www.smdailyjournal.com Weekend • Dec.

7-8, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 96
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd. #1
South San Francisco, CA
94080
Pillar Point Harbor
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay, CA
94019
It doesn’t get any fresher!
Just caught seafood for sale right at the
docks at Pillar Point Harbor.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sixty-five-year old Louis Marlin Jr. was
on a cruise in Europe when he found out his
Burlingame home of 39 years had burned
down.
Just before Thanksgiving, at 3:49 a.m.
Nov. 23, Marlin’s apartment, at the 1200
block of Donnelly Avenue near downtown
Burlingame was part of a four-alarm blaze
that badly damaged both his building and a
commercial building
next door, according to
Central County Fire
Marshal Rocque Yballa.
Investigators believe
combustible items near a
floor heater at the com-
mercial business on the
first floor of his apart-
ment at 1218 Donnelly
Ave. started the fire and
caused $2 million in damage, Yballa said. A
full report on the fire will be released some-
time next week.
Marlin, who is deaf, found out about the
fire through an email sent to the leader of
his trip one morning at breakfast in Rome.
“At first I was shocked,” he said through
an interpreter. “Then I was worried, think-
ing about all the valuable things [I lost]. I
was so unsettled and couldn’t sleep well.”
Now he is disappointed, but glad to be
alive.
“In some ways I felt the house was mine,”
he said. “I loved the stairway because it kept
me in shape — I was getting a little bit
thick in the middle. I loved the view and
watched people go by and of course I would
flirt sometimes with the girls going by. One
of the most important things I thought of
was my life. I would have died for sure if I
was not on vacation since I’m a heavy
sleeper. ”
For now, he’s staying at the Crowne Plaza
Hotel in Burlingame. His stay there can last
Moving forward after fire takes home
Economy
returning
to normal?
Consistent hiring points to
stronger economy ahead
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The job market is showing signs of the
consistent gains the nation has awaited in the 4 1/2 years
since the Great Recession.
Employers added 203,000 jobs in November, and the
unemployment rate fell to 7 percent, a five-year low, the
Labor Department reported Friday. Four straight months of
robust hiring have raised hopes that 2014 will be the year
the economy returns to normal.
The steady job growth could also hasten a move by the
Federal Reserve to reduce its stimulus efforts.
Stock investors were heartened by the report. The Dow
Jones industrial average jumped 198 points.
A steadily improving job market could give consumers
and business executives the confidence to keep spending
Sea level rise focus of conference
Federal, state, local officials to highlight
potential impact on San Mateo County
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County Supervisor Dave Pine, U.S. Rep.
Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, and Assemblyman Rich
Gordon, D-Menlo Park, are hosting a conference to address
how San Mateo County can begin to prepare for the effects
of sea level rise.
About 300 people have registered for Meeting the
Challenge of Sea Level Rise in San Mateo County on
Monday morning at the College of San Mateo. National,
state and local officials and environmental experts will
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For many, jumping out of a plane
and freefalling from thousands of feet
in the air at 180 mph evokes anxiety
and gut-wrenching fear; but for Alana
Fulvio, it’s what gets her through life.
The 38-year-old Belmont native and
Redwood City resident has been cop-
ing with the loss of her job and the
tragic death of her husband through
skydiving.
“It’s just freeing, it allows me to
release everything. And I kind of gig-
gle every time I do it just because it’s
really kind of funny and crazy that we
jump out of a plane. But you get away
from everything that society weighs
on you and the sadness of the loss,
[skydiving] allows me just to be in a
happy place. ” Fulvio said.
She started jumping in 2002 after
she lost her job during the recession.
Since then, she’s logged in more than
2,900 jumps, Fulvio said.
“I needed a shock to my system, to
do something that I’d never done,”
Fulvio.
Nowadays, even with a day job at a
recruiting firm in the technology sec-
tor, she tries to get in the air nearly
every weekend.
“It’s probably the most freeing feel-
ing I’ve ever had in my life, because it
is a true sport, it’s not just jumping out
of a plane and falling. It’s difficult to
learn and it takes a lot of dedication
and time to learn the discipline,”
Fulvio said.
Fulvio’s favorite style of skydiving
is called freeflying, where anything
goes.
“To me, freeflying is the most unin-
hibited type of flying and gave me the
most freedom to move my body in the
Jumping toward recovery
Local woman works through grief while setting skydiving records
ALEX CASHMAN
Alana Fulvio freestyle skydiving with a friend.
Louis Marlin Jr.
See SEA LEVEL, Page 8
See ECONOMY, Page 24
See FULVIO, Page 24
See MARLIN, Page 8
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Basketball Hall of
Famer Larry Bird is
57.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1941
Japan launched a surprise attack on
the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in
Hawaii as part of its plan to conquer
Southeast Asian territories; the raid,
which claimed some 2,400 American
lives, prompted the United States to
declare war against Japan the next
day.
“War is the
unfolding of miscalculations.”
— Barbara Tuchman, American historian (1912-1989)
Linguist,
philosopher Noam
Chomsky is 85.
NFL player Terrell
Owens is 40.
Birthdays
KERRY CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Members of the Coventry Carolers from the Great Dickens Christmas Fair delight the crowds at the Burlingame Tree Lighting
and Holiday Parade Friday night downtown.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Breezy. A
slight chance of rain in the morning.
Highs in the mid 40s. Northwest winds 20
to 30 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly clear.
Lows in the lower 30s. Northeast winds
10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 40s. Northeast winds 10
to 15 mph.
Sunday night: Clear. Lows in the mid 30s. North winds 5
to 10 mph.
Monday: Sunny. Highs around 50.
Monday ni ght: Clear. Lows in the mid 30s to lower 40s.
Tuesday through Wednesday: Mostly clear. Highs in
the mid 50s. Lows in the mid 30s to lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
I n 1796, electors chose John Adams to be the second pres-
ident of the United States.
I n 1808, electors chose James Madison to be the fourth
president of the United States.
I n 1842, the New York Philharmonic performed its first
concert.
I n 1909, in his State of the Union address, President
William Howard Taft defended the decision to base U.S.
naval operations in the Pacific at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii,
instead of in the Philippines.
In 1911, China abolished the requirement that men wear
their hair in a queue, or ponytail.
I n 1946, fire broke out at the Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta;
the blaze killed 119 people, including hotel founder W.
Frank Winecoff.
I n 1972, America’s last moon mission to date was
launched as Apollo 17 blasted off from Cape Canaveral.
Imelda Marcos, wife of Philippine President Ferdinand E.
Marcos, was seriously wounded by an assailant who was
then shot dead by her bodyguards.
I n 1982, convicted murderer Charlie Brooks Jr. became the
first U.S. prisoner to be executed by injection, at a prison in
Huntsville, Texas.
I n 1987, 43 people were killed after a gunman aboard a
Pacific Southwest Airlines jetliner in California apparently
opened fire on a fellow passenger, the pilots and himself,
causing the plane to crash.
M
ale parrots are usually more
colorful than female parrots.
***
Large species of parrots, such as the
macaw and the cockatoo, can live to be
more than 75 years old in captivity.
They can outlive their owners, so it is
often necessary for owners to put the
birds in their wills.
***
Legally, animals cannot inherit proper-
ty or money. If a pet owner wants their
pet to be cared for in a specific way after
the owner’s death, a trust can be estab-
lished in the will. The trust devotes a
certain amount of money to be used for
pet care, food and toys.
***
James Buchanan Duke (1856-1925) was
a founder of the American Tobacco
Company. Upon his death, his only
child, Doris Duke, born in 1912, was
heir to her father’s $80 million tobacco
fortune at age 13. When Doris died a
very rich woman in 1993, she left a
$100,000 trust to her dog Minni.
***
Mickey and Minnie Mouse have never
been married on screen.
***
In the 1930 Disney cartoon “The
Picnic” Minnie Mouse had a dog named
Rover. The next year, Rover became
Mickey’s faithful dog Pluto. Pluto went
on to become a star in 48 cartoons.
***
Goofy’s name was originally Dippy
Dog.
***
Born Marion Michael Morrison (1907-
1979), he was better known to the world
as John Wayne (1907-1979). Wayne’s
nickname was an homage to his child-
hood pet dog, an Airedale named Duke.
***
In the 1989 movie “Indiana Jones and
the Last Crusade,” the last movie in the
trilogy, Indiana’s real name was
revealed by his father, played by Sean
Connery (born 1930). The dashing
character was named Junior, but he pre-
ferred to go by the nickname Indiana,
which was the family dog’s name.
***
At age 16, Scottish-born actor Sean
Connery got two tattoos on his right
arm. Revealing what’s really important
to him, Connery’s tattoos say
“Scotland forever” and “Mum and Dad.”
***
In 1953, author Ian Fleming (1908-
1964) created a series of fictional spy
novels that featured British Secret
Service agent James Bond fighting a
creative cast of villains. Bond often
faced off against the group SPECTRE.
Do you know what the acronym
stands for and who their evil leader
was? See answer at end.
***
The 1983 Bond film “Never Say Never
Again” had a scene with a horse jump-
ing off a cliff. The stunt caused contro-
versy among animal rights activists.
So, it became the first movie ever to
have the disclaimer stating that no ani-
mals were mistreated during production
of the film.
***
Astandard martini is made with gin and
vermouth and garnished with an olive.
Substitute a pearl onion for an olive and
the drink is called a Gibson.
***
The Russian word voda means water.
That is the origin of the word Vodka,
meaning eighty proof alcohol. Vodka
was originally distilled from potatoes.
Now it is made from grain.
***
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) ate fried
potatoes in France. Impressed with the
treat, he brought the recipe to the White
House. In 1802 “potatoes served in the
French manner” appeared on a White
House menu. It was the introduction of
French fries.
***
Answer: SPECTRE (Special Executive
for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism,
Revenge and Extortion,) is a fictional
global terrorist organization led by the
evil genius, and Bond’s archenemy,
Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Blofeld has aspi-
rations of world domination, and a
white cat. Blofeld was parodied in the
Austin Powers trilogy of comedic
movies (1997, 1999, 2002) as Dr. Evil.
(Answers Monday)
ALBUM DIGIT BOTANY INVITE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When it came to protecting their castle, they
were – “MOAT-IVATED”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NEKTA
OZPAT
GINNIN
MESRUM
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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- -
Ans.
here:
Actor Eli Wallach is 98. Bluegrass singer Bobby Osborne is
82. Actress Ellen Burstyn is 81. Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss.,
is 76. Broadcast journalist Carole Simpson is 73. Baseball
Hall of Famer Johnny Bench is 66. Actor-director-producer
James Keach is 66. Country singer Gary Morris is 65. Singer-
songwriter Tom Waits is 64. Sen. Susan M. Collins, R-Maine,
is 61. Actress Priscilla Barnes is 56. Former “Tonight Show”
announcer Edd (cq) Hall is 55. Rock musician Tim Butler (The
Psychedelic Furs) is 55. Actor Patrick Fabian is 49. Actor
Jeffrey Wright is 48. Actor C. Thomas Howell is 47. Producer-
director Jason Winer is 41. Rapper-producer Kon Artis is 39.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Whirl Win, No. 6, in second
place; and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:42.47.
5 5 3
11 29 44 63 64 3
Mega number
Dec. 6 Mega Millions
6 9 11 31 44 25
Powerball
Dec. 4 Powerball
3 10 14 23 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 5 3 2
Daily Four
5 6 6
Daily three evening
7 24 28 43 46 13
Mega number
Dec. 4 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Accident. Anon-injury accident involving a
Mercedes and truck caused traffic to be blocked
at the intersection of Monte Diablo Avenue
and North San Mateo Drive before 5:33 p.m.
Sunday, Dec.1.
Theft. An iPod was stolen from an office at
the 3100 block of Del Monte Street before
1:12 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
Theft. Aperson was caught stealing liquor on
the 300 block of Baldwin Avenue before 3:52
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
Theft. Awoman said she had her purse stolen
on the 200 block of Baldwin Avenue before
2:09 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
Disturbance. Police were asked to assist
with a woman who sat at table and refused to
leave the establishment on Fourth Avenue
before 7:39 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
South San Francisco
SPCA case. Abrown and white dog was run-
ning around loose on Westborough and
Skyline boulevards before 5:18 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 25.
Ci vi l case. A tenant that only speaks
Spanish claims that his landlord stole items
worth $1,000 from his storage on Railroad
Avenue before 1:33 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. Aman was reported-
ly going door to door telling people he was
sent from the city to install carbon monoxide
detectors on Aspen Avenue before 9:30 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 25.
Police reports
It gets the hose again
Anon-English speaking woman report-
ed “the big man” squirted her with a
hose for no reason on the 600 block of
Spruce Avenue in South San Francisco
before 1:44 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25.
By Kenny Martin
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
This November, just like all of the others
for the past five years, Pack 458 of San Mateo
hit the streets of the Parkside neighborhood
asking people to donate to the Second
Harvest Food Bank.
The pack has just 16 members out of the
total of 8,500 members in the county, said
Donn Lovell, cubmaster of Pack 458.
Lovell, cubmaster since 2009, said in this
year’s “Scouting for Food,” as the event is
called, 12 of the boys in the pack collected
1,300 pounds of food, which consisted of
dried pasta, canned food, frozen turkeys and
ham, among other items.
On Saturday, Nov. 9, a bright and warm
Indian summer day, the boys teamed up and,
led by a parent leader, spent two hours plac-
ing more than 1,800 door hangers on houses.
“It was a very nice day,” said Lovell, who
was overseeing the event. “There have been
years where it was pouring rain.”
On Nov. 16, the boys of Pack 458 came back
to the houses whose residents responded to the
door hangers, and hauled 20 pound bags of
food into collection vehicles. The collection
vehicles then deposited the bags of food they
were carrying into one really large truck which
transported the bags directly to the Second
Harvest Food Bank’s San Carlos location.
Lovell hopes events like “Scouting for
Food” instill the kids with values that hard
work and dedication is rewarding.
“Their hard work benefited others,” Lovell
said. “There were hundreds of families who
got food because of their hard work.”
Saturday, Nov. 16 also happened to be
the day Second Harvest dropped off food to
be given to families at the Parkside
Elementary School in San Mateo. Lovell
said about 10 of the kids volunteered to
hand out food to families at the school, so
they got to see for themselves the impact
they were having on families.
“The contribution from Pack 358 will go a
long way toward helping Second Harvest
Food Bank feed our hungry neighbors,”
Second Harvest spokeswoman Caitlin Kerk
wrote in an email. “The 1,300 pounds of food
donated is the equivalent of 1,083 meals.”
Ardys Sandell, who volunteers distributing
food at the St. John’s Lutheran Trinity
Methodist church in Sunnyvale, said the
church receives food from Second Harvest and
distributes the food in bags every Tuesday
morning. If people have cards signaling they
qualify, they can get bags of food containing
fresh fruit and vegetables, can foods, rice and
sometimes eggs and frozen meats.
Sandell has also been the recipient of food
donations, when she accepted a couple more
people into her home for a while. Sandell said
the bags really supplement a main meal, and
aren’t substitutes for them, but the donations
really help out.
The scouts also gathered 735 pairs of glass-
es, along with bags of candy, which were sent
to the 101st and 455th Airborne divisions in
the U.S. Army.
“There are a lot of San Mateo soldiers,”
Lovell said. “When you talk to the soldiers
they like anything from home because it
means people are thinking of them. Soldiers
would use toys to hand out to kids in war-torn
villages.”
Scouting for food: San Mateo Cub
Scouts collect food bank donations
Boys and den leaders of San Mateo Pack 458 set out with wagons in tow and walked the
streets of the Parkside and Shoreview neighborhoods of San Mateo in November collecting
food for Second Harvest Food Bank.
4
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Richard John Venturelli
June 7, 1943 – December 4, 2013
Richard John Venturelli, 70, of San Mateo went
to be with the Lord on Wednesday, December
4, 2013. He was born June 7, 1943 in San Mateo
to the late John and Nancy Venturelli. Richard
attended San Mateo High School and the
College of San Mateo. He was a General Building
Contractor with specialty licenses in electrical
and plumbing. He also held a real estate license
and was a skilled mechanic.
Richard had a passion for blues music and
attended the Monterey Blues Festival annually. He enjoyed playing the harmonica,
guitar and singing. In his younger years, he liked riding motorcycles. Richard had
a wonderful sense of humor, was very social and cherished his time with family
and friends.
Richard is survived by his children, Harmony, Brittany, Marjorie, Gina, Richard
and John (Bridgette), granddaughter Taylor (Gina) and sisters Gloria and
Rosalind. Preceded in death by his sister Antoinette. He is also survived by his
former wife of thirty one years Cynthia.
He will always be remembered for his beautiful smile and his charm.
Friends and family may visit at Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s in San Mateo
from 5 – 8 PM on Monday, December 9th . Rosary to begin at 7 PM. Funeral Mass
at St. Matthew’s beginning at 10:30 AM on Tuesday, December 10th then to the
Italian Cemetery in Colma for burial.
Sneider & Sullivan & O’connell’s Funeral Home (650) 343-1804
Obituary
PG&E unveils $38
million gas control center
PG&E Friday unveiled a $38 million gas
control and dispatch center in San Ramon that
will serve as the main monitoring facility for
the utility’s gas system and 70,000-square-
mile service area, utility officials said.
In a statement, utility officials described the
facility as “PG&E’s around-the-clock nerve
center,” that receives real-time information to
help staff better anticipate and respond to pub-
lic safety issues. The center is located in the
Bishop Ranch office park in the 6100 block of
Bollinger Canyon Road off of Interstate 680
in San Ramon.
