2008

Legislative, Communication, and Media Training and Publications

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences
Courses approved for CEUs from George Mason University

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

About Us
Since 1999, TheCapitol.Net has been the exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly (CQ) Executive Conferences. TheCapitol.Net is a non-partisan business derived from Congressional Quarterly, which offered many of the same courses and workshops since the 1970s. Instruction includes topics on the legislative and budget process, congressional operations, public and foreign policy development, advocacy and media training, business etiquette and writing. TheCapitol.Net encompasses a dynamic team of more than 150 faculty members and authors, all of whom are independent subject matter experts and veterans in their fields. Faculty and authors include senior government executives, former Members of Congress, Hill and agency staff, editors and journalists, lobbyists, lawyers, nonprofit executives and scholars. All courses, seminars and workshops can be tailored to align with your organization’s educational objectives and presented on-site at your location. We’ve worked with hundreds of clients to develop and produce a wide variety of custom, on-site training. Our practitioner books and publications are written by leading subject matter experts. Many of our publications are customizable with your logo. TheCapitol.Net has more than 2,000 clients representing Congressional offices, federal and state agencies, military branches, corporations, news media and NGOs nationwide. Our blog: Hobnob Blog—hit or miss ... give or take ... this or that ...

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 703-739-3790 www.TheCapitol.Net

2008 Table of Contents
2 Courses
2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 34 35
Advanced Federal Budget Process Advanced Legislative Strategies Advanced Media Relations Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election Capitol Hill Workshop Communication Skills for the Professional Congress in a Nutshell Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Congressional Oversight and Investigation Crisis Communications Training The Defense Budget Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments Earmarks Effective Executive Briefings How America Governs How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals The New Congress 2009 Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony The President’s Budget Public Affairs and the Internet Research Skills for the Real World Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations Tracking and Monitoring Legislation Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations Understanding the Regulatory Process Update on the 110th Congress, 2008 Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard Working with Congress and Congressional Staff Writing Congressional Correspondence Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing

32 36 38 48 50

Calendar of Courses and Workshops Certificate Programs Convenience Learning Custom Training Publications
50 51 52 53 53 54 55 56 57 58
Congressional Deskbook Congressional Directory 2008 Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook Real World Research Skills How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level Media Relations Handbook Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers Congressional Operations Poster Federal Regulatory Process Poster Legal Spectator & More
Copyright ©2008 by TheCapitol.Net All Rights Reserved. PO Box 25706 Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 703-739-3790 www.TheCapitol.Net

59 Custom Products 60 Selected Clients 62 Faculty and Authors 63 TheCapitol.Net Policies Order Form: inside back cover

Rave Reviews
“Practical suggestions for working with appropriators to maximize funds.”
Congressional Liaison, DEA

Advanced Federal Budget Process
Integrating Performance and the Budget
Learn how the federal budget process really works from faculty members with years of subject-matter expertise. Study important terminology and get tips to protect your budgetary interests. We provide a comprehensive overview of current budget politics and the federal budgeting process. So you gain the awareness and guidance necessary to increase your chance of boosting funds and minimizing cuts. Understand the budget resolution process as well as the differences between authorizations and appropriations. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Accountability • Strategic Thinking Financial Management • Political Savvy

“Helped me to understand the budget language used in the appropriations process and how to read a bill in detail.”
Assistant Director, Federal Relations, a state university

“An excellent introduction to the federal budget process—at a level usable for the federal agency lawyer.” “I feel more comfortable in the preparation of my budget and the process it will go through on the Hill.”
Budget Analyst, Treasury Dept.

