not Presently Accessible.
Old And New Hand Carved Pillars, Wood
Chests, Cupboards, Carved Planks Of Many
Sizes and Shapes, Window Grates,
Rosewood Jewelry Boxes And Side Tables
With Inlaid Brass.
Rugs, Flat-Weaves And Felt Floor Coverings,
Horse Decorations, Afghan Saddles And
Saddle Covers.
Many Eclectic Decorator Items.
Come And See!
950-B Comanche Street
South On Hwy 7 in Estes Park, Right Turn on Comanche, 2 Blocks Past Holiday Inn,
Half Block Up Hill On Left.
Call: 970-586-8485, Cell: 970-215-6488 bmt@airbits.com
Call For Appointment, Or Take Your Chances And Come By.
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24 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Where to find the fun...
By Janice Mason
K
eeping up with all the event offerings in town, Estes Park
organizations fill the calendar year-round. Stop into the
Visitors Center; park in one of the new, expanded park-
ing lots and stroll into town on the Riverwalk. Find favorite
haunts or check out something new in this beautiful gateway to
Rocky Mountain National Park.
Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB)
The CVB Visitors Center offers ample parking and shuttle
service through town and into Rocky Mountain National Park.
The center, located at 500 Big Thompson Avenue, has increased
visitor services, making vacations in Estes Park a relaxing, fun-
filled experience. Helpful volunteer ambassadors assist visitors,
providing maps and information. Brochures and souvenirs are
located in the lobby. Community events are listed on the CVB
Web site — www.estesparkcvb.com. Click on Events and then
Calendar for vacation planning information. For more informa-
tion, call the CVB at (970) 577-9900 or 1-800-44-Estes.
Art Center of Estes Park
The Art Center of Estes Park Fine Art Gallery features juried
original art by Estes Valley and regional Colorado artists in a
broad range of media. The center offers featured artist’s exhibits
throughout the year, as well as a revolving collection from more
than 40 members. The gallery provides exhibit space for school
children and aspiring artists. The center also offers art classes,
slideshows and educational programs. The Art Center of Estes
Park is located at 517 Big Thompson Avenue in Stanley Village.
For more information, call (970) 586-5882 or visit
www.artcenterofestes.com.
Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park
The Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park presents visual and
performing arts programming year-round. The arts council and
fine art gallery will open in its new location on June 1 — 423
W. Elkhorn Avenue (directly in front of Performance Park out-
door amphitheater). Look for grander and greater offerings
through the arts council this summer and beyond. For more
information, call (970) 586-9203 or visit www.estesarts.com.
Estes Park organizations have
the 411 on
vacation planning
Photo by Walt Hester
A baby enjoys one of the many
Performance Park summer concerts.
LEAH’S LEAH’S
Come visit
(formerly Spirits of the Rocks)
owned by
Leah Simmons DeCapio,
Libby Hooper,
and Carol Simmons,
in "downtown" Glen Haven!
970-586-3831 www.leahshop.com
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LEAH’ S
Glen Haven
Estes Park Estes Park
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Mention this ad for a free surprise gift!
The 2008 Season
starts Saturday, May 10!
In the summer,
we are open daily: 9-6
(call for fall/winter hours)!
We feature fine arts & crafts from local as well as nationally recognized artists.
New this summer: We are happy to introduce our new COFFEE & TEA CAFÉ!
We proudly serve locally roasted Kind Coffee
Glen Haven is located
7 miles north of Estes Park.
LEAH's is across the street from
the "Inn of Glen Haven."
Estes Park Museum
The Estes Park Museum collects, interprets and preserves local history
through permanent and temporary exhibits, programs and events. The
museum educates visitors, exploring the rich history of Estes Park and
Rocky Mountain National Park. The Estes Park Museum is located at 200
Fourth Street off of Highway 36 just west of Lake Estes. Museum admis-
sion and programs are free. For more information, call the museum at
(970) 586-6256 or visit www.estesnet.com/museum.
Estes Park Music Festival
The Estes Park Music Festival offers a splendid summer concert series by
the Colorado Music Festival, conducted by the world-renowned conductor
Michael Christie. The Music Festival presents a free Patriotic and Pops con-
cert by the entire Colorado Music Festival orchestra in July. It also presents
a Sunday afternoon concert series at the historic Stanley Hotel, November
through April. For schedule information, call 586-9519 or visit
www.estesparkmusicfestival.org.
Estes Park Public Library
The Estes Park Public Library offers a Summer Reading Program for
children, provides meeting space for a variety of community programming
and free Internet service by appointment. Visit the Estes Park Public
Library at 335 E. Elkhorn Avenue, call (970) 586-8116, or visit
www.estes.lib.co.us.
Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies
The Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies brings theater productions to the
Estes Valley year-round. They also offer the Fine Arts and Crafts Festival in
September. For more information, call the Cultural Arts Council of Estes
Park at (970) 586-9203 or visit www.fineartsguild.org. Theater ticket infor-
mation can be obtained by calling the Macdonald Book Shop at (970) 586-
3450.
The Fine Arts Guild is also leading the call for a new Performing Arts
Center in Estes Park. Progress has been made in raising the necessary funds
for the construction of the new theater. For more information, visit
www.estesparktheater.com.
Estes Park Senior Center
The Estes Park Senior Center has a busy activities schedule and serves
weekly lunches at noon. The Senior Center is located at 220 Fourth Street
and is open Monday through Friday. The Senior Center Summer Breakfast
Buffets are open to the public and held on June 14, July 12, Aug. 9 and
Sept. 6, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. The cost is $7/adults, $3/children ages 4 to
7, free/children under age 4. No reservations are needed. For more informa-
tion, call the Senior Center at (970) 586-2996 or visit
www.estesnet.com/seniorcenter.
Performance Park
Performance Park outdoor amphitheater is located at 417 W. Elkhorn
Avenue at the west end of the Riverwalk. The beautiful rock backdrop cre-
ates impeccable acoustics with a lawn in front of the stage, and tables and
chairs along the river for visitor’s picnicking convenience. Performances take
place May through August. For schedule information, call the CVB at
(970) 577-9900.
Rocky Ridge Music Center
Rocky Ridge Music Center (RRMC) is a summer music center/camp for
middle school, high school and college students. They offer chamber and
orchestral music, private lessons and music theory for all types of instru-
mentalists. Student and faculty concerts are offered throughout the summer
at RRMC, located at 465 Longs Peak Road. For more information, call
(970) 586-4031 or visit www.rockyridge.org.
Stanley Museum
The Stanley Hotel, built by F.O. (Freelan Oscar) Stanley of Stanley
Steamer automobile fame, opened on June 22, 1909. The Stanley Museum
is located at 517 Big Thompson Avenue in Lower Stanley Village. For more
information, call (970) 577-1903 or visit www.stanleymuseum.org.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 25
...the art,
the music...
Photo by Walt Hester
Mother and daughter perform for the Estes Park Music Festival.
BECK Architects
ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING, INTERIORS
970-586-3913
www.twbeckarchitects.com
PASSIVE & ACTIVE SOLAR SYSTEMS
SUSTAINABLE, HIGH PERFORMANCE HOMES
THOMAS W. BECK, AIA, NCARB
Extraordinary design pays extraordinary dividends.
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26 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Photo by Janice Mason
Take the Riverwalk just south of West Elkhorn Avenue and follow the river to the waterwheel to Performance Park and beyond.
Discover the pedestrian path
By Janice Mason
T
ake in the sights and sounds, slow down the pace and escape the rat race in Estes Park. Enjoy
the view and the wildlife, or the sound of the rolling water along the Riverwalk. Grab a cup of
coffee or stroll into one of the many shops along the way. Relax, you’re in Estes Park, far away
from the hustle and bustle of the big city.
Fur & Leather
Fur & Leather
The Most Impressive Collection of Outerwear in
Northern Colorado & Much, Much More!
Men’s & Ladies’ Apparel
450 Moraine Ave. Estes Park, CO
970-586-4539
(1/2 mile west of downtown on Highway 36)
www.TheTwistedPine.com
Lone Pine Leather • Scully Leather • Remy Leather
Motorcycle Wear • Hats • Lady Brighton Belts & Jewelry
Leather & Fleece Coats • Fur & Woven Rugs
Native American Home Decor & Jewelry • Hides, Pelts & Taxidermy
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 27
Lake Estes Trail
Park at the Visitors Center (500 Big Thompson Avenue) and follow
the Riverwalk east to Lake Estes. Go the distance around the lake (3.75
miles) or just enjoy a short stroll. Wildlife and magnificent views of
Rocky Mountain National Park are the main attractions of the Lake
Estes Trail.
Riverwalk
From the Visitors Center, walk through the underpass and hike west
into town along the Riverwalk. Take a seat on the outdoor patio of an
Estes Park restaurant or coffee shop. Enter shops from the back door
along the Riverwalk and enjoy Estes Park shopping and nature along the
way. The newly beautified Riverwalk Wiest Plaza expansion, starts at
Moraine Avenue and winds up to West Elkhorn Avenue and turns into
Fall River Trail. (The downtown Riverwalk is pedestrian only.)
Fall River Trail
Fall River Trail starts at West Elkhorn Avenue at the waterwheel. Walk
west to the outdoor Performance Park amphitheater where visitors enjoy
music performances all summer long. Stroll into the West Park Center
and check out the new Cultural Arts Council location. The trail contin-
ues west along a wooded path on the Fall River and will eventually link
to Rocky Mountain National Park.
Knoll-Willows Trail
From Bond Park, in the center of downtown, enter the Knoll-Willows
Trail from the north side of the Municipal Building. The trail winds up
to the historic Birch Cabin and the ruins, which feature excellent views
of Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. Another trailhead
starts at the top of Wonderview Drive, across from the Stanley Hotel,
and leads to the ruins.
Fish Creek Trail
Enter Fish Creek Trail on the southeast end of Lake Estes. Go south
along Fish Creek Road past the high school and the Estes Park Golf
Course. Enjoy the view of Longs Peak along the way.
A dog stops his person to take a look at the Big Thompson River on
Barlow Plaza along the Riverwalk.
457 E. Wonderview,
Estes Park, CO
80517
1-800-607-3538x4022
Days (970) 481-5188
Evenings 303-823-5022
Adams@Realtor.com
More Photos: www.TomAdams.net
www.TomAdamsRealEstate.com
381 WICHITA
A River Runs Through It:
This unique, custom 3300 sq.
ft. log home on 1.9 acres offers
Italian porcelain tile and
beetle-kill pine floors, aspen
ceilings, tumbled marble
bathrooms, a 15,000 pound
moss rock fireplace, master
suite, large redwood deck in a
forested setting. Lower level
has 2 car garage, 22’x16’ shop,
22’x10’ bonus room, bedroom
and full bath. Log cabin feel
with all amenities. $700,000
540 LAUREL LANE, #4
Great little cabin with huge Longs Peak &
Meeker & Divide views. Short walk to Rocky
Mountain National Park & close to town.
Income potential for short term vacation
rental. Inviting deck for bar-b-que & snow
capped viewing. Classic Rocky Mountain
retreat. $186,000
1963 KIOWA
The Best of everything…Granite, travertine &
marble for all counters, floors and baths…
Energy efficient, new furnace, central air,
fresh air ventilation, Nile Sound system,
media room, ether net, DSL, stained concrete
patios front & back, gorgeous kitchen
cabinets, granite island w/professional gas
range, marble great room fireplace w/ledger
stone surround & wood mantel. Two acre lot
next to National Forest, southern
exposure…and much more. $595,000
402 IROQUOIS
Pinewood Springs Very secluded lot on the
river w/ over 1 acre of land & trees. 3
bedroom-2 bath-2 car garage -new roof-fire
place-new furnace- many upgrades of flooring
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in private forest setting. Unique location.
$339,000
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24
Ranch Estate: 4 bed-6 bath 2 master
suites,open floor plan, granite
counters, wood cabinetry, island
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$950,000
532 KIOWA ROAD
Private/secluded 5.5 acres, 3600 sqft well built
home. Clear-heart redwood siding concrete roof,
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view home. Close to Estes Park, only 30 minutes
to Boulder. $575,000
By Janice Mason
F
rom warm, intimate gallery shows in winter
to visions of painters dotting the Rocky
Mountain landscape throughout the sum-
mer, the Estes Park art scene expands the heart,
mind and soul. Now that the Cultural Arts
Council of Estes Park has a new home at 423 W.
Elkhorn Avenue, the arts council will feature larg-
er opening receptions with visiting musicians and
room for its ever-growing programming schedule.
The arts council sits directly in front of
Performance Park outdoor amphitheater, home to
the arts council’s Thursday Night Live music
series.
“It opens up vistas and new possibilities — the
proximity to Performance Park —with ample
parking,” said Lynda Vogel, executive director for
the Cultural Arts Council for the past 18 years.
“We will also have a far greater physical presence
on Elkhorn. It’s now wide open — what we can
develop and bring.”
The arts council presents museum quality
shows including original paintings, sculpture,
pottery, weaving, jewelry, woodcarving, Native
American crafts, glasswork, handmade paper,
photography and more.
The grand opening of the new Cultural Arts
Council of Estes Park will take place on June 1,
with the arrival of the international exhibit, “Far
and New Horizons.”
After the international show opens, the sum-
mer programming will begin full swing with the
Summer Art Walk featuring area galleries, and
the seventh annual Estes Park Plein Air 2008-
Painting the Parks event, taking place Aug. 9
through September.
Art walks present Estes Park’s finest arts coun-
cil, member galleries. Locations often have artists
on hand, demonstrating technique in different
art mediums. Most galleries are open daily
throughout the year, though exact hours vary
with each location. Studio tours present an inti-
mate look inside the life and work of the Estes
Park artist. Art Walk maps are available at the
Cultural Arts Council, visitor’s centers and mem-
ber galleries.
The Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park
enhances the quality and accessibility of visual
and performing arts for people of all ages and has
brought programming to the state of Colorado as
a 501 (c)(3) non-profit arts agency since 1990. It
provides free or affordable arts programming and
acts as a vital information and support resource
for the arts community.
Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
The Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park, located
at 423 W. Elkhorn Avenue, is handicapped acces-
sible with ample gallery-front parking. For more
information, contact the Cultural Arts Council at
586-9203, cacep@earthlink.net or visit
www.estesarts.com.
28 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Revel in the artistic experience
Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park — bigger and better than ever
Photos by Teresa Binstock
Left: LaNell Arndt paints the
Park Theater during the
plein air event, which takes
place in August. Above, the
finished product, “Next
Performance.” Below: Artists
paint subjects in Riverside
Plaza at the Estes Park Plein
Air Quick Draw event.
Summer schedule
June 1 to July 6 — “Far and Near Horizons” featuring Landscape Artists
International (LAI) and International Plein Air Painters (IPAP) in the
Cultural Arts Council Fine Art Gallery. Contemporary landscape artists
seek to create environmental awareness, stewardship of the land and appre-
ciation for landscape painting in this world tour. “Far and Near Horizons”
includes 18 artists from Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic and the United
States.
“We are excited to bring this caliber of work to Colorado and at the
same time, honored to be part of their worldwide mission using visual arts
as the medium,” said Lynda S. Vogel, executive director of the Cultural Arts
Council of Estes Park, “As a gate-
way community to Rocky
Mountain National Park, we
have presented previous exhibi-
tions that exemplify land stew-
ardship and preservation through
national tours like ‘Arts for the
Parks.’ We are grateful to work
with IPAP and LAI and hope the
public will join us this summer as
we unveil ‘Far and Near
Horizons’ in Colorado.”
The Cultural Arts Council
Fine Art Gallery is the only
Colorado stop on the world tour.
The opening reception will take
place from 1 to 4 p.m. Artists
will be on hand and refreshments
will be served.
June 1 through Sept. 1 —
“10th Summer Art Walk” featur-
ing a self-guided tour of area gal-
leries and artist studios. Tour
maps are available at the Cultural
Arts Council, visitor’s centers and participating galleries.
June 19 to Aug. 21 —Thursday Night Live at Performance Park, 417
W. Elkhorn Avenue. The 10th annual summer concert series takes place on
Thursday nights at 7 p.m., weather permitting. Bring a blanket or chair and
enjoy classical, jazz, folk, current music, theater and/or dance performances.
July 11 to Aug. 3 — “Legends & Lore II.” The tradition continues with
the second exhibition of art works from Estes Park’s past that also celebrates
today’s artistic heritage. The exhibit includes a collection of rarely seen art,
objects and photographs on loan and a limited sale of art from private col-
lections. Featured artists are Dorothy Carnine Scott, E.E. Herrmann and
others to be announced. The opening reception will take place on Friday,
July 11, from 5 to 8 p.m.
Aug. 9 to Sept. 30 — Seventh annual Estes Park Plein Air 2008 -
Painting the Parks. Beauty and inspiration go hand-in-hand when painters
come to the Estes Valley and Northern Rockies to paint the parks. Fifty
artists from across the nation arrive to paint on-location from Aug. 9
through 22, choosing locations including, Rocky Mountain National Park,
forest lands, river canyons, views along the Peak to Peak Scenic Highway,
urban areas and/or people and places in Estes Park. Starting Aug. 23, the
public can view the finished works on display through Sept. 30.
Aug. 21 — Estes Park Plein Air - Paint Our Town. Artists will paint
along the Riverwalk and throughout the downtown area from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Aug. 23 — Estes Park Plein Air Quick Draw and Auction. Watch as
artists paint live models (or any scene) in a fast-paced, 90-minute time
frame from 8:30 a.m. to 12 pm. in Riverside Plaza, in the center of down-
town Estes Park, on the Riverwalk. The auction immediately follows after
the whistle denotes the end of the Quick Draw event.
Aug. 23 —Estes Park Plein Air Gala opening day festivities at the arts
council and at Earthwood Collections, located at 141 E. Elkhorn Avenue.
Fifty artists from across the country exhibit freshly painted works created
outdoors and on location through August. The show opens to the public at
12 p.m. Gala
receptions and
awards, in the
amount of $7,000,
are presented to the
winning artists.
For further
schedule informa-
tion continuing
throughout the end
of the year and
beyond, visit
www.estesarts.com.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 29
Photos this page courtesy Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park
“Above Estes Park” by 2008 EPPA artist Tamara Simmons.
Counter-clockwise, paintings
showing in the exhibit “Far and
Near Horizons” at the Cultural Arts
Council’s Fine Art Gallery through
July 6: “Blooming Tree Adobe” by
Leslie Allen; “Old Fountain” by
Sandra Nunes; “The Wind and Sea”
by Kathryn A. McMahon.
30 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
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Certified Drivers
Wednesday Nights
at Performance Park
T
he Town of Estes Park spon-
sors Wednesday Nights at
Performance Park from June
18 to Aug. 27 at 7 p.m. The
Performance Park outdoor
amphitheater is located at 417 W.
Elkhorn Avenue. There’s plenty of
parking adjacent to the park. Bring
a lawn chair or blanket for comfort-
able seating in the open air
amphitheater. All concerts are free.
June 18 — Bonnie Lowdermilk:
Jazz singer/pianist Bonnie
Lowdermilk performs jazz stan-
dards. She is also known for finding
unknown treasures, which have
rarely been performed or recorded.
Her singing is charged with emo-
tion and sensuality, and her voice is
supple and clear with a warm, low
register and luminous treble.