The bone-chilling temperatures that blasted
California this week prompted PG&E to pro-
vide a record-breaking amount of natural gas
on Thursday to homes and businesses through-
out its service area from Bakersfield to Eureka,
PG&E spokeswoman Brittany Chord said.
The spokeswoman said the new control cen-
ter enabled the utility to push more than 4.5
billion cubic feet of gas through its system to
warm buildings statewide.
Employees at the state-of-the-art center use a
90-foot-long video wall and smart boards that
allow them to keep an eye on regional data in
real time.
Center employees monitor 6,750 miles of
transmission pipeline and 42,000 miles of
distribution pipeline, according to utility offi-
cials.
Freezing temperatures
to continue this weekend
The Bay Area saw record low temperatures
Friday morning and is expected to stay cold
through the weekend, according to the
National Weather Service.
Low temperatures throughout the Bay Area
hit new records or tied old ones Friday morn-
ing and ranged from 22 degrees in Gilroy to 40
degrees in downtown San Francisco, according
to weather service figures.
Freezing temperatures are expected to return
by late Saturday night and into Sunday morn-
ing, and a freeze warning has been issued for
the entire Bay Area aside from San Francisco.
Freezing temperatures are expected again on
Sunday night and into Monday, forecasters said.
Drivers are warned to expect icy roads, espe-
cially at higher elevations, and limited visi-
bility in some areas Friday and Saturday. In
addition, residents should be aware of the risk
of hypothermia for people and animals stay-
ing outdoors overnight.
Motorist flees after striking bicyclist
ASouth San Francisco bicyclist was struck
by a hit-and-run driver early Thursday morn-
ing, according to police.
The man was bicycling at the intersection of
Grand and Magnolia avenues at 5:48 a.m.
when a woman in a late 1990s to early 2000s
beige Buick struck him. Immediately after, the
woman fled the scene heading north on
Magnolia Avenue toward Miller Avenue,
according to police.
The bicyclist sustained non-life threatening
injuries and was transported to a local hospi-
tal. Anyone with information regarding this
incident should contact the South San
Francisco Police Department at (650) 877-
8900.
Man,22,shot in East Palo Alto
Aman was injured in a shooting in East Palo
Alto on Thursday afternoon, according to
police.
The shooting was reported at 1:36 p.m. in
the 400 block of Larkspur Drive, East Palo
Alto police said.
Officers arrived and found evidence of a
shooting but no victim. A short time later,
they received word that a 22-year-old victim
had arrived at a nearby emergency room with a
gunshot wound to his lower body, according to
police. The victim, an East Palo Alto resident,
was in stable condition as of late Thursday,
police said.
No information was immediately available
about a possible suspect in the shooting.
Anyone who may have witnessed the inci-
dent or has knowledge about the case is
encouraged to contact East Palo Alto police by
calling or sending a text message to (650)
409-6792, calling (650) 853-8477 or sending
an email to epa@tipnow.org.
California PUC to join in
BART disabled train probe
San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit offi-
cials say a state agency is also looking into
why a disabled train stranded hundreds of pas-
sengers in a tunnel that sent at least nine peo-
ple to the hospital.
BARTspokeswoman Alicia Trost said Friday
that the California Public Utilities
Commission will be a part of the probe on
why a train became stuck in the Berkeley hills
tunnel due to an electrical short causing the
emergency brakes to suddenly activate on
Wednesday.
Trost says the CPUC initiates an investiga-
tion whenever more than two people require
medical transport after a transit incident.
The 10-car train with around 700 passengers
was traveling from Pittsburg to San Francisco
came to a stop when the brakes activated and
created a smoky dust that made several passen-
gers ill.
FDA approves
breakthrough hepatitis C drug
Federal health officials have approved a
highly anticipated hepatitis C drug from
Foster City-based Gilead Sciences Inc. that is
expected to offer a faster, more palatable cure
to millions of people infected with the liver-
destroying virus.
The Food and Drug Administration said
Friday it approved the pill Sovaldi in combi-
nation with older drugs to treat the main forms
of hepatitis C that affect U.S. patients.
Current treatments for hepatitis C can take
up to a year of therapy and involve weekly
injections of a drug that causes flu-like side
effects. That approach only cures about three
out of four patients. Sovaldi is a daily pill that
in clinical trials cured roughly 90 percent of
patients in just 12 weeks, when combined
with the older drug cocktail.
Between 3 million and 4 million Americans
are estimated to carry the blood-borne virus,
though most do not even know they are infect-
ed. Others have tested positive but are waiting
for more effective treatments to become avail-
able. Hepatitis C symptoms may not appear
until two or three decades after infection,
though the virus can cause liver failure, cirrho-
sis and cancer if left untreated.
Local briefs
5
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
A Bite of Old Time
San Francisco
The Authentic Blum’s
Coffee Crunch Cake
10% off Special with this Ad
Open Christmas Eve until 6 pm. Closed Christmas Day
CALL (650) 348-5253 to order
or email info@kathyskakes.com
Kathy's Kreative Kakes
631 South B Street, San Mateo
Perfect For the Holidays
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The after-school child-care aide
accused of kissing and touching a
6-year-old girl inappropriately on
the Horrall Elementary School
campus and found after his arrest to
reportedly have downloaded child
pornography pleaded not guilty to
all charges.
Eric Michael Renz, 20, of
Millbrae, is charged with two
felony counts of lewd and lascivi-
ous acts on a child under 14 and
felony possession of child
pornography.
But defense attorney Chuck
Smith said his client’s conduct is
“not a case of molestation.
Affection, certainly, but not
molestation.”
On Oct. 18, prosecutors say a
school custodian looking out a
classroom window at the San
Mateo school saw Renz sitting on
a bench with his arm around the
girl’s shoulder
with his hand on her hip. Renz
kissed the student twice, according
to the custodian who reported the
alleged incident to school admin-
istrators. He was immediately
removed and police contacted.
Renz denied the kissing and
touching, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Smith said Renz did touch and
kiss the child, who was very affec-
tionate with him, but “not in a
sexual way. ”
Apolice search of Renz’s laptop
computer reportedly turned up
downloaded child pornography.
Smith said he has yet to see the
alleged illegal material so can’t
evaluate the validity of the claim.
Renz was arrested in October but
is only appearing in court now
because he posted $100,000 bail
shortly after being taken into cus-
tody. At his initial arraignment,
prosecutors asked to increase bail
to $300,000, citing the alleged
pornography found after he had
already posted the lesser amount,
but was denied.
The request was “totally inap-
propriate” because Renz is not a
flight risk and should not be pun-
ished with incarceration prior to a
conviction, Smith said.
Renz returns to court Jan. 31 for
a preliminary hearing.
Renz, who worked for about a
month at the school’s Children’s
Annex, is on administrative leave.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Child-care aide pleads not
guilty to kissing 6-year-old
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The ATM robbery defendant who
authorities believe stabbed him-
self in the abdomen twice after a
high-speed chase from Burlingame
police last year was sentenced
Friday to a year in jail and five
years probation for robbery, evad-
ing police and using a weapon.
Prosecutors sought four years in
prison for Daniel Thomas Cassidy,
25, but he instead received the jail
term which can be modified to a
residential treatment program. He
must also pay restitution in an
amount to be determined later.
As part of his
plea deal,
Cassidy waived
all the credit he
a c c u mu l a t e d
while in cus-
tody on a
$100,000 prop-
erty bond.
Aut hor i t i es
say Cassidy
approached a woman at the ATM
on 1145 Broadway and flashed a
large folding knife just before 9
p.m. Aug. 28, 2012. He allegedly
ordered her to withdraw $100 three
times and fled after taking the
money. ABurlingame officer spot-
ted him and pursued his vehicle
until Cassidy allegedly lost con-
trol, went around a turn and crashed
into an occupied car. Cassidy con-
tinued his flight into Hillsborough
where he again lost control and
crashed into vegetation and ivy
near the Burlingame/Hillsborough
border. The officer shot a Taser
twice at Cassidy as he ran on foot
and, after subduing him, noticed
he had cut himself in several
places with the knife, including
two stab wounds to the abdomen,
prosecutors said.
ATM robbery brings jail and probation
Daniel Cassidy
Comment on or share this
story at www.smdailyjournal.com
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It doesn’t rival
Amazon and Travelocity, but
President Barack Obama’s much-
maligned health insurance website
finally seems to be working reason-
ably well most of the time.
Still, consumers are well-advised
to verify, not just trust.
More than 3.7 million people
visited HealthCare.gov this week
— and it didn’t crash, administra-
tion spokeswoman Julie Bataille
deadpanned Friday on a call with
reporters.
Officials say 29,000 people
enrolled the first two days of the
week, exceeding total signups for
the 36 states served by the federal
site during October, the month of
its problem-plagued launch.
Online Spanish-language
signups, delayed because of initial
problems, will finally go live this
weekend in a “soft launch” to tease
out any lurking glitches.
Consumers around the country will
be able to use the new feature at
CuidadoDeSalud.gov. Apromotion-
al campaign in Spanish will follow.
Overall, work has shifted from
zapping technical gremlins that
frustrated consumers to cleaning up
garbled enrollment files that the
system has been delivering to
insurers.
“The new process put in place
this week is making a difference,”
acknowledged Karen Ignagni, head
of the largest industry group,
America’s Health Insurance Plans.
“The enrollment files are getting
better, but there is more work to be
done to ensure consumers are cov-
ered.”
While not calling it an “error
rate,” Bataille says mistakes on
those files are now affecting 1 in 10
transactions with insurers, down
from an estimated 25 percent.
New consumer tips for
Obama’s fixer-upper site
REUTERS
A woman fills out her thoughts on the Affordable Care Act at the White
House Youth Summit on the Affordable Care Act .
6
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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NSA defending its global
cellphone tracking as legal
By Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency on Friday
said its tracking of cellphones overseas is legally author-
ized under a sweeping U.S. presidential order. The distinc-
tion means the extraordinary surveillance program is not
overseen by a secretive U.S. intelligence court but is regu-
lated by some U.S. lawmakers, Obama administration insid-
ers and inspectors general.
Documents obtained from former NSA contractor Edward
Snowden showed that the NSAgathers as many as 5 billion
records every day about the location data for hundreds of
millions of cellphones worldwide by tapping into cables
that carry international cellphone traffic. The Washington
Post said the collection inadvertently scoops up an
unknown amount of American data as well.
The NSA said Friday it was not tracking every foreign
phone call and said it takes measures to limit how much U.S.
data is collected. The NSAhas declined to provide any esti-
mates about the number of Americans whose cellphones it
has tracked either because they were traveling overseas or
their data was irrevocably included in information about for-
eigners’ cellphones.
O
n Sa t u r d a y, Roos evel t
Elementary School i n
Redwood City will receive a
Cal i forni a School Boards
Associ at i on Gol den Bel l Award
at the association’s annual education
conference and trade show in San
Diego. The Golden Bell Award, now
in its 34th year, recognizes public
school programs that are innovative
and sustainable, make a demonstrated
difference for students and focus on
meeting the needs of all students.
***
State Superintendent To m
Torl akson will participate Monday,
Dec. 9 in a school assembly at
West borough Mi ddl e School , i n
the South San Franci sco Uni fi ed
School Di st ri ct , to kick off
Computer Science Education
We e k. The event is organized by
Code. org, a nonprofit foundation
dedicated to expanding and improv-
ing computer science education for
all students in kindergarten to 12th-
grade.
During the school assembly,
Torlakson will present a $10,000
check to Westborough Middle School
from DonorsChoose. org. The
prize is intended to go toward tech-
nology allowing students to expand
their education in computer science.
The event is at 8:30 a.m. at 2570
Westborough Blvd.
***
The San Mateo County School
Boards As s oci at i on is looking for
mentors for new school board mem-
bers in San Mateo County. The asso-
ciation sponsored a new board mem-
ber orientation on Nov. 23. Ideally,
mentors would meet at least once
with the new member for a casual
conversation and then be available
for questions or discussion for the
first year. If you are available con-
tact Carrie Du Boi s at
cdubois@cbnorcal.com.
***
Information for the 2014-15
school year preschool enrollment is
now available for the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School
Di st ri ct. Applications have been
available since Dec. 2 and can be
found at smfc.k12.ca.us/preschool.
You can also sign up for tours.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Daniel Zacapa,of ‘Se7en,’‘Confessions of a Dangerous Mind,’‘The Sandlot’and
other films, come to rehearsal to work with Hillsdale High School’s student cast of
‘In the Heights’showing 7 p.m.Dec.5 to Dec.7 and 2 p.m.Dec.8.Tickets are $17 for
adults and $12 for students and seniors. You can purchase tickets at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama.
WORLD 7
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
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products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
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Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
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required
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succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
By Christopher Torchia
and jason Straziuso
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — Themba
Radebe spun slowly in a circle.
First he pointed his cellphone
camera at a group of children
chanting Nelson Mandela’s name
as they waved posters of the anti-
apartheid champion. Then pivot-
ing to his right, Radebe aimed his
camera at a swaying group of
adults who sang in Zulu while
rocking and clapping.
A day after Mandela’s death at
95, South Africans of all colors
erupted in song, dance and tears
Friday in emotional celebrations
of the life of the man who bridged
this country’s black-white divide
and helped avert a race war.
“I don’t think Mr. Mandela
belonged to black people,” said
Alex Freilingsdorf, a Toyota exec-
utive at a Soweto dealership. “He
belonged to South Africa.”
Freilingsdorf and other white
South Africans mingled among the
hundreds of blacks gathered out-
side a home where Mandela lived
as a young lawyer in the rough and
tumble Soweto township.
The mood was simultaneously
celebratory and somber at the
impromptu street festival where
Radebe filmed scenes to share with
his family.
“I’m sorry, I’m too emotional.
The tears flow too easily,” said the
balding 60-year-old, his eyes
sparkling with tears as he reflected
on how South Africa’s race rela-
tions have improved — “not per-
fect, but much better” — compared
with his childhood in the black
township.
“This is a celebration of the
death, because we knew he was an
old man,” Radebe said. “He
brought a lot of changes to our
community, because I grew up in
apartheid. It was a very bad situa-
tion.”
Song, dance, tears for Mandela in South Africa
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — North
Korea said Saturday it has deported
an elderly U.S. tourist who was
detained for more than a month,
apparently ending the saga of
Merrill Newman’s return to the
North six decades after he advised
South Korean guerrillas still
loathed by Pyongyang.
North Korea made the decision
because the 85-year-old Newman
had apologized for his alleged
crimes during the Korean War and
because of his age and medical
condition, according to the
North’s official Korean Central
News Agency.
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden,
who is traveling in Seoul, wel-
comed the release and said
Newman was in Beijing. Aside
from an awkwardly worded alleged
confession last month, Newman
has yet to speak publicly since
being taken off a plane Oct. 26 by
North Korean authorities while
preparing to leave the country
after a 10-day tour.
North Korea says it deports U.S. tourist and war vet
By Christopher Torchia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG — What
next for South Africa?
This racially charged country
that, on Nelson Mandela’s
watch, inspired the world by
embracing reconciliation in all-
race elections in 1994 is again in
the global spotlight after the
loss of such a towering historical
figure. It is a time not just for
grief and gratitude, but also a
clear-eyed assessment of nation-
al strengths and shortcomings in
a future without a man who was a
guide and comfort to so many.
“It’s a new beginning,” said
Kyle Redford, one of many out-
side the home of the anti-
apartheid leader who became the
nation’s first black president.
“The loss of a legend is going to
force us to come together once
again.”
He acknowledged that there is a
“sense of what next: Where do we
go? What do we do? And how do
we do it?”
Mandela’s resolve rubbed off
on many of his compatriots,
though such conviction is tem-
pered by the reality that his
vision of a “rainbow nation”
failed, almost inevitably, to
meet the heady expectations pro-
pelling the country two decades
ago. Peaceful elections and rela-
tively harmonious race relations
define today’s South Africa; so do
crime, corruption and economic
inequality.
Mandela remained a powerful
symbol in the hopeful, uncharted
period after apartheid, even when
he left the presidency, retired
from public life and shuttled in
and out of hospitals as a protract-
ed illness eroded his once-robust
frame. He became a moral
anchor, so entwined with the
national identity that some jit-
tery South Africans wondered
whether the country would slide
into chaos after his death.
“Does it spell doomsday and
disaster for us?” retired
Archbishop Desmond Tutu asked
rhetorically Friday before declar-
ing that no, the country will not
disintegrate.
“The sun will rise tomorrow
and the next day and the next,”
said Tutu, who like Mandela won
the Nobel Peace Prize for fight-
ing apartheid and promoting rec-
onciliation. “It may not appear
as bright as yesterday, but life
will carry on.”
South Africa begins life
without Nelson Mandela
REUTERS
South Africans gather in honor of former President Nelson Mandela outside
his home in Houghton, Johannesburg.
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Episodes:
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
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At College Heights Stadiumin San Mateo,
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SUN & SAT @ 9:00 PM
Room to Breathe
Part of Pen Voice
Learn about the greenbelt system that
runs through our Peninsula and beyond.
EVERYDAY @ 7 AM, NOON & 7 PM
speak about the magnitude of the reported
effects the county faces.
“San Mateo County is uniquely posi-
tioned to be impacted on two fronts by sea
level rise; both along the coastal zone and
along the Bayfront. So we need to be plan-
ning now for what will happen when our
seas rise,” Gordon said.
San Mateo County is one of the top 10
hot spots in the country predicted to be the
most affected by sea level rise, Speier said.
In a 2012 study, scientists predicted that the
San Francisco Bay could rise up to 55 inch-
es at the end of the century, if not sooner,
Pine said.
“Whether you believe in global warming
or not, the data on sea level rise is very
clear. Scientists who monitor this do see our
seas rising and, if you look at the state of
California, the state has one of the largest
coastal zones of any state in the nation,”
Gordon said.