Agenda
Day One 8:30 The Budget and the Economy Federal Budget Phases and Time Frames 10:30 Congressional Budgeting Today STAGE I: The Congressional Budget Resolution and Reconciliation Process 12:00 Networking Lunch 1:00 STAGE I: The Congressional Budget Resolution and Reconciliation Process (continued) 2:30 STAGE II: Authorizations 4:00 Day One Concludes Day Two 8:30 STAGE III: Appropriations 10:30 STAGE IV: Final Actions on Appropriations 12:00 Networking Lunch 1:00 STAGE V: The Budget Execution Process 2:15 Integrating the Budget and Performance 3:15 The Budget: Short- and Long-Term Prospects 4:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations • Capitol Hill Workshop • The President’s Budget • The Defense Budget

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:00 pm both days • August 4-5, 2008 • December 4-5, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
Formulation of President’s Budget*
Preparation of the president’s budget typically begins in the spring of each year, often nine months before the budget is submitted to Congress and about 17 months before the start of the fiscal year to which it pertains.
During calendar year prior to year in which the fiscal year begins:

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net 1.2
CEU

Approved for 1.2 CEU credits from George Mason University.
The Federal Budget Process
§ 9.53*

Congressional Budget Process Flowchart
Approximate timeline: Fiscal Year begins

February

March

April
Congress agrees to concurrent resolution on the budget.

May
Congress implements budget resolution policies by adopting: (1) appropriations measures; (2) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation; and (3) reconciliation legislation (if required).

June–September
President signs (or vetoes) budget measures.

October 1

President submits budget proposal to Congress no later than first Monday in February. § 9.40

Execution of Federal Budget*
During fiscal year:

Budget Resolution
§ 9.50

House committees submit views and estimates to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

House floor votes on budget resolution.

House floor votes on conference report on budget resolution. Budget resolution spending levels are allocated to committees having jurisdiction over spending legislation. Allocations, referred to as 302(a) allocations, are printed in joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on the budget resolution.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of budget resolution. Senate committees submit views and estimates to Senate Budget Committee. Senate Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

Spring

Registration Fee: $995
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

• Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issues planning guidance to executive agencies. • Agencies begin development of budget requests.

Senate floor votes on budget resolution.

Senate floor votes on conference report on budget resolution.

Discretionary Spending

Appropriations process
§ 9.80

Summer
• OMB issues Circular A-11, providing detailed instructions for submitting budget data and material. • Agencies submit initial budget requests to OMB.

House Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

House Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

House floor votes on the appropriations measures.

House votes on conference reports.

Fall
• OMB staff review agency budget requests in relation to president’s priorities, program performance, and budget constraints. • President, based on recommendations by the OMB director, makes decisions on agency budget requests. Commonly referred to as the “passback,” OMB informs agencies of decisions on budget requests.

Hearings on president’s budget by House and Senate Appropriations Committees and subcommittees begin soon after it is submitted and continue through the spring.

Discretionary spending amount assumed in budget resolution allocated to House/ Senate Appropriations Committees in respective 302(a) allocations.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of the appropriations measures.

President signs (or vetoes) appropriations measures.

Senate Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

• Agencies submit apportionment requests to OMB for each budget account. • OMB apportions (either approving or modifying apportionment requests) available funds to agencies by time period, program, project, or activity. • Agencies make allotments to lower-level units, incur obligations, make outlays, and request supplemental appropriations, if necessary, to carry out programs, projects, and activities. • Agencies record obligations and outlays pursuant to administrative control of funds procedures, report to Treasury, and prepare financial statements. • President may submit supplemental appropriations request to Congress. • President may propose impoundments (e.g., deferrals or rescissions) to Congress.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Senate Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

Senate floor votes on the appropriations measures.

Senate votes on conference reports.

§ 9.82

Mandatory Spending and Revenues

Reconciliation process
§ 9.110

House authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

House floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

House votes on reconciliation conference report.

New Appropriations Subcommittee Organization
President signs (or vetoes) reconciliation legislation.
Congress annually considers regular appropriations bills to provide budget authority to agencies for the upcoming fiscal year. Each regular appropriations bill typically has been developed by the relevant House and Senate Appropriations subcommittee. At the beginning of the 109th Congress, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees reorganized their subcommittees, with the House eliminating three subcommittees and the Senate Appropriations Committee eliminating one. The subcommittee organization and the resulting regular appropriations bills will no longer be parallel and thus will require some resolution when the two committees resolve any differences before sending the measures to the president. The Appropriations subcommittees of the House and Senate are the following:

Winter
• Agencies may appeal decisions on budget requests to OMB director and in some cases directly to the president. • Agencies prepare and OMB reviews budget justification material that is presented to the responsible appropriations subcommittees during the congressional phase of the federal budget process.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Budget resolution may include reconciliation directives to authorizing committees, instructing them to recommend changes in law to achieve mandatory spending and revenue changes specified in budget resolution. Senate Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of reconciliation legislation.