June 25 —Marimba Band: The
marimba is a musical instrument in
the percussion family. Keys or bars
(usually made of wood) are struck
with mallets to produce unique
musical tones.
July 2 — Estes Park Jazz Big
Band directed by Chuck Varilek:
The Estes Park Jazz Big Band per-
forms music from the swing era to
contemporary compositions.
July 9 — Sferes & White: This
acoustic duo has discovered an
uncommon synergy, blending clear
and luscious harmonies with com-
plex and imaginative guitar playing.
Their performances feature an eclec-
tic and soulful combination of
blues, roots and rock.
July 16 — Dulcimer Orchestra:
The Dulcimer Orchestra perform-
ing folk, Irish, Scottish and
American traditional music on ham-
mered and fretted dulcimers, guitar,
bodhrán and penny whistle.
July 23 — O-Tones Brass Band:
Original funk, Latin and soul mixed
with a serious helping of New
Orleans groove is what you get with
this eight-piece group. The O-Tones
have marched in parades, played at
festivals and Mardi Gras celebra-
tions, taking the grooves out into
the crowds. They have also played
numerous concert venues and bars,
opening for the Preservation Hall
Jazz Band, among others.
July 30 — Lisa Bell: Jazz singer
Lisa Bell writes much of her own
material, mixes in influences from
pop music to Broadway, and crafts
compelling modern arrangements
that alternate between trumpet and
sax on some tunes and non-tradi-
tional jazz instruments such as
dobro and pedal steel on others.
Aug. 6 — Acoustic Roots Trio:
Randy Kelley and Bonnie Carol
accompany Nancy Cook on her
original songs in an acoustic trio
including bass, guitar, mandolin,
fiddle, hammered dulcimer, marim-
ba and congas.
Aug. 13 — To be announced
Aug. 20 — Clint Clymer:
Country vocalist Clint Clymer com-
bines sounds reminiscent of Elvis,
Jim Morrison and Chris Ledoux.
Aug. 27 — To be announced
For more information, call (970)
577-9900, 800-44-ESTES or visit
www.estesparkcvb.com.
Thursday Night Live
The Cultural Arts Council of
Estes Park sponsors a series of free
concerts on Thursday evenings at 7
p.m. Performances take place from
June 26 to Aug. 21 at 7 p.m. at
Performance Park outdoor
amphitheater. The Cultural Arts
Council of Estes Park is located at
423 W. Elkhorn Avenue directly in
front of Performance Park. For a
complete listing of the scheduled
performances, call (970) 586-9203
or visit www.estesarts.com.
Compiled by Janice Mason
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 31
Performance Park
The ultimate outdoor music experience
Photo by Walt Hester
The crowd enjoying Jazz Fest,
which takes place in May.
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T
he Estes
Park Music
Festival
offers an exciting
mix of professional
music performances
year-round.
Outstanding classical,
international, vocal and
instrumental musicians take
the stage to measure up to the
excellence only the Estes Park Music
Festival provides.
The summer offers programming by the
Colorado Music Festival chamber orchestra fea-
turing American conductor Michael Christie.
Born in Buffalo, New York, in 1974, Christie’s
exceptional career spans conducting posts on
three continents. After gaining early international
recognition in 1995, when he was awarded a spe-
cial prize for “Outstanding Potential” at the First
International Sibelius Conductor’s Competition
in Helsinki, Christie has been consistently identi-
fied among the most talented and most closely
watched conductors of his generation. Christie
was appointed music director of the Colorado
Music Festival in 2000. During his first six sea-
sons, he has increased festival audiences through
his enthusiastic leadership, innovative program-
ming and widely acclaimed audience-building
initiatives.
The Sounds of Summer indoor concerts, fea-
turing the Colorado Music Festival, will be held
in the historic, acoustically ideal Concert Hall at
the Stanley Hotel, located at 333 W. Wonderview
Avenue, on June 20, July 21 and 28 at 7:30 p.m.
Subscription and individual tickets are available.
For more information, schedules and ticket infor-
mation, call 586-9519 or visit www.estesparkmu-
sicfestival.org.
The Sounds of Summer 2008
Featuring the Colorado Music Festival
June 30 — “Magnificent Mozart” featuring
Michael Christie, conductor, and Glenn
Einschlag, bassoon.
Mozart: Serenade No. 6 in D Major, K. 239,
“Serenata notturna”
Mozart: Bassoon Concerto in B-flat Major, K.
191
Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C Major, K.
425, “Linz”
July 21 — Joana Carneiro, guest conductor,
and Bjorn Ranheim, cello
Dvorak: Serenade for Strings
Haydn: Cello Concerto in D Major
Kodaly: Dances of Galanta
Guest conductor Joana Carneiro has attracted
considerable attention as one of the most out-
standing young conductors working today. She
currently serves as assistant conductor with the
Los Angeles Philharmonic, working closely with
Esa-Pekka Salonen. Carneiro was principal guest
conductor of the Metropolitan Orchestra of
Lisbon in 2005-2006, and was named official
guest conductor of the Gulbenkian Orchestra in
2006-2007, working with the orchestra at least
four weeks every year.
July 28— Tapage, tap dance duo featuring
Michael Christie, conductor
Revueltas: Homenaje a Frederico Lorca
(Homage to Lorca)
Revueltas: Sensemaya
Piazzolla: Four for Tango
Alouette (tap Solo)
Frank: Leyendas: Andean Walkabout
Ginastera: Variaciones Concertantes
A unique dancing duet, Mari Fujibayashi
(Japan) and Olivia Rosenkrantz (France), com-
bine their Asian and European roots with a New
York twist. Tapage’s choreographic approach
incorporates dramatic intensity and rhythmic
complexity with a contemporary gesture.
Patriotism and Pops concert: The free outdoor
Patriotic Pops Concert featuring Scott O’Neil,
guest conductor, begins at 7 p.m. on July 7 at
Performance Park outdoor amphitheater, 417 W.
Elkhorn Avenue. Always an Independence cele-
bration favorite, the entire Colorado Music
Festival orchestra takes the Performance Park
stage for a summer evening of patriotic music.
Audience members pack the outdoor venue to lis-
ten and sing along to songs in tribute to the
United States of America.
The Estes Park Music Festival also presents a
Winter Series of exquisite performances at the
Historic Stanley Hotel. The concert series takes
place November through April on Sunday after-
noons at 2 p.m. featuring a variety of chorale,
instrumental and solo performances.
Compiled by Janice Mason
32 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Estes Park Music Festival
Exquisite performances
Photo by Walt Hester
Colorado Music Festival conductor Michael
Christie takes a moment to enjoy the sing-
along portion of the Patriotic and Pops con-
cert held at Performance Park in July.
Courtesy photo
Tapage, tap dance duo will perform July 28.
Photo by Walt Hester
Cello in concert at Performance Park.
By Janice Mason
F
ilmmakers, festival attendees and industry
professionals from around the world attend
the Estes Park Film Festival each year to
enjoy a diverse selection of independent, feature-
length films, shorts and documentaries. The Estes
Park Film Festival has been showcasing some of
the world’s best in cutting edge, independent cin-
ema since 2006.
The third annual Estes Park Film Festival will
take place from Sept. 11 to 14, at the Historic
Park Theatre. Founded in 2005, the annual Estes
Park Film Festival traditionally takes place the
second weekend of September. Local residents
Sean Doherty and Cliff Armitage, co-directors,
created the festival.
“Part of our mission is to bring independent
film to Estes Park and to promote the preserva-
tion of cinematic landmarks like the Park
Theatre,” said Doherty. “Alternative events like
this help to keep theaters like this open, which I
think is great.”
Doherty and Armitage present a call for entries
each year to the independent filmmakers. Films
are then selected and accepted for the festival.
The weekend presents educational seminars
and numerous parties, including the opening
party, parties after each showing and the awards
gala. The parties offer audiences the opportunity
to meet the artists and talk to directors about
their experience in the theatre.
“It’s really cool because you get to watch the
movie and when the movie’s done, you get to
meet the actors, ask
questions and learn from them,” said Doherty.
“It’s really a unique experience.”
The Park Theatre, constructed by J.L. Jackson
in 1913 and completed by C.H. Bond in 1915,
stands as a historic landmark in Estes Park. The
building was later sold to Ralph Gwynn in 1922,
who operated the theatre until his death. Ola and
Richard Stanger purchased the building in 1982
and the family continues to show films at the
theatre to this day.
The Park Theatre is located at 130 Moraine
Avenue. For ticket information, call (970) 231-
2580 or visit www.estesparkfilm.com.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 33
Estes Park
Film Festival
Creating a tradition
Photos by Walt Hester
The crowd mingles in the lobby after one of the films during the 2007 festival.
Sean Doherty, co-founder of the Film Festival, converses during a
2007 after-film party in the lobby.
• Honesty • Integrity • Service
John Miltenberger
Call
970-231-6699
Call
970-231-6699
(and Max The Wonder Dog)
email: jamiltenberger@frii.com
http://www.johnmiltenberger.com
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Rocky Mountain Lifestyle Realty, LLC
34 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
R
ocky Mountain National Park
is home to 60 species of
mammals. This incredible
diversity of wildlife is a reflection of
the wide range of habitats found in
the Park due to variations in eleva-
tion, climate and plant communi-
ties.
Mammals in the Park can be sep-
arated into three main groups: the
small mammals, the hooved animals
or ungulates, and the carnivores or
meat eaters.
Small animals
There are 40 species of small
mammals in RMNP. They range in
size from the water shrew to the
beaver, which can weigh up to 50
pounds. With the exception of the
shrews, the bats and the rabbits,
these animals are all rodents.
Following is a brief sampling of
some of the more prominent small
mammals in the Park.
Wyoming ground
squirrel
The Wyoming ground squirrel is
a commonly seen animal in the
Park during the summer. Although
they hibernate for seven to eight
months, they are an important prey
for coyotes, and raptors such as
hawks and eagles. A winter hiberna-
tor, the ground squirrel may be seen
throughout the Park from the mon-
tane valleys to alpine levels.
Yellow-bellied
marmot
Yellow-bellied marmots are colo-
nial animals that live throughout
the Park but are especially common
above tree line. They are one of the
largest rodents in the Park, reaching
weights of over 10 pounds.
Marmots can be seen on a number
of days in the Park and along Trail
Ridge Road.
Litter sizes average a bit over four
pups, of which about half survive
their first year.
Yellow-bellied marmots chuck,
whistle, and trill when alarmed by
predators. Only the whistles and
trills are loud alarm calls.
Pika
The pika, or “rock rabbit” is the
smallest member of the rabbit fami-
ly. They live on rock slides and talus
slopes in the subalpine zones at
9,500 feet and higher, and above
tree line. Although well-camou-
flaged, pikas can often be located by
their piercing call that sounds like a
high-pitched “eep”.
Pikas are generalist herbivores,
eating almost anything that grows
near their rocky habitat. Each pika
collects vegetation during the short
alpine summer and stores it in a
"hay pile" in the rocks. Pikas don't
hibernate. They use their hay piles
as a food source during the long
alpine winter. They also continue to
forage on what ever is available
under the snow, including bark and
lichens.
Pikas are individually territorial,
fiercely defending portions of a
talus slope from each other during
the summer haying season.
Porcupines
Fairly common but not often
seen in all forests throughout the
Park. Like other rodents, porcu-
pines chew bones and antlers to
obtain minerals. They are frequent
visitors to backcountry camp-
grounds, mainly because tools and
backpacks that humans have
On the Wild Side
Photo by John Cordsen
Porcupines are usually timid ani-
mals that avoid contact with
humans.
Photo by John Cordsen
Yellow-bellied marmots live
throughout the Park but are
more common above tree line.
Visit us at www.RMConnection.com
Home of Rocky Mountain Catalog • 1-800-679-3600
Estes Park’s Family Activewear Store
141 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park • (970) 586-3361
Estes Park’s Largest Selection of Outdoor Clothing
156 E. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park • (970) 586-2114
• Hiking • Climbing • Camping • Travel • Rentals
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OUTDOOR WORLD
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 35
touched have a desired salty residue
on them.
Beaver
Beaver weave a complex web in
Rocky Mountain National Park. Beaver
use willow and aspen for food and to
build dams and lodges.
There are some beaver in the Park
with a population thriving in Endovalley
near the headwaters of the Big
Thompson River.
Beaver were plentiful before there was a
lot of trapping in Beaver Meadows in 1941
and 1942. There are no beaver there now.
Snowshoe Hare
Snowshoe hare are famous for
their seasonal molts. In the sum-
mer, the coat is a grizzled rusty or
grayish brown. During the winter,
the fur is almost entirely white,
except for black eyelids and the
blackened tips on the ears. The
soles of the feet are densely furred,
with stiff hairs (forming the snow-
shoe) on the hind feet.
Snowshoe hare browse on green
grasses, and forbs.
Major predators of snowshoe hare
include red foxes, coyotes and bobcats.
Ungulates
There are four species of ungu-
lates or hooved mammals found in
the Park. They can be separated into
two distinct families: the deer fami-
ly, which have antlers that are shed
and regrow each year, and the sheep
family, which carry true horns that
grow throughout the life of the ani-
mal.
The deer family
Elk (Wapiti)
Elk are the Park’s most common
ungulate. Brown-colored animals
with white rump patches, they can
be seen throughout the Park.
Elk can be dangerous to humans.
In the spring, mother elk fiercely
protect their newborn calves, ward-
ing off any and all creatures that
come between them and their young
by slashing with their hooves.
During the fall, bull elk become
aggressive during the breeding rut.
Clashes between massive bull elk are
common. They use their antlers as
weapons as they lock in combat
with other bulls for breeding rights
to large harems of cow elk. Visitors
should be cautious and not
approach elk during any season and
to watch for any aggressive displays
by the animals (raised ears, glaring
looks, stamping of feet, snorting,
etc.) If they move away, the visitor
has approached too closely. Despite
their close proximity to humans, elk
are still wild animals.
Moose
The moose is the largest member
of the deer family. Moose are found
more commonly in the Kawuneeche
Valley on the west side of the Park,
however, they have been seen on the
east side, including Sprague Lake
and the southwest corner of Estes
Park near Hwy. 7 and Fishcreek.
Mule deer
One look at a mule deer and it is
easy to see how they got their name.
Their large ears are distinctive. Mule
deer are usually a dark gray-brown,
with a small white rump patch and
a small, black-tipped tail.
Photo by John Cordsen
Moose are more commonly seen
on the Park’s west side.
Photo by Walt Hester
Sheep Lakes in Horseshoe Park is a popular fall hangout for bighorn
sheep.
Big Thompson
Indian Village
VISIT OUR UNIQUE SHOP
Collectable Handmade Indian Jewelry
Navajo Rugs • Baskets • Pottery • Sand Paintings
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Old West Collectables
1348 West Highway 34
Big Thompson Canyon
Loveland, CO 80537
(970) 667-9353
carman1348@aol.com
Halfway between Estes & Loveland on Hwy 34
(at the Tipi)
37 Years in Same Location
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Two Hours
Three and Four Hours • Mountain Trails
Located at Glacier Lodge on Hwy 66,
3 miles from Downtown • 970-586-5890
www.NationalParkGatewayStables.com
36 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Mule deer are browsers and eat a
great variety of vegetable matter,
including fresh green leaves, twigs,
lower branches of trees, and various
grasses.
They are commonly seen along
the roadways in the Park.
Males are larger than females.
The bucks' antlers, which start
growth in spring and are shed
around December each year, are
high and branch forward.
Mule deer are excellent swim-
mers.
The sheep and goat
family
Bighorn sheep
Bighorn sheep can be found at
many locations throughout the Park
but are commonly seen along Fall
River Road in the Horseshoe Park
area or along Trail Ridge Road at
the Rock Cut.
Bighorn have a sandy-brown coat
and a white rump patch. Rams have
massive spirally brown horns. Ewes
have short, spiky brown horns.
Bighorn are primarily grazers and
may migrate seasonally between low
grassy slopes and the alpine tundra.
Escape terrain with rocky ledges is
usually nearby.
The carnivores
There are four families of carni-
vore in the Park, the weasel, dog, cat
and bear families.
The weasel family
The weasels generally have elon-
gated bodies, short legs, and glands,
which produce a strong-smelling
scent. Pine martens are common
throughout the forested areas of the
Park. Other members of the weasel
family found in RMNP include the
long-tailed weasel and badger.
The cat family
Two members of the cat family
are found in Rocky Mountain
National Park. The largest of the
two is the mountain lion or cougar.
These big cats are rarely seen.
Cougars are secretive, solitary
hunters that feed primarily on deer
but will also eat smaller game such
as rabbits and rodents if food sup-
plies are limited. Cougars are skilled
night hunters with excellent eyesight
and superb hearing.
The other member of the cat
family is the bobcat. These cats get
their name from their short, bobbed
tail. Bobcats are medium-sized cats,
slightly smaller and similar in
appearance to their cousin the lynx.
Their coat varies in color from
shades of buff or brown fur with
spotted or lined markings in dark
brown or black. A bobcat measures
17 to 23 inches in height and 25 to
41 inches in length. Males weigh
approximately 16 to 28 pounds,
while females typically weigh 10 to
18 pounds.
Rabbits are the staple of the bob-
cat diet. They are also known to eat
rodents, birds, bats and even adult
deer (usually killed during the win-
ter months).
The dog family
The coyote is a medium-sized
grayish dog with a slender muzzle,
large pointed ears, and a bushy tail.
Coyotes are often seen patrolling the
road right-of-ways and meadows in
search of small rodents.
The bear family
Black bears aren’t necessarily
black. Their colors range from black
to a light cinnamon brown.
The black bear is approximately
four to seven feet from nose to tail,
and two to three feet high at the
withers. It has small eyes, rounded
ears, a long snout, a large body, a
short tail, and shaggy hair.
Bears are adaptable. They can be
found anywhere from the forests of
the Park to the neighborhoods of
Estes Park.
Photo by Tony Wedick
Members of the weasel family are noted for their short legs and
elongated bodies.
342 Moraine Ave.
586-2988
2
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7
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An Estes Park
Tradition
for
over
30
years!
Since 1907, Estes Park Center has provided
families and groups with pristine scenery, affordable
lodge rooms, cabins, meals, activities and a
wholesome environment. View wildlife, hike and
daydream at YMCAof the Rockies.
Explore God’s Country
www. ymcarockies. org
Cal l Now!
(970) 586-3341
Lodge Rooms Still Available for Summer !
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 37
Celtic tradition on parade at Scots Fest
1976-2008: 32 Years of Celtic Tradition
September 4-7, 2008
A
lways held the weekend after Labor Day, the Longs Peak
Scottish/Irish Highland Festival is a bagpipeful of fun for folks of all
nationalities and generations.
The festival starts with the 7:30 p.m. Thursday Tattoo. The field is open
Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Evening activities Friday
and Saturday at 7:30 are: the Colorado Celtic Rock Concert, the Folk
Concert, and new this year, the Longs Peak Concert, Estes Tattoo, and
starting at 10 p.m, the Ceilidh, to pick up after the other events end and
the celebrating continues into the wee hours of the next morning. Sunday
morning, the Pancake Breakfast, where you can dine with the Jousters and
Athletes, will begin at 8 a.m until 10 a.m. Sunday evening marks the end of
the festival with the Honored Guest Banquet, a superb meal complete with
dress kilts, suits, evening dress attire for the ladies, a cash bar and live enter-
tainment beginning with cocktails at 7 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m.