Oceanographer John Englander will be
Monday’s keynote speaker. The oceans are
warmer than they were a century ago and sea
level rise is inevitable. But what people can
focus on is how to slow it and how to pre-
pare for it, Englander said.
“We need to begin adapting while we’re
also being green and sustainable ... but we
need to separate out the fact that the sea is
going to rise and move the shore level in
the next century. Once you look at it that
way, it forces a different attitude; adapt
while we’re trying to slow the effects,”
Englander said.
Counties in the Bay Area have too much at
stake; there are key public facilities located
in the areas that can be heavily affected by
sea level rise, Gordon and Speier said. They
caution about the impacts it could have on
the San Francisco International Airport,
Highway 101, wastewater treatment plants,
Bayfront communities and development,
harbor and fishing activities in Half Moon
Bay and coastal agriculture.
San Mateo County has more property at
risk from sea level rise than any other coun-
ty in the state and about 110,000 local resi-
dents live in vulnerable areas, Pine said. But
individual cities and counties cannot face
this alone and 25 percent of those who have
registered for the conference are from out-
side San Mateo County, Pine said.
Gordon and Speier agree that one of the
most influential things people can do now
is to engage in learning about the chal-
lenges they will face and how to collabora-
tively prepare.
“I think it’s important for the public to
begin to engage in these kinds of issues
because it’s going to inform the planning
that’s going to need to happen in our coun-
ties and local jurisdictions,” Gordon said.
City staff, developers, business represen-
tatives, residents and government officials
are slated to attend the conference and will
need to work together to find viable solu-
tions, Pine said. Sea level rise has been
described as a slow-moving emergency and,
although it’s too late to stop it from rising,
there is time to prepare, Pine said. There are
things that people can be doing now to
stave off rising sea levels, including invest-
ing in levees, creating and protecting wet-
lands that provide a natural buffer and think-
ing critically about how to approach devel-
opment along the Bay, Pine said.
How to address the challenges sea level
rise poses will be a learning process and
hosting formats that bring the public,
experts and government officials together
needs to continue, Speier said. Even if peo-
ple believe these predictions won’t take
shape until the future, the time to do some-
thing is now, Speier said. The county can’t
afford to be reactive as New York was during
hurricane Sandy, it needs to be proactive,
Speier said.
“This issue requires regional leadership;
it’s not just an issue that respects city lines
or county boundaries,” Speier said. “As
such, I think we want to be in the forefront
of addressing it.”
It’s encouraging that a range of environ-
mental experts, city planners, development
companies, merchants, residents and gov-
ernment officials are attending the confer-
ence; because it’s the start of a long process
that can no longer be postponed, Pine said.
“The conference is the beginning of the
dialogue and brainstorming of how we can
respond,” Pine said. “There is no silver bul-
let, and it will take collaboration across
city lines and partnerships with state and
federal government to make headway here,
particularly with respect to securing fund-
ing.”
Meeting the Challenge of Sea Level Rise
in San Mateo County is held Monday, Nov.
9 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the College
of San Mateo Theater, Building 3 at 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd.
For more information or to register visit
sanmateosealeverise.wordpress.com.
Ukraine, Russia
presidents meet; protests persist
KIEV, Ukraine — Ukrainian President
Viktor Yanukovych met with his Russian
counterpart Friday to discuss closer cooper-
ation, while protests clung to the capital
over Ukraine’s decision to scrap a deal with
the EU.
Yanukovych met with Russian President
Vladimir Putin in the Russian city of Sochi
on his way back from a state visit to China.
Yanukovych’s office said the talks were about
trade and economic cooperation and prepara-
tions for signing a partnership agreement.
No details were given, but the meeting is a
challenge to leaders of the protests that
broke out last month after Yanukovych
stepped back from signing a long-anticipat-
ed agreement to deepen economic and politi-
cal ties with the European Union.
Yemen says Saudis behind attack
ADEN, Yemen — Saudi militants were
behind the massive car bombing and assault
on Yemen’s military headquarters that killed
more than 50 people, including foreigners,
investigators said in a preliminary report
released Friday. Al-Qaida claimed responsi-
bility for the attack, saying it was retaliation
for U.S. drone strikes that have killed dozens
of the terror network’s leaders.
The attack — the deadliest in Sanaa since
May 2012 — marked an escalation in the ter-
ror network’s battle to undermine the U.S.-
allied government and destabilize the
impoverished Arab nation despite the drone
strikes and a series of U.S.-backed military
offensive against it. U.S. forces also have
been training and arming Yemeni special
forces, and exchanging intelligence with the
central government.
Continued from page 1
SEA LEVEL
until January, but could be extended if his
search for housing continues past then. He
lost his car and had home renter’s insurance,
but not everything is covered.
Marlin was born in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii,
and moved to Missouri after the death of his
father in a Navy accident. He also spent
time in Florida, where his stepfather worked
for the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration, and Illinois before study-
ing photography at National Technical
Institute for the Deaf, a college of Rochester
Institute of Technology in New York.
During summer, he would hitchhike and
visited California, finding himself loving
the area.
“When I graduated, I decided to make a new
life for myself in California,” said Marlin,
who worked for the government’s U.S.
Geological Survey in Menlo Park for 28
years as a cartographer. “I stopped here and
haven’t left.”
In the early ’70s, he settled in
Burlingame, paying $75 for his first
month’s rent. He has continued his travels
throughout the years, making his way to
Egypt, Italy, Greece, Turkey and other coun-
tries. He became a San Francisco Giants fan,
then enjoyed walking around town, reading
newspapers, running errands and shopping
once he retired. His most recent trip was on
the cruise.
His stepbrother, Steve Daubs, said every-
one in town knows him and always says hi.
“Anyone who comes in contact with him
walks away a better person,” Daubs said.
Marlin was able to recover a small collec-
tion of Native American arrowheads he put
together at his grandparents’ farm in south-
eastern Missouri.
“I took care of it and brought it every-
where I went,” he said. “I’m so glad I was
able to find this (in the burned building).”
Marlin also recovered some photos, but
he was really disappointed to lose the flag
from his father’s coffin and quilts his grand-
mother made. He also missed the items in
his dining room, which included maps on
the wall with pins that documented all of his
world travels.
He is being allowed to go back into the
home this morning as well to recover more
belongings.
Does he plan on staying in the area?
“I think ‘my heart is in San Francisco’ i s
a cliché, but I want to stay for five years or
more,” he said. “I’m considering moving
back to Missouri because Missouri is where
I grew up, I have relatives back there and my
father is buried there. I love Missouri, but I
consider it my second home. It’s beautiful
here and the weather is nice.”
Since the Donnelly home was so close to
restaurants, stores, the airport, Caltrain,
his bank and San Francisco, Marlin said he
it was the perfect location and he didn’t want
to leave.
He said the support of his friends, the
police and others here have helped him get
through the loss of his home. The Red Cross
has been of help, along with Partners in
Communication who offered pro bono inter-
pretation services. The Love Awakening, a
nonprofit volunteer organization of which
Marlin is part, bought him a winter coat and
provided him with a computer.
“I want to stay put here and take time to
start over here,” Marlin said. “I want to find
something close to the same area. I have to
start all over again and buy all the essential
things, but life goes on.”
The Red Cross has advised him get to get
a legal team together to do a thorough
investigation of the fire, he said.
Those interested in helping Marlin can be
contacted through P.O. Box 117612
Burlingame, CA94011-7612.
Continued from page 1
MARLIN
Around the world
OPINION 9
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Rush Limbaugh attacks the pope
Editor,
Pope Francis stated, in a recent
interview on TN TV Channel, that we
are now living in an unjust system in
which money is the king, the center.
He blasted unfettered capitalism as a
“new form of tyranny.”
For this statement, Rush Limbaugh
called the pope a socialist at best and
a communist at worst. No pope ever
promoted a welfare state that perpetu-
ally cares for the poor but, to their
ultimate goal to enable the poor to
rise above poverty and to reach a
level of dignity to commensurate
with their human dignity. The pope
stresses that access to necessary
goods is certainly a natural right but
does not mean that the natural moral
law requires the poor to become
enslaved to the “state” by permanent-
ly keeping them dependent. Does this
sound like a commie comment? Then,
the pope stated in his interview that
the world has changed and has
become a throwaway culture that dis-
cards young people as well as its
older people. He also points out that
in certain European countries, there is
youth unemployment of 40 percent or
higher; a generation of young people
that do not have the dignity that is
brought by work.
Lastly, Pope Francis’ comment on
trickle-down economics is just restat-
ing basic economics that largely
unregulated free-market capitalism
ultimately results in an unequal distri-
bution of wealth. He, in my opinion,
is referring to the corporate elite who
now monopolize the economies of
the world. In the past 40 years in the
United States, the “Corporate Elite”
have succeeded in deregulating the
regulatory laws that kept them in
check. Rush Limbaugh, doesn’t this
sound more commie then what the
pope said in his interview?
Ross Foti
Belmont
Letter to the editor
By Lt. Col. Eric Lopez
In June of this year, soldiers in my
battalion, the 2nd Battalion of the
2nd Infantry Regiment from Fort
Knox, Ky., deployed to Zabul
Province, Afghanistan to train, advise
and assist members of the Afghan
National Security Forces. Our
assigned mission was to assist our
partners during their transition to an
independent, trained and competent
security force. Their ability to suc-
cessfully protect the Afghan populace
and preserve Afghan sovereignty
would serve as our culminating
achievement. Each day we are engaged
with our counterparts and each
engagement displays their growth as
a professional military force.
When we deployed, we recognized
we would miss the holiday season
with the timing of our departure, but
we understood the importance of our
mission and accepted the sacrifices
associated with our choice to serve in
the military. As a commander, I was
extremely proud of the young men and
women in my formation willing to
pay such a high price because of their
calling to serve. As an American, I
was humbled to be surrounded by
intelligent, physically fit, intuitive,
creative and disciplined patriots ready
and willing to serve on behalf of their
families, friends and countrymen.
History will one day praise this gen-
eration of warriors and identify them
as “America’s Strongest Generation”
because of their willingness to volun-
teer, serve, and sacrifice during the
nation’s longest era of persistent con-
flict and military actions.
Recently, another corps of great
Americans from Hillsborough, San
Mateo and areas around the Peninsula
decided to recognize our efforts. We
were overwhelmed by the generosity,
kindness and gratitude represented by
more than 200 care packages along
with countless thoughts and prayers.
The packages arrived the day after
Thanksgiving and gave my battalion
a tremendous morale boost during one
of the more difficult periods of a
deployment. I am grateful for caring
and supportive Americans who take
time to lovingly pack boxes for sol-
diers they may never meet. I was once
again humbled to witness the depths
of patriotism that still exists in the
greatest country in the world.
Specifically I would like to thank
the Hillsborough Police Department
for organizing the event and the San
Mateo City Clerk’s Office for their
contributions. Comprehensively, I
would like to convey my appreciation
to all those who donated money,
helped pack boxes, write letters, com-
plete U.S. Postal Custom Forms and,
most importantly, offered soldiers in
my battalion emblems from a grateful
nation. Thank you.
Lt. Col. Eric Lopez is the battalion
commander for 2nd Battalion, 2nd
Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry
Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry
Division from Fort Knox, Ky. The
unit, affectionately known as the
“Ramrods,” is partnered with more than
3,000 Afghans serving in the Afghan
National Security Forces. They will
redeploy to Fort Knox in the spring of
2014.
From grateful soldiers on the frontlines
Sacramento’s
rosy scenario
By John McDowell
W
e’ve just come through our annual days of shop-
ping deals. Hillsdale and Tanforan were packed on
Black Friday as stores enticed shoppers with one-
time-only deals. Moreover, if surveys are accurate, not a lot of
work was done on Cyber Monday when online deals kept
office workers away from their normal duties. There seems to
something is the American psyche that says spend, spend,
spend! If the deals are good enough, and if the family budget
can afford it, why not?
Unfortunately, that same spend, spend,
spend mentality pervades the thinking of
Sacramento politicians. Now that
Democrats hold a two-thirds supermajority
in both legislative houses, there is little
to stop them from acting on the impulse,
whether the state budget (the ever-increas-
ing money you shell out in taxes) can
accommodate it or not.
The impulse to spend was evident in the
reception given the release two weeks ago of the Legislative
Analyst’s Office “California’s Fiscal Outlook” that purports to
show budget surpluses as far as the eye can see. Senate
President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg said in part that the report
means the state can “expand worthy programs for people and
our economy.” Assembly Speaker John Perez chimed in that
the state can now “make use of one-time money and stronger
revenues to reinvest in California families.”
Progressive/liberal groups added to the chorus. According to
Capital Public Radio News, Chris Hoene, executive director of
the California Budget Project, immediately called for reinvest-
ment in “programs like welfare.” These statements are all
Sacramento speak for spend, spend, spend!
Yet California is not in any position to turn on the spending
spigot, no matter what the progressives in Sacramento think.
It turns out the so-called budget surpluses are mostly illusory
anyway. Yes, the projected surpluses are based on the usual
political smoke and mirrors employed by politicians and
bureaucrats. Who could have guessed at such a thing?
The LAO report rests on the proverbial “rosy scenario” with
California’s projected economic growth rate far outstripping
that of the nation as a whole. Carson Bruno of Stanford
University’s Hoover Institution points out that the LAO report
assumes that between 2014 and 2020 California’s unemploy-
ment rate will be an average of just 0.4 points above the
nation’s. This in a state where the current unemployment rate
is a full 1.4 percent above the national average, and in one
county the unemployment rate is over 25 percent.
The LAO itself makes clear that repaying much of what was
borrowed from state special funds to cover increased spending
over the last decade (over the last decade total Sacramento
spending has increased by almost 40 percent) is not included
in the report’s assumptions. Let the report’s authors speak for
themselves, “liabilities, including some items on the gover-
nor’s wall of debt and the state’s huge retirement liabilities
(particularly those related to the California State Teachers’
Retirement System), remain unpaid under our forecast. If addi-
tional payments are made in the future to repay these liabili-
ties or to provide inflation adjustments to universities, the
courts, state employees and other programs, the operating sur-
pluses in our forecast would fall significantly below our projec-
tions” (italics mine).
The “huge retirement liabilities” of the California State
Teachers’ Retirement System deserve a special look. Carson
Bruno warns us that CalSTRs has an unfunded liability ranging
from between $71 billion to $167 billion. Because of that,
according to the LAO, the state should be adding at least $4.5
billion annually in contributions to reduce that sum and
strengthen the plan. Such needed payments would greatly
reduce or eliminate any of the supposed surpluses over the next
few years.
If this isn’t bad enough, just about the time the LAO issued
its rosy scenario, California was named, for the third year in a
row, the “worst run state in America” by Wall St. 24/7. Its
ranking notes that, “California carries an Acredit rating from
Standard & Poor’s, and an A1 from Moody’s — both worse
than any other state except for Illinois. Explaining its rating,
Moody’s pointed to the state’s history of one-time solutions
to resolve its budgetary gaps. It also noted the state’s “highly
volatile revenue structure,” due to its overreliance on wealthy
taxpayers.”
We are living in the worst run state in America, facing huge
retirement liabilities, with unrestrained politicians salivating
over an economic report that upon further review does not
inspire confidence in its supposed surplus projections.
It’s one thing for families to spend big on holiday shop-
ping. Good deals and confidence in the family budget allow for
shopping sprees on Black Friday or Cyber Monday. But it’s
another thing altogether for Sacramento politicians to take
flimsy projections and turn them into excuses for “expand-
ing,” “reinvesting” or just plain increased spending. We can
and should do better.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he has
worked as a political volunteer and staff member in local, state
and federal government, including time spent as a press secre-
tary on Capitol Hill and in the second Bush administration.
Guest
perspective
Lt. Col. Eric Lopez, left, and Command Sgt. Major John Morales, right. Lopez is the
battalion commander and Morales is the senior non-commissioned officer in the
battalion.
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,020.20 +198.69 10-Yr Bond 2.883 +0.02
Nasdaq 4,062.52 +29.36 Oil (per barrel) 97.69
S&P 500 1,805.09 +20.06 Gold 1,229.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Sears Holdings Corp., down $1.89 to $48.09
The retailer is spinning off its Lands’End clothing business and distributing
stock to shareholders in its turnaround bid.
Boston Scientific Corp., up 51 cents to $11.85
Cowen & Co. upgrades the stock, saying Wall Street is underestimating
the medical device maker.
The Gap Inc., down 78 cents to $39.46
The clothing retailer escaped the gloom seen by the rest of the sector,
but Jefferies & Co. now sees its shares as expensive.
General Motors Co., up $1.08 to $40.17
Shareholders are starting to look for a dividend payout as the government
unloads it stake in the now profitable carmaker.
Nasdaq
Intel Corp., up 56 cents to $24.82
Citigroup is telling clients to buy shares of the software giant after seeing
steady indications of a stabilizing PC market.
Electronic Arts Inc., up $1.23 to $22.24
Wedbush is telling investors that concerns over glitches in the
gamemaker’s blockbuster “Battlefield 4”are excessive.
Pacific Sunwear of California Inc., up 52 cents at $3.28.
The teen retailer reported better-than-expected revenue for its fiscal
third quarter and was upgraded by an analyst at B. Riley & Co.
Ulta Salon, Cosmetics & Fragrance Inc., down $24.24 to $93.76
The beauty products company had a terrible quarter and told investors
the soft retail trends may continue into the holiday.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Good news was final-
ly good news for the stock market on
Friday.
Stocks rose sharply after the govern-
ment reported a fourth straight month of
solid U.S. job gains, the latest encour-
aging sign for the economy.
The strengthening job market focused
investors on the nation’s improving
economy instead of concerns about the
Federal Reserve’s stimulus, snapping a
five-day losing streak for stocks.