Hearings on presidential and congressional mandatory spending and revenue proposals by House and Senate authorizing committees begin soon after president’s budget is submitted and continue through the spring.

Senate authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to Senate Budget Committee.

Senate floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

Senate votes on reconciliation conference report.

Individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation
§ 9.70, § 9.90

House authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House votes on conference reports.

Separate from any reconciliation directives, authorizing committees also may develop and report individual legislation changing mandatory spending and revenue laws. Any such legislation, however, must be consistent with budget resolution policies.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

President signs (or vetoes) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Agencies Department of Homeland Security

Senate
Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water, and Related Agencies State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Homeland Security Interior and Related Agencies Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Congressional Operations Poster
Copyright © 2005 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressPoster.com Sections are from and section references are to the Congressional Deskbook 2005-2007, by Judy Schneider and Michael Koempel. ISBN: 1-58733-011-3

Senate authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate votes on conference reports.

* By Bill Heniff Jr.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

§ 9.160

Budget Process Glossary
Account: Control and reporting unit for budgeting and accounting. Allowances: Amounts included in the budget to cover possible additional expenditures for statutory pay increases, contingencies, and other requirements. Appropriated Entitlement: An entitlement for which budget authority is provided in annual appropriations acts. Appropriation: Provision of law providing budget authority that permits federal agencies to incur obligations and make payments out of the Treasury. Authorization: Provision in law that establishes or continues a program or agency and authorizes appropriations for it. Baseline: Projection of future revenues, budget authority, outlays, and other budget amounts under assumed economic conditions and participation rates without a change in current policy. Borrowing Authority: Spending authority that permits a federal agency to incur obligations and to make payments for specified purposes out of funds borrowed from the Treasury or the public. Budget Authority: Authority in law to enter into obligations that normally result in outlays. Budget Resolution: Concurrent resolution passed by both houses setting forth the congressional budget for budget aggregates and possibly containing reconciliation instructions. Byrd Rule: A Congressional Budget Act rule (Section 313), named after its author, Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), that prohibits extraneous matter in a reconciliation measure considered in the Senate. Under the rule, extraneous matter includes, among other things specified in the act, any provision that has no direct budgetary effect or that increases the deficit (or reduces the surplus) in a fiscal year beyond those covered in the reconciliation measure. Continuing Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides stop-gap (or full-year) funding for agencies that have not received regular appropriations. (Also referred to as a continuing resolution.) Cost Estimate: A Congressional Budget Office estimate of outlays from reported legislation. Credit Authority: Authority to incur direct loan obligations or make loan guarantee commitments. Deferral: Action or inaction that temporarily withholds, delays, or effectively precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Direct Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in laws other than annual appropriations acts. Discretionary Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in annual appropriations acts. Earmark: For expenditures, an amount set aside within an appropriation account for a specified purpose. Entitlement Authority: Law that obligates the federal government to make payments to eligible persons, businesses, or governments. Fiscal Year: October 1 through September 30; e.g., fiscal year 2010 begins October 1, 2009. Impoundment: Action or inaction by an executive official that delays or precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Mandatory Spending: See Direct Spending. Obligation: A binding agreement that requires payment. Outlays: Payments to liquidate obligations. PAYGO (Pay-As-You-Go): Process by which new direct spending or decreases must be offset so that a surplus is not reduced or a deficit increased. Reconciliation: Process by which Congress changes existing laws to conform revenue and spending levels to the levels set in a budget resolution. Regular Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides budget authority for the next fiscal year. Reprogramming: Shifting funds from one program to another in the same appropriations account. Rescission: Cancellation of budget authority previously provided by Congress. Revenues: Taxes, fees, gifts, and other income received by the federal government. Scorekeeping: Process for tracking and reporting on the status of congressional budgetary actions affecting budget authority, receipts, outlays, the surplus or deficit, and the public-debt limit. Sequester: Cancellation of budgetary resources in response to a breach in discretionary-spending limits or a violation of the PAYGO requirement. Supplemental Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides additional budget authority during the current year when the regular appropriation is insufficient. Tax Expenditure: Loss of revenue attributable to an exemption, deduction, preference, or other exclusion under federal tax law. Transfer: Shift of budgetary resources from one appropriation account to another, as authorized by law. Views and Estimates: Annual report of each House and Senate committee on budgetary matters within its jurisdiction.