The parade starts at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at the west end of the
main street (Elkhorn Avenue) and continues to the Visitor’s Center just past
the Hwy 34/36 intersection. There are shuttle busses that will take people
from the Festival Field to the Municipal Building on Elkhorn Avenue, start-
ing at 8 a.m. on Saturday. They will make a loop all day Saturday and
Sunday from downtown to the Festival Field and will stop at 6 p.m. both
days.
There will be pipers piping and drummers drumming, kilts and plumed
bonnets, brave steeds bearing medieval jousters in combat, caber, stone and
hammer-throwing athletes.
You’ll hear international and world-famous singers and entertainers for
free on the field and watch the “creme de la crème” of young dancers exe-
cuting the Highland, Folk and Irish dances of their heritage. The dogs
indigenous to the British Isles will win your hearts and tempt you to add a
“family member.” Fine merchants and talented crafters with exotic Celtic
merchandise, beautiful clothing, exquisite jewelry, fascinating heraldry his-
tories and art in all its many guises will satisfy the most ardent souvenir col-
lector. Add the clans with their gorgeous tartan displays, hospitality tents
and joyous reunions, and you cannot but feel welcome and happy.
Hungry, are you? Then the Festival is a haven of the familiar American
foods and Celtic specialties — turkey legs, hamburgers, ice cream, Scotch,
beer, haggis, meat pies, funnel cakes and much, much more!
Come to Estes Park for the Festival. Renew your spirits, dance to the
pipes and find out what a Celtic tradition means.
Photos by Walt Hester
Star power — see the heavens at
Estes Park Memorial Observatory
O
rion? Cassiopeia? Venus? If you’re looking to
really see the stars, planets and constella-
tions in the clear night skies, you can
mosey on over to Estes Park’s newest star
attraction, the Estes Park Memorial
Observatory, located on the grounds
of Estes Park High School.The
Angels Above Foundation (AAF)
is the operating entity of the
Estes Park Memorial
Observatory. It came about
as a result of Mike and
Carole Connolly and
Michele Johnson wish-
ing to build an obser-
vatory in honor of
Mike and Carole’s
children and
Michele’s siblings,
Thomas and
Christian
Connolly, who
died July 2,
2005, in a
traffic acci-
dent. The
Connollys all
have a back-
ground in
science,
math and
astronomy.
Mike, a
retired engi-
neer from
Lockheed
Martin
Corporation,
spent many a
night with his
children view-
ing stars and
planets. Because
of this family
interest and the
tragic death of
Thomas and
Christian, the concept
of a memorial observa-
tory came into being.
The AAF is utilizing
the concept of the Little
Thompson Observatory
(LTO) located in Berthoud,
Colo. The LTO built an observa-
tory on land owned by the
Berthoud School District. The LTO
operates the facility and it is used for
education of school students and the gener-
al public. The Connollys approached the Park
R-3 School District about the concept of the AAF
building an observatory on property the school district
would donate. The operation of the completed observatory is
by the AAF and expenses associated with insurance and utilities are
paid by the school district in exchange for the observatory being offered to school district students and the general public as an educational resource. The
AAF provides the building and maintenance and operation of the observatory for the use of students of the school district as well as the general public.
The Observatory will be used by the school district in their science curriculum and as a tool to encourage learning by students and members of the public
in principles of science, math and astronomy.
38 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
The dome arrives at the observatory.
Photo by Walt Hester
This is a place unlike any other, just ask anyone
who has ever been here. A place with walls that
whisper, floors that creak underfoot, a place
with a rare history, a patina left by time and an
endless parade of characters…
Adapted from a Vacation Edition story by Valerie Pehrson
The sky was heavy with impending snow and Eagle Plume’s
was warm and welcoming.
There was the smell of a fire in the grate, and lunch cooking.
Ann Strange Owl, her husband Dayton Raben, their
daughter Nico Strange Owl, and Nico’s son, Dah’som are all
fixtures in the shop.
Creaking floorboards added to the rustic atmosphere as
Ann and Nico explained how they came to the area, and how
they came to be the caretakers and owners of this unique
and historical shop.
“Ann is from Montana originally, our reservation is in
Southwest Montana, and Dayton, is from Wyoming. They
married in the late 50s in Wyoming when interracial marriages were
still illegal,” said Nico. “Shortly after that they moved to California where
there was more tolerance at the time. After I was
born, they moved to Colorado to be closer to
family again.”
She continues, “Ann eventually became
lonesome for her family and culture, and
someone suggested that we visit an Indian man
by the name of Charles Eagle Plume. That was in
the 60s. We became fast friends with Charles, and like so many
families, fell in love with the Estes area.”.
She carries on, “Charles had always wanted my mother to
help him at the shop, and she finally did take him up on that.
Eventually Dayton was coaxed into helping out, then I finally came to
work here in the summers while at CSU.”
“I had a shop of my own in Ft Collins then, and he would come
(it is beautiful)
continued on next page.
Charles Eagle Plume, 1939
Lakota Shirt, circa 1875, Charles Eagle Plume Collection
have coffee with
me and we would visit,
since he closed the shop in
the wintertime,” interjected Strange Owl.
The two women fall into reminisces of Charles Eagle
Plume, telling stories about how he loved to tell stories.
One in particular brings laughter bubbling up between the two of
them, the question of Charles’s age.
“He always claimed to be 105, right mom?” Asked Nico.
Ann nodded with a slow smile spreading across her face as
she stirred a pot of stew.
Nico continued. “Every spring we would have to figure
out how many years ago he would have to have been born
to be 105 that year.”
“I remember he always had a note behind the desk,”
added Ann. “A cheat sheet.”
Ann and Charles mutually adopted each other after
years of fielding questions about whether they were
related.
“People would ask if he was my father and I always
had this long story to tell them, or people would ask
him if I was his daughter,” explained Ann. “One
afternoon he said, ‘just tell them we are father and
daughter.’ And things changed after that. People
would come and say ‘how is your father,’ or ‘where is
your daughter?’”
Family isn’t always about who you are born to, and Nico echoed that
sentiment.
“He took care of us like family. He was really generous with all of us,
and we took care of him as he got older, too.”
“He was a nice person,” agreed Ann. “He was so good to
all the people here. We still miss him a lot.”
Blue jays and chickadees hopped around the feeder while
the women prepared lunch.
Estes Park has thousands of items that are Native American
themed, but not necessarily made by Native Americans
themselves, and supporting indigenous artists is important to
the family, obviously.
“We belong to the Indian Arts and Crafts Association, or
IACA,” explained Nico. “And they are part of this whole
movement to police that kind of thing. They work to enforce
laws that aim to stop people from marketing things as being
Native American made when they really aren’t. That’s why we try
to work with the artists directly when we can, otherwise it is
taking money out of Indian artist’s pockets and that’s just not
right.”
The family has had some experience in this particular area, when
Ann Strange Owl and
Dayton Raben
Eagle Plume’s
Circa 1934
Charles Eagle Plume
with young visitors
several years ago someone tried to sell them some questionable merchandise.
“We were looking at beadwork that a fellow we had known for many years
was showing us,” said Nico. “It looked kind of funny, it was sewn with fishing
line instead of thread and the way that the beads were laid down just wasn’t
quite right.”
“So we started looking in to it, and we discovered this man had gotten these
things from another dealer who was outsourcing to China. They were
marketing it as Native American made, and selling it dirt-cheap. The bizarre
thing was, he was claiming that the beadworker that made these pieces was my
aunt. He was just using her name because she had worked for him 20 or 30
years earlier. He had started out working with Indian people and then found a
cheaper way to make money.”
The wind picked up, the snow started blowing in, and we sat down to lunch.
Charles Eagle Plume
Charles Eagle Plume claimed to have been born on the Montana-Canadian
border. He was Blackfeet Indian, French and German, and grew up in poverty.
Because he was a storyteller, the time frame in which he came to Colorado is
shrouded in mystery. While studying English at CU he met Katherine Lindsay,
proprietress of the Whatnot Inn and he began working for her in the 1930s.
Katherine eventually married and changed the focus of the business to
Indian arts and crafts, renaming it Perkins Trading Post. When times were
slow, Charles, who was known to dress in full regalia and with bow and arrow
in hand, would ambush carloads of tourists on the road and sell them
moccasins or point them towards the trading post.
Over the decades Katherine and Charles collected historic and prehistoric
Indian artifacts, many of which still remain at the Eagle Plume’s. Over one
thousand of these treasures adorn their beloved trading post today, comprising
the Charles Eagle Plume Collection. Bead and
quillwork from the Plains, ceramics and kachina dolls from the Southwest, and
many fine baskets beckon the eye throughout the post.
When Katherine died, Eagle Plume took over the shop. To get through the
winter season, he would travel the country as a paid lecturer at supper clubs
and other venues speaking about the benefits of a college education and civil
rights for all people.
In the 1980s some young Lakota men robbed the Eagle Plume shop. They
were prosecuted and convicted in Boulder County, and Eagle Plume offered to
pay for the young men to go to college when they got out of prison. None of
them took him up on the offer.
In the late 1980s he received an honorary doctorate from his alma mater for
his lifetime achievements of championing civil rights and awareness and
advocacy for the Native American.
Eagle Plume loved children, and very young visitors to his shop would
receive a feather from him as a present. He would say that there was a method
to his madness, as young children want to touch
everything. With feather in hand, they would
gently dust everything in sight!
Children who were a little older would be
offered a trade. Eagle Plume would hold out an
arrowhead, and offer to trade the young person for
the most valuable thing they possessed. The
children would offer their mothers or diamonds, but Eagle Plume
would correct them, saying that their friendship was the most
valuable thing they possessed.
Although this dynamic man is no longer at the trading post, he
remains so in spirit. His collection of arrowheads and feathers remain
at his desk amid cigarette burns and old “cheat sheets”, where they are still
gifted to children that wander in the door, wide-eyed at all there is to see at
Eagle Plume’s Trading Post.
Eagle Plume’s Today
Nico Strange Owl
Ann Strange Owl
A few years back, I was asked to
travel to Utah for an appraisal. I had
no idea that the journey would bring
me back to my ancestors.
When I arrived, I was astounded to
see a number of historic Cheyenne
pieces waiting for my appraisal.
Everything was so familiar - the
beadwork designs in rich reds and
blues meant for men and women’s
clothing, and even old beadwork
designs meant to influence the fate of
Cheyenne infants. To touch these items
was to touch my relatives lost long ago.
After learning from the man who had
hired me that these pieces were
originally collected by his great-great
grandfather, Captain John Robert Livermore, an Army officer assigned to
Fort Keogh, Montana, I was thunderstruck. I knew from the stories I had
been told by my parents and grandparents, that this is where my ancestors
had been held prior to being moved to our present day reservation in
southeastern Montana. Was it possible that one of my grandmothers had
sewn these beads down onto this buckskin I held in my hand?
With this solemn knowledge, I began to examine and photograph the
items that lay in front of me. As I handled each piece, I wondered
about the woman that lovingly made it, what man had worn it with
pride into battle, or whose baby had slept peacefully in the cradleboard
under a cottonwood tree while his mother picked rosehips.
After I had finished examining the beadwork, my client brought my
attention to a large ledger style drawing on muslin cloth that he had
retrieved from another room. While I began work on the ledger
drawing, he explained that Captain Livermore commissioned the
painting from a Cheyenne man by the name of White Bird. Livermore
had White Bird make enough muslin drawings to cover the walls of his
small cabin at Fort Keogh to prevent the log chinking from falling onto
the floors. My client brought out photos of Captain Livermore standing
near his cabin at the fort, interior photos of the cabin where White
Bird’s paintings hung, and his military orders dating to 1865. The past
had come alive.
White Bird
An article from the Denver Times, January 19th 1913, describes three
of White Bird’s paintings that were to be featured in and “Indian
Pageant” in Denver. According to the article, White Bird was sixteen at
the time of the Battle of the Little Bighorn and had a clear memory of
the battle and the strategies used by the Indian forces that day. Having
graduated from West Point, and presumably having a keen interest in
the battle, Livermore commissioned White Bird to draw a panorama of
the entire battle. This piece was shown at the pageant and eventually
donated to the museum at West Point in 1958. The Denver Art Museum
also has a number of muslin paintings by White Bird donated by
Livermore’s descendants.
White Bird can be seen in the center of the top section of the ledger
drawing, next to the married couple, wearing a hat. His name is also
listed in the ledger roll of Cheyenne transferred to the Tongue River
Agency (our present day reservation) from Fort Keogh, Montana as
“Who-pah-vi-kiss - White Bird - Husband, age 35”.
Red Paint Woman
When I arrived back to Eagle Plume’s from Utah, I began in earnest
my research into the Cheyenne beadwork
and ledger drawing. I had permission from
my client to share photos of the ledger
drawing with my parents to gain their insight.
Dayton, of course, immediately began
deciphering and “reading” the ledger
drawing, eager to understand its meaning.
When my mother first saw the drawing, she was very quiet,
looking at it carefully for a long time before finally saying,
“hmm, I wonder…”.
“What?” Dayton and I both asked her at the same time.
Ann said, “Well, I’m not sure. But remember, Nico, how we
paint our cheek before we dance?” slowly making a circle
on her cheek with her index finger, realization dawning. At
that moment we all grasped that the woman in the ledger
drawing was Ann’s great grandmother, Red Paint Woman.
My mother always told me the story of Red Paint Woman as she
helped me into my buckskin dress or braided my hair. It was during
these times she would paint a red circle on my cheek, reminding me
that we paint this circle to honor one of our highly respected
grandmothers – Red Paint Woman. Then she would go on to remind
me of what it takes to be respected as a Cheyenne woman.
Red Paint Woman was born with a perfectly round strawberry
birthmark on her cheek. Cheyenne people always admired her perfect
red paint – the birthmark. Years ago my grandmother, Grace Strange
Owl, told my mother this same story as she helped my mother into her
buckskin dress, braided her hair, and painted that round mark on her
cheek in honor of Red Paint Woman.
As we all looked at the ledger painting again, we saw that the young
bride had a round red mark on her cheek.
Heirlooms for Sale
In our travels and dealings, my family has seen many historic
Cheyenne objects, from Dull Knife’s clothing on display, to a pair of
woman’s moccasins taken from a grave, to remarkably old cradleboards
housed in a European museum. Among the Cheyenne, items of this
sort were either gifted, traded, or sold, but were more often buried with
the person that owned them. For these reasons, many Northern Plains
Indians do not possess family heirlooms in the usual sense.
Charles Eagle Plume, Ann’s adopted father, gifted to her a fully
beaded Southern Cheyenne woman’s outfit. It is one of Ann’s prized
possessions. We proudly display it here at the shop and love to visit
with people about it.
On one occasion before this, we were able to identify a Southern
Cheyenne beaded blanket strip that had belonged to one of Ann’s great
uncles. We asked to purchase it, but sadly it was not for sale.
So, after we realized that the woman in this ledger drawing was the
grandmother we still honor, I called my client with the news and with
an offer of purchase that he accepted. After making our last payment
to him, the ledger drawing of Red Paint Woman’s wedding ceremony
was ours to share.
(they are married)
Plains ledger drawings are read from right to left beginning at the
lower right corner. White Bird’s drawing includes all the tradi-
tional elements of a Cheyenne courtship and wedding. Stop by
the trading post sometime – we’d love to have you see the drawing
and tell you the story of Red Paint Woman’s courtship and mar-
riage.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 43
Celebrate
July 4th
weekend
By Janice Mason
T
he biggest, event-filled week of the
summer happens over the
Independence Day holiday. Estes
Park’s July 4th schedule presents music,
Arabian horses, vintage cars and the spec-
tacular fireworks display over Lake Estes.
Independence week
schedule
July 2 — Estes Park Jazz Big Band,
under the direction of Chuck Varilek, at 7
p.m. at Performance Park, 417 W.
Elkhorn Avenue. Bring lawn chairs or
blankets to enjoy a night of jazz music
under the stars.
July 2 — Queen City Jazz Band per-
forms a SummerFest concert in the Walter
Ruesch Auditorium at the YMCA of the
Rockies at 7:30 p.m. Call 586-3341 for
details.
July 3, 4 and 5 — Arabian Horse Show
at the Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209
Manford Avenue. Arabian horse competi-
tions begin each day at 9 a.m.
July 4 — Annual Holiday Pancake
Breakfast at Our Lady of the Mountains
Catholic Church, 920 Big Thompson
Avenue, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. The
breakfast is a benefit for Crossroads
Ministry, a non-profit organization assist-
ing people in need throughout the Estes
Valley.
July 4 — Coolest Car Show, featuring
vintage vehicles from the 1920s and
beyond, in Bond Park, downtown Estes
Park, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Close-up
inspections cost $4 for adults, $2 for chil-
dren and students, $10 for the whole fam-
ily, and free for children under six-years-
old.
July 4 — Estes Park Village Band
Patriotic Concert under the direction of
Chuck Varilek at Performance Park, 417
W. Elkhorn Avenue (time to be
announced/call (970) 577-9900).
July 4 — Independence Day Fireworks
over Lake Estes at 9:30 p.m. One of
Colorado’s most brilliant fireworks dis-
plays.
July 5 and 6 — Music in the
Mountains Faculty Concerts at Rocky
Ridge Music Center, 465 Longs Peak Rd.,
at 7:30 p.m. Adult tickets are $15; seniors
65 and over/$12; students 12- to 18-
years-old/$12; children under 12-years-
old/free. Call 586-4031 for more informa-
tion.
July 7 — Colorado Music Festival
Orchestra Patriotic and Pops Concert at
Performance Park, 417 W. Elkhorn Ave.,
at 7 p.m. a free presentation sponsored by
the Estes Park Music Festival.
Photos by Walt Hester
44 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
By Mike Oatley
W
ith four miles of shoreline and more than 2,500 surface acres,
Lake Estes stands apart from the recreational opportunities
offered by the mountains, trails, small streams and alpine lakes
that lure most visitors to the Estes Valley. The lake, created by the construc-
tion of Olympus Dam on the Big Thompson River in the late 1940s is the
only local body of water where you can — or would need to — fire up an
outboard engine.
The primary attraction of Lake Estes is fishing, and in this regard the
lake has a variety of game fish for anglers to pursue that goes beyond the
trout that are the target everywhere else.
Over the years, the lake has seen layers of regular and experimental (and
probably bootleg) stockings that have been aimed at fortifying the angling
opportunities. Everything from yellow perch and walleyes to tiger muskies
have been introduced into the lake, either officially or surreptitiously, in
addition to the trout you’d expect to find in it.
Still, the bulk of the take remains the rainbow trout the Colorado
Division of Wildlife stocks into the lake each spring. Few seem to grow
much beyond 16 inches or so, or at least the larger fish are rarely hooked: in
the annual Lake Estes Fishing Derby early each June, the vast majority of
fish entered are ‘bows just over a foot long.
Not that there’s anything wrong with that: the lake’s rainbows are rela-
tively easy to catch, and unlike many of the other waters in and outside
Rocky Mountain National Park, there are no special regulations restricting
how anglers may fish.
But bigger quarry lurk in the lake: a two-pound brown trout won last
year’s fishing derby easily, and those knowledgeable about the lake agree
that it is home to some sizeable browns which have moved downstream
from the Big Thompson and taken up residence in the lake.