Stocks had been falling this week
after a string of positive economic
reports made investors worry that the
Fed would soon pull back on its $85 bil-
lion in monthly bond purchases, which
have kept long-term interest rates low
and supported the stock market.
Now that hiring is showing consis-
tent strength, investors seem to be let-
ting go of their worry that the economy
isn’t ready for the Fed to start weaning
the U.S. off that stimulus.
“The jobs report was outstanding,”
said Randy Frederick, a director of trad-
ing and derivatives at Charles Schwab.
“It’s refreshing to see the markets react
positively, because we’ve been in a
mode for so long of ‘good news is bad
news.”’
Employers added 203,000 jobs last
month after adding 200,000 in October,
the Labor Department announced before
the U.S. stock market opened on Friday.
November’s job gain helped lower the
unemployment rate to 7 percent from
7.3 percent in October.
Stocks jumped at the open and moved
higher throughout the day. The Dow
Jones industrial average rose by as much
as 200 points in early afternoon trading
before easing back slightly before the
close.
The Dow closed up 198.69 points, or
1.3 percent, to 16,020.20. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index rose 20.06 points,
or 1.1 percent, to 1,805.09, its biggest
gain in a month. The Nasdaq composite
climbed 29.36, or 0.7 percent, to
4,062.52.
All 10 sectors in the S&P 500 index
rose. Industrial stocks and others that
tend to rise the most when the economy
is growing posted some of the biggest
gains. The jobs report showed that man-
ufacturers added 27,000 jobs, the most
since March 2012.
General Electric rose 49 cents, or 2
percent, to $26.94. Plane maker Boeing
increased $2.45, or 2 percent, to
$135.18.
“Now we’re getting investors trading
more on fundamentals and long-term
earnings for next year,” said Mike
Serio, regional Chief Investment Officer
for Wells Fargo Private Bank. “There
may be some backbone to the econo-
my.”
Friday’s jobs news follows other
upbeat signals this week on hous-
ing, manufacturing and economic
growth.
Signs that the recovery is becoming
more entrenched may lure more buyers
back into the stock market, supporting
prices, said JJ Kinahan, chief deriva-
tives strategist at TD Ameritrade.
Despite steady gains for the market over
the last five years, some investors have
remained wary after the collapse of
2008.
“We’re seeing good numbers,”
Kinahan said. “Does this encourage
people who have been underinvested all
year to come in and spend some money
on the market?”
Friday’s gains ended a mini-slump for
the market in December. Fears of the Fed
pulling back on its stimulus had made
traders nervous when they saw the slew
of good economic reports.
The good-news-is-bad-news attitude
has at times stalled the market’s impres-
sive run-up this year.
The S&P500 index fell 1.5 percent in
June when Fed chairman Ben Bernanke
said that policy makers could start scal-
ing back stimulus later in the year. In
August, the market dipped again, falling
3.1 percent, as bond yields climbed in
anticipation of the end of stimulus.
Stock market jumps after strong jobs report
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — AT&T, under fire for ongoing
revelations that it shares and sells cus-
tomers’ communications records to the
National Security Agency and other U.S.
intelligence offices, says it isn’t required to
disclose to shareholders what it does with
customers’ data.
In a letter sent Thursday to the Securities
and Exchange Commission, AT&T said it
protects customer information and complies
with government requests for records “only
to the extent required by law.”
The telecom giant’s letter was a response
to a shareholder revolt sparked on Nov. 20
by the New York State Common Retirement
Fund, the ACLU of Northern California and
others. The groups are demanding that AT&T
and Verizon be more transparent about their
dealings with the NSA.
In the letter, obtained exclusively by the
Associated Press before it was made public
by the SEC, AT&T said information about
assisting foreign intelligence surveillance
activities is almost certainly classified. The
company said it should not have to address
the issue at its annual shareholders meeting
this spring. Nicole Ozer, technology and
civil liberties policy director at the ACLU of
Northern California said AT&T has over-
stepped its bounds.
“It’s outrageous that AT&T is trying to
block the shareholder proposal,” she said.
“Customers have a right to know how often
their private information is ending up in the
government’s hands.”
Apple wants Samsung
to pay $22M for legal bills
SAN JOSE — Apple wants Samsung
Electronics to pay $22 million of the legal
bills that the iPhone and iPad maker has
rung up so far defending its mobile device
patents in a courtroom battle.
The money sought in documents filed
Thursday would be in addition to the $930
million in damages that juries decided
Samsung owes Apple Inc. after hearing evi-
dence of patent infringement in two sepa-
rate trials held in a San Jose, Calif., federal
court during the past 15 months. The latest
verdict was handed down last month.
Apple is asking U.S. District Judge Lucy
Koh to order Samsung to pay $15.7 million
in attorney fees. That would cover less than
one-third of the more than $60 million that
Apple says it owes its lawyers in the case.
Apple also wants Samsung to reimburse
its lawyers for $6.2 million in various
expenses. AJan. 30 hearing has been sched-
uled to examine Apple’s requests.
Apple guides shoppers
inside stores with iBeacon
NEW YORK — GPS will tell you how to
get to the nearest Apple store.
With iBeacon, Apple hopes to guide you
around once you’re inside, whether it’s to
pick up an order, upgrade to a new iPhone or
shop for a pair of headphones.
The implications of iBeacon go beyond
Apple stores. One day, commuters might get
information on subway delays as they stand
on the platform, while museum visitors
might get details on the painting they are
standing in front of.
Other retailers will be also able to offer
deals or track which aisles shoppers linger
in the longest.
In-store location technology does raise
privacy concerns, though many shoppers
have shown a willingness to be tracked if
there’s something in it for them.
AT&T says it doesn’t have
to disclose NSA dealings
Business briefs
Weekend, Dec. 7-8, 2013
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A single football game can hold many
individual moments of immortality.
Friday night, amidst frigid temperatures
and an atmosphere made for Hollywood,
the Serra Padres seized their moments.
Hamilton Anoa’i, :31
second mark of the third
quarter.
Vince Camp, 11:48 of
the fourth quarter.
Matt Fa’aita, 1:56
after that.
Kevin McGee, 5:33
before the buzzer.
When you string those key pieces of
time together, you get a night that will
live on forever in Junipero Serra football
history.
For the first time ever, the Padres are the
Central Coast Section Open Division
champions by virtue of a 21-7 win over
Archbishop Mitty. The win marks Serra’s
third section title overall and almost cer-
tainly locks up a spot in the CIF Regional
Champion as the top team in CCS.
“It’s good to make history,” Anoa’i said.
“It’s the first time we get to hang an Open
Division banner in our gym. It’s a goal we
See SERRA, Page 14
SHP plays for
its own place
in history
See page 18
INSIDE
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The U.S. drew a daunting task for
next year’s World Cup: difficult oppo-
nents, tropical venues and a wearying
9,000-mile zigzag journey across
Brazil.
The Americans wound up with the
potentially punishing group they
feared and will play Ghana, Portugal
and Germany next June as they try to
achieve a U.S. first: reaching the
knockout phase twice in a row.
While Ghana eliminated the
Americans in 2006 and 2010, the
Black Stars won’t do it again.
The U.S. opens its seventh straight
World Cup appearance against Ghana
on June 16 at Natal.
The U.S. meets Portugal and 2008
FIFA Player of the Year Cristiano
Ronaldo six days later in the Amazon
rain forest city Manaus.
The Americans have just three off
days to recover before closing Group
G on June 26 in Recife against three-
time champion Germany.
“I think we have the quality, if we
play our best ball, to get out of the
group,” U.S. captain Clint Dempsey
said after Friday’s draw set the eight
four-nation groups. “You can’t think
about, ‘Am I the favorite? Am I the
underdog? What’s it going to be like
playing in the heat? What’s it going
to be like with the travel?’ Those are
factors that come into it, but at the
end of the day both teams have to deal
with it.”
After having the shortest group-
play travel in South Africa, the U.S.
will have the longest in Brazil.
The Americans will be based in Sao
Paulo and face trips of 1,436 miles to
Natal, 1,832 miles to Manaus and
1,321 miles to Recife.
They also will play all three match-
es in the tropics, with the second and
third matches in the afternoon.
And the U.S. group has the top aver-
age FIFAworld ranking.
“It’s definitely one of the tougher
groups, if not the toughest, but at the
same time, this is what the World
Cup’s all about. You go there to play
against the best,” American forward
Jozy Altidore said in a telephone
interview with The Associated Press.
“I think the boys will be excited, will
be up for it.”
U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann, who
replaced Bob Bradley 2 1/2 years ago,
played for Germany’s 1990 World Cup
championship team and coached his
native country to third place at home
in the 2006 tournament, commuting
to Europe from his California house
in Orange County.
“It couldn’t get any more difficult or
any bigger,” he said at the draw in
Costa do Sauipe, Brazil. “It’s a real
challenge. And we’ll take it. We’ll
take it on, and hopefully we’re going
to surprise some people there.”
The U.S. and South Korea were the
last remaining teams in draw pot
three. While the Americans landed in a
group with an average FIFA ranking
of 11.25, South Korea wound up in
Group H, creating a group with the
poorest average at 28.25.
“I think the team’s mentality is that
we can go and play with anybody, ”
American defender Matt Besler said.
“Now we’re going to have to prove
it.”
Germany beat the U.S. 2-0 in its
1998 World Cup opener in Paris —
with Klinsmann setting up the first
goal and scoring the second — then
edged the Americans 1-0 on a contro-
versial goal in the 2002 quarterfinal
in South Korea.
Die Mannschaft is coached by
Klinsmann’s former assistant,
Joachim Loew. The Americans beat a
second-tier German roster 4-3 in a
June exhibition at Washington.
“With Jurgen Klinsmann, they have
another mentality,” Loew said. “I
learned a lot from Jurgen, so this is
special.”
Ranked 14th in the world, the U.S.
has alternated quick exits with
advancement since returning to soc-
cer’s showcase in 1990.
After the draw four years ago, one
British paper used a headline “EASY”
for England, Algeria, Slovenia and
the Yanks, and The Sun called it the
“best English group since the
Beatles.
” The Americans wound up atop a
group for the first time, and England
advanced as the second-place nation.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RALEIGH, N.C. — The Carolina Hurricanes used a strong
third period to extend their winning streak to three games.
The Hurricanes scored four goals in the third period to
rally past the San Jose Sharks 5-3 on Friday night.
“That was our best game of the year,” Carolina coach Kirk
Muller said.
Elias Lindholm had a goal and two assists to lead the
Hurricanes, including the game-winner with six minutes
remaining.
Jordan Staal, Eric Staal, Riley Nash and Jay Harrison had
Carolina’s other goals.
Cam Ward made 22 saves for the Hurricanes in his return
to the lineup after sitting out Carolina’s previous two
games.
Justin Braun, Marc-Edouard Vlasic and Tommy Wingels
scored for the Sharks. Joe Thornton extended his point
streak to eight games with an assist in the first period.
Backup goalie Alex Stalock made 30 saves, and San Jose
lost consecutive games in regulation for the first time this
season.
Before the loss to the Hurricanes and Thursday’s 5-1
defeat against Pittsburgh, San Jose had won six in a row.
“I don’t see an energized team right now,” San Jose coach
Todd McLellan said. “I see us chasing and the other team
dictating the pace of the game. I see us making sloppy
plays, sloppy passes — even missing assignments that are
defensive assignments that we should be able to do in our
sleep right now.
“That could be lazy or that could be fatigue. We have to
figure that part out.”
Lindholm’s go-ahead goal came on a deflection on Andrej
Sekera’s wrist shot. Lindholm knocked it through
Stalock’s legs after Sekera skated around the perimeter.
It was the first career multi-point game for Lindholm,
who was Carolina’s first-round pick and fifth overall in the
2013 draft.
“That was the player we drafted,” Muller said.
Eric Staal then added an empty-net goal with 30.2 sec-
onds remaining.
“That has got to be a big confidence builder for our guys
tonight — to beat a team like that who we have a lot of
respect for tonight,” Muller said.
San Jose had tied the score at 3 with 10:25 remaining in
the third period on Braun’s slap shot from the point.
The Hurricanes scored twice earlier in the third period,
controlling much of the action to erase a 2-1 deficit.
Nash first deflected a Harrison shot above Stalock’s left
shoulder to tie the score at 2 at 4:54.
U.S. gets tough WCup draw
Hurricanes
take out SJ
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Harden scores 34, Rockets beat Warriors
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON — The Rockets’ offense is one
of the best in the NBA. However, against
Golden State on Friday night, it was the
defense that was the key.
Houston leaned on its defense in the first
quarter while jumping out to a double-digit
lead it didn’t relinquish.
James Harden scored 34 points, Dwight
Howard had 22 points and 18 rebounds, and
the Rockets beat the Warriors 105-83.
Terrence Jones added 16 points and 10
rebounds for the Rockets, who had lost two
straight. Harden shot 13 for 22 from the
field and 7 for 9 on free throws two nights
after shooting 3 for 17 — including 0 for 10
on 3-pointers — against Phoenix.
Howard was 12 for 20 on free throws as
the Rockets finished 25 for 39 from the
line. Houston was also 45 percent from the
field.
“That’s the way we play,” Harden said. “If
we don’t get after them on the defensive end,
it’s going to be tough for us. We were get-
ting huge stops and getting out in transi-
tion. We did a good job early in the game of
putting pressure on their guards, and we got
things going our way. ”
Stephen Curry led the Warriors with 22
points and five assists, but was just 5 of 14
from the field while making all 11 free-
throw attempts. Harrison Barnes had 14
points and seven rebounds, Kent Bazemore
added 12 and David Lee 11 points as the
Warriors saw their two-game win streak end.
Golden State shot 36 percent from the
field, including 2 for 16 on 3s.
“They’re a tough team,” Houston coach
Kevin McHale said. “They shoot a lot of 3s.
They shoot them at a really high percent-
age. We were trying to get them off the line
and keep pressure on them and keep our bids
up so they just couldn’t walk into shots. For
the most part, we did a very good job of
that.”
Golden State coach Mark Jackson said it
was a bad loss.
“The way we started the ball game, there
have been times when our bench has been
bad, and we let them know, and tonight, the
starters did a poor job of setting the tone,”
Jackson said. “We got outworked. They
played with more force and that set the tone
the rest of the way. ”
The Rockets led 61-37 at halftime and
pushed the advantage to 28 on Harden’s
three-point play less than 2 minutes into
the third quarter.
Golden State pulled to 74-50 on Jermaine
O’Neal’s jumper midway through the third,
and the Warriors resorted to ‘Hack-a-
Howard’ with 5:40 remaining in the period.
Howard made 2 of 4 from the line, and the
Warriors pulled to 76-54 on O’Neal’s layup
with 5:06 to go in the quarter. Howard con-
nected on the next two free throws, and the
Warriors went away from hacking him.
set out at the beginning of the season and
it feels good to accomplish it.”
“It feels good,” Fa’aita said. “This is
what we’ve focused on since Day 1 and to
finally reach it, I’m at a loss for words
right now. I’m just really happy for this
team, this program.”
It’s a program that was handed a couple
of speed bumps along their journey to the
Open championship but was able to battle
through that adversity. And that same
theme played out Friday night against
Mitty.
Tied at 0-0 come halftime and having
benefited from a couple of missed field
goals by the Monarchs, Serra saw their
championship dreams dash down the Mitty
sideline in the form of Dakari Monroe,
who took a pitch 10 minutes into the third
quarter 74 yards into the end zone for the
game’s first touchdown. Monroe’s score
came after Mitty stopped a fake field goal
attempt by Serra and three plays after that,
the Monarchs had themselves all the
momentum and the lead.
“That’s life in playoff football,” said
Serra head coach Patrick Walsh, who
became a two-time CCS champion with the
win Friday. “It’s going to happen. You’re
going to be behind. You’re going to go
through adversity. ... [you have to] fight
through it.”
That’s exactly was Serra did.
After putting up just 95 yards of total
offense in the first half and turning the
ball over once, Serra, behind Fa’aita’s
passing, found a bit of a groove to start
the second half. While they didn’t score on
their initial possession, the offense was
showing signs of life that weren’t there in
the first half.
Down 7-0, Fa’aita found Kava Cassidy
on a big third down and long conversion to
keep that crucial drive alive. Three plays
later, Fa’aita hooked up with an ailing
Anoa’i on a 30-yard touchdown pass, with
No. 11 doing most of the work in the red
zone after his catch.
“I got a key block from my teammate Ian
McGuire and coach said we needed a big
play,” Anoa’i said. “I just did my best to
get into the end zone. When it comes down
to a championship, I didn’t want to feel
like I let my team down. Coach needed me
and I wanted to make sure he knew that he
could count on me to step up to the plate.”
“He basically had the opportunity to
start believing in himself and believing in
his receivers to make plays,” Walsh said of
his quarterback. “Nobody panicked.
Everyone was just calm and it wasn’t a
chaotic scene on our sideline. That’s a tes-
tament to our senior leadership. We found
our niche. Mitty made some great adjust-
ments from the first game that kept us off-
balanced in the first half. ”
The equalizing touchdown lifted the
entire Serra Nation. One play into the
fourth quarter, Camp came up with the turn-
ing point of the game. His interception
and return deep into Mitty territory set the
Padres up with first-and-goal from the 9-
yard line. Three plays later, Fa’aita pushed
his way into the end zone from a yard out
to give Serra a lead they would not relin-
quish.
And then, after the Serra defense shut
down Mitty one more time, Serra put the
game away on a 57-yard drive that culmi-
nated with McGee’s 2-yard run with 5:33
left in the game.