Science, the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and Related Agencies

Transportation, Departments of Treasury, Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary, and Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, Housing and Urban District of Columbia, and Development, Independent Agencies and Related Agencies District of Columbia Legislative Branch [no subcommittee, handled by full committee] Legislative Branch

Course materials include The Federal Budget by Allen Schick, and the “Congressional Operations Poster.”

2

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/afbp.htm or BudgetProcess.com

COURSES
Advanced Legislative Strategies
This advanced three-day course builds on the skills of those who have already learned the legislative process and basic congressional operations. In this course, participants learn how to develop high-level strategies and tactics to help educate Congress and influence legislation. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Political Savvy • Financial Management • Influencing Strategic Thinking

Rave Reviews
“Indispensable!”
Partner, Patton Boggs

“Will be a more proficient lobbyist.”
Lobbyist (12 year’s experience)

Topics
Day One • How Knowing the Procedures Enables the Formulation of Strategies and Tactics and Ultimately Influences Congressional Action • The Committee System and Committee Markups • The House Rules Committee: Gatekeeper to the Floor • Major Legislation on the House Floor and the Amending Process • Mastering Legislative Procedures: A Member’s Perspective Day Two • The Dynamics of the U.S. Senate • Scheduling and Calling Up Bills on the Senate Floor • Senate Floor Procedures • Amending Legislation on the Senate Floor • The Role of the Conference Committee in the Legislative Process • The Conference Committee in Action Day Three • Congressional Floor Strategies and Tactics • Strategies and Tactics You Can Use to Create Results for Your Organization • Influencing the Appropriations Process; Earmarks

“Quality of presenters is unrivaled. Congressional Deskbook is priceless. Another outstanding course by TheCapitol.Net.”
Attorney/Analyst, FAA

“Will improve my ability to provide informative updates on legislation and floor action affecting my organization.”
Congressional Affairs Specialist, Dept. of Navy

Related Training:
• Capitol Hill Workshop • Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm all 3 days • August 6-8, 2008 • December 9-11, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
1.6
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Approved for 1.6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Registration Fee: $1295
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Deskbook Congressional Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Course materials include the Training Edition of the

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

and a course manual of over 100 pages.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/als.htm or AdvancedLegislativeStrategies.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

3

Rave Reviews
Gave me more information in one day than I could’ve gotten in a year on my own. This course gave me new tools to help me focus my agency’s messages.”
Workshop Attendee, DSCA

Advanced Media Relations
Do your competitive media campaigns target the right audience? Are you tracking and evaluating media coverage or using the Internet to its full advantage? In this course, instructors discuss these topics and more. Learn how to pitch your story creatively to reporters, coordinate and prepare for interviews, deal with the media hog and the media mouse, and use the FOIA to your advantage. Students work with each other and our experienced faculty, discussing best practices and professional strategies for handling internal and external challenges. Our Advanced Media Relations course is geared toward practicing public relations professionals with at least three years’ experience. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Partnering • Political Savvy • Technology Management Strategic Thinking • Creativity and Innovation • External Awareness • Flexibility • Interpersonal Skills • Written Communication

“Well worth my time.”
Director of Education, national association

“Gave me practical information I can use.” “It was valuable across the board. The strategy aspects of each speaker’s presentation were particularly helpful. I will better be able to anticipate issues and develop communication plans.”
Workshop Attendee, DoD/DSCA

Agenda
8:30 Advanced Media Relations: Balancing Your Resources, Your Office, and the Media 10:30 The How’s and Why’s of Press Events 11:10 Attendee Best Practices Session 12:00 Networking Lunch 1:15 Coordinating and Preparing for Interviews: How to Deal with the Media Hog and the Media Mouse 3:00 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 4:00 FOIA from the Agency Perspective 4:30 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Effective Executive Briefings • Communication Skills for the Professional • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations • Crisis Communications Training • Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals

Time and Date
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • May 7, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.7
CEU

Approved for .7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course materials include Media Relations Handbook for Agencies, Associations, Media Relations Nonprofits and Congress, Handbook by Brad Fitch, Foreword by Mike McCurry.
Brad Fitch
for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress
Foreword by Mike McCurry

4

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/amr.htm or AdvancedMediaRelations.com

COURSES
Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election
This workshop includes all of the topics covered in our Capitol Hill Workshop, with a greater focus and emphasis on the 2008 elections. Capitol Hill Workshop: Election is of particular interest to anyone needing more background on how Capitol Hill really works or early insight into the 111th Congress and the new administration.
This course is designed for GS-12 and above, military officers, supervisory personnel, and Leadership Development participants, to meet these Leadership Competencies: Strategic Vision, Planning and Quality Identifying/ Integrating Key Issues • Setting Work Priorities Balancing National/ Local Interests • Problem Anticipation/Adjustment Managing Budgetary Processes • Senior Level Communication

Rave Reviews
“This seminar was an eye-opener.”
Workshop Attendee, United States Marine Corps

“Provides excellent insight into legislative workings of Congress which will only improve our abilities to work with Congress.”
Chief of Contracting, U.S. Air Force

“Best seminar ever.”
— Systems Analyst, DFAS

Topics
Day One • The Dynamics of Congress • Today’s Legislative Process and Congressional Operations • Politics and Leadership in the New Congress: Winners, Losers, and What the Election Means for the 111th Congress • Public Policy and Foreign Policy Making in Congress and in Washington Day Two • Presidential-Congressional Relations: Implications for the Relationship Between the New Congress and the New White House • Outcomes of the 2008 Election and Campaign and Election Trends • Washington Advocacy: Communicating Effectively with the New Congress • How the Media Covers Washington: The White House, Capitol Hill and the Pentagon • A Member’s Perspective on Politics and Policy Day Three • Congressional Budgeting Today • The Role of OMB in the Legislative Process • Polling in America • The Work of Personal and Committee Staff

“Excellent program— very informative with entertaining, knowledgeable speakers from different backgrounds.”
Government Relations Analyst, TRW, Inc.

“Brings realism to congressional environment. All the components of this workshop were very useful.”
Policy Analyst, DoD

Related Training:
• The President’s Budget • The Defense Budget • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Working with Congress and Congressional Staff • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation

Time and Date
8:30 am to 4:00 pm all 3 days • November 12-14, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
1.7
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Approved for 1.7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Registration Fee: $1295
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Congressional Directory
110th Congress 2nd Session/2008

Legislative Series

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

www.TheCapitol.Net

Workshop materials include the Training Edition of the Congressional Deskbook, and the then-available Congressional Directory.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/chwelect.htm or ElectionCapitolHillWorkshop.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

5

Rave Reviews
“Understanding the ‘players’ and the processes used by Congress will help our staff improve our responses to Congress on our programs.” “One of the best courses I’ve taken under government sponsorship.”
Program Director, FAA

Capitol Hill Workshop
Politics, Policy, and Process
Congressional decision-making is driven by politics, policy and process. In this engaging workshop, Washington-based experts discuss the 3 P’s and help you understand the complete policymaking process. You’ll leave with a solid understanding of: • Congressional operations and the legislative process • How public and foreign policy become law • Congressional politics and leadership • Congressional budgeting today • The role of OMB in the legislative process • Effective communication with Congress • How the media covers the Hill • Current campaign and election trends • How members of Congress advance their legislative, public policy and political agendas • How personal and committee staff work • How you can build win/win relationships with staffers This course is designed for GS-12 and above, military officers, supervisory personnel, and Leadership Development participants, to meet these Leadership Competencies: Strategic Vision, Planning and Quality • Identifying/Integrating Key Issues • Setting Work Priorities • Balancing National/Local Interests • Problem Anticipation/Adjustment • Managing Budgetary Processes • Senior Level Communication

“Great and insightful presentations. Wonderful workshop! Thanks for attention to details.”
Chief of Contracting, U.S. Air Force