A few tiger muskies may yet swim in Lake Estes. It has been a few years
since a stocking program featuring the pike-muskellunge hybrid seemed
find little success and was abandoned, but any holdovers would be large
specimens by now.
Access to the lake comes at three primary points: at the Cherokee Draw
day use area off US 36 on the lake’s southwest shoreline, at Fisherman’s
Nook on the lake’s north shore, and at the Lake Estes Marina, on the east-
ern end of the lake’s north shoreline.
The marina, at 1170 Big Thompson Avenue, is the focus point of activi-
ty on the lake. Swinging into daily summer operations in early May, the
marina offers boat rentals ranging from single-passenger kayaks to nine-pas-
senger pontoons that are perfect for a sightseeing cruise to enjoy the spec-
tacular setting of the surrounding mountains and peaks.
The marina also has a boat launch to get your own boat in the water,
and the marina store sells fishing licenses and fishing supplies, as well as
other items like snacks and sunscreen to make your day at the lake even
more enjoyable.
Photo by Walt Hester
Lake Estes is just big enough —and plenty windy often enough —for small sailboats.
On the waterfront
Lake Estes recreation stands apart
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 45
Lake Estes Trail
But not all the fun at Lake Estes takes place on the water. In addition to
a beach for playing in the sand, the marina offers volleyball, horseshows
and picnic areas, as well as a recently constructed pavilion that may be rent-
ed for group gatherings.
The Lake Estes Trail is another popular draw, offering walking, jogging,
skating, biking and wildlife viewing as it skirts the waterline as it circles the
lake.
In addition to access points at Cherokee Draw, Fisherman’s Nook and
the Lake Estes Marina, the paved trail can be accessed from the Convention
and Visitors Bureau parking areas on the river just west of the lake and
from parking areas in Stanley Park.
Lake Estes is generally too cold for water skiing or sailboarding without a
wetsuit.
The marina rents several types of bikes, including mountain bikes,
tandems, and a surrey-type bike, and child carriers are also available. The
Lake Estes Marina is at 1770 Big Thompson Avenue, and can be reached at
970- 586-2011 or evrmarina@aol.com.
Marys Lake
Another popular and interesting place to fish in the immediate Estes
Park area is Marys Lake, on Marys Lake Road near the intersection with
CO-7 (South St. Vrain Drive) on the south side of town. Boating is not
allowed and all fishing is from the shoreline at Marys Lake because the
underwater outlet of this holding tank in the Colorado-Big Thompson (C-
BT) water project creates strong vortex currents and the inlet often sends
plumes of water arcing across the lake. But the fishing can be quite good as
the Division of Wildlife stocks the lake with catchable sized rainbow trout.
Rumor has it that the occasional lake trout or kokanee salmon transported
under the Continental Divide from the West Slope by the tunnel that con-
nects the two sides of the C-BT turns up in the catch.
Whitewater
In most years, snow-melt coursing out of the Park in the Big Thompson
and Fall Rivers put enough water in the section of the Big T above Lakes
Estes to make it worth dropping a kayak in between mid-May and mid-July
or so, depending on how the summer, and the winter before, unfold.
Though in-stream improvements in the Fall, above its confluence with the
Big Thompson downtown, were aimed at paddlers, most focus on the so-
called Dairy Queen Hole, just below the confluence, and the run behind
Elkhorn Avenue shops below.
What makes Estes Valley whitewater paddling interesting and unique,
though, is the opportunity to run the Big Thompson through the canyon
in the fall. This is a time of year when, as a rule, mountain streams are
approaching their lowest natural flows of the year and play boats and pad-
dles have been gathering dust for weeks.
But it’s a time when the Big T often gets a major squirt of water as the
Bureau of Reclamation shuts down components in the trans-Divide
Colorado-Big Thompson water project, often pushing the flows to 400
cubic feet per second and higher.
But be warned: at the 400 cfs, the Big T is transformed from a mild
mannered trout stream, a characteristic it typically maintains right through
run-off relative to the unregulated streams in the area, to a proving ground
for experienced paddlers.
Photo by Mike Oatley
Contrary to what you’d expect, some of the best whitewater kayak-
ing of the year happens in the fall in years when the Bureau of
Reclamation releases high flows out of Olympus Dam.
Enjoy the Best of Both Worlds!
Mountain Setting ~ Facing the River
• Comfortable Rooms & Suites
• Spacious Cabins
• Fully Equipped Kitchens
• Cozy Woodburning Fireplaces
• Hot Tubs
• Gas Grills
Within 1 Block of
Riverwalk, Shopping
Playground & Picnic Area
232 E. Riverside Dr.
Estes Park, CO
970-586-4100 or 800-586-8778
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46 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Bird, bird, bird —
S
ince the desig-
nation of Rocky
Mountain
National Park in
1915, there have
been 280 species of
birds reported for
this area, including
the park, Arapaho
National Recreation
Area and the towns
of Estes Park and
Granby. So, if you
want to see our
feathered friends,
you’ve flocked to the
right place.
In 2000, Rocky
Mountain National
Park was designated
as a Global
Important Bird
Area. This designa-
tion recognizes the
vital role of the Park
in the perpetuation
of bird species.
Raptors, or birds
of prey, are a symbol
of freedom, grace
and power for many
backcountry users. Climbers in particular seem to feel a special kinship with
these magnificent predators, and enjoy the rare chance of looking down
upon a bird of prey from above as it soars past a climb. Actually, climbers
and birds of prey are often attracted to the same environment.
Golden eagles are highly sensitive to disturbance during their courtship
and nesting cycle. Courtship and nest selection begins in February, and the
eagles often rotate between several established nest sites in an area.
Prairie falcons, peregrine falcons and various owl species are also com-
monly encountered near climbing areas. Although some birds of prey vigor-
ously defend their nests, raptors in general are very vulnerable to human
impacts. In fact, their future and our enjoyment of them may well be
dependent on our ability to respect their requirements for life. Closures may
be put in place to protect raptors and other wildlife.
Where the birds are
• Clark’s nutcrackers, Steller’s jays, golden eagles and prairie falcons can
be seen along Trail Ridge Road.
• White-tailed ptarmigans, some of the most sought-after birds in Rocky
Mountain National Park, are common but difficult to spot. For best results,
hike on the tundra trails and look carefully. Ptarmigans usually remain still,
relying on their natural camouflage for protection.
• American dippers, or water ouzels, can be found along most streams.
Listen for their loud call, similar to the rapid clicking of two stones togeth-
er, as they fly up and down their territories.
• Mountain bluebirds have returned to the lower areas in Rocky
Mountain National Park, a sure sign that spring is here. Mountain bluebirds
are small blue birds (male) or grayish brown birds with blue tinge on tail
and flight feathers (female) that nest in cavities. They prefer to perch on
fences, trees and shrubs, surveying broad open areas for their next meal.
Rocky Mountain National Park also has numbers of western bluebirds, and
occasional reports of eastern bluebirds, so you may be able to see all three
varieties on your next visit to the park.
• Great horned owls are year-round residents in the park. During January
and February, they establish territories and court.
• Red-tailed hawks are the most commonly observed hawks, and the
Rescued red-
tailed hawk.
Photo by Walt Hester
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Only 20 minutes South of Estes Park on Hwy 36!
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Our small-town integrity will exceed your expectations!
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 47
Bird is the word
most commonly seen raptors in Rocky Mountain National Park. They are
often seen throughout the year, but resident hawks may move to lower ele-
vation areas such as the eastern plains of Colorado, during severe winters.
Red-tailed hawks are the largest of the hawks. They get their name from
their rich, russet red, broadly rounded tails, which are clearly visible while
they soar, their favorite mode of hunting.
• Broad-tailed hummingbirds visit the park to breed. The breeding sea-
son for these western hummingbirds begins shortly after their arrival from
the Mexican highlands in April and lasts for about two months. Females
build the nests on the horizontal limbs of aspen, cottonwood, willow and
coniferous trees, along streams and rivers near meadows and forested areas.
Shortly after the youngsters have fledged, the broad-tailed hummingbirds
head up toward treeline and alpine meadows, where nectar-producing flow-
ers are still blooming in profusion. The young birds have a short amount of
time to learn their life skills before they migrate back to Mexico in
September. Rocky Mountain National Park has reliable reports of six species
of hummingbirds occurring within the Park’s boundaries.
Backyard Birds of Estes Park
The following birds have been identified as inhabitants of Estes Park:
American Crow, American Dipper, American Goldfinch, American Green-
winged Teal, American Kestrel, American Robin, Bald Eagle, Band-tailed
Pigeon, Belted Kingfisher, Black-billed Magpie, Black-capped Chickadee,
Brown Creeper, Brown-headed Cowbird, Canada Goose, Cassin’s Finch,
Clark’s Nutcracker, Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Common
Raven, Dark-eyed Junco, Downy Woodpecker, European Starling, Evening
Grosbeak, Gray Jay, Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch, Great Blue Heron, Hairy
Woodpecker, Hooded Merganser, House Finch, House Sparrow, Mallard,
Mountain Chickadee, Northern Flicker, Northern Pygmy-Owl, Northern
Shrike, Peregrine Falcon, Pine Siskin, Pygmy Nuthatch, Red Crossbill, Red-
breasted Nuthatch, Red-tailed Hawk, Ring-billed Gull, Rock Dove, Steller’s
Jay, White-breasted Nuthatch and Wilson’s Snipe.
The Rocky Mountain Nature Association offers Field Seminars on bird-
ing in June and July. See the Web site at rmna.org for more information.
According to Audubon Magazine, Estes Park is a “birder’s paradise.” Be
birds of a feather and flock here to enjoy the heavenly plumage.
Bluebird resting on a twig.
Photo by Walt Hester
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
HEALTH CLUB
Day & Week Passes
19,000 sq. ft. spacious facility
1230 Big Thompson Ave ~ Highway 34
970-577-1900
Free Weights ~ Elliptical ~ Treadmills ~ Whirlpools ~ Saunas ~ Showers
Squash ~ Racquetball ~ Basketball ~ Tanning Bed ~ Stretching Room
Personal Trainers ~ Boxing Room ~ Large Locker Rooms
Hammer Strength
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Protein Drinks and Powders
Protein Bars & Supplements
Exercise classes included with Pass or Membership!
www.rockymountainhealthclub.com
Located on the
walking path east of the visitor center
Enjoy the
Mountain Views
While
Working Out!
GUESTS
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OPEN
365 Days
a Year!
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ARTISANS OF COLORADO
• jewelry • pottery • woodwork
• stained glass • wind chimes • metal art
• decorator items and much more
You will love
our prices!
“Take home a piece of
Colorado from our
UNIQUE gallery of art and crafts”
We also carry gifts from around the world
and German Pewter
222 A E. Elkhorn
970-577-1882
(Next to Dairy Queen)
P.O. Box 1923 • Estes Park, CO 80517
E-mail: alpacc@peakpeak.com • Toll-Free 1-866-386-6660 2
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A
M
u
s
t
-
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e
a
rs U
n
d
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r th
e
S
a
m
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O
w
n
e
rsh
ip
By Janice Mason
E
stes Park hosts the largest Scandinavian Midsummer Festival in
Colorado in June. Scandinavians celebrate the summer solstice, the
longest day of the year, with a festival of flowers, food, textiles, arts
and crafts, music and traditional dance.
The Scandinavian Midsummer Festival will take place on June 28 and
29, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in Bond Park, downtown Estes Park. Musicians
and dancers entertain both days at the festival. Children enjoy the festivities
around the Midsummer pole decorated with flowers and ribbons.
Professional Scandinavian dance instructors assist visitors in traditional
48 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Scandinavian Midsummer Festival
Flowers, dancing, sugar and everything Scandinavian
Photo by Walt Hester
Photo by John Cordsen
Festivities begin on Saturday morning in downtown Bond Park with
the raising of the Midsummer pole.
R
u
g
H
o
o
k
in
g
&
P
e
n
n
y R
u
g
S
u
p
p
lie
s
P
a
tte
rn
s &
K
its
C
la
sse
s
H
a
n
d
D
ye
d
W
o
o
l
A
lso
W
o
o
l F
a
b
rics
fo
r Q
u
iltin
g
a
n
d
S
e
w
in
g
526 N. Cleveland Ave. Loveland, CO 80537
(970) 203-0999 • Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday
From Hwy 34 (Eisenhower Blvd.) go south on Cleveland Ave.,
we’re between 6th and 5th on the East side, beside Mathew’s Sewing Center

W
e’r
e

h
o
o
k
e
d

o
n
w
ool!”
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The Wool
Basket
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 49
movements throughout the
festival. Bakers offer delec-
table treats.
The Scandinavian
Midsummer Festival brings
the traditions of Norway,
Sweden, Finland, Denmark
and Iceland to Estes Park.
Festivities begin on
Saturday morning in
downtown Bond Park with
the raising of the
Midsummer pole followed
by an opening ceremony.
Colorfully dressed families
enter the park carrying the
flags of their native lands.
The day continues with
entertainment provided by
a variety of folk dance
groups and Scandinavian
musicians. All activities are
free and open to the pub-
lic.
Midsummer was origi-
nally a fertility festival with
customs and rituals associ-
ated with nature and the
hope for a good autumn
harvest. The celebration
has its roots in pre-
Christian practices and is a
day when the nature spirits
join humans to rejoice in
the long days of summer.
For more information, visit
www.estesmidsummer.com.
Photo by Walt Hester
Professional Scandinavian dancers perform at the festival.
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50 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Explore the Estes Park Museum
By Janice Mason
T
he Estes Park Museum offers permanent
and temporary exhibits celebrating Native
Americans, explorers, pioneers, moun-
taineers, lodge owners of Estes Park and Rocky
Mountain National Park. The museum houses
more than 20,000 artifacts, including a 1909
Stanley Steamer, documents, manuscripts, maps,
textiles, original art, photographs, prints and
books. The collection represents much of the fas-
cinating history of the Estes Park area.
Explore temporary exhibits in the National
Park Service building that served as Rocky
Mountain National Park’s first headquarters. See
the historic 1910 Cobb-Macdonald log cabin,
also located on the museum grounds. Browse the
Estes Park Museum Shop and pick up a schedule
of free educational programs and historic tours.
There is something for everyone.
The Estes Park Museum collects, interprets
and preserves local history, and presents exhibits,
programs and events, for the education and bene-
fit of residents and visitors of all ages. The muse-
um is located on the corner of U.S. Highway 36
and Fourth Street and admission is free.
The museum is open Monday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays
from 1 to 5 p.m., May through October. Winter
hours are Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.,
November through April. For more information,
call 586-6256 or visit www.estesnet.com/
museum.
The staff of the Estes Park Museum also oper-
ate the Historic Fall River Hydroplant, open
Memorial Day through Labor Day, Tuesday
through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Visitors are
sure to enjoy the fascinating story of the first
electric plant in Estes Park, built by Hotelier F.O.
Stanley in 1907 to provide electricity to his
famous hotel by the power of Fall River.
Admission is free. For more information, call
586-6256 or visit www.estesnet.com/hydroplant.
Above photo by Janice Mason. Below photo by Walt Hester
The Estes Park Museum sits on the corner of Highway 36 and Fourth Street. Below, the bust
of Joel Estes stands in front of the 1910 Cobb-Macdonald log cabin behind the museum.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 51
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Old Church Shops
Suite 16C, Estes Park
586-2510
866-311-2510
FAX 970-692-8152
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(970) 577-1118
Yoga Accessories • Bellydance Accessories
Decoratives Handmade Clothing • Scarves
Huge Selection of Silver Jewelry • Purses • Jewelry Boxes
Incense • Statues • Singing Bowls • Tapestries
www.himalayanartsandcrafts.com
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970-586-0091 • mhm@churchshops.com • www.coloradocandelabra.com
Wedding Candles
Colorado Made Candles
Wedding Candles
Colorado Made Candles
Scented & Unscented Candles
Candle Accessories
Scented & Unscented Candles
Candle Accessories
Take a “tour” of the world’s only
“Pewter Mine” and cast your own Pewter
Hummingbird in the Old Church Shops,
downtown Estes Park. Educational
and fun, with many activities for young and
old! Each person taking the tour may pick
a Pewter Crystal off the wall and keep it.
Call 303-517-1068 for more information.
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Old Church Shops • 970.586.2806
See our Ad in Names & Numbers
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52 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Meet the artisans
By Janice Mason
T
he beautiful sunlit gallery features the works of over 40 local and
regional artists displaying a wide range of media. Established in
1987, the Art Center of Estes Park presents revolving exhibits by
artists, whose works are juried and selected. The center offers art classes,
slide presentations and educational programs for the community. Classes
are offered for children in the summer and youth scholarships are available
to cover the cost for inquiring students. The gallery also provides exhibit
space for those aspiring artists.
The “Lines Into Shapes” national show in September brings artists from
across the nation and abroad to display a diversity of work. From sculpture
to paintings, photography to jewelry, the annual “Lines Into Shapes” exhib-
it presents the most anticipated event of the year. A number of awards are
presented in numerous categories.
Art Center of Estes Park opening receptions are typically held on the
first night of each exhibit from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments are served. Artists
and community members meet to enjoy the camaraderie and the art.
The Art Center of Estes Park inspires
Photo by Walt Hester
“Arabesque” by Mollie Walsh showed in 2007 “Lines Into Shapes.”
Photo by Janice Mason
Photo courtesy Cynthia Price Reedy
“Art Supplies“ by Cynthia Price Reedy was featured in April.
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 53
Exhibit schedule
Now showing through June 22 — “Artistic Expression in Fiber”
Art quilts by Annette Kennedy, known for making colorful
wall creations and silk garments.
June 27 to Aug. 3 — “Nature’s Forms”
Featuring the photography of Del Hope and the lifelike bronze equine
and other sculptures of Carol Cunningham.
Aug. 8 to Sept. 14 —“Watercolor - Here and There”
Featuring an array of colorful watercolors depicting images of flowers,
landscapes and architecture by Pam England.
Sept. 19 to Oct. 4 — “Lines into Shapes”
Annual nationally juried exhibit representing a diverse selection of
mediums. Cash prizes are awarded the night of the opening reception.
Oct. 10 to Nov. 16 — “Enchanting Wearable Art”
Whimsical, wire wrap/bead and fossil jewelry by Alice League and the
colorful creations of life-long fiber and knitwear artist, Janice Kay.
Nov. 21 to Dec. 31 — “Nature’s Tranquility”
Mel Wilson shows wildlife and nature photography of Rocky Mountain
National Park and other locations.
The Art Center of Estes Park is a non-profit organization, which pro-
vides a facility to support and promote the work of local and regional
artists. The proceeds benefit both the artist and contribute to the Art
Center’s educational and community outreach programs.
The Art Center is located at 517 Big Thompson Avenue in Stanley
Village and is handicapped accessible. Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
daily and the all exhibits are free and open to the public. Winter hours are
Friday through Monday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call
586-5882 or visit www.artcenterofestes.com.
Photo by Walt Hester
“Wrapped in Red” by Kathie Wheeler showed in the 2007 “Lines
Into Shapes” exhibit.
Photo by Walt Hester
“On the Wall” by Joan Wolfer showed in the 2007 “Lines Into
Shapes” exhibit.
Great for Gifts!
Show that You Climbed
14,255 Foot Longs Peak!