“They’ve done that all year,” Walsh said
of a defense that, with the exception of
Monroe’s big run, shut the Monarchs
down. “They say defense wins champi-
onships and I don’t think there’s any doubt
about that. ... I guess tonight God is a
Padre.”
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
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Make your Holiday
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Menlo is set to play its biggest
game of the year, and fittingly will
be going up against its most chal-
lenging opponent of the postsea-
son.
After wrapping up the Nor Cal
championship Tuesday with a dra-
matic five-set win over Sonora,
the Knights travel to Santiago
Canyon College in Orange, Calif.
to take on SoCal champion
Francis Parker School for the
California Interscholastic
Federation championship,
Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
Win or lose, Saturday’s show-
down will mark the last game of
the season for both teams. Menlo
(32-5) looks to capture its first
state championship in program
history, having gone winless in
four straight appearances on prep
volleyball’s ultimate stage from
1999-2002.
Parker (28-5), meanwhile, is
aiming for its second straight and
eighth overall state champi-
onship. The Lancers captured the
Division IV crown last year with a
five-set win over Sacred Heart
Prep. Parker previously took
Division IVtitles in 2004 and ’05,
the Division V title in 1998, and
Division III titles in 1986, ’87
and ’88.
“[Parker is] just a really well-
balanced team, and they play good
volleyball,” Menlo head coach
Steve Cavella said. “So, we’ll
have our hands full [Saturday] and
just do the best that we can.”
Asecular private school, Parker
is a perennial sports powerhouse
located a stone’s throw from the
University of San Diego campus
about a mile inland from Mission
Bay. And while most of the
school’s teams have been compet-
itive at a top level in recent years,
none have surpassed the success of
the girls’ volleyball program.
Parker head coach John
Landicho is in his second year at
the helm, but has enjoyed four of
the Lancers’ state championship
runs, having previously worked as
an assistant coach from 1998-
2007.
“We embrace who we are,”
Landicho said. “We don’t shy away
from the fact that we are a state
championship contender. You
play at a certain pace and a certain
level and you understand that there
are expectations that maybe bring
you some pressure, and at the same
time you just understand that that’s
what we do as the Parker volley-
ball program. That’s who we are.”
One of the facets making the
Parker squad who they are is a long
line of legendary coaching. The
program rose to prominence in the
‘80s after John Cook took over as
head coach in 1981. Cook went on
to post a 162-18 career record and
lead the Lancers to their first two
state titles. He later served as an
assistant coach for the bronze-
medal U.S. men’s team in the 1992
Summer Olympics in Barcelona,
then won two national champi-
onships as head coach of the
University of Nebraska women’s
team.
Other storied coaches in the pro-
gram’s history are Eric Sato, a
1988 Olympic gold medalist
ranked as the No. 35 greatest vol-
leyball player of all time by
Volleyball Magazine in 2011 ,
who coached the Lancers to their
2004 and ’05 championships;
Mark Presho, who coached Parker
for two years before being named
as a men’s assistant coach at UC
Irvine, where he has enjoyed three
national championships; and
John Herman, who lead the
Lancers to their 1998 state title
before coaching the boys’ volley-
ball team to a SoCal champi-
onship last season. Herman also
currently serves as assistant coach
for the Parker girls’ team.
“There’s been a pretty impres-
sive lineage of coaches … so, I’m
privileged to be in a seat that some
pretty good people have occupied
over the years,” Landicho said.
Parker also boasts plenty of
experience on the court. The
Lancers graduated just two starters
from last year’s state champi-
onship squad, both of whom are
currently playing for Division I
college programs. This year,
Parker features another pair of
Division-I bound standouts in 5-
10 outside hitter Michaela Dews
(Harvard) and 5-8 libero Sarah
Benjamin (Stanford).
“That returning core knew we
can be doing something really
good (this season),” Landicho
said. “So, getting back to state
and winning the state champi-
onship was the primary focus of
this team.”
For a Menlo program that hasn’t
appeared in a state-championship
bracket since 2008, every player
on the current roster will be play-
ing in their first state title game.
The Knights arrived in Orange on
Thursday night and decidedly did-
n’t practice Friday to instead
unwind from the eight-hour bus
ride.
In light of the winter weather,
the Knights won’t have the chance
to go to Disneyland, despite lodg-
ing just a few miles from the
Magic Kingdom. However, they
are hoping to claim – “We’re
going to Disneyland!” – in the
metaphorical spirit of champi-
onship celebration after
Saturday’s big game.
“We kind of came into [this sea-
son] knowing that this team had
talent,” Cavella said. “I think this
team set goals for winning certain
things and whatnot, but … we
tried to keep them focused on what
they needed to do each day in prac-
tice, and what they needed to do in
each match, in order to get to the
places they wanted to be at the end
of the season.”
Menlo one win from immortality
Continued from page 11
SERRA
SPORTS FILE
Up for grabs on Saturday is Menlo volleyball’s first ever state title.
15
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
16
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 9 12 .429 —
Philadelphia 7 13 .350 1 1/2
Toronto 6 12 .333 1 1/2
New York 5 13 .2782 1/2
Brooklyn 5 14 .263 3
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 14 5 .737 —
Atlanta 11 10 .524 4
Washington 9 10 .474 5
Charlotte 9 11 .450 5 1/2
Orlando 6 13 .316 8
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 17 2 .895 —
Detroit 9 10 .474 8
Chicago 8 9 .471 8
Cleveland 6 13 .316 11
Milwaukee 4 15 .211 13
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 3 .833 —
Houston 14 7 .667 2 1/2
Dallas 12 8 .600 4
Memphis 9 9 .500 6
New Orleans 9 10 .474 6 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 17 3 .850 —
Oklahoma City 14 4 .778 2
Denver 11 8 .579 5 1/2
Minnesota 9 10 .474 7 1/2
Utah 4 17 .190 13 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 13 7 .650 —
Golden State 11 9 .550 2
Phoenix 11 9 .550 2
L.A. Lakers 10 9 .526 2 1/2
Sacramento 4 13 .235 7 1/2
NFC LEADERS
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 30 18 9 3 39 82 63
Boston 28 18 8 2 38 76 57
Detroit 30 15 8 7 37 84 80
Tampa Bay 28 17 10 1 35 79 68
Toronto 29 15 11 3 33 80 79
Ottawa 29 11 14 4 26 83 95
Florida 29 8 16 5 21 66 97
Buffalo 29 6 21 2 14 49 88
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 30 20 9 1 41 94 67
Carolina 30 13 12 5 31 71 84
Washington 28 14 12 2 30 83 82
N.Y. Rangers 29 15 14 0 30 65 72
Philadelphia 28 13 13 2 28 63 68
New Jersey 30 11 13 6 28 65 74
Columbus 29 12 14 3 27 72 80
N.Y. Islanders 29 8 16 5 21 75 101
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 31 20 6 5 45 110 87
St. Louis 27 19 5 3 41 96 61
Colorado 27 20 7 0 40 81 62
Minnesota 31 17 9 5 39 74 74
Dallas 27 13 9 5 31 76 79
Winnipeg 30 13 13 4 30 80 87
Nashville 29 13 13 3 29 65 83
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 29 19 5 5 43 100 72
Anaheim 31 19 7 5 43 96 82
Los Angeles 29 18 7 4 40 76 62
Phoenix 29 16 8 5 37 94 93
Vancouver 31 16 10 5 37 83 80
Calgary 28 10 14 4 24 76 97
Edmonton 30 10 18 2 22 83 103
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
TRANSACTIONS NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0 .583 329 303
Philadelphia 7 5 0 .583 300 281
N.Y. Giants 5 7 0 .417 237 297
Washington 3 9 0 .250 269 362
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 3 0 .750 312 230
Carolina 9 3 0 .750 285 157
Tampa Bay 3 9 0 .250 217 285
Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 261 340
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 7 5 0 .583 326 287
Chicago 6 6 0 .500 323 332
Green Bay 5 6 1 .458 294 305
Minnesota 3 8 1 .292 289 366
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 11 1 0 .917 340 186
San Francisco 8 4 0 .667 297 197
Arizona 7 5 0 .583 275 247
St. Louis 5 7 0 .417 279 278
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 9 3 0 .750 322 261
Miami 6 6 0 .500 252 248
N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 189 310
Buffalo 4 8 0 .333 267 307
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 285 274
Tennessee 5 7 0 .417 264 267
Jacksonville 4 9 0 .308 201 372
Houston 2 11 0 .154 250 350
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 8 4 0 .667 292 216
Baltimore 6 6 0 .500 249 235
Pittsburgh 5 7 0 .417 263 278
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 231 297
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 10 2 0 .833 464 317
Kansas City 9 3 0 .750 298 214
San Diego 5 7 0 .417 279 277
Oakland 4 8 0 .333 237 300
QUATERBACKS
Att Com Yds TD Int
Foles, PHL 196 124 1791 19 0
R.Wilson, SEA 305 198 2672 22 6
A. Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218 15 4
Brees, NOR 477 323 3794 29 8
J. McCown, CHI 184 120 1461 9 1
Romo, DAL 440 285 3140 24 7
RUSHERS
Att ComYds TD Int
A. Peterson, MIN 261 1208 4.63 78t 10
L. McCoy, PHL 232 1088 4.69 41t 5
A. Morris,WAS 206 996 4.83 45t 6
Forte, CHI 214 971 4.5 4 55 7
M. Lynch, SEA 224 970 4.33 43 9
Re. Bush, DET 180 854 4.74 39 3
NFL GLANCE
Monday’sGame
Seattle 34, New Orleans 7
Thursday, Dec. 5
Jacksonville 27, Houston 20
Sunday, Dec. 8
Atlanta at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at New England, 10 a.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
CHICAGOWHITESOX—AssignedINFMikeMcDade
and OF Blake Tekotte outright to Charlotte (IL).
HOUSTONASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Scott Feldman on a three-year contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS — Agreed to terms with C Jarrod
Saltalamacchia on a three-year contract.
AmericanAssociation
AMARILLOSOX—TradedINF/CTreyFordtoSanAn-
gelo to complete an earlier trade.
WICHITAWINGNUTS—ReleasedRHPChrisM.Smith
and C Cole Armstrong.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Fined Denver G Nate Robinson $25,000 for
public criticism of officiating.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Detroit LB DeAndre Levy and Atlanta
LB Sean Weatherspoon $15,750 for their actions dur-
ing last week’s games.
HOUSTONTEXANS— Fired coach Gary Kubiak and
special teams coordinator Joe Marciano. Named de-
fensive coordinator Wade Phillips interim coach.
Promoted special teams assistant Bob Ligashesky to
coordinator.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
CHICAGOBLACKHAWKS — Traded F Kyle Beach to
theN.Y.Rangersfor FBrandonMashinter,andassigned
Mashinter to Rockford (AHL).
NEWYORK RANGERS — Recalled F J.T. Miller from
Hartford (AHL).
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Recalled D John-
Michael Liles from Toronto (AHL).
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— As if playing in the Eastern
time zone where they’ve lost 12 straight
games isn’t bad enough, the Oakland
Raiders could be facing snowy conditions
for Sunday’s game in New York.
Rookie quarterback Matt McGloin could-
n’t be more excited.
McGloin, who will be making his fourth
consecutive start for the Raiders, grew up in
Scranton, Pa., about two hours away from
MetLife Stadium and spent four years at
Penn State where he was the Nittany Lions’
first walk-on to start at quarterback in more
than 60 years.
Playing in the cold? That’s easy, especial-
ly when McGloin is expected to have about
200 family member and friends in the stadi-
um to support him.
“The weather is going to be a nice change
for me,” McGloin said. “I grew up in the
East my whole life so I’m used to playing in
the cold weather. I’m used to the grip of the
ball, how it feels, how to keep your hands
warm and moist. That won’t be too much of
an adjustment for me.”
Getting Oakland’s offense back on track
after back-to-back losses might be a bit
more difficult for the Raiders’ undrafted
starter.
Running back Darren McFadden has
already been ruled out because of an ankle
injury, while Rashad Jennings has yet to be
cleared after suffering a concussion against
the Dallas Cowboys on Thanksgiving.
Oakland will also be minus injured wide
receiver Denarius Moore, who leads the
team with five touchdown receptions.
Then there’s the cross-country trip to New
York. The Raiders haven’t won in the
Eastern time zone since beating the
Pittsburgh Steelers 27-24 on Dec. 26, 2009
— not long after McGloin arrived at Penn
State as a walk-on.
“It’s not a statistic we’re proud of,”
McGloin said. “Any time you’re traveling
across the country to play, it’ll be difficult.
But for me it’s exciting to go back East and
play in the cold.”
The game will mark the Raiders’ second
trip to New York in four weeks. They lost to
the Giants 24-20 on Nov. 10 when McGloin
was still backing up Terrelle Pryor.
McGloin stepped into the starting job the
following week and hasn’t looked back.
Though Oakland is just 1-2 in his three
starts, McGloin has passed for nearly 800
yards with four touchdowns and two inter-
ceptions. His 84.6 passer rating is signifi-
cantly better than Pryor’s mark of 69.0, and
McGloin has only been sacked twice.
McGloin has also showed remarkable
poise for a rookie quarterback, something
Raiders coach Dennis Allen thinks will
serve the young quarterback well when he
starts in New York in front of family and
friends.
“Nothing seems to overwhelm him,”
Allen said Friday. “Going to the mecca of
football in New York, I don’t think that’s
anything that’s going to affect him that
much. He understands what he’s got to do.
I’ve been very impressed with the way that
he’s handled himself, specifically for an
undrafted rookie.”
Allen has said the Raiders still want to see
what Pryor has to offer as a quarterback.
Cold weather doesn’t faze McGloin
USATODAY SPORTS
Raiders QB Matt McGloin will start on Sunday.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A December
matchup between fierce rivals that only
months ago looked to be a for-sure NFC
West championship decider has instead
become San Francisco’s chance to show it
still belongs in the playoff mix. Period.
If the two-time reigning division champi-
on 49ers (8-4) can’t beat the Seahawks (11-
1) at home Sunday, they will certainly have
a far more daunting task of trying to beat
them in Seattle if the teams meet again in
the NFC playoffs.
“If this doesn’t fire you up, if this doesn’t
fire up the fans, then what does?” 49ers
coach Jim Harbaugh said. “I suppose
Abraham Lincoln riding across the field
with a frock and a top hat, riding a horse,
waving an American flag. I doubt that would
fire them up, if this game doesn’t fire them
up. The people that really love football
would be fired up by this matchup.”
Seattle clinched the NFL’s first playoff
berth with a rout of New Orleans on Monday
night, and could wrap up the West and first-
round bye with a win at Candlestick Park.
The Seahawks are thinking far beyond the
rivalry, or that a team that reached the last
Super Bowl is on the other side.
“Well, we’ve been in the midst of these
for a long time,” coach Pete Carroll said.
“We’ve looked at every game like it’s a
championship opportunity for us, and
we’ve continued to see and feel it that way. ”
Here are a couple things to watch Sunday
in Seattle’s final visit to Candlestick Park:
SAN FRANCISCO’S 12TH MAN: The
49ers are calling for a “red out” this week-
end, as in all fans wear red. Anything to
help boost the energy at Candlestick for a
game of this magnitude.
Sure, the Niners would love to establish a
home-field advantage similar to what
Seattle has.
“I would hope for that this week, that
Candlestick, we get it cranked up,”
Harbaugh said. “Make it a real great envi-
ronment, because it’ll be a great football
game.”
Not that Seattle isn’t accustomed to
noise. The Seahawks’ own home games
help them prepare — and on Sunday they
will try for a franchise-best sixth road vic-
tory.
“Our crowd is sensational,” quarterback
Russell Wilson said. “They’re so loud every
week. So, yeah, I think it definitely does.
We’re not afraid to go on the road and play
in a tough environment.”
BRAGGING RIGHTS IN THE WEST:
Sure, Seattle has owned this series of late,
outscoring the 49ers 71-16 in the past two
meetings, both at home. Yet that hardly
matters with the high stakes on this one.
“It’s a new game, another Sunday,” 49ers
linebacker Patrick Willis said. “We’ve
talked about it the last couple of weeks that
every game we play from here on it out is
important. It’s important to where we go to
get into the playoffs. ... Once we get in,
then I feel like anything can happen.”
The Seahawks don’t doubt it. They have
had a good view of the Niners’ success the
past two years since Harbaugh came aboard.
“They’ve been winning for a long time.
That just makes it that much more of a chal-
lenge and difficult to get,” Carroll said.
“We’re going for it with everything we’ve
got this week.”
THE DECEMBER STRETCH: Carroll
just chuckles at the idea that, as well as
Seattle has played, people are concerned
about the Seahawks peaking too soon to
sustain this level of success.
“I’m glad people are concerned about that;
we’ve been trying to manage a steady ascent
in our play, our execution,” he said. “This is
fourth quarter of the season, this is when
you finish it off and set yourself up for post-
season. We certainly haven’t gotten to the
point we think we’ve got it made, we’ve got
‘em now. ”
49ers try to deny the
Seahawks on Sunday
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Event hosted at Paye's Place:
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Reachyour potential withour girls’ volleyball programs
by
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There should be some familiarity when
No. 1 seed Sacred Heart Prep (11-1) takes
on No. 7 Pacific Grove (11-1) in the
Central Coast Section Division IV cham-
pionship game at Independence High
School Saturday night.
Not only because the Gators dispatched
the Breakers 48-15 on their way to win-
ning the Division IVtitle last season, but
because Pacific Grove could be the only
team not named Terra Nova to give the
Gators’ defense fit s.
Don’t let the No. 7 seed fool you. Much
like Terra Nova, the Breakers are a quick-
strike offense, not liking to waste time in
finding the end zone. In their 77-53 win
over Carmel in the semifinals, five of the
Breakers’ touchdowns came on drives of
five plays or less.