“Excellent choice of presenters. Would recommend this workshop to anybody interested in learning how Washington really works.”
Program Manager, FAA

“What an outstanding 3 days! A wonderful use of my time. All aspects of this program were useful.”
Director, Public Affairs, Fortune 500 company

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:00 pm all 3 days • February 20-22, 2008 • June 11-13, 2008 • September 24-26, 2008 • November 12-14, 2008 (2008 Election) • February 11-13, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
1.7
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Approved for 1.7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Congressional Directory
110th Congress 2nd Session/2008

Legislative Series

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

www.TheCapitol.Net

Workshop materials include the Training Edition of the Congressional Deskbook, and the then-available Congressional Directory.

Registration Fee: $1295
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

6

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/chw.htm or CapitolHillWorkshop.com

COURSES
Capitol Hill Workshop Sample Agenda
Day One
8:30 9:45 10:00 12:00 1:15 2:30 4:00 8:15 8:30 11:30 12:30 1:30 1:45 2:45 3:00 4:00 8:30 9:30 9:40 10:30 10:45 The Dynamics of Congress Break Today’s Legislative Process and Congressional Operations Networking Lunch Politics and Leadership in the Current Congress Public Policy and Foreign Policy Making in Congress and in Washington Day One Concludes Welcome and Directions Attend Congressional Hearing Networking Lunch Influencing Washington: Communicating Effectively with Congress Break Presidential-Congressional Relations Break Campaign and Election Trends and Election Update Day Two Concludes

Rave Reviews
“Taught me how to communicate effectively with House and Senate members.”
Workshop Attendee, Navy Sea Systems

“Excellent course. Every Federal Manager should take it.”
Deputy Director, Office of Competitive Sourcing Acquisition, FAA

Day Two

“What an extraordinary group of [faculty]. All were extremely dynamic.”
Senior Administrator, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

“I was able to get ‘realworld’ insight into the actual operations of Congress. It was awesome.”
Group Manager, Government Agency

Day Three
Congressional Budgeting Today Break Congressional Budgeting Today (continued) Break How the Media Covers Washington: The White House, Capitol Hill, and the Pentagon 11:55 Networking Lunch 1:00 A Member’s Perspective on Politics and Policy 2:10 Break 2:20 The Work of Personal and Committee Staff 4:00 Complete Evaluations and Workshop Concludes

Related Training:
• Capitol Hill Workshop— 2008 Election • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Working with Congress and Congressional Staff • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/chw.htm or CapitolHillWorkshop.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

7

Rave Reviews
“Very practical/ useful information” “Meal etiquette was extremely useful.” “It was good—new tips even for those who have taken courses in effective presentations.” “The tips I learned today will help to make my next presentation, or briefing better than the last one I did.”
Congressional Relations Officer, DHS/FEMA

Communication Skills for the Professional
Presentations, Briefings, Business Etiquette, and Networking Skills for Washington
Don’t enter a business meeting, present a briefing or attend a networking lunch without first attending this course. Participants gain the confidence they need to communicate any message clearly and effectively. In this course, you’ll learn the basics of planning, structuring and delivering winning presentations. You’ll also learn business etiquette basics, including: • Appropriate attire for different occasions • Projecting a professional image • Working a room with authenticity and class • How and when to offer your business card, and what to do when someone else offers theirs • How to join and exit conversations gracefully • How to balance your plate and navigate your way at receptions During our working lunch, our faculty also review business meal etiquette. This course is ideal for sales staff, editorial staff, new attorneys and accountants, managers, anyone newly posted to Washington, GS 5-15s, and anyone seeking a job or wondering how to network in Washington. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Influencing • Interpersonal Skills • Strategic Thinking Resilience • Political Savvy

“Will allow me to accurately relay my ideas to my colleagues.”

Related Training:
• Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Effective Executive Briefings • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Media Relations for Public Relations Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations

Agenda
8:30 10:00 11:40 12:30 2:00 2:15 4:30 From Thought to Talk: Communications and Presentation Skills Briefings: What are They and What Should They Look Like Professional Image and Business Etiquette Working and Networking Lunch