Stop By Any RMNP Gift Shop,
Chrysalis at the Stanley
333 Wonderview Drive
Outdoor World
156 E. Elkhorn Avenue
Rocky Mountain Tops
101 E. Elkhorn Avenue
or LongsPeakSummitClub.com
To Purchase Pin
Great for Gifts!
Show that You Climbed
14,255 Foot Longs Peak!
Stop By Any RMNP Gift Shop,
Chrysalis at the Stanley
333 Wonderview Drive
Outdoor World
156 E. Elkhorn Avenue
Rocky Mountain Tops
101 E. Elkhorn Avenue
or LongsPeakSummitClub.com
To Purchase Pin
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54 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
The flowers that bloom in the spring
W
ildflower-lovers are never disappointed
in June and July when the meadows
and hillsides of the Rockies around
Estes Park are alive with the sights and sounds
of color splashing all around. Autumn visitors
can relax among the golden aspens and rust col-
ors or enjoy the rowdier antics of the elk rut
(mating season). Winter is an alpine wonder-
land. Spring brings an explosion of wildflowers,
making May through August a dazzling display
of fire-worked colors.
Weeds? No way! What may look like an
unkempt lawn to the casual observer is actually
an ecosystem of surprising diversity. Small
changes in alpine topography and climate fac-
tors allow for a variety of plant communities
and species. The alpine climate, with its cold
temperatures, fierce winds, heavy snows and
rugged terrain, is the most severe climate on
Earth. Rocky Mountain National Park has many
species of alpine flowers with special adaptations
that enable them to survive and flourish in what
researchers describe as the Earth’s harshest cli-
mate.
Rocky Mountain Nature Association Field
Seminar offers a course on alpine flowers
Tuesday, July 1, for a fee, and on identifying
wildflowers, Wednesday, July 2. For informa-
tion, write the Rocky Mountain Field Seminar
& Conference Center, 1895 Fall River Rd.,
Estes Park, CO 80517, or see the Web site at
rmna.org.
At Trio Falls, you can see three different
waterfalls in one area, with great wildflowers in
bloom in season.
Photo by Walt Hester
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 55
Lily Lake
This hike provides a gentler viewing of wildflowers. Enos Mills, the
“father of Rocky Mountain National Park,” enjoyed walking to Lily Lake
from his nearby cabin. Check along the mile-long trail through this relative-
ly low-elevation area for wildflowers in the spring and early summer.
The best times for wildflowers may be the second week through the third
week of July. Elevations dictate what is and what is not in bloom at any par-
ticular time. Elevations around Estes Park generally produce pasque flowers
found usually on Ponderosa Pine south-facing hillsides about the first three
weeks of April. Various penstemmons will be found starting in June along
roadsides. Columbine appear in late June through early August, depending
on elevation (the higher up, the later the bloom). Trail Ridge Road is usual-
ly open by Memorial Day, but late snows can delay this up to a week or
more. Fall River Road opens at the same time or much later, again depend-
ing on Mother Nature.
The Colorado Rockies are arguably the wildflower capital of North
America, and Rocky Mountain National Park is the region’s high-country
showcase. In the middle elevations of RMNP (from 6,000 to 9,000 feet),
you’ll find arnica, sego lilies, blue columbine and meadowrue in the pine
and aspen forests. The July breezes bring scarlet paintbrush, blue penstem-
mons, orange sneezeweed, purple fringed gentians and plenty more. Higher
up on the mountains, brilliant bursts of tundra wildflowers bloom and die
quickly, including phlox, wild iris, alpine sunflower, alpine avens, pale-blue
harebell and moss campion.
Dream and Emerald Lakes
About 40 kinds of wildflowers contribute colorful accents, including
some spring bloomers coming out in summer where snow lingers late. To
insure a quick start on a hike to the three lakes, hop the shuttle. The busy
Bear Lake parking lot is nearly always full. The trail begins between the
Bear Lake information booths and rises to Nymph Lake, followed soon by
well-named Dream Lake. The last pitch to reach Emerald Lake is steep and
rugged, but worth the effort. This is a good summer trail on which to view
marsh marigold, globeflower and pink bog laurel.
Gem Lake
An extraordinary saxifrage, called telesonix, blooms here in July. This
pink flower found here (and on Pikes Peak) tucks itself into crevices in the
mounded granite surrounding Gem Lake. Devil’s Gulch Road (which began
as MacGregor Avenue) has trailhead parking for about 20 vehicles, and it
pays to arrive early or to wait until late afternoon.
Tundra World/Toll Memorial
Rocky Mountain National Park is such a treasured resource that it has
been designated an International Biosphere Reserve. Famed Trail Ridge
Road, the highest continuous highway in the nation, reaches heights of
12,183 feet. Six miles east of the Alpine Visitor Center is the site of the
Tundra World Trail — a window into an ecosystem equivalent to going to
the Arctic Circle. Since the growing season high above treeline here is short,
a mid-July visit is your best bet.
Continued from page 54
Photo by Walt Hester
Flowers: the hills are alive with color
We invite you to sample a
selection of award-winning
Colorado wines.
www.snowypeakswinery.com
292 Moraine Avenue
Estes Park, CO
970-586-2099
Everything you need for a picnic in
the park, including the basket.
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Featuring Colorado-Made Wines
Cheeses ~ Crackers ~ Preserves
Gifts and More
Guided Winery Tours
Family-Friendly Tasting Room
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56 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
By Mike Oatley
I
t has not always been called the Rooftop Rodeo, or even a rodeo, but the
Rooftop Rodeo can trace its roots back 100 years, to a July, 1908, when
an article in the sixth issue of The Mountaineer reported that “The
Glorious Fourth Was Duly Celebrated” and that a “Genuine Wild West
show provide(d) plenty of thrills for large crowd, including many Eastern
tourists.”
It was just a bronc busting competition then, and it took place under the
midday sun, but otherwise it sounds like the first of what eventually became
the Rooftop Rodeo would be recognizable to us today.
Except that today, cowboys and cowgirls come from all over to compete
in one of the smallest rodeos in one of the loveliest settings on the circuit.
The Rooftop Rodeo in its current form goes back to 1941, and in the
post-war years it became an annual event.
In recent years it has blossomed into one favorite stop on the regional
circuit, winning three straight PRCA Cowboy’s Choice Awards for the
mountain states region from 1994 to 1996, four times being nominated for
the PRCA’s Small Rodeo of the Year award, and twice winning.
Last year, the Rooftop Rodeo was not only a nominee for that that
award, which it last one in 2006, the rodeo also won the Most Improved
award for the mountain states circuit after large playback monitor was
deployed to get fans in the stands replays and close-ups of the action.
And the little rodeo at the Stanley Fairgrounds will continue that tradi-
tion again this year with six nights of rodeo performances that will include
saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, bareback bronc riding,
barrel racing and bull riding, along with one for the kids, mutton bustin’.
The mutton bustin' competition in the arena each night gives kids a
chance to step into the spotlight. Each night, 10 helmet-wearing children
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 57
between the ages of five and eight will sit on sheep and hang on as long as
they can.
Rodeo Week will kick off, as it does every year, with the Rooftop Rodeo
Parade through downtown Estes Park. This year, that will be on Tuesday,
July 8, with a 10:30 a.m. start. The parade includes floats, bands, horseback
riders and, of course, this year’s rodeo royalty, in a procession that will make
its way down Elkhorn Avenue and then on to the Stanley Fairgrounds.
New to Rodeo Week this year will be the first of a planned annual bene-
fit golf tournament to be played at the Estes Park Golf Course. Last year,
the Rooftop Rodeo Committee raised several thousand dollars for cancer
research through the 'Tough Enough To Wear Pink' program during the
rodeo. This year, they hope to increase the amount they raise even more
money through the tournament. For more information email
events@estes.org or call 970-586-6104.
2008 Rooftop Rodeo Schedule
Rodeo Parade Tuesday, July 8 at 10:30 a.m.
Downtown Estes Park to the Fairgrounds
PRCA Rodeo Tuesday, July 8 through Sunday, July 13
Stanley Fairgrounds
PRCA rodeos each night at 6:45 p.m. with preshow entertainment
beginning at 7:30. Both general admission and box seat tickets are
available for each rodeo performance. General admission seats are not
reserved and prices are $15 for adults and $5 for children ages 3-11. Box
seat tickets are $20 for all ages. To order tickets, or for more information
about the award winning Rooftop Rodeo, call the Estes Park Special
events department at 970-586-6104.
The kid’s mutton bustin’ competition and the pageantry of the
parade are as much a part of the Rooftop Rodeo as the perfor-
mances by the pros under the arena’s bright lights each night.
Photos by Walt Hester
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North St. Vrain
Lake Estes
Estes Park
Laundracenters
Estes Park
Laundracenters
in Town
S
o
u
t
h

S
t
.
V
r
a
i
n
Estes Park Laundracenters
The Largest Coin-Op Laundry in Estes!
Nina says,
“If your clothes have spots,
visit Estes Park
Laundracenters!
EXTENDED HOURS:
Open 5 A.M. - 11 P.M.
EVERYDAY!
Convenient to Downtown Shopping and
Rocky Mountain National Park
Two Locations with Plenty of Parking!
• 172 S. St. Vrain Ave.
Across from the Holiday Inn
• 183 W. Riverside Dr.
2 doors N of the Post Office
970-481-9900
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58 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
O
l
d

F
a
l
l

R
i
v
e
r

R
o
a
d
Many
Parks
Curve
Rainbow
Curve
Alluvial
Fan
Horseshoe
Park
Hidden
Valley
Forest
Canyon
Overlook
Rock
Cut
Highest point
on road
12,183 ft,
3,713 m
Alpine
Visitor
Center
Lava
Cliffs
Gore
Range
Milner
Pass
N
tjw
T
rail Ridge Road winds gently through some of the most breathtaking
scenery in the state. Visitors to the area who are interested in taking
the drive should set aside a leisurely day, bring a camera, and hop in
the car for a tour on the highest continuous paved road in North America.
The highway to the sky covers the 48 miles between Estes Park on
Rocky Mountain National Park’s (RMNP) east side, and Grand Lake on
the west side.
Construction of Trail Ridge Road began in the autumn of 1929 and was
finished to Fall River Pass in the summer of 1932. The road was built to
make up for the old Fall River route, which was too narrow for increasing
motorized traffic, full of hairpin switchbacks, and prone to snow slides.
Engineers of the road were mindful of the magnificence of the surround-
ing landscape and were cautious that the road wouldn’t interfere with the
vistas around them. When possible, the rocks that were blasted during the
road’s construction were used to build retaining walls.
The maximum grade on the road does not exceed seven percent, and
eight miles of the road is 11,000 feet above sea level. At its highest point,
Trail Ridge Road peaks at a dizzying 12,183 feet in elevation. Motorists
venturing out from either Estes Park or Grand Lake climb around 4,000
feet in elevation in a few minutes, beginning in montane forests of aspen
and pine before entering sub alpine forests of fir and spruce.
Motorists tend to try and reach timberline quickly. Slow down and take
your time, enjoying all the climate zones along the journey. When you
reach timberline, the last of the trees are twisted and stunted against the
tundra.
Some animals that motorists might encounter along the way include the
Colorado’s
‘Highway to the Sky’
Trail Ridge Road Offers Stunning Views
See Trail Ridge: Page 59
T
C
20-16904
Fun Horse Rides
Ranging from one hour to all day
rides. Our stables offer a variety of
trails; many traveling into Rocky
Mountain National Park!
No Worries...we match each rider’s
ability with our horses’ personalities.
Additional Western Festivities:
• Pony rides for young children
• Hayrides with chuckwagon dinners -
Tuesdays & Saturdays.
Special group rates available.
Reservations recommended.
Jackson Stables is located at the YMCA of the Rockies
Located on Hwy. 66, Estes Park, CO
PUBLIC WELCOME
JACKSON STABLES, Inc.
YMCA of The Rockies Livery
Allen & Julie Jackson
P.O. BOX 20549, ESTES PARK, CO 80511
970-586-3341 ext. 1140/1149
Fax: 970-577-1401
Winter Office: 970-586-6748
www.jacksonstables.com
O
pen to
the P
ublic
A
pril
thru O
ct.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 59
bighorn sheep, elk, pikas, marmots,
moose (mostly on the west side of
RMNP), and ptarmigans.
Plant life is diverse, despite what
appears to be incredibly hostile condi-
tions here for most of the year.
There are around 200 species of
fragile, tiny alpine plants that hug the
earth beside the road. Their growing
season may only last 40 days, but the
little plants bloom in great sweeps of
yellow, red, pink, blue, and violet.
The Tundra World Nature Trail is
a fantastic place to see these delicate
displays without damaging them; a
half hour walk begins near the park-
ing lot at Rock Cut.
The tundra is an important and
fragile environment, and it is strongly
recommended that you do not step
outside of the designated path or pick
flowers.
The annual spring plowing of Trail
Ridge Road is a Herculean undertak-
ing. Crews generally start plowing in
mid-April. Plowing Trail Ridge can
cost in excess of $36,000 and takes an
average of 42 days to accomplish. The
National Park Service keeps their
plows in top working order during
the plowing by fueling, oiling, and
greasing them every morning. A
rotary plow, called the ‘pioneer rotary’
clears the centerline of the road all
day, while a second rotary widens the
road. A grader and bulldozer then
pulls the snow towards the side of the
road. Runoff from the snow banks is
diverted into drains and ditches. At
the end of the day, the equipment is
parked at Rainbow Curve to avoid
the machinery being stranded by
passing storms.
Trail Ridge Road closes with the
first heavy snowfall of the season
and remains closed in the winter,
generally reopening on Memorial
Day weekend. Nature has a great
deal to say about the scheduling of
this road, and it is not uncommon
for visitors to drive between six-foot
walls of snow even at midsummer.
Atop Trail Ridge Road is the
Alpine Visitors Center, where
motorists can stop and have a snack,
purchase souvenirs, and browse
exhibits that are staffed with Park
rangers who are happy to answer
questions and share information on
this spectacular area.
Some things to remember while
traveling on Trail Ridge Road:
• Bring a jacket, even if it a bright
warm day. At the high elevations on
Trail Ridge Road, it may be 20 to 30
degrees cooler than the temperatures
in Estes Park or Grand Lake.
• The high elevations may cause
altitude sickness in some people.
Drink plenty of water. The elevation
may also aggravate heart or lung
conditions in some people.
• Afternoon thunderstorms are
common in the mountains in the
summer months. It is also very
important to be aware of lightning
at the high elevations found on Trail
Ridge Road.
• If you see a beautiful scene or
wildlife that you would like to look
more closely at, be sure to pull safely
off the road to stop. Many accidents
are caused by people stopping in the
center of the road to photograph
animals or scenery.
• Be on the lookout for wildlife
on the road or on the sides of the
road. Deer and elk on the side of
the road may startle and leap in the
path of vehicles.
• Warn oncoming vehicles of
wildlife in the road by flashing your
headlights at them.
Trail Ridge Road is not a toll road,
but you must pay the entrance fee at
RMNP to travel on the road. Fees for
the summer 2008 season are $20 for a
seven-day entrance fee for passenger
vehicles, $10 per person per night on
a bicycle or motorcycle, or $35 for an
annual parks pass.
Trail Ridge
Continued from page 58
TG File Photo by Walt Hester
Visitors can enjoy a break atop Trail Ridge Road at the Alpine
Visitors Center.
Estes Park Medical Center
Your peace of mind while on summer vacation – we’re here 24/7!
FULL SERVICE, CRITICAL ACCESS HOSPITAL AND LEVEL IV TRAUMA CENTER
EMERGENCY CALL 911 www.epmedcenter.com
970-586-2317
“Providing Excellent Health Care and Promoting Community Wellness in the Estes Valley”
555 Prospect Avenue – Just 3 blocks off Highway 36 to Stanley Avenue; then right on Prospect. Follow the signs to the Emergency Room.
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60 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
By Mike Oatley
A
pparently, not everyone comes to Estes Park to hike the backcountry.
If you don’t think so, try getting a round of golf in on a July morn-
ing without a tee time.
It goes without saying that Estes Park’s two golf courses, with 27 holes
between them, offer some of the most scenic golfing you can find any-
where. The 18-hole Estes Park Golf Course has even been included on a list
of the most beautiful golf courses in the United States, and the nine-hole
Lake Estes Golf Course keeps the golfing going on all year round, as it is
open for play in the winter when weather allows.
Estes Park Golf Course
The Estes Park Golf Course, open mid-April through October, winds
over rolling uplands in the Estes Valley, surrounded by mountain splendor.
Frequently, golfers will share the course with herds of elk, mule deer, and
the occasional coyote.
The 18-hole course plays at 5,250 yards from the front tees and 6,400
yards from the back tees, and is a par-72 course except from the champi-
onship tees, where it rates a 71.
Resident green fees are $33, non-resident green fees are $41, with late-
day rates of $25 and $31, respectively. Electric carts, pull carts and clubs are
available for rent.
The amenities at the Estes Park Gold Course include a filly outfitted pro
shop, a newly remodeled driving range, and the Hangar Restaurant, com-
plete with a deck with great views, for drink and meal at the conclusion of
your round.
Lake Estes Golf Course
For a shorter round down by Lake Estes, or for winter golf, the nine-
Hole Lake Estes Executive Golf Course fits the bill.
Laid out as a par 31 from each set of tees, the course stretches from
2,026 yards to 2,209 on three sets of tee boxes, and plays over flatter terrain
than the Estes Park Golf Course.
Ah, but the water. The course straddles the Big Thompson River and lies
adjacent to Lake Estes, adding plenty of challenge to the intimate layout of
the course.
A pro shop and practice facility round out the services offered at the
Lakes Estes Golf Course.
27 holes in a one-of-a-kind setting
Play short or long and almost always with the elk
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 61
Located at 690 Big Thompson Avenue, the nine-hole green fees rate is
$13 for residents and $16 for non-residents, with 18-hole rates at $22 and
$25, and a P.M. rates of $11 and $14. Pull carts and clubs are available for
rental.
Winter golf
It may seem unlikely, but Estes Park winters are often scattered with
plenty of golf-able days between November and March, as the fairways are
often free of snow, allowing an afternoon round to be tacked on the second
half of a day in Estes Park. When conditions allow, golfers can play unlim-
ited rounds on the course fir $7, no tee time required.
Tee-times are strongly recommended at both courses during the peak
season, especially for morning rounds, and can be made by calling the Estes
Park Golf course at 866- 586-8146 ext. 0 or the Lake Estes Golf Course at
970-586-8176. Weekday times may be made beginning seven days in
advance, weekend tee times may be made eight or nine days in advance by
calling at 4 p.m. on the Friday of the previous weekend. Steel Spikes are
not allowed on either course.
Groups of 20 or more are invited to plan tee-times in advance. For
advance tee-times and for help planning your outing contact course pro
Mark Miller at 970-586-8146, ext. 4. or email: mark@golfestes.com . A
reservation fee of $5 per person will be required and will be returned to you
in the form of gift certificates for merchandise in the pro shop.
With mountain valley settings, Estes Park’s two golf courses have
beautiful views, and offer two choices, longer with more slope, and
short but with water hazards. The elk will likely join you on the fair-
ways in either case.
Photos by Walt Hester
AERIAL TRAMWAY AERIAL TRAMWAY
• PICNIC AREAS
• SNACK BAR
• HIKING TRAILS
• GIFT SHOPS
Open 9 a.m. Daily
Ride to the top of Prospect Mountain
View Rocky Mountain National Park, the Continental Divide and Longs Peak!