The offense is triggered by quarterback
Luke Lowell, who has passed for nearly
2,400 yards and 31 touchdowns. He also
averages five yards a carry when he does
pull it down to run.
The Breakers’ ground attack is paced by
Jason Leach, who has rushed for nearly
1,600 yards and is one of two players
with 16 touchdowns scored. Jake Speed
also has rushed for 16 scores.
Nine times the Breakers have
eclipsed the 40-point mark and they
have twice scored 60 points this season,
their 77 points scored last week was a
season high and avenged Pacific Grove’s
lone loss of the season.
Pacific Grove’s offense is averaging
more than 450 yards of offense per game,
including 200 yards through the air.
Suddenly Sacred Heart Prep’s offense —
which is averaging 33 points per game —
looks pedestrian.
But if there is ever a team that is ever
proving the football adage, “defense
wins championships,” the Gators are it.
While Pacific Grove is averaging 47.5
points on offense, SHP is allowing just
eight per game. The Gators have given up
20 points or more just once this season
— during a 29-15 loss to Terra Nova a
month ago. Pacific Grove is allowing an
average of three touchdowns per contest.
The Gators defense swarms to the ball,
lays hat and is completely confident in
their abilities. The defensive line is
anchored by Nic Collazo and Paul
Westcott, who have combined for 11. 5
sacks and have gotten consistent pres-
sure all season long. Linebacker Ben
Burr-Kirven is one of the most unheralded
defend-
ers in the Central
Coast Section,
with an ability to
apply pressure on
the quarterback, but
is equally at home
dropping back into
coverage.
Noah Kawasaki
anchors a secondary
that has 17 intercep-
tions this season.
While all the typical
clichés are at work in the 7
p.m. championship game
Saturday night — the team
with the fewest turnovers will
win, the team that executes the
best will win — there appears to
be an even more simple formula at
work: Pacific Grove’s offense ver-
sus Sacred Heart Prep’s defense. The
winner of that matchup will win their
second CCS title in school history.
By Janani Kumar
“T
omorrow. Tomorrow. I love
you. Tomorrow. You’re always
a day away. ”
That catchy line from “Annie” is basical-
ly the mantra for all procrastinators.
Oh, the temptation for
students to watch just
one more episode of The
Mindy Project or
Supernatural before start-
ing to study for finals.
Or the ease with which
our families put off holi-
day shopping in an
attempt to avoid those
horrendous lines and overpriced goods. All
because “there’s always tomorrow. ”
Well, I can tell you that, as a student,
with final exams approaching with a fright-
ening speed and stressing over those grades
hanging at the hinges, the last thing on
my head is studying.
The tendency for us is to just bury our
heads in the sand and sink into a deep state
of denial, as if to say “ha ha, what exams?”
But, in general, especially during the
holiday season, everyone ends up slacking
off a little.
After all, the year has almost ended, so
shouldn’t our stress as well?
And plus, there is also the seasonal stress
of knowing you have to study for multiple
exams and while trying to figure out gifts
for your long-lost relatives who you see,
what, twice a year?
OK, so turns out, there is a way to allevi-
ate this crazy stress. And no, it is not
avoiding cracking open those textbooks,
or just spending days on end watching ABC
Family’s 25 Days of Christmas (But I must
Procrastinators
unite! Well, how
about tomorrow?
Mario is back
Video game
icon is back in
new retro game
SEE PAGE 21
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol” puts a
different twist on “A Christmas Carol,” the
1843 holiday favorite by Charles Dickens.
Instead of the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge
as the central character, playwright Tom
Mula focuses on his late business partner,
Jacob Marley. Marley has been dead for
seven years when his ghost appears on
Christmas Eve to warn Scrooge that he
needs to change his ways or be eternally
condemned.
The play looks at how Marley came to
make that appearance and what happened to
him and Scrooge thereafter.
In the production by Marin Theatre
Company, four actors, often assisted by two
stagehands, portray varied characters, but
each has a principal character. Khris Lewin
is Marley, while Nicholas Pelczar is
Scrooge. Stacy Ross plays the Record
Keeper, and Rami Margron is the Bogle.
Burdened by the chains of misdeeds that
he forged in his life, Marley is called before
the Record Keeper, who gives him a chance
to redeem himself. He must somehow get
the miserly Scrooge to change his ways and
find the joy of Christmas.
Marley’s guide for this daunting task is
the Bogle, a phantom or goblin.
Marley’s first step is to appear before
Scrooge and warn him, a scene that’s simi-
lar to the one in Dickens’ tale. This doesn’t
work too well, but Marley decides to go
back to a time when Scrooge wasn’t so
miserly.
Act 2 of this two-act play differs from
Dickens’ format with the Ghosts of
Christmases Past, Present and Future
because Christmas Past emphasizes
Marley’s youth. He and Scrooge navigate
the present together, but Scrooge is on his
own for the future. There’s redemption for
both in the end.
To start with, Nina Ball’s bare-bones set
features a metal catwalk running diagonally
‘Christmas Carol’ through Marley’s eyes
KEVIN BERNE
Khris Lewin (Jacob Marley’s ghost) and Rami Magron (Bogle) in Jacob Marley’s Christmas
Carol, running through Dec. 22 at Marin Theatre Company in Mill Valley.
‘Out of the
Furnace’ is
suffocating
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Out of the Furnace” is an earnestly crafted,
passionately acted working-class drama rusted
over by its noble intentions of steel-town sympa-
thizing.
Director Scott Cooper (whose first film, “Crazy Heart,” was
also drawn to the dwindling options of an increasingly obsolete hard
worker) sets his movie in Braddock, Pa., where he also shot it. The town
mill hovers as the empty heart of a corroded city.
Cooper lays the atmosphere on thick, suffocating the film with worn inte-
riors, factory smokestacks, dive bars and highway overpasses. It’s filled
with tattoos, beer bottles, muscle cars, flannel shirts and, to top it off, Eddie
Vedder (who opens the films with the song “Release”).
The film’s clichis are many, but few will doubt its weighty sincerity, its
heavy-handed Rust Belt eulogizing.
What’s dying? The lives of blue-collar men. The film is centered on
the Baze brothers, Russell (Christian Bale) and Rodney (Casey
Affleck), both of whom are finding that, as their father dies of
lung cancer from years at the mill, life in Braddock is dried up.
Russell is an honest mill worker and
Rodney is an increasingly lost Army man,
altered badly from repeated tours in Iraq.
They’re two of the men in this very
macho ensemble that also includes
Woody Harrelson, Sam Shepard,
Willem Dafoe and Forrest Whitaker.
One of the pleasures of “Out of the
Furnace” is to be in the company of
such a fine group of faces, all of
them various shades of weariness
See FURNACE, Page 20
See CAROL, Page 20
See STUDENT, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: December 31, 2013
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and anger. (Humor is emphatically not one
of the movie’s shades, as much as one might
hope for a rendition of “YMCA” from its
collection of mill worker, solider and police
officer types.)
No, “Out of the Furnace” is serious busi-
ness, announced from the first scene at a
drive-in: a brutal, largely unprompted beat
down given by Harrelson’s Harlan DeGroat,
who we later learn is a menacing
Appalachian meth-dealer and underworld
figure. He’s the fire the film’s title promises,
into which the Baze bothers will jump from
the furnace of Braddock.
Their route to him begins when Rodney
runs up a debt to a local bookie (Dafoe).
After stopping by to secretly help pay it
down (and have a drink pushed on him),
Russell rams a car and is imprisoned for
DUI. When he later gets out, things have
worsened: Their father has died, his girl-
friend (Zoe Saldana, the film’s lone woman)
has left him for a cop (Whitaker), and
Rodney is now earning money in bare-
knuckle fights. (The film “Warrior” is an
obvious comparison to “Out of the
Furnace.”)
Affleck is excellent as Rodney, a tense,
confused shell of rage. He wants punish-
ment, and he finds it when he pushes,
against repeated advice, to land a bout in
DeGroat’s ring.
Harrelson, such an uncommon force in
movies, is again memorable here. When
Rodney asks him if he as a problem with
him, he gives a darker answer than Marlon
Brando gave in “The Wild One”: “I got a
problem with everybody,” he says.
“Out of the Furnace” makes an impression
thanks to these performances, as well as
Bale’s captivating stillness. Cooper’s drive
to tell a story of Rust Belt decay has clearly
elicited dedication in his cast.
But it has also given the film such heavy-
handedness and hard-to-take allusions to
“The Deer Hunter” that “Out of the Furnace”
loses much of the authenticity it strives so
hard for.
“Out of the Furnace,” a Relativity Media
release, is rated R by the Motion Picture
Association of America for “intense
sequences of violence and action, some
frightening images, thematic elements, a
suggestive situation and language.”
Running time: 116 minutes. Two stars out
of four.
Continued from page 19
FURNACE
confess that even the Nth time watching
“The Polar Express” or “Elf” carries a cer-
tain element of charm).
No. I am talking about actually being
productive in a less migraine conducive
way. So what works for me is making a
checklist and designating times for each
activity.
I know, sounds so cliche. But I really
can’t complain because it actually
works like a charm?
Anyway, last week, I found myself com-
pletely drowned in a mound of assign-
ments, both school and extracurricular
related.
Under normal circumstances, I would just
waste my limited time, watching movies or
getting sucked into the endless time warp,
looking at funny memes on Facebook.
However, making said list with time
restrictions made me work quickly and effi-
ciently, often finishing each task a little
before the assigned time.
And that would give me and, I would
imagine, most others a great feeling of
accomplishment.
I know; this does not even compare to
the carefree days of vacation, but it’s the
next best thing.
But if you are a senior in high school,
like me, you just have a few more weeks
left before you can just enjoy your vacation
and reap the benefits of having finished
your college apps.
I am definitely looking forward to not
having to meet app deadlines for the entire
spring semester.
And trust me; I know all the holiday
movies portray the season as quiet and
peaceful and just warm and fuzzy all over.
And it is crushing to realize that real-
ity is far from optimal, but just remem-
ber you are not alone.
So let’s all be smart this holiday season.
Let’s stop the procrastinating, get to writ-
ing our to-do lists, check off the “done”
items and sigh in satisfaction as we finish
our last days of work.
Trust me. It will all be so worth it.
So it’s settled then. We will all make our
to-do lists and finish off the tasks one by
one.
Let’s do this ... tomorrow.
Janani Kumar is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
overhead with a ghost light on the stage.
(In accordance with theatrical tradition, one
bare light bulb is left burning on stage
when a theater is unoccupied. It’s a safety
measure as well as a way to scare off any
ghosts.)
Kurt Landisman’s mostly dark lighting is
often augmented by the actors’ hand-held
flashlights or by spotlights wielded by the
actors or stagehands from the sides of the
stage. Heidi Leigh Hanson’s basic costumes
are the same for all: blue work shirts and
jeans with suspenders. Hats and other addi-
tions allow them to change character.
Composer Chris Houston’s often chilling
sound design is integral to the atmosphere.
Even though the reviewed performance
was the final preview, everything went
smoothly under the direction of Jon Tracy.
All four versatile actors are excellent.
Publicity for the show says it’s suitable
for ages 6 and up, but it might be too scary
for some of the younger set. For adults,
though, it’s an intriguing look at a yuletide
classic.
“Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol” will
continue at Marin Theatre Company, 397
Miller Ave., through Dec. 22. For tickets
and information call (415) 388-5208 or
visit www.marintheatre.org.
Continued from page 19
CAROL
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — With the passing of Nelson
Mandela, the sweeping biopic “Mandela:
Long Walk to Freedom” transforms in the
midst of its theatrical release from a living
tribute to a big-screen eulogy.
The South African revolutionary and former
president, who died Thursday at the age of 95,
has long been a compelling figure for movies
— a hero of uncommon dignity whose dra-
matic story and titanic accomplishments
insured his tale would be told often in film.
But arguably the fullest movie portrait of
Mandela’s life — a film made with his per-
mission and his family’s support — was
released just six days before his death.
News of Mandela’s death broke as
“Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” played
during its London premiere, where Mandela’s
daughters Zindzi and Zenani were in atten-
dance. A spokesman with the film said the
daughters requested that the film continue,
though they immediately left the theater.
Producer Anant Singh, who has spent more
than a decade trying to get the film made,
called for a moment of silence at the film’s
end.
“Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” opened
in a limited release of four theaters in the U.S.
last Friday. When the film opens wide on
Christmas, it’s sure to draw larger crowds
moved to remember Mandela. The Weinstein
Co.’s challenge is to not appear to be capi-
talizing on Mandela’s passing, but celebrat-
ing his life.
Apublicist for the Weinstein Co. said the
film’s release schedule won’t be changed, but
declined to say if the movie’s marketing
would be altered.
Harvey Weinstein, the co-chairman of the
Weinstein Co., is renowned for his promo-
tional gusto. He’s pushing the film for awards
recognition, which hasn’t yet developed in
early prizes. But sentiment could flow toward
“Mandela: Long Ride to Freedom” following
Mandela’s death as voting for the Oscars,
Golden Globes and other awards kicks in over
the next two months.
“One of the privileges of making movies is
having the opportunity to immortalize those
who have made a profound impact on human-
ity,” Weinstein said in a statement. “We count
ourselves unspeakably fortunate to have been
immersed in Nelson Mandela’s story and
legacy. It’s been an honor to have been grant-
ed such proximity to a man who will go down
as one of history’s greatest freedom fighters
and advocates for justice.”
Mandela has been played by Danny Glover
in the 1987 TVfilm “Mandela” (it aired while
Mandela was still imprisoned), Sidney
Poitier in the 1997 TV film “Mandela and De
Klerk,” Dennis Haysbert in 2007’s “Goodbye
Bafana,” Morgan Freeman in 2009’s
“Invictus” and Terrence Howard in the recent-
ly released “Winnie Mandela.”
Mandela film shifts from tribute to eulogy
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
While Sony and Microsoft are spending
this holiday season asking video-game
players to invest in the future — namely,
their respective new consoles, the
PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One —
Nintendo is reminding us of the great
times it gave us in the past.
Remember how much you enjoyed
“The Legend of Zelda: ALink to the
Past” on the Super Nintendo back
in 1991? Well, how can you resist
“The Legend of Zelda: A Link
Between Worlds,” now out for the
Nintendo 3DS?
Likewise, “Super Mario 3D
World” (for the Wii U,
$59. 99) evokes
memories of
“Super Mario
64,” the landmark
1996 hit
that first
b r o a d -
ened Nintendo’s tenacious plumber into
three dimensions. Of course, we’re all
used to 3-D Mario by now, so “3D World”
doesn’t have the same impact. Nor does it
deliver the gravity-defying genius of
2007’s “Super Mario Galaxy.” But it is a
charming, occasionally brilliant addition
to a 30-year legacy of video-game excel-
lence.
Like last year’s “New Super Mario Bros.
U,” Mario’s latest adventure is designed
to accommodate up to four players. The
four available characters have different
skills: Luigi can jump higher, Princess
Peach can float, Toad can run faster and
Mario more or less averages them out.
The distinctions are somewhat marginal,
though, since each level is designed so
that any one character can finish.
This time, the nefarious Bowser has
kidnapped a bunch of helpless fairies
called “Sprixies.” The goal, as always, is
to run and jump across each level, bounc-
ing off the heads of enemies while avoid-
ing fireballs, bullets and other obstacles.
There are a few new additions to the land-
scape, like transparent pipes that shoot
you across short dis-
tances, but the
S p r i x i e
K i n g d o m
d o e s n ’ t
look sub-
s t a n t i a l l y
d i f f e r e n t
from Mario’s
M u s h r o o m
Kingdom.
The power-ups
are mostly familiar as
well, from the basic
mushroom that doubles
your size to the
Tanooki suit that
transforms you into a
raccoon that can swat
enemies with its tail.
New to the series is the
“double cherry” that turns
one Mario into two, but the most radical
addition is a furry cat suit that gives our
heroes the ability to climb walls — an
essential skill if you want to find all the
green stars hidden throughout the game.
You can scamper through each level
without gathering any stars, but some
areas of the Sprixie Kingdom won’t open
up unless you’ve accumulated a certain
number of collectibles. That includes the
game’s final castle, which requires 130
stars; when I arrived I had just 80, so I had
a lot of backtracking to do.
So you want to take your time and
explore each area as thoroughly as possi-
ble, while also being aware of a constant-
ly ticking countdown clock in the corner
of every screen. And you can’t dawdle if
you’re playing with friends — eventually
you’ll be dragged to wherever the fastest
player is waiting.
Indeed, whether I was playing alone or
on a team, I found it most frustrating that
“3D World” wouldn’t let me explore at my
own pace. Granted, the countdown clock
has been part of Mario games since the
beginning, but it’s a tired old gimmick.
Like any multiplayer-focused game,
“3D World” can get chaotic when you’re
playing in a foursome. But it’s a high-
spirited kind of chaos, one that provokes
laughter rather than the cursing you’re
likely to hear in, say, a “Call of Duty”
free-for-all.
Played solo, “3D World” isn’t quite as
endearing. It’s not exactly dumbed down,
but it didn’t bend my brain like “Super
Mario Galaxy.” Often, it feels like a clas-
sic 2-D Mario adventure translated into 3-
D, a game that prizes familiarity over
innovation. It’s solid and satisfying, but
next time, I want to be wowed. Three stars
out of four.
Mario back on the prowl in ‘3D World’
22
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Rob Portman, R-Ohio.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Jesse Jackson; Charles Ogletree, a law professor at Harvard University.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Former Secretary of State James Baker; Randall Robinson, who led the anti-apartheid
group TransAfrica; poet Maya Angelou.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Reps. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, and Adam Schiff, D-Calif.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.; Pik Botha, a former South African foreign minister.
Sunday news shows
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEVERLYHILLS — Amural stenciled on
the side of a Hollywood gas station five
years ago by the British street artist
Banksy has fetched more than $200,000 at
a Beverly Hills auction.
The 9-by-8 foot “Flower Girl” artwork
sold for $209,000 on Thursday at an auc-
tion that featured nearly 100 works by more
than 30 artists, according to the Los
Angeles Times. The winning bid came from
a Los Angeles buyer who requested
anonymity.
The mural shows a little girl holding a
flower basket under the eye of a surveillance
camera planted atop a tall stalk.
The seller of the mural was Eytan
Rosenberg, former owner of a gas station,
who had allowed a group of three street
artists to paint something on its white
brick wall.
Rosenberg sold the gas station last year
and painstakingly removed the artwork and
installed it in a sturdy aluminum frame. He
and his sister want to use the money from
the sale to build a car wash.
Banksy, who refuses to reveal his full
identity, began his career spray-painting
buildings in Bristol, England. He is known
for his silhouetted figures and spray-painted
messages.
The highest known price for a Banksy
work is about $1.1 million for a mural
called “Slave Labor” that was auctioned in
London in June.
Banksy’s work has caught the eye of A-
list Hollywood celebrities such as Brad Pitt
and Angelina Jolie, who recently bought a
smaller piece for $1 million.
Banksy mural fetches
$209K at state auction
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
WHISKEY MAKES NEWS IN PITTS-
BURGH ... AGAIN: WHISKEY MAK-
ING, AND TASTING, IN THE HEART
OF WHISKEY REBELLION COUNTRY.
It’s been centuries since the Whiskey
Rebellion shook up Western Pennsylvania,
but listening to Meredith Grelli tell the his-
tory of American Whiskey makes those
long-ago events come vividly to life. Grelli
is co-owner of Wigle Whiskey, an artisan,
small batch whiskey distillery in the Strip
District of Pittsburgh. When it opened in
2012, Wigle Whiskey became the first new
distillery in that city since Prohibition. In
her hour-long tours, Grelli explains the
process of turning organic, local grain into
full flavored white whiskey. Her entertain-
ing talk deftly blends whiskey knowledge
and Whiskey Rebellion lore.
HOW DID WIGLE WHISKEY GET
ITS NAME? The company is named after
Philip Wigle, a key figure in the Whiskey
Rebellion. Grelli said: “We pronounce
Wigle like the word “wiggle,” because it
rolls off the tongue nice and easy. When
Wigle was alive, he likely would have pro-
nounced his name with a “V” and hard “i”
sound. No matter how you’re saying it, it’s
probably closer to the actual proper pronun-
ciation of his name than how we say Wigle.”
WHAT IS THE CONNECTION
BETWEEN PITTSBURGH AND
WHISKEY? Grelli said: “Pittsburgh is the
birthplace of American Whiskey; Western
Pennsylvania was Kentucky before
Kentucky existed. At the height of whiskey
making in Western Pennsylvania, there were
4,000 documented stills. By 1850 the
Pittsburgh region was producing half a bar-
rel’s worth of whiskey for every man,
woman and child living in America. If you
were drinking in America in the 1700
through the late 1800s, you were likely
drinking Pittsburgh Rye Whiskey. It was
called Monongahela Rye and Pittsburgh was
known all over the world for the quality of
our Rye Whiskey. ”
WHAT WAS THE WHISKEY REBEL-
LION? The Whiskey Rebellion was a tax
protest that began in 1791 when farmers
who made whiskey were forced to pay a new
tax on their product. Grelli said: “Whiskey
was so central to the lives of the people who
lived here in Pittsburgh in the 1700s that
they became incensed when the first excise
tax levied in the US singled out whiskey dis-
tillers.” The farmers who resisted, many of
them Revolutionary war veterans, contend-
ed that they were fighting taxation without
local representation; the newly formed
Federal government maintained that the tax
was imposed legally. Events escalated until,
in 1794, 500 armed men attacked the
Pittsburgh home of tax inspector John
Neville and burned it to the ground. At this
point troops were sent to quell the violence.
HOW WAS PHILIP WIGLE
INVOLVED? Grelli said, “Our namesake,
Philip Wigle, got into trouble when he
demanded from a local tax collector his list
of all documented stills in the region. This
tussle led to the Whiskey Rebellion, which
pitted Pittsburgh distillers against 13,000
troops led to town by President George
Washington.” As the army neared
Pittsburgh, the rebels went home and the
uprising ended without bloodshed. Wigle
and another man were convicted of treason
for tax resistance and sentenced to be
hanged. Washington pardoned both, howev-
er, and the two became the first Americans to
enjoy a presidential pardon. The tax on
whiskey was repealed in 1802.
WHAT MAKES THE WHISKEY
REBELLION IMPORTANT? Grelli said,
“The Whiskey Rebellion was the first test of
federal power in this country and remains
the only instance in American history of a
president leading troops against his own
people.”
HOW DOES WIGLE WHISKEY
MAKE ITS SPIRITS? Grelli said: “We at
Wigle Whiskey are working to restore a
Pennsylvania tradition championed by
these rebellious distillers. We make spirits
much the same way Wigle and his friends did
when Pittsburgh was the epicenter of
American Whiskey – we mill local, organic
grains on site and distill in small batches in
a traditional copper pot still. We are one of
the few distilleries in the United States that
produce whiskey in this way. ”
WIGLE WHISKEY PARTICULARS.
Wigle Whiskey is located at 2401 Smallman
St. in Pittsburgh, Pa. A$20 tour includes a
whiskey cocktail to start, a tour of the dis-
tillation process, a history of the Whiskey
Rebellion told through the eyes of Philip
Wigle, and a seated straight tasting. For
information visit wiglewhiskey.com or call
(412) 728-0053.
AND REMEMBER: I think that travel
comes from some deep urge to see the world,
like the urge that brings up a worm in an
Irish bog to see the moon when it is full.
Lord Dunsany.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine & Travel
Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
PITTSBURGH WHISKEY KEEPS HISTORY FROM BEING A DRY SUBJECT.Meredith Grelli,co-owner
of Wigle Whiskey in Pittsburgh, Pa., tells of the Whiskey Rebellion during tours of the
one-year-old Wigle distillery, the first to open in Pittsburgh since Prohibition. Grelli stands in
front of a traditional copper pot still.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
24
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, DEC. 7
JavaWith Sen. Jerry Hill. 8:30 a.m. to
9:30 a.m. Caffe Roma, 143 S. El Camino
Real, Millbrae. Free. For more informa-
tion call 212-3313.
Fear of Flying Clinic Workshop. 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Francisco
International Airport. Pre registration
is required. For more information call
341-1595.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Huge variety of books and
media for all ages and in a variety of
languages. Free admission. For more
information call 697-7607.
Brunch with Santa. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
King Community Center, 725 Monte
Diablo Ave., San Mateo. $9. For more
information call 522-7270.
Special Holiday Free Program. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. The day will feature
children’s craft activities such as mak-
ing old fashion Christmas tree orna-
ments. Free. For more information call
299-0104.
PENPEX Stamp Show. 10 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. Community Activities Building,
1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City.
PENPEX Stamp Show features 18
dealers, more than 50 frames of
exhibits, special souvenir show
cachets, activities and free stamps for
beginners, and a silent auction of
more than 500 lots that closes at 2:30
p.m. on Sunday. The U.S. Postal
Service will be present on Saturday
with items for sale. Snack bar with hot
and cold food. Free admission and
free parking. For more information go
to www.penpex.org or call 365-2956.
A Nutcracker Sampler. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
Worm Composting Class. 10:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. Common Ground Garden
Supply and Education Center, 559
College Ave., Palo Alto. Learn how to
turn kitchen scraps into botanical
gold. For more information call 493-
6072.
A Christmas Carol. 11 a.m. Menlo
Park Council Chambers, 701 Laurel
St., Menlo Park. Duffy Hudson brings
the holiday classic to life in a one-
man show. Free. For more information
call 330-2525.
Dad and Me at the Library. 11 a.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Free. For more information go
to www.fatherhoodcollaborative.org.
Fall Open Studios at Peninsula Art
Institute. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
Peninsula Art Institute, 1777
California Drive, Burlingame. There
will be a gallery exhibit, light refresh-
ments and artist demos. Free. For
more information go to www.penin-
sulaartinstitute.org.
Dragon Theatre Fundraising Gift
Boutique. Noon to 5 p.m. Dragon
Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. Support the Dragon Theatre
while shopping for holiday gifts from
jewelry, cosmetics and other vendors.
Cash and checks are preferred.
Patrons are urged to park at the
Middlefield and Veterans Parkway
garage. Same day as Hometown
Holidays event in Redwood City.
Enoteca 100 Grand Wine Tasting. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Donato Enoteca, 1041
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. The
tasting will feature 100 artisan wines
from Italy. $55. For more information
call 701-1000.
The Gift — A Christmas Carol
Musical. 2 p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Notre Dame de Namur
University presents this performance
for the 28th year. Free. For more infor-
mation visit www.christmas-
carolthegift.org.
Redwood City Firefighters’ Create-
A-Smile Foundation barbecue and
Raffle Fundraiser. 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Fire Station 9, 755 Marshall St.
Support fire victims of 531 and 926
Woodside Road by enjoying a barbe-
cue at Fire Station 9. Raffle tickets for
a variety of prizes will be sold to also
benefit the victims. Tickets to attend
are $8 for adults and $5 for children
and can be purchased on site on Dec.
7. For more information call 780-
7400.
PWC presents ‘Illuminate This
Night.’ 2:30 p.m. St. Mark’s Episcopal
Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto.
PWC will sing holiday music from
around the world. Premium tickets are
$35, general tickets are $30 and stu-
dents 18 and under are $10. To get
more information or purchase tickets
go to www.pwchorus.org or call 327-
3095.
Anders Zorn: Sweden’s Master
Painter. 3 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
For more information, contact con-
rad@smcl.org.
Caltrain Holiday Train stops at var-
ious train stations. Decorated with
60,000 glittering lights, the train will
visit nine Caltrain stations between
San Francisco and Santa Clara on Dec.
7 and Dec. 8, providing holiday enter-
tainment and collecting donations of
toys for local children. Dec. 7: San Fran-
cisco 4 p.m., Burlingame 5:15 p.m.,
Redwood City 6:15 p.m., Palo Alto 6:50
p.m., Santa Clara 8:10 p.m. Free. For
more information call (800) 660-4287.
Ragazzi Boys Chorus presents A
Cheerful Noise. 5 p.m. First Congre-
gational Church, 1985 Louis Road, Palo
Alto. Tickets: $27 reserved, $16 gen-
eral, $10 students. For more
information call 342-8785 or visit
www.ragazzi.org.
Millbrae Chamber of Commerce:
22nd Annual Tree Lighting Cele-
bration. 7 p.m. Millbrae City Hall
Constitution Square. Please bring an
unwrapped new toy for the toy drive,
or a clean gently-used jacket for the
Warm Coat Project. For more informa-
tion call 344-5200.
Hillsdale High School presents ‘In
The Heights.’ 7 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Theatre, 3115 Del Monte St.,
San Mateo. $17 for adults and $12 for
students and seniors. Tickets can be
purchased at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama. For more
information email hillsdaledra-
matix@gmail.com.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical.’ 7
p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Notre
Dame de Namur University presents
this performance for the 28th year.
Free. For more information go to
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Arsenic and Old Lace.’ 7 p.m. Ca-
puchino High School, 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. Student production
of the comedy play ‘Arsenic and Old
Lace’ in Capuchnio’s new state-of-the-
art theater. Tickets are $15 for general
admission and $10 for students. For
more information call 558-2799.
‘The Gift — A Christmas Carol.’ 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Free. Tickets must be pre-or-
dered. For more information go to
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
Palo Alto Philharmonic Concert. 8
p.m. with a special pre-concert talk at
7:30. Cubberley Theatre, 4000 Middle-
field Road, Palo Alto. The Palo Alto
Philharmonic is proud to present the
premiere performance of Symphony
No. 3 by composer-in-residence Lee
Actor. Tickets are $20 for general ad-
mission, $17 for seniors and $10 for
students. They can be purchased at
www.papahil.org or the box office the
night of the performance. For more in-
formation email Nat Collins at
president@paphil.org.
Poletential AirShow. 8 p.m. 2411
Broadway, Redwood City. An aston-
ishing display by pole and aerial
artists. Tickets are available to those
18 and older for $35 at www.poleten-
tial.com or $40 at the door. For more
information contact Poletential Fitness
at twirl@poletential.com or 274-4640.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Red-
wood City. A hilariously biting
commentary on the state of the union,
a politically incorrect president in the
death throes of his failing re-election
campaign and some Thanksgiving
turkey pardons for sale. Contains adult
language. Tickets range from $15 to
$30 and can be purchased at
www.dragonproductions.net. Runs
Nov. 22 through Dec. 15. Thursdays
through Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays
at 2 p.m.
SUNDAY, DEC. 8
PENPEX Stamp Show. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Community Activities Building,
1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City.
PENPEX Stamp Show features 18 deal-
ers, over 50 frames of exhibits, special
souvenir show cachets, activities and
free stamps for beginners, and a silent
auction of more than 500 lots that
closes at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. The U.S.
Postal Service will be present on Sat-
urday with items for sale. Snack bar
with hot and cold food. Free admis-
sion and free parking. For more
information go to www.penpex.org or
call 365-2956.
Palcare Holiday Market featuring
California Artists. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Palcare, 945 California Drive,
Burlingame. A variety of items — in-
cluding ceramics, jewelry, clothing and
other one-of-a-kind items will be avail-
able.
Peninsula School Craft Fair. 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. 920 Peninsula Way, Menlo
Park. Free. For more information go to
peninsulaschool.org/craftfair.htm.
Fall Open Studios at Peninsula Art
Institute. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Penin-
sula Art Institute, 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame.There will be a gallery ex-
hibit, light refreshments and artist
demos. Free. For more information go
to www.peninsulaartinstitute.org.
Christmas Boutique. 11:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. Church of All Russian Saints, 744
El Camino Real, Burlingame. Enjoy hot
and delicious piroshki while shopping
with local venders. Some vendors in-
clude: Paper Bash (custom notecards
and crafts), Beezy Brothers Candle Co.
(hand-made candles), Firefly Gifts (im-
ported, hand carved and hand painted
Russian gift items like santas, nesting
dolls, ornaments) and many more
items. Fresh wreaths will be on sale.
For more information email
burlingamesisterhood@gmail.com.
Urban Animal Day. Noon to 5 p.m.
1651 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Free with admission. For more infor-
mation call 342-7755.
The Friends of the Menlo Park Li-
brary Holiday Book Sale. Noon to 4
p.m. 800 Alma St., Menlo Park. Gently
used books for sale, most at $2 or less.
Proceeds benefit Children’s and Adult
Library programming. For more infor-
mation call 330-2521.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Big
Book and Media Sale. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave., Mill-
brae. Admission is free. Bag of Books
is $5. For more information call 697-
7607.
Bay’s Got Talent. 2 p.m. Serramonte
Center, 3 Serramonte Center, Daly City.
Don’t miss the Bay’s Got Talent Finale
where the annual talent competition’s
top 10 acts will compete live at Serra-
monte Center. Free. For more
information go to www.serramonte-
center.com.
Hillsdale High School presents ‘In
The Heights.’ 2 p.m. Hillsdale High
School Theatre, 3115 Del Monte St.,
San Mateo. $17 for adults and $12 for
students and seniors. Tickets can be
purchased at
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama. For more
information email hillsdaledra-
matix@gmail.com.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical.’ 2
p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Notre
Dame de Namur University presents
this performance for the 28th year.
Free. For more information go to
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Arsenic and Old Lace.’ 2 p.m. Ca-
puchino High School, 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. Student production
of the comedy play Arsenic and Old
Lace in Capuchnio’s new state-of-the-
art theater. Tickets are $15 for general
admission and $10 for students. For
more information call 558-2799.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 2 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Red-
wood City. A hilariously biting
commentary on the state of the union,
a politically incorrect president in the
death throes of his failing re-election
campaign and some Thanksgiving
turkey pardons for sale. Contains adult
language. Tickets range from $15 to
$30 and can be purchased at
www.dragonproductions.net. Runs
Nov. 22 through Dec. 15. Thursdays
through Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays
at 2 p.m.
Notre Dame de Namur University’s
‘Noël.’ 2 p.m. Taube Center, 1500 Ral-
ston Ave., Belmont. $25 for students,
$15 for students/seniors. For more in-
formation call 508-3713.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd Ave.,
San Mateo. Free admission and all are
welcome to discuss the latest news
about bigfoot/sasquatch. For more in-
formation call 504-1782.
Caltrain Holiday Train stops at var-
ious train stations. Decorated with
60,000 glittering lights, the dazzling
show-train will visit six Caltrain sta-
tions, providing holiday entertainment
and collecting donations of toys for
local children. San Francisco 4 p.m.,
Millbrae 5:15 p.m., San Mateo 6:20
p.m., Menlo Park 7:45 p.m., Sunnyvale
8:40 p.m. Free. For more information
call (800) 660-4287.
Sweet Rejoicing. 4 p.m. St. Peters Epis-
copal Church, 178 Clinton St.,
Redwood City. This holiday concert
featuring choir, orchestra and soloists
is presented by Viva la Musica. Tickets
purchased in advance are $22 for gen-
eral seating. Tickets at the door are
$24. For tickets go to www.vivalamu-
sica.org/Concerts/Buy_Tickets.html.
For more information go to www.vi-
valamusica.org or call 281-9663.
The Marvegos Fine Art School An-
nual Staff Exhibit. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
1212C W. Hilldale Blvd., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 212-
0671.