(Children under 6 ride FREE with Parent)
420 E. Riverside Dr. • Estes Park • 586-3675
www.estestram.com
CELEBRATING
YEARS 53
CELEBRATING
YEARS 53
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Opening Day
May 24, 2008
62 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
F
ollowing two seasons of success, modifications to the free
Shopper Shuttle system, which begins operating June 28, have
been established. Changes effect scheduling and route modifi-
cations.
Shuttles will operate daily through Labor Day.
After September 1, the shuttles will continue making rounds on
Saturdays and Sundays through September, except during the
Scottish/Irish Highland Festival weekend, when special routes and
schedules will be used.
The Elkhorn Avenue route will be the same as in past years.
The Stanley Hotel was added as a stop on the Big Thompson
Avenue route.
Shuttles will begin each day, with routes leaving from the Estes
Park Visitors Center at 10 a.m. The last Brown — Southwest
“campground” — shuttle leaves the Visitors Center at 8 p.m., while
the other two routes will depart the Visitors Center at 8:30 p.m.
Stops at the Estes Park Center-YMCA of the Rockies and Marys
Lake Lodge were added to the Brown route.
Based on low ridership last year, three stops along Highway 7
were eliminated from the schedule.
The Town-sponsored shuttles remain connected to Rocky
Mountain National Park’s express Hiker Shuttle that transports to
the Park & Ride lot on Bear Lake Road.
Want to scuttle?
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 63
Use the Shopper Shuttle
Photos by Walt Hester
Peggy Lynch
GRI, CRS, ABR, SRES,
QSC, CLHS, RRS
586-1000
PeggyLynch@remax.net
MOUNTAIN BROKERS
1200 Graves Ave. Estes Park, CO 80517
(970) 586-5324 1-800-827-8780 (24 Hours)
Greg Falconer
Broker
GRI, CRS
586-1010
greg@GregFalconer.com
Estes Park Property Statistics
April 2007 through April 2008
Average Sale Price for a Home in Estes Park is $387,603
Average Sale Price for a Condo in Estes Park is $285,602
Average Sale Price for a Lot in Estes Park is $193,275
Source: IRES (Information and Real Estate Services LLC)
Arthur von
Boennighausen
Broker
719-276-4304
George
Leonard
Broker
586-2181
georgeleonard@remax.net
Helene Ault
Broker
586-2454
heleneault@remax.net
All Estes Park Listings on www.WeSellEstesPark.com
Contact Agents Direct Anytime 24/7
Nobody in the World
Sells More
Real Estate than
RE/MAX
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Bring This Coupon
to Rustic Mountain Charm and
Receive a Free 3-Day Lodging
Certificate!
www.ytb.com/timefortrips Good for a limited time!
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Lodge Home
Furnishings
Accessories & Gifts
135 E. Elkhorn Downtown
Estes Park, CO
970-586-4344
Time for Trips
Travel Store
In Partnership with

64 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
MacGregor Ranch: a living history
D
ating back to the late 1800s, MacGregor Ranch is the last remaining working
cattle ranch in Estes Park and one of the few sites of its kind in Northern
Colorado. Staff, volunteers and the ranch hands keep MacGregor in pristine
working order.
Alexander and Clara MacGregor founded the ranch in 1873. Donald (son of
Alexander and Clara) and Maude (Koontz) MacGregor lived and worked on
the ranch, improving it to its current prime. Their daughter, Muriel, was
born on April 2, 1904 in Denver. Muriel worked and lived on the ranch
her entire life. When her parents died, she inherited the ranch, pre-
serving the home and items included with care and detail. The
home now stands as the museum, depicting the colorful history
of the MacGregor family.
Summer visitors can explore the museum, the
nature center, the gift shop and historic struc-
tures while taking in the view of this 2,000-
acre working cattle ranch.
Photos by Walt Hester
Morning round-up starts early, and the new calves are
roped and branded the old-fashioned way. Cattle drives and
pasture rotation are done by horseback.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 65
Life on the ranch
From the early homesteading times to modern day, MacGregor Ranch
has been home to an active cattle operation. During the early years, Donald
often had as many as 200 head of cattle, selling 70 calves a year. Today, the
year-round herd numbers approximately 110 to 120 head, producing 40 to
45 calves a year. Alexander first registered the XIX Brand in 1885. The his-
toric XIX MacGregor brand is still used today at the annual branding day
in mid-May.
The ranch offers all-natural beef products as a source of income and sup-
port for ranch operations. MacGregor Black Angus cattle are born and
raised on the natural grass meadows of the ranch.
Youth programs
MacGregor Ranch offers educational day camps and hands-on experi-
ences in the museum, historic buildings, on interpretive trails and at the
scout/youth group camping area.
Chuckwagon Dinner
The MacGregor Ranch Chuckwagon Dinner, to preserve Western her-
itage and youth education programs at the ranch, takes place on June 21,
from 3 to 7:30 p.m. Afternoon activities, including hay wagon rides, barn
and museum tours, take place between 3 to 5 p.m. Reservations are
required.
MacGregor Ranch is open to the public during the summer months of
June, July and August, Tuesday through Saturday. For more information or
to make reservations, call 586-3749 or e-mail emily@macgregorranch.org.
Compiled by Janice Mason
Photos by Walt Hester
The annual branding takes place in May. Left, Adam Tallman crosses
the Big Thompson River.
Complete Selection of Traditional Mexican Dishes
at Affordable Prices
Sizzling Fajitas our Specialty
Children’s Menu • Senior’s Menu • Full Bar Menu • Dine In or Carry Out
Relax on our Streamside Patio & Enjoy the Best Margaritas in Town
220 E. Elkhorn Avenue • Phone 577-0799
Open 11 am - Serving Lunch & Dinner • Family Owned and Operated
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66 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
O
ne of the most fascinating places
in Rocky Mountain National
Park is the alpine tundra, also
known as “the land above the trees.”
This harsh but poignantly beautiful area
is accessed by Trail Ridge Road, taking
visitors to an altitude of 12,183 feet.
The alpine ecosystem begins at
11,000 to 11,500 feet elevation. It is
an area of extremes.
Plants and animals are uniquely
adapted to live on the tundra.
Frequent winds and cold tempera-
tures limit what plants can grow there.
Many plants are dwarfed, thus allow-
ing them to escape the strong winds
blowing above them.
This miniature world contains
many species of tiny plants and thin
soils. These plants survive extreme
cold, strong winds, intense ultra-violet
radiation and very low humidity.
They’re hardy but fragile under
human impact. They cannot with-
stand repeated trampling.
High altitude plants are fairly frag-
ile. Most plant communities involved
are very slow growing and have short
growing seasons. Tundra plants have a
six to 12 week growing season. It takes
100 years for many alpine tundra
plants to grow an inch.
The moss campion is one of the
small plants that survives on the tun-
dra. Research shows it is only one-half
inch in diameter when it’s five years
old, Benton said. It doesn’t begin to
bloom until it’s ten years old, and
reaches a diameter of seven inches
when it’s 25 years old.
Tundra plants have a low resistance
and a low recuperation rate. Some
may take five to 30 years or longer to
recover from even small amounts of
use or damage.
Disturbances, even small ones, cause fairly
significant compaction of the very thin soils
found in high altitude areas. Soil loss con-
tributes to erosion and a loss of the plant base.
Scientists say these areas are very fragile,
much more fragile than people realize. Very
small amounts of use or damage can cause per-
manent damage and scarring.
The Park does not allow driving cars onto
the tundra but does allow people to walk on it
except in three protected areas: the area around
the Alpine Visitor Center, Forest Canyon
Overlook and Rock Cut. The Park
wants to provide people the opportuni-
ty to see the small world of the tundra
wildflowers but repeated foot traffic on
the same plants will kill them.
Elk walk on the tundra without
damaging the plants. They weigh about
800 pounds and use the tundra for
their summer range. But they don’t
walk in single file as people tend to do.
They walk spread out. The Park asks
visitors to walk spread out, not in sin-
gle file. Walking spread out prevents
footprints from being concentrated in
a small area. Avoiding grinding heels
into the plants. When possible rock-
hop or walk on gravel rather than
walking on vegetation.
It is also important to use only des-
ignate pullouts along Trail Ridge Road
and not park along the side of the road
elsewhere. Some of the pullouts along
Trail Ridge Road were created because
visitors consistently drove their cars
onto the tundra. Those areas were
destroyed and the tiny plants they once
held couldn’t grow back.
Animals who live on the tundra also
face challenges, especially surviving in
winter.
They have three survival strategies,
said Benton: hibernate, migrate and
tolerate (stay put).
The yellow-bellied marmot and
golden-mantled ground squirrels are
examples of animals that hibernate.
They live off of stored fat in their bod-
ies for seven months of the year. It is
especially important not to feed these
animals because if they receive the
wrong kinds of fats they can die dur-
ing hibernation, she said.
The pika is an animal that stays on
the tundra during the winter months.
They are often seen squeaking and carrying
food in their mouths. Pikas are not rodents.
They are related to rabbits. But they have tiny
ears and tails instead because if they were big,
Off Trail in Alpine Zones is Off Limits
Hardy Plants are Fragile and Damage Easily
Photos by Walt Hester
Tundra plants are hardy, yet damage easily when trampled by
humans, often taking years to recover.
970-586-3496 • Summer Hours 8 am - 9 pm • Open 7 days/week!
STANLEY VILLAGE
SHOPPING CENTER
461 E. WONDERVIEW AVE.
• Housewares
• Clothing
• RV Supplies
• Sporting Goods
• Camping Equipment
• Swimwear
• Fishing / Licenses
• Board Games
• Ammunition
• Electronics
• UPS / FedEx Shipping

$
1.99 DVD Rentals
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like they are on rabbits, they
would freeze in the winter.
In July pikas start cutting and
drying vegetation. They put it
under rocks and eat it all winter
long.
A bird that tolerates winters on
the tundra is the white-tailed
ptarmigan, a relative of the grouse.
They are well-suited for the snowy,
wintery life. They molt and their
mottled brown feathers change to
a snowy white for camouflage.
They grow extra feathers on
their feet that act like snowshoes
as well as on their eyelids and nos-
trils that provide extra protection
in the extreme cold temperatures.
They burrow into the snow and
use it for insulation against the
cold.
They eat willow buds and come
out fatter after winter.
Larger animals such as elk,
mule deer, coyotes and mountain
lions migrate to lower elevations
in the Park in winter. Many bird
species do as well. These birds like
to hang out at the overlooks and
beg for food from visitors. But
feeding them can endanger them.
They need certain nutrients to be
able to make their migratory flight
and getting the wrong nutrients
can cause them harm.
Rocky Mountain National Park
rangers give daily tundra nature
walks all summer and the Park pro-
vides information on “tundra eti-
quette.” For more information, call
586-1206.
There are new exhibits at the
Alpine Visitor’s Center this year
such as taxidermy, plant models and
a weather station where visitors can
see what the temperature and wind
speed are outside.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 67
Photo by John Cordsen
Yellow-bellied marmots can be found on the tundra.
OO
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68 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Wonders, great and small
Photos by Walt Hester
May snow at Bear Lake
McHenrys Peak in
Black Lake
Longs Peak from the Boulder Field
Colorado Columbines
Fox Kits
Humming Bird
Pika in Glacier Gorge
Calendar submitted by Suzy Blackhurst, Convention and Visitors
Bureau. For additional information, call (970) 577-9900, 1-800-44-ESTES
or visit www.estesparkcvb.com.
June 2008
June 1: Far and Near Horizons International Plein Air Painters and
Landscape Artist’s International exhibit opening and reception, 1 to 4 p.m.;
includes work by 18 artists from Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic and the
United States. Cultural Arts Council Fine Art Gallery, 423 W. Elkhorn
Avenue, 586-9203, www.estesarts.com.
June 1: 10th Summer Art Walk, a self-guided tour of the galleries and
artist studios throughout the area. Tour maps are available at the Cultural
Arts Council at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave, visitors centers, and participating
artist studios. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, 586-9203.
June 5: Estes Valley Historic Tour. Estes Park Historian Laureate Jim
Pickering will lead a tour of historic sites in Estes Park and Rocky
Mountain National Park. Advance reservations are required. Tickets avail-
able at the Estes Park Museum, $5/members, $15/non-members, Estes Park
Museum, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., 586-6256.
June 7: Fishing Derby on Lake Estes. Registration at Lake Estes Marina
begins at 6:30 a.m. The derby is from 8 a.m. to noon, 1770 Big Thompson
Ave., No fishing license required on Fishing Derby Day, 586-8191.
June 13: Diego Martin, el vaquero. Angel Vigil will discuss Diego
Martin, a true American cowboy who used el vaquero, the repository of
practical and Spanish wisdom and experience in the ways of horses and cat-
tle in his work. Estes Park Museum, 200 Fourth St., 7 p.m., 586-6256.
June 14: Takacs Quartet in concert; a special performance by one of the
world’s premiere string quartets. Sponsored by the Estes Park Chamber
Music Society, tickets are $25 at MacDonald Book Shop, 152 E. Elkhorn
Ave., No charge for children through grade 12. Students/$10. Community
Church of the Rockies, 1700 Brodie Ave., 2:30 p.m., 586-9203.
June 14-15: Wool Market, an annual fiber festival with two days of
exhibits, demonstrations, competitions and vendor booths. Free.
Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., Saturday 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., 577-9900.
June 15: Estes Park Marathon, Half Marathon, 10K/5K Race, the high-
est paved marathon course in the world. There is no race-day registration
for the marathon or the half marathon. There will be race-day registration
for the 10K and 5K races only. The marathon and half-marathon start at 7
a.m.; 10K takes off at 8 a.m. and the 5K race starts at 9 a.m. from the
grounds of the Estes Park Middle School, 1500 Manford Ave.,
www.epmarathon.org.
June 18-19: Rocky Mountain Miniature Horse Show. Fairgrounds at
Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., Sponsored by the Rocky Mountain
Miniature Horse Club, 586-6104.
June 19-22: Quilt Colorado 2008 Exhibit from the Colorado Quilting
Council, Estes Park Conference Center, 201 S. St., Vrain Ave., www.quilt-
colorado.com/index.html.
June 21: MacGregor Ranch Chuckwagon Dinner benefit to preserve
Western heritage and youth education programs at the 1860s historic
ranch. Activities from 3 to 5 p.m. include hay wagon rides, barn and muse-
um tours. Chuckwagon supper from 5 to 7:30 p.m. followed by live enter-
tainment, MacGregor Ranch, 180 MacGregor Ln. Reservations are
required, 586-3749, www.macgregorranch.org.
June 21 – 22: Rocky Mountain Miniature Horse Show. Fairgrounds at
Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., sponsored by the Rocky Mountain
Miniature Horse Club, 586-6104.
June 22: Forever Plaid Supporters for the Performing Arts benefit con-
cert, Park Village Playhouse, 900 Moraine Ave., 7:30 p.m., 481-9142,
www.estesparktheater.com.
June 23, 24: Juanita Heider and Jo Arnold performance in Riverside
Rhythms, a free musical entertainment series in Riverside Plaza on East
Riverside Drive just a half-block south of Elkhorn Ave., 3 p.m.
June 25: Marimba Band, Performance Park, 7 p.m., 577-9900.
June 27: Nature’s Forms exhibit opening and reception. The show fea-
tures the highly imaginative photography of Del Hope and the lifelike
bronze equine and other artful sculptures of Carol Cunningham. Art
Center of Estes Park, 517 Big Thompson Ave., 5 to 7 p.m., 586-5882.
June 27-29: Saddlebred Horse Show. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209
Manford Ave., 9 a.m. Free.
June 27: Cool Night Cruz-In. Classic cars, 5 p.m. Estes Park Visitors
Center parking lot, 500 Big Thompson Ave.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 69
See Calendar: page 70
Calendar of events
Courtesy photo
Takacs Quartet in concert June 14.
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June 28-29: Scandinavian Midsummer Festival, Bond Park, Saturday
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. www.estesmidsummer.com.
June 30: The Colorado Music Festival Orchestra, under the direction of
Michael Christie, performs. Adult tickets are $25 at the door. 7:30 p.m.
Stanley Hotel Concert Hall, 333 W. Wonderview Ave, 586-9519.
July 2008
July 2: Estes Park Jazz Big Band under the direction of Chuck Varilek,
Performance Park, 417 W. Elkhorn Ave, free, 7 p.m., 577-9900.
July 3-5: Arabian Horse Show competition between horses known for
their intelligence, spirit, and stamina, Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209
Manford Ave., 9 a.m. Free, 577-9900.
July 4: Holiday Pancake Breakfast benefit for Crossroads Ministry a non-
profit organization assisting people in need. Our Lady of the Mountains
Catholic Church, 920 Big Thompson Ave., 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
July 4: Coolest Car Show of vintage vehicles from the 1920s and beyond.
Close-up inspections costs: $4 per adult, $2 for children, free for those
under 6, $10 for the whole family, or $2 for students. Bond Park in the
center of downtown, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 586-6256.
July 4: Estes Park Village Band Patriotic Concert under the direction of
Chuck Varilek, Performance Park, 577-9900.
July 4: Independence Day Fireworks over Lake Estes, 9:30 p.m.
July 7: Colorado Music Festival Orchestra Patriotic Concert, a free pre-
sentation from the Estes Park Music Festival. Performance Park, 417 W.
Elkhorn Ave., 7 p.m., 586-9519.
July 8-13: Rooftop Rodeo and Parade. The 2008 Rooftop Rodeo Parade
at 10:30 a.m., July 8, Elkhorn Avenue, downtown. Professional Rodeo
Cowboy Association athletes compete during evening performances.
Fairgrounds at Stanley Park. Nightly performances at 7:30 p.m., 577-9900.
July 11: Legends and Lore II exhibit opening and reception for works
from Estes Park’s artistic heritage. Includes a collection of rarely seen art,
objects and photographs on loan. Cultural Arts Council Fine Art Gallery,
423 W. Elkhorn Ave, 586-9203, www.estesarts.com.
July 12: O’Brien Family Bluegrass Concert, Supporters for the
Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m. at Performance Park, www.estesparktheater.com.
July 16: Dulcimer Orchestra, Performance Park, 7 p.m., 577-9900.
July 17 – 20: Dressage Equestrian Event featuring riders and horses per-
form technical routines. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., 9
a.m. Free, 577-9900.
July 17: The Wigwam Teahouse Tour. Ken Jessen will lead a tour of the
1913 teahouse used for passing travelers. Tour begins at 9 a.m. and ends at
approximately noon. Cost is $6 for members of the Estes Park Museum
Friends and Foundation and $8 for non-members. Transportation from the
Estes Park Museum is included. Call 586-6256 for reservations beginning
May 1. Sponsored by the Estes Park Museum Friends and Foundation.
July 18 -20: Top Hands Classic Team Penning, a competitive event con-
sisting of three team mates who cut out and drive three head of assigned
cattle to the pen. The fastest team wins, Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209
Manford Ave., 9 a.m. Free, 586-6104.
July 18: Meet Martha Maxwell: Pioneer Naturalist. Linda Batlin presents
the story of Martha Maxwell’s love of animals and the natural world.
Nicknamed the “Colorado Huntress” in the mid-nineteenth century, she
was Colorado’s first taxidermist and created displays now known as diora-
mas. Estes Park Museum, 7 p.m., 586-6256.
July 19: A Cappella Men’s Quartet Recital. Christian music will be fea-
tured during this benefit for the Supporters of the Performing Arts efforts
to construct a performing arts theater in Estes Park. 7:30 p.m., Hyde
Chapel, Estes Park Center-YMCA of the Rockies. Donations will be accept-
ed, 481-6142.
July 19: The Incredible Circus Mat performs. Tickets: $5 per person or
$15 for family. Performance Park, 7:30 p.m., www.estesparktheater.com.
July 21: Colorado Music Festival Orchestra Concert from the orchestra
whose home is the Boulder Chautauqua, sponsored by the Estes Park Music
Festival. Tickets are $25 at the door, 7:30 pm, Stanley Hotel Concert Hall,
333 W. Wonderview Ave, 586-9519.
July 23-24: Half-Penny Horse Show for the Colorado Hunter Jumper
Association. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., 577-9900.
www.chja.org.
July 23: Otones Brass Band, Performance Park, 7 p.m., 577-9900.
July 25-26: Copper Penny Horse Show for the Colorado Hunter Jumper
Association. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 577-9900, www.chja.org.
July 25: Cool Night Cruz-In. Classics, muscle cars, hot rods, trucks, kit
cars -anything with an engine and four wheels on display. Listen to old-time
70 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Calendar
Continued from page 69
Photo by Walt Hester
Independence Day Fireworks over Lake Estes.
Come Every Thursday
June 5 through September 25
At Our NEW Location
1209 Manford Avenue
Stanley Fair Grounds
Open 8am - 12:30pm
You can buy:
• Fresh vegetables & tomatoes
• Fresh bread & pastries
• Flowers, plants & herbs
• Cheese & honey
• And so much more!
Your
FARMERS MARKET
IS HERE!
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radio and admire the steel. 5 p.m. Free. Estes Park Visitors Center parking
lot, 500 Big Thompson Ave, 577-9900.
July 27: All-Gershwin Concert by the Estes Park Oratorio Society and
Estes Park Chamber Orchestra, a benefit for the Supporters of the
Performing Arts, www.estesparktheater.com. No admission fee, but a free-
will offering will be accepted. Mountain View Bible Fellowship Church,
Peak View and Hwy 7, 7:30 p.m., 586-9405.
July 28: Colorado Music Festival Orchestra Concert sponsored by the
Estes Park Music Festival. Tickets are $25 at the door. 7:30 p.m. Stanley
Hotel Concert Hall, 333 W. Wonderview Ave, 586-9519.
Jul 30-Aug 3: Hunter Jumper Horse Show Festival I. Competitions rep-
resent the hunter jumper disciplines. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park.
August 2008
Aug. 1–2: Relay for Life, an overnight, non-competitive, team event to
raise funds and awareness to fight cancer combined with an event that hon-
ors cancer survivors. Fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, from 6
p.m. Friday night to 9 a.m. Saturday morning. Estes Park High School
Football Stadium, 1600 Brodie Ave, 586-4350.
Aug. 2: Rocky Mountain National Park Pictorial History program and
book-signing reception. Author Ken Jessen will give a slide presentation
based on his new book. Sponsored by the Estes Park Museum Friends and
Foundation and the Town of Estes Park. Estes Park Museum, 5 to 7 p.m.
Aug. 2-3: Ruckus in the Rockies-JRTCA Jack Russell Terrier Trials, a
variety of sanctioned and non-sanctioned events. Free. 8 a.m. Stanley Park
Ball Fields, 303-926-1251, www.rmjrtn.com.
Aug. 6-10: Hunter Jumper Horse Show Festival II competitions.
Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave, 577-9900.
Aug. 6: Acoustic Roots Trio, Performance Park, 7 p.m.
Aug. 8: Watercolor-Here and There, exhibit opening and reception fea-
turing an array of watercolors depicting images of flowers, landscapes and
architecture by Pam England. Art Center of Estes Park, 517 Big Thompson
Ave., 5 to 7 p.m., 586-5882.
Aug. 8: Prelude to Estes Park Plein Air 2008 exhibit opening and recep-
tion featuring a sampling of work by artists represented by the Cultural Arts
Council Fine Art Gallery in Estes Park Plein Air 2008. Noon to 5 p.m.,
586-9203. www.estesarts.com.
Aug 9: 7th Annual Estes Park Plein Air Painting the Parks. Artists from
across the nation paint on-location. Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park,
586-9203, 423 W. Elkhorn Avenue, www.estesarts.com.
Aug. 14: Boulder County Ghost Town Tour, a tour of the towns of
Salina, Wall Street, Sunset, Mont Alto Park and Gold Hill led by Keith
Jessen. The tour begins at 7:30 a.m. and is expected to continue until
approximately 5:30 p.m. Call the museum at 586-6256 for reservations
after June 1. Sponsored by the Estes Park Museum Friends and Foundation.
Aug. 15-17: Colorado Jr. Rodeo Association Finals, Fairgrounds at
Stanley Park, 9 a.m., 577-9900.
Aug. 16: Auto Extravaganza. The focus always is on a special model, but
you’re likely to find any number of vintage autos on display. Free. Bond
Park in the center of downtown, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 577-9900.
Aug. 20-22: Rocky Mountain Gay Days. For more information, visit
www.rockymountaingaydays.com.
Aug. 21: Estes Park Plein Air “Paint Our Town.” Plein Air artists paint
scenes along the Riverwalk and throughout the downtown area. Event
sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
586-9203.
Aug. 23: Estes Park Plein Air “Quick Draw” and Auction when artists
paint live models (or any subject they can see from the plaza) in 90 minutes
in Riverside Plaza in downtown Estes Park. 8:30 to 11 a.m, 586-9203.
Aug. 23: Estes Park Plein Air Gala opening day festivities. Receptions
and award presentations. Noon, 586-9203, www.estesarts.com.
Aug. 23-24: Heritage Festival, a celebration of Estes Park’s history,
includes storytelling, musical performances and exhibits. Bond Park in the
center of downtown, 577-1903.
Aug. 29: Capt. Jepp and the Little Black Book. Authors Flint Whitlock
and Terry Barnhart tell the story of Elrey Jeppesen who began flying in the
Roaring ‘20s. Free. Estes Park Museum, 7 p.m., 586-6256.
Aug. 29: Cool Night Cruz-In. Classics, muscle cars, hot rods, trucks, kit
cars – anything with an engine and four wheels – are on display. Listen to
old-time radio and admire the steel. 5 p.m. Estes Park Visitors Center park-
ing lot, 500 Big Thompson Ave, 577-9900.
Aug. 30-Sept. 1: Estes Park Alpaca Market featuring Alpaca spinning,
weaving and knitting, with Alpacas on display and for sale. Fairgrounds at
Stanley Park, beginning at 9 a.m, 577-9900.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 71
See Calendar: page 74
Photo by Walt Hester
Heritage Festival, Aug. 23-24, features a petting zoo.
10% Off when you mention this ad
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www.BellaCreations-Online.com
72 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Estes Park Dining, Food, Treats & Beverages
The Baldpate Inn
For the 91st year we welcome you to our historic lodge to experience for
yourself our tradition of an unparalleled dining experience. As a
specialty restaurant, we invite you to enjoy our award-winning Soup &
Salad buffet with homemade breads and pies. At 9,000 ft. on the side
of Twin Sisters mountain, our Sunporch Dining Room undeniably has the
best view in the area. Daily 11:30 am – 8 pm. Reservations always
recommended. 4900 S. Hwy 7, Estes Park. 980/586-KEYS (5397)
Casa Grande
Casa Grande features a complete selection of traditional Mexican
dishes at affordable prices. We serve dinner combinations, steak
platters, hamburgers and fries. Our specialties are sizzling fajitas with
choice of chicken, steak, shrimp or a combination. We have a children’s
menu, senior menu and full bar menu. Relax on our streamside patio
(Summer) and enjoy the best margaritas in town. Dine in our carry out.
Open at 11 am, 220 E. Elkhorn Avenue, Estes Park. 970/577-0799.
Coffee on the Rocks
“Where the coffee is as great as the views!” Marvel at the beautiful
mountain views as you enjoy our organic free-trade coffee, tea,
smoothies and other cold drinks. Offering breakfast, lunch and dinner
with baked goods from the famous Schmidt’s bakery, “lunches-to-go”,
panini sandwiches, salads, soup du jour, smothered burritos and more!
Free Wi-Fi! Indoor/Outdoor seating (Lakeside or on the deck). Featuring
local artists. Meeting room in back. Large flat-screen TV. Plenty of
parking. Located on Hwy 36 on the way to RMNP, next to Red Rose Rock
Shop & Dick’s Rock Museum. Open year-round. 510 Moraine Avenue.
970/586-5181.
DeLeo’s Park Theatre Cafe & Deli
Whether you’ve visited us in person before, heard about us by word of
mouth, or learned about us from The Food Network, we’re delighted to
have you here. You’re invited to stop in for some of the finest,
mouthwatering Italian deli you’ve ever encountered. Sit inside with us or
outside along the Fall River (weather permitting), or take a feast to go
and head into Rocky Mountain National Park, which is just up the road.
You will find us at the entrance to the Historic Park Theatre, the oldest
continuously operating movie theater west of the Mississippi, and just a
few steps from the exact center of downtown Estes Park. If you have an
event happening in town, you can share great deli with your guests. Try
our full-service World Class Catering! 132 Moraine Avenue, Estes Park.
970/577-2234
Donut Haus
Proudly serving handmade donuts and other baked goods for over 30
years. Come and enjoy an Estes Park tradition. We are locally owned and
operated. Open Daily 6 am to 1 pm. 342 Moraine Avenue, Estes Park.
970/586-2988. www.donuthaus-estespark.com
Dunraven Downtown
We serve fresh, homemade Italian cuisine in the heart of downtown
Estes. Dunraven Downtown has the feel of an open-air bistro with a
warm, inviting dining room with hand-painted murals of the Italian
countryside. Whether you feel like an in-house cut sirloin steak, shrimp
scampi, or pasta favorites such as our famous lasagna or chicken
primavera, we’ve got something you’ll love! We have an extensive wine
list that compliments our menu. Save some room for our spumoni or
tiramisu. There is a public parking lot conveniently located behind our
restaurant. Dunraven Downtown is open for lunch every day at 11 am.
We start serving dinner at 4 pm. 101 W. Elkhorn Avenue, Estes Park.
970/586-3818.
Dunraven Inn
“The Rome of the Rockies.” Estes Park’s most romantic restaurant
featuring Italian cuisine, great steaks and wonderful seafood. Dinner
served nightly at 5 pm. 2470 Colo. Hwy. 66, Estes Park. 970/586-
6409.
Estes Park Brewery
Come for a free taste of our many beers. Open at 11:00 am daily. We
have a wide variety of food along with pool tables, video games and TVs.
Deck seating with views of Longs Peak. 470 Prospect Village Drive.
970/586-5421.
Grandmaison’s Chalet Room at
Marys Lake Lodge
We offer world-class cuisine in an elegant ambiance. Award-winning
Chef Marc Grandmaison has created an extraordinary menu offering a
culinary tour of Europe, with specials from Lisbon, Barcelona, Milan,
Munich, and Athens, as well as exquisite seafood, steaks, veal, lamb,
and pasta, just to name a few. Vegetarian and vegan entrées are also
extensive! Located just three miles from downtown Estes Park on Hwy 7.
2625 Marys Lake Road. 970/586-5958.
The Grubsteak
We feature fantastic Burgers, Steaks, Buffalo Steaks and Elk Steaks. We
also have Rocky Mountain Trout, Baby Back Pork Ribs, Buffalo Ribs,
Pastas, Sandwiches and Salads. Home of the $3.99 Breakfast Special
(two eggs, potatoes & toast.) Full breakfast menu in summer. Serving
lunch and dinner year-round. Largest shaded patio, sunny pub room,
and an Old West atmosphere. Take out available. Public parking lot in
rear. 134 W. Elkhorn Avenue 970/586-8388.
Kind Coffee
Kind Coffee is Estes Park’s exclusive organic coffee roaster, roasting
daily on the West End of town. We offer two full-service espresso bars
located on the East and West Ends of the River Walk featuring our fresh
roasted coffees. Fruit smoothies, milkshakes, and frozen drinks are
made to order! Fresh bagel sandwiches and breakfast items, lunch
sandwiches to go, along with local baked goods and desserts round out
our offerings. Pounds of fresh roasted coffee, t-shirts and mugs are great
souvenirs and gift items! As a locally owned business and a member of
1% for the Planet, Kind Coffee is committed to both our community and
our environment. KIND is what coffee should be.
Leah’s
LEAH’s (formerly Spirits of the Rocks) is now featuring espresso coffee
drinks and fine teas! We are located in “downtown” Glen Haven, just
across from the “Inn of Glen Haven.” Come for a drink and shop in our
fun gallery! We’re open daily 9 am to 6 pm. 970-586-3831,
www.leahshop.com
Lonigans Saloon Nightclub & Grill
An Irish Pub. The best in live music and entertainment. Great
atmosphere, fun, food, and drink. Serving Appetizers, Burgers,
Wings, Reubens, Fish & Chips, and other great tavern fare. Happy hour
food & drink specials. Downtown at 110 West Elkhorn. 970-586-4346.
www.lonigans.com.
Longz—A Mountain Grill
Longz Family Restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner daily with
Friday & Saturday dinner buffets and breakfast buffets on the weekends
(every day in the summer). Longz Mountain Grill offers extended
Colorado Regional Cuisine after 5 pm, and Longz Lounge has daily
happy hour specials & an extensive martini menu. Located in Rocky
Mountain Park Holiday Inn, 101 S. St. Vrain. 970/586-2332.
Mama Rose’s Homemade Italian
Taste. Traditional Italian food at its best, in a casually elegant
atmosphere. Enjoy great wine, or relaxing beer in the dining room or
seasonal riverside patio. A varied children’s menu is available for the
little ones. Open daily at 4 pm for dinner. 338 E. Elkhorn Ave. (Barlow
Plaza), Estes Park. 970/586-3330.
Poppy’s Pizza & Grill
Imagine. Create. Eat. Soup, salad, sandwiches and pizza created as you
want! Fun, casual dining area or seasonal riverside patio. Menus are
available for kids 12 and under. Open daily at 11 am. 342 E. Elkhorn
Avenue (Barlow Plaza), Estes Park. 970/586-8282.
Pura Vida
Costa Rican Cuisine. Salads, Soups, Seafood, Steaks, Combination
Plates. Plus a childrens’ menu and an American menu. 160 1st St.,
970/586-3686.
Schmidt’s Bakery & Delicatessen
Quality and Fresh Coffee Cakes, Signature & Wedding Cakes, Tortes,
Breads & Rolls, and Delicatessen. You can’t visit Estes without trying
Schmidt’s! Located in Country Market at 900 Moraine Avenue. Open
every day.
Sundeck Restaurant
Serving the best food under the sun for the last 60 years. Known for our
grilled fresh trout, steaks, chili rellenos and other excellent dishes.
Reservations recommended for dinner. Non-smoking dining room. Full
bar. Open mid-May to early October. Amex, Discover, Visa, MasterCard.
915 Moraine Ave. (2 miles west of downtown, at the junction of Hwy. 36,
Mary’s Lake Road and High Drive.) 970/586-9832.
www.sundeckrestaurant.com
The Tavern at Marys Lake Lodge
We offer casual comfort and serve a hearty meal in a fun-filled
atmosphere. The Tavern is the only establishment in the area to offer live
entertainment SEVEN NIGHTS A WEEK from May – October, and FIVE
NIGHTS A WEEK from November – April. Located just three miles from
downtown Estes Park on Hwy 7. 2625 Marys Lake Road. 970/586-
5958.
Trailhead Restaurant at
Rocky Mountain Gateway
(Fall River entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park.) Relaxed dining
nestled just outside the Park with spectacular views of mountain
scenery. Visit us for either breakfast, lunch or dinner and enjoy either
traditional menu favorites or our selections of wild game, Buffalo and
Elk. Enjoy a glass of wine or beer with your dinner whether seated in our
cozy dining room or at a table outside on the deck. Open daily 8:00 am
– 9:00 pm seasonal. 3450 Fall River Road, Estes Park. 970/577-0043.
Twin Owls Steakhouse at the
Black Canyon Inn
We have a warm candlelight feel accompanied by culinary skill and
impeccable service that is unparalleled in the Estes Valley. We serve a
variety of entrées from steaks and chops to pastas and seafood. 800
MacGregor Avenue (Devil’s Gulch Road). 970/586-9344.
Vega
Come join us on our huge rooftop patio in the heart of downtown with
views of Estes in every direction! If you prefer indoor dining you can sit
in our bright, sunny dining room or relaxing full bar. Try a pitcher of one
of our eight beers on tap, wine, or a refreshing sangria. Enjoy Spanish-
style tapas, pizza, salads, local fare such as trout and elk, and delicious
grilled entrées. Vega opens every day at 11 am. See us on the rooftop at
the Courtyard Shops, 205 Virginia Drive, Estes Park. 970/586-9494.
The View Restaurant at The Historic Crags
Lodge
Surround yourself in the rustic charm of this Historic Lodge that hosts
views of the entire Estes Valley! The menu offers steak, fresh fish, pasta,
and vegetarian entrées. Wine, beer, and cocktails are available to
accompany your meal. Call for reservations. 300 Riverside Drive, Estes
Park. 970/586-6066
The Wild Rose
Family Friendly with a Taste of Europe. The Wild Rose Restaurant, the
Staff and Chefs have always felt to please their guests and make them
comfortable. The Continental Cuisine with fresh Seafood. Hand-cut
Steaks and homemade Sauces are a delight and rewarding for the
palate. We open at 11 am and serve all day Lunch or Dinner (until 10
pm in the Summer Season). Please join us for a delightful meal and
great selected Wines in our two Dining Rooms or enjoy the sunshine on
the Patio. If you have special needs, please let us know and we will try
our best to serve you. Old Church Shops, 157 W. Elkhorn Avenue, Estes
Park. 970/586-2806.
Wine & Cheese
Cheese is a wine bar and restaurant in downtown Estes Park. We are
open 11 am to 9 pm every day (10 pm after Memorial Day) and feature
beautiful platters of imported and local meats and cheeses as well as
over 20 wines by the glass or tasting flight. 330 & 332 E. Elkhorn
Avenue, Estes Park 80517. For reservations, please call 970/586-
6611.
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 73
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74 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
September 2008
Sept. 4-7: Longs Peak Scottish Irish Highland Festival
includes bagpiping, dancing, athletics, jousting and other com-
petitions along with premier entertainment. Festival Grounds at
Stanley Park, U.S. Hwy. 36 and Community Drive, open from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., www.scotfest.com.
Sept. 6: Longs Peak Scottish Irish Highland Festival Parade,
an hour-long parade down Elkhorn Avenue, downtown Estes
Park, filled with the pomp and pageantry of the Scottish Festival
highland bands, bagpipers and clans, 9:30 a.m.
Sept. 11-14: 3rd Annual Estes Park Film Festival showcasing
new independent feature films, documentaries and shorts from
around the country. Park Theatre, 130 Moraine Ave, 231-2580,
www.estesparkfilm.com.
Sept. 12-14: Top Hands Classic Team Penning Event. The
competitive event consists of three teammates who cut out and
drive their three head of assigned cattle to the pen. The fastest
team wins. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., 9
a.m, 586-6104.
Sept. 13: Cheley Camp Tour from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Reservations necessary and will be accepted at the Estes Park
Museum beginning Aug. 1. Inquire at the Estes Park Museum,
586-6256.
Sept. 13-14: Autumn Art Walk and Studio Tour of galleries
and artist studios throughout the area. Tour directories are avail-
able at the Cultural Arts Council at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave, visi-
tors centers and participating artist studios, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
586-9203.
Sept. 13-14: Fine Arts and Crafts Festival, sponsored by the
Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies, featuring juried work in wear-
able art, sculpture, photography, jewelry, folk art, glass, wood,
leather, metal, ceramics, oil, pencil drawings and watercolor
paintings. Bond Park, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Photo by Walt Hester
The Longs Peak Scottish Irish Highland Festival takes place from Sept. 4 to 7
at the Fairgrounds at Stanley Park.
Calendar
Continued from page 71
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2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 75
Sept. 19: Lines Into Shapes, exhibit opening and reception for the Art
Center’s annual nationally juried exhibit and sale. All mediums are repre-
sented, with approximately 180 works of art. Art Center of Estes Park, 517
Big Thompson Ave., 5 to 7 p.m., 586-5882, www.artcenterofestes.com.
Sept. 20-21: Autumn Gold - A Festival of Bands, Brats ‘n Beer. Bond
Park in the center of downtown Estes Park, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 577-9900.
Sept. 20: Running of the Bulls, a 3.75-mile run/walk around Lake Estes
to benefit Partners Mentoring Youth. Pre-registration fees are $20 per per-
son and $15 per person on a team. Add $5 per person for race day registra-
tion. The run/walk starts and ends at the Lake Estes Marina 1770 Big
Thompson Ave., Run/walk begins at 10 a.m, 577-9348. Register at
www.active.com.
Sept. 20-28: 13th Annual Colorado Yoga Journal Conference. More than
100 classes, all levels and styles taught by notables. Day passes are available
for Friday and Saturday. A Yoga Marketplace featuring yoga products from
all around the world; jewelry to clothes to mats and props, DVDs, books
and more, is open free to the public. Estes Park Center-YMCA of the
Rockies, 800-561-9398, www.yogajournal.com.
Sept. 24-26: Rocky Mountain National Park Historic Lodges and
Homesteads Tour of lodges and homesteads from the past in Rocky
Mountain National Park. Tour begins at the Fall River Inn site, with visits
to the Horseshoe Inn, the Hupp graves and homestead, and Sprague’s
Resort in Moraine Park, $8 for members, $10 for non-members. Tickets
available at the Estes Park Museum beginning Aug. 1. Estes Park Museum,
586-6256.
Sept. 27-28: 3rd Annual Estes Park Studio Tour, annual art tour visiting
artists in their private studios. Experience the art process in the artist’s habi-
tat. Sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park, 423 W. Elkhorn
Avenue, 586-9203, www.estesarts.com.
Sept. 29-30: Rocky Mountain Beagle Club Specialty Dog Show. Events
will include obedience, agility, rally, and conformation judging. Vendors
will have dog-related items for sale and the event is open to the general
public. Only dogs participating in the show will be allowed on the show
grounds. Estes Park Conference Center, 201 S. St., Vrain Ave., 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., 303-280-2216, www.nbcspecialtyshow.com.
Photo by Walt Hester
Rodney Yee teaching a class at the 2007 Colorado Yoga Journal
Conference in Estes Park.
See Calendar: page 76
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Open Every Day
Free Weights &
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Cardiovascular Equipment
Exercise Classes
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A special place just for fun at
239 W. Elkhorn next to the waterwheel • (970) 586-5523
Open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Daily
Ken Scott
Signed Metal Sculptures
20-17058
October 2008
Oct. 1-31: Elktober the month when area elk provide daily sights and
sounds while in their peak mating season, Rocky Mountain National Park,
577-9900.
Oct. 1-3: National Beagle Club of America Specialty Dog Show featur-
ing competitions in obedience, agility, rally, and conformation judging.
Vendors will have dog-related items for sale, and the event is open to the
general public. Only dogs participating in the show will be allowed on the
show grounds. Estes Park Conference Center. 201 S. St. Vrain Ave., 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.. 303-280-2216, www.nbcspecialtyshow.com.
Oct. 3: The Playground Trail: To and Through the National Parks of the
West, a slide-illustrated program by authors Lee and Jane Whiteley based
on their book, “The Playground Trail.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for the 7
p.m. program. Sponsored by the Estes Park Museum Friends and
Foundation, Estes Park Museum, 200 Fourth St., 586-6256.
Oct. 4-5: Elk Fest, a celebration of all things Wapiti, the American elk
that calls Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park its home. Activities
include seminars, bugling contests, elk tours, a Mountain Man encamp-
ment, Native American music and dancing, and edible products from elk.
Bond Park in the center of downtown Estes Park. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, 577-9900, estesparkcvb.com/events.
Oct. 10: Enchanting Wearable Art exhibit opening and reception with
whimsical, wire wrap/bead and fossil jewelry by Alice League and the color-
ful creations of life-long fiber and knitwear artist Janice Kay. Art Center of
Estes Park, 517 Big Thompson Ave., 5 to 7 p.m., 586-5882.
Oct. 10-11, 17-18, 24-25: Scary Wagon Rides at Aspen Lodge, 6120
Hwy. 7. Ghosts, goblins and a headless horseman thrill riders with their
antics. A wagon is pulled by Belgian draft horses. Call for times and fees at
586-8133.
Oct. 11-12: Surprise Sidewalk Sale where the surprise is what you’ll find.
Merchants set up tables on the sidewalks and offer special pricing on many
items indoors as well. Downtown Estes Park. 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Oct. 17: Collecting Art from Estes Park: The Howard and Sue Houston
Collection exhibit opening and reception (5 to 7 p.m.). The exhibit
explores some of Estes Park’s top rated artists in all media, with examples
from the Houston Private Collection. Estes Park Museum, 200 Fourth St.,
Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday 1 to 5 pm, 586-6256.
www.estesnet.com/museum.
November 2008
Nov 2: Rocky Mountain Romance Bridal and Fashion Show sponsored
by The Estes Park Wedding Association. The show includes vendor booths,
a fashion show and groom-to-be lounge. Estes Park Conference Center, 201
S. St. Vrain Ave., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 586-6151.
Nov. 7-9, 14-25: “Bye Bye Birdie,” 1960 Tony award theater production
by the Fine Arts Guild of the Rockies. Hempel Auditorium at YMCA of
the Rockies. Curtain Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Sunday matinee at 3
p.m. $14 Adults; $8 ages 18 and under for tickets purchased at the door,
586-9203.
Nov. 21: Nature’s Tranquility exhibit opening and reception featuring
Mel Wilson’s wildlife and nature photography of Rocky Mountain National
Park and photographs of many other locations throughout America. Art
Center of Estes Park, 517 Big Thompson Ave., 5 to 7 p.m., 586-5882.
Nov. 28: Catch the Glow celebration and evening parade kicks off the
holiday season. Visits with Santa, hayrides, pony rides, carolers, costumed
characters and an early-evening lighted parade. All activities are free.
Downtown Estes Park. Activities begin at noon; the parade starts at 5:30
p.m., 577-9900.
Nov. 28: Holiday Art Walk, a self-guided tour of the galleries and artist
studios throughout the area. Tour maps are available at the Cultural Arts
Council at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Visitors Centers and participating artist
studios. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 586-9203, wwwestesarts.com.
Nov. 29: Holiday House Christmas Bazaar, an annual bazaar filled with
homemade baked goods and crafts, clothing, holiday gifts, raffles, a silent
auction with donated items from downtown merchants and more.
Admission is $1 at the door. Estes Park Conference Center, 201 S. St. Vrain
Ave., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., 586-7205.
December 2008
Dec. 6: Holiday Home Tour, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. From quaint to luxurious
and full log homes to condos, the annual tour of homes in the Estes Park
area showcases unique mountain abodes decked out in holiday finery.
Tickets: $12 in advance; $15 on the day of the tour. Tickets and maps are
available at the Estes Park Visitors Center, 500 Big Thompson Ave., 577-
9900.
Dec. 6-7, 13-14, 20-21: Sleigh Bells Ring Christmas Tradition Weekend.
Holiday Tree Sales and Horse Drawn Sleigh/Wagon Rides. Reservations
required. Aspen Lodge Ranch Resort, 6120 Hwy 7, 586-8133, www.aspen-
lodge.net.
Dec. 12: A Celtic Christmas II. The Muses entertain with old songs per-
formed as part of a Celtic repertoire. Location to be determined. 7 p.m.,
call 586-9203 for ticket information. Sponsored by the Cultural Arts
Council of Estes Park, 586-9203, wwwestesarts.com.
Dec.13: Estes Park Music Festival Fantasy Ball, 586-9519, www.estes-
parkmusicfestival.com.
76 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Calendar
Continued from page 75
Photo by Walt Hester
The Catch the Glow celebration and evening parade kicks off the
holiday season in Estes Park on Nov. 28.
555 Prospect Ave. Estes Park • Monday-Friday, 8 to 5; Saturday, 9 to 12
The Family Medical Clinic, at Estes Park Medical Center,
offers the most complete scope of health care services
available in the Estes Valley
Pictured left to right: Dr. Dumont, Dr. Woodard, Dr. Beesley, Dr. Van der Werf,
Dr. Lampey, Dr. Koschnitzke, and Dr. Barry
Scott D. Woodard, M.D.
Board Certified
General Surgery
Martin Koschnitzke, M.D.
Board Certified
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Guy P. Van der Werf, M.D.
Board Certified
Family Medicine
Patrick Barry, M.D.
Board Certified
Family Medicine
Richard Beesley, M.D.
Board Certified
Pediatrics
Frank Dumont, M.D.
Board Certified
Internal Medicine
Astrid Lampey, M.D.
Board Certified
Family Medicine & Obstetrics
Same Day Appointments For Urgent Care
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78 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Photo by Walt Hester
Hikers photograph the scenery at Dream Lake in May, just as high country lakes are beginning to shed their ice.
Time to hit the trail
By Mike Oatley
There are two ways to see Rocky Mountain National Park: the comfort-
able way (through the windshield), or the hard way — on foot. In style and
comfort, or by sweating for solitude, your call.
Okay, the Park is a little more accommodating than that. Not every out-
ing has to be a test of endurance or turn into a death march.
But it does seem as if hundreds of thousands of visitors to Rocky
Mountain National Park come to the Park and never get out of sight of
their cars. The result is that, in truth, finding a little peace and quiet in one
of our most heavily visited national parks is a lot easier than the annual visi-
tor count would lead you to believe. And the farther you are willing to
walk, more of that solitude you can find. You’ll know you’ve been some-
place special when you are back at the trailhead feeling like you don’t have
another 100 feet in you.
All in all, the Park strings together more then 350 miles of trails and
boasts numerous backcountry campsites. That’s in addition to 585 camp-
sites in five drive-in campgrounds at one end of the comfort meter
(Aspenglen, Glacier Basin, Moraine Park, Longs Peak, and Timber Creek,
with group camping sites at Glacier Basin) and designated off-trail travel
areas at the other.
Excellent commercial maps of the Park are available, and useful not only
in figuring out where to go but also in identifying features of the landscape
around you. The primary jumping-off points for day hikes, including
ascents of Longs Peak during the short non-technical season on the Front
Range’s preeminent 14er, on the east side of the Park include the Wild
Basin ranger’s station, the Longs Peak campground area, Bear Lake,
Horseshoe Park.
Day hikers need to be as aware of the threats the mountains can pose as
backcountry travelers need to be. But for all of the questions about bears
and mountain lions, it’s the weather that poses the greatest threat to anyone
traveling in the mountains. In the late summer, you can almost set your
watch by the lightning-riven thunderstorms that crop up off the
Continental Divide and push eastward.
Of course, getting off exposed ridges by early afternoon to avoid light-
ning is a very good idea, but just as important is planning to stay dry when
the rain comes. Afternoon thunderstorms, sometimes bearing hail, can send
temperatures plummeting. Cold and wet is a bad combination when you
find yourself three miles from the trailhead. A rain jacket is as important as
sunscreen and a sturdy pair of hiking boots when heading out for a day on
the trail.
As is drinking water. Hikers should assume all surface water is contami-
nated with one nasty critter or another, and either carry sufficient water or
You know you’ve been somewhere when your dogs start to bark
2008 Trail Vacation Edition — 79
carry a suitable filter. Dehydration headaches ruin plenty of otherwise fine
days in the Park for many people each summer.
Backcountry travelers who will stay overnight need to acquire a permit
from the backcountry office at the Park’s Estes Park headquarters or the
Kawuneeche Visitor Center at the Park’s western entrance, and reservations
at backcountry campsites can be made as early as March 1 each year.
Horseback
There are places a person just can’t reasonably go on foot in a single day,
and another way to see the high country is on horseback. Estes Park has a
number of outfitters that lead trail rides into the Park.
Traveling on horseback in the mountains is a fantastic way to travel, and
with your eyes lifted three or four feet higher off the ground, the landscape
around you opens up in surprising ways, revealing distant ridges that might
go unnoticed.
But keep in mind that if you have never ridden before, you’re likely to
get out of the saddle at the end of the day as beat up as if you had covered
the same ground on foot.
Photo by Walt Hester
A camper on Longs Peak gets his morning sustenance before head-
ing for the summit.
Doug Bailard GRI
Broker Associate
Cell 970-231-5878
www.DougBailard.com
DBailard@pruteam.com
Lois Bailard GRI
Broker Associate
Cell 970-227-0495
www.LoisBailard.com
LBailard@pruteam.com
You love your vacations in Estes Park.
Have you ever dreamed of owning your own cabin, second home,
or vacation condo here? Something in the wide variety of properties here would fit your needs.
There are cabins, homes and condominiums of all shapes and sizes, each as unique as you.
Some investment properties have onsite property management to rent your
vacation property when you are not using it. Call us!
We’ll help you make that dream come true!
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Upper Stanley Village
“Call us!”
Rocky Mountain, REALTORS
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A Permanent Vacation A Permanent Vacation
TWO UNIQUE PERSONALITIES. ONE POWERFUL TEAM.
80 — 2008 Trail Vacation Edition
Index to Advertisers
Aerial Tramway .............................................................................61
Alpine Accents...............................................................................47
American Wilderness Tours..........................................................12
Aspen Brook Vacation Homes ......................................................18
Bella Creations..............................................................................71
Big O Tires...........................................................Inside Back Cover
Big Thompson Indian Village.......................................................35
Black Mountain Traders ...............................................................23
Bob’s Towing & Repair .................................................................30
Boulder Valley Credit Union.........................................................69
Brownfields Trading Post ...............................................................5
Canyonlands Indian Arts ..............................................................79
Casa Grande Mexican Restaurant ................................................65
Coldwell Banker/Estes Village Properties .......Outside Back Cover
Cowpoke Corner Corral................................................................35
DeLeo’s Deli ....................................................................................8
Donut Haus...................................................................................36
Doug & Lois Bailard/Prudential...................................................79
Eagle Plume’s ..........................................................39, 40, 41 & 42
Estes Park Good Samaritan Village .............................................67
Estes Park Laundracenters...........................................................57
Estes Park Medical Center............................................................59
Estes Park Mountain Shop...........................................................20
Estes Park Rent All .......................................................................22
Estes Park Trail-Gazette ..............................................................77
Family Medical Clinic...................................................................76
Farmers Market ............................................................................70
Fine Arts Guild................................................................................6
Food Listings ................................................................................73
Fun City ........................................................................................10
Glassworks ....................................................................................19
Gwynne’s Greenhouse ..................................................................49
Insurance Associates.....................................................................74
Jackson Stables .............................................................................58
Jay Harroff/Prudential ..................................................................52
John Denver Tribute Concert/Lions Club......................................8
Kind Coffee......................................................................................6
Leah’s.............................................................................................24
Lithium...........................................................................................7
Longs Peak Summit Club ............................................................53
Lonigans Saloon, Nightclub and Grill .........................................56
Macdonald Bookshop......................................................................3
Mary’s Lake Lodge ........................................................................21
Med X ............................................................................................75
Misty Mountain Lodge..................................................................45
Mountain Paradise Real Estate ....................................................46
National Park Players ...................................................................31
National Park Village ....................................................................17
Old Church Shops ........................................................................51
Omnibus........................................................................................75
Outdoor World/RMC.....................................................................34
Photos by Sandi ............................................................................11
Plum Creek Shoes/Merrell Footwear................Inside Front Cover
Prudential Rocky Mountain Realtors...........................................13
Rambo’s Longhorn Liquor Mart ..................................................11
Range Property Management.......................................................12
Re/Max Mountain Brokers................................................63
Red Rose Rock Shop.....................................................................10
Rocky Mountain Gateway.............................................................23
Rocky Mountain Health Club.......................................................47
Rocky Mountain Lifestyle Realty..................................................33
Rocky Mountain Nature Association..............................................9
Rocky Ridge Music Center ...........................................................34
Rustic Mountain Charm...............................................................63
Schmidt’s Bakery ............................................................................3
Serendipity....................................................................................22
Snowy Peaks Winery.....................................................................55
T.W. Beck Architechture...............................................................25
The White Lion.............................................................................46
Tiny Town Shell ............................................................................74
Tom Adams/Prudential .................................................................27
True Value .....................................................................................66
Twisted Pine..................................................................................26
Village Goldsmith ...........................................................................4
Wine & Cheese..............................................................................15
Wool Basket ..................................................................................48
YMCA of the Rockies ....................................................................36
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“Thanks to you, we were able to accomplish our long-time dream of having
a get-away in beautiful Estes Park. We highly recommend Coldwell Banker
Estes Village Properties. You skillfully took care of all the details and made
it a very enjoyable process.”
J. & B. Wall—Estes Park, CO and Colorado Springs, CO
“I can tell you without hesitation that moving to Estes Park and working
with Coldwell Banker Estes Village Properties are two of the best things
that have happened to us. We were always treated like friends, rather than
just clients.”
C. & C. Hillerson, Estes Park, CO
“They helped us find exactly the home we wanted for retirement. Their service
is anchored in professionalism and integrity, with a genuine friendliness that
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D. & J. Britton—Estes Park, CO
“When I was transferred to Estes as an employee of the National Park,
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T. & N. Greer—Estes Park, CO
320 East Elkhorn P.O. Box 4130, Estes Park, CO 80517 www.estesparkrealestate.com
970-586-4425
Denver Metro: (303) 442-2762 / 1-800-726-1405
Janice Harrigan
Administrative
Assistant
ESTES VILLAGE
PROPERTIES, LTD.
Where the Estes Valley has been coming for real estate solutions since 1985.
HowTo Make
Your Vacation Permanent.
Each office is independently owned and operated. ©2008 CBEVP
Vicky Holler
Broker, CRS,
GRI
Scott Thompson
Broker Assoc.
Randy Good
Broker Assoc.
Wayne Newsom
Broker Assoc.,
CRS, GRI
Marcia Duell
Broker Assoc.,
GRI
Dave Kiser
Broker Assoc.
Mary Murphy
Broker Assoc.
GRI