Bereaved Families Join in 17th
Worldwide Candle Lighting. 6:30
p.m.The Burlingame United Methodist
Church, 1443 Howard Ave.,
Burlingame. Free. For more informa-
tion call 302-6802.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
air. ... Generally, it’s just a feeling of the
ability to do something that a lot of people
don’t do and to get out of the norm that we
generally call life,” Fulvio said.
She typically jumps from 13,000 feet in
the air and, although it was intimidating at
first, she now feels empowered, Fulvio said.
“Now it’s just a bunch of happiness. In the
beginning it’s a bit scary learning how the
wind feels on your body and how when you
move an arm what that does. Now that I have
the basic controls it’s learning how to
improve on that and learning how to com-
pete,” Fulvio said.
In just the last month, she’s participated
in three record-breaking formation events.
Formation skydiving is when a large group
of people join arms in the air; when it
comes to competing, it’s the more the mer-
rier. Competing in formations is very tech-
nical, they practice several dirt dives on the
ground, where they outline the exact layout
and specific spots where they grip each
other. When they compete, they’re required
to give the judges a diagram in advance and
everything needs to be identical and slot
specific once they’re in flight, Fulvio said.
She helped break the Texas state record by
creating a formation with 34 others, broke
the California state record by forming with
64 others and, the one she’s most proud of,
broke the Women’s Vertical World record in
Arizona with 63 skydivers last week, Fulvio
said.
“Jumping out of a plane and being in the
open air and being in front of my friends
constantly just around me smiling; it’s just
a one minute rush of constant smiles, con-
stant positivity. It’s more than most people
get in a year, and we get it in a minute,”
Fulvio said.
There’s about one female jumper to every
three men; skydivers from all over the world
traveled to help set the new record, Fulvio
said. The women raised the bar and jumped
from 18,000 feet, high enough that they had
to use oxygen tanks while they were still on
the plane, Fulvio said.
A typical freefall lasts about one minute
and then takes several more minutes to
descend to the ground after pulling their
parachute, Fulvio said.
“It’s like 10 hours packed into one minute
of just exhilaration and happiness and
smiles and just elation,” Fulvio said.
Although she’s a skydiver for life, there
was a period when she had to take a break. In
2009, she married her best friend and fellow
skydiver Robert Bigley, Fulvio said.
Robby, as he was known, put himself
through a Ph.D. program by working as a
skydiving instructor and videographer,
Fulvio said. He had more than 5,500 jumps
and would compete in Canopy Relative
Work, in which divers open their parachutes
quickly after jumping.
Fifteen days after the two married, Robby
and a fellow jumper’s parachutes became
entangled 6,000 in the air. Tragically, they
were unable to free themselves. He was 32,
Fulvio said.
When he died, the whole community came
to support her. They would even take shifts,
making sure to check on her every day,
Fulvio said. Her life revolved around sky-
diving and, after he died, she didn’t feel any-
thing for a long time, Fulvio said. She knew
the only way for her to begin to love life
again was to get back into the air. Six
months later, she jumped toward recovery,
Fulvio said.
“It was probably the most magical sky-
dive I’ve ever had in my life,” Fulvio said.
“When I landed, I got down and started to
cry, and my friends came around me and
everyone just said ‘we’re so happy you’re
back’”
Continued from page 1
FULVIO
and investing, even if a pullback by the Fed
leads to higher interest rates. The Fed has
been buying bonds each month to try to
keep long-term borrowing rates low to spur
spending and growth.
The celebration on Wall Street suggested
that investors think a healthier job market,
if it fuels more spending, would outweigh
higher borrowing rates caused by a Fed pull-
back.
“It’s hinting very, very strongly that the
economy is starting to ramp up, that growth
is getting better, that businesses are hir-
ing,” said Joel Naroff, president of Naroff
Economic Advisors.
The economy has added a four-month aver-
age of 204,000 jobs from August through
November, up sharply from 159,000 a
month from April through July.
“The consistency (in hiring) is actually
reassuring,” said Doug Handler, chief U.S.
economist at IHS Global Insight. “Slow and
steady is something you can plan and build
on.”
The Fed could start slowing its bond pur-
chases as soon as its Dec. 17-18 meeting.
Some economists think the Fed may only
telegraph a move at that meeting and wait
until early next year to cut back.
Even if the Fed does start reining in its
stimulus, most economists think growth
will accelerate next year. Drew Matus, an
economist at UBS, forecasts that growth
will top 3 percent in 2014, from roughly 2
percent this year. That would be first time
growth had topped 3 percent for a full calen-
dar year since 2005.
In addition to the solid job gains and the
drop in unemployment, Friday’s report
offered other encouraging signs:
— Higher-paying industries are adding
jobs. Manufacturers added 27,000, the most
since March 2012. Construction companies
added 17,000. The two industries have creat-
ed a combined 113,000 jobs over the past
four months.
Continued from page 1
ECONOMY
COMICS/GAMES
12-7-13
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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7 Gangplank
11 Gulf st.
12 Herr’s spouse
13 Latin I verb
14 Novice swimmer
16 Greedy sorts
17 Horror flick extra
18 Import vehicle
19 Have a cold
20 Mr. Kilmer
21 Pile
24 Pestered
27 Winning streak
28 First name in cheesecake
30 Pantyhose shade
32 Concorde fleet of yore
34 Recounted
36 Summer forecast
37 Nice and warm
39 Marry in haste
41 Monsieur’s wine
42 Dirty place
43 Ninny
45 Makes one’s way
48 Sigh loudly
49 Education
52 — time no see
53 Hair styling goops
54 Compete
55 Diner sandwiches
56 Just scrape by
57 Bastille Day season
DOWN
1 P.O. service
2 Stop up
3 — 1 (speed of sound)
4 Dental gear
5 Fleming of 007 fame
6 Dog days mo.
7 Drive back
8 Parched
9 Noted star-seekers
10 Qt. parts
12 Oil and water
15 Zen riddle
18 Battery size
20 Tender cutlets
21 Half a couple
22 Depose
23 Till
24 Helen of —
25 Reverberate
26 Lemon candy
29 Memo abbr.
31 Versatile vehicle
33 Nest egg
35 Discourages
38 Command for Fido
40 Singer Loretta —
42 Marshy hollow
43 File or chisel
44 Wish for
46 Cheap nightspot
47 Huff
48 Diamond org.
49 Not sm. or med.
50 Reaction to a mouse
51 Right, to Dobbin
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Get back to
basics and go over past experience in order to avoid
making a repetitious mistake. Use your intelligence
and initiate the changes you need to make.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Show how
passionate you can be regarding a cause or belief you
embrace. Your attention to detail and determination
to reach a goal will leave an imprint.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Forget about your
problems and take time out to enjoy friends, colleagues
or family. Make positive personal physical changes that
will help improve your health and your happiness.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your greatest rewards
will come from helping those less fortunate. New
relationships will develop through your selfless actions.
Others will notice and appreciate your generous spirit.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Don’t overspend on
luxury items. Keep life simple and focus more on what
you can do to improve your position, reputation and
future. Question your beliefs and your direction.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Make plans to spend
time with people you find uplifting. Harmony will make
up for any dilemmas or losses that you face. Put home
and family first. Entertain the ones you love.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Take part in a crusade or
event where you feel you can offer your services. Your
sociable nature will make a difference to those you
encounter. A partnership looks encouraging.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Make a difference to
the people around you. Offer insightful suggestions
and make a point to do your part to bring peace and
happiness to those less fortunate.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Quickly handle any problem
you face. Don’t take over; just offer suggestions. You
don’t want to be labeled as a meddler. A short trip or
meeting will lead to a big change.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Spend time with people
who mean a lot to you. Participate in joint ventures,
and you’ll acquire better insight into how you can help
others. The benefits will be worth your while.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Take part in social
activities that encourage greater communication.
Find solutions to problems that face a core group,
community or cause you want to help.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Fix up your place
or look for ways to spice up your life. Small, unique
alterations to the way you live will grab attention and
give your love life a boost.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 25
THE DAILY JOURNAL
26
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
SAN MATEO COUNTY
San Mateo County Aging and Adult Services, Public Adminis-
trator Office, seeks qualified organizations interested in provid-
ing Tax Preparer/Certified Public Accountant Services for the
period of January 15, 2014 through December 31, 2016.
Proposal packages will be available beginning December 5,
2013, on the San Mateo County Health System website:
www.smhealth.org\AAS.
Proposals will be due no later than 4:30 p.m., December 20,
2013.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
DISH WASHER &PREP COOK
To apply, please call:512-653-1836
696 Laurel St, San Carlos,
110 Employment
ARE YOU CREATIVE, like to bake? Do
you enjoy working with the public? We
want you to come & talk to us! Looking
for FT/PT to work hard & have fun. We
will train you. Call Linda @ 235-0222 for
info/application.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CLUB SPORTS
COORDINATOR
$3000-$4400 monthly
BA/BS Recreation,
Sports Management
2 years related experience in recrea-
tion, intramural,
college club sports program
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:
http://www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED -
\San Mateo. Cleaning, washing, prepare
for meal (no cooking), take care of whole
house. $20 per hour, 2-3 hours per day,
5pm-7pm. Send resume by mail: Attn:
Connie, 3130-3132 Diablo Ave, Hayward
CA 94545.
110 Employment
HOUSEKEEPER
NEEDED
Full-time in Woodside. 3+
yrs professional in-home
experience req'd. Duties:
cleaning, laundry, ironing,
errands, pet care.
$25/hour.
www.tandcr.com
415-567-0956
110 Employment
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
LANDSCAPING -
Part-time Landscapers needed. Three to
five days a week. Peninsula and Half
Moon Bay. Must have own transportation
Contact Ian @ 415-385-8861 or email
ian@flowerpowergardens.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258536
The following person is doing business
as: Pendulum Comics, 40 W. 4th Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Max-
well Brown, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Maxwell Leon Brown/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
27 Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday, De-
cember 17, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the
following item. All interested persons are invited to attend.
223 Euclid Avenue. Request for a Use Permit to allow an addi-
tion which increases the gross floor area of the existing home
by greater than 50%, and exceeds the 1,825 square foot
guideline for having a one-car garage per SMBC Sections
12.200.030.B.1 and 12.200.080.A.2. Recommended Environ-
mental Determination: Categorical Exemption.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, December 7, 2013
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524926
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
JenniferMichelle Austin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Michelle Austin filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jennifer Michelle Austin
Proposed name: Jennifer Austin Conti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
20, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/04/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/31/2013
(Published, 11/16/13, 11/23/2013,
11/30/2013, 12/07/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258542
The following person is doing business
as: Skyline News and Gifts, SFO Termi-
nal 3, Boarding Area E, SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94128 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Skyline Concess-
sions, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Manuel Soto IV /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258412
The following person is doing business
as: ALL Care Nurses Staffing Agency,81
Bayview Drive,SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94083 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Joel Dacoron, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 12/01/2013
/s/ Joel Dacoron/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/16/13, 11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258567
The following person is doing business
as: Special Advantage, 505 Sapphire St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Denise
Jeanne Carbon, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/05/2013.
/s/ Denise Jeanne Carbon/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/23/13, 11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258659
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Roverware, 116 Hillcrest Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner:Graeme
Ware, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 11/12/2013.
/s/ Graeme Ware /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258683
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Biz Magic, 2) Business Strat-
egy Technologies, 3) Silcon Valley High
Tech Parade, 2162 Carlmont Dr., Unit 3,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bistratex,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 11/12/2013.
/s/ Graeme Ware /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/30/13, 12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258713
The following person is doing business
as: Grand Partners, 800 El Camino Real,
Suite 180, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040
is hereby registered by the following
owner: California Partners, Inc., same
address. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/Walter Gil /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/13, 12/13/13, 12/20/13, 12/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258767
The following person is doing business
as: Wishing Well, 2041 Vista Del Mar,
SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Robert
Firebaughm, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN N/A.
/s/ Robert Firebaugh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258499
The following person is doing business
as: Write Time Tutoring, 435 Hawthorn
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Laura
Albretsen-Shugart, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN .
/s/ Laura Albretsen-Shugart /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258734
The following person is doing business
as: Edwards Everything Travel, 385 Fos-
ter City Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Edwards Luggage, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN .
/s/ Marty Reiniger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258513
The following person is doing business
as: Rustic Tart, 728 Vasques Dr., HALF
MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jennifer
Papa, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN .
/s/ Jennifer Papa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258655
The following person is doing business
as: Tea Plus Noodle, 1100-D Howard
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Ling Ko Yen, 233 San Mateo Ave., San
Bruno, CA 94066. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN .
/s/ Ling Ko Yen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258376
The following person is doing business
as: LED Light Worx, 605 Spar Dr., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Robert
Korte, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN .
/s/ Robert Korte /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258693
The following person is doing business
as:Trust Management Services, 887 Mit-
ten Rd. Ste. 200, BURLINGAME,
CA94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Fiduciary Plan Manage-
ment Services, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN 10/24/2013.
/s/ Derrick Quan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/07/13, 12/14/13, 12/21/13, 12/28/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Vidyagauri Kantilal Khatri
Case Number: 123880
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Vidyagauri Kantilal Kha-
tri. A Petition for Probate has been filed
by Pradeep Kantilal Khatri in the Superi-
or Court of California, County of San Ma-
teo. The Petition for Probate requests
that Pradeep Kantilal Khatri be appointed
as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 13, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
203 Public Notices
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Cecelia C. Fusich
2300 Geng Rd. #200
PALO ALTO, CA 94303
(650)493-8070
Dated: November 21, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 23, 30, December 7, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Gein Seki
Case Number: 123933
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Gein Seki. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Glenn Seki in
the Superior Court of California, County
of San Mateo. The Petition for Probate
requests that Glenn Seki be appointed
as personal representative to administer
the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 3, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Ken W. Obata
437 El Alamo
DANVILLE, CA 94526
(510)378-3586
Dated: November 22, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 23, 30, December 7, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: 113CV250881
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): DAI TRUONG; TERESA
TROUNG; and Does 1-50 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): TECH-
NOLOGY CREDIT UNION
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
203 Public Notices
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
Santa Clara
191 N. First St..
San Jose, CA 95113
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
REILLY D. WILKINSON (Bar# 250086)
Scheer Law Group, LLP
155 N. Redwood Dr., Ste. 100
SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903
(415)491-8900
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 08, 2013
David H. Yamasaki, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 23, 30, December 7, 14,
2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, (650)345-5502
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $45 San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., SOLD
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$4.00, Steve, SC, (650)518-6614
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
28
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $7.
Steve, San Carlos, (650)518-6614.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$45 OBO. Steve, (650)518-6614.
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 SOLD
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, SOLD!
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
310 Misc. For Sale
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
SOLD!
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 (650)348-6428
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
29 Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Overseas county
6 Zurich highlight
9 Golden Gate
element
14 Saved for later,
in a way
15 Architectural
prefix
16 Providers of
added light
17 Emergency
strategies
20 Mattered
21 NBA great
22 Bush led it for
about a yr. in the
’70s
23 Post-election
governmental
meeting,
perhaps
32 March middle
33 They may lead
to risky moves
34 Many a
reference book
35 Like some
tempers
36 “Reversal of
Fortune” Oscar
winner
37 Brimless hat
38 Home of Phillips
University
40 Secretary of
State after Colin,
familiarly
41 Candy __
42 Number?
45 Seinfeld
specialty
46 Electrical
particle
47 Takes an
opposite position
56 Alters some
game
parameters
57 Great
enthusiasm
58 Classified abbr.
59 Part of a meet
60 Disengages, as
from a habit
61 High degree
62 Comes up short
DOWN
1 Arise (from)
2 “__ Nagila”
3 Jobs news of
2010
4 Moves back
5 Former Georgian
president
Shevardnadze
6 Freeze
beginning
7 Hero in Treece’s
“Vinland the
Good”
8 Magic word
9 Mid-calf pants
10 That much or
more
11 Grain layer
12 Omar’s role in
“The Mod
Squad”
13 No effort
18 Settles
19 Bare things
23 Suit material
24 Hersey’s bell
town
25 Front VIP
26 Leslie of “Fanny”
27 Danish capital
28 Enthralls
29 Whits
30 Arabian
peninsula native
31 Mythical lion’s
home
39 Suddenly occurs
to
41 1/100 of a
Brazilian real
43 Hybrid cats
44 Low-cost
stopover
47 Sticking place
48 Memorable
napper
49 Radamès’ love
50 Flight feature
51 “We’re in
trouble!”
52 Call for
53 They usually
have four
strings
54 Birds seen by
players of 53-
Down
55 Body shop figs.
By Bruce Venzke
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/07/13
12/07/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
318 Sports Equipment
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. Please call
(650)283-6997
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
Decorator /
Party Planner’s
Dream!
SAT & SUN
9am-4pm
149 South Blvd
San Mateo
High quality items including
antiques, tons of pots & gar-
den decor, dishes & glass-
ware, floral design supplies,
candles & candleholders,
holiday decor, sports equip-
ment, kitchen supplies & ba-
keware, some electronics &
music equipmen, and more!
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
SATURDAY
8am - 3pm
471 Topaz St
Redwood City
Lots of household
items, antiques,
kitchenware, clothing,
and much more!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each SOLD!
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
379 Open Houses
SAN CARLOS
1005 Hall St
OPEN
SATURDAY
9am-4pm
Charming Remodeled
2 bedroom, 1 bath
cottage, 2-car garage,
in quiet neighborhood.
Walk to downtown and
nearby parks.
$769,000
Call or text Cheryl:
(949) 338-8718
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
studios and 1 bedrooms, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. 6503025523
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
30
Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
31 Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
32 Weekend • Dec. 7-8, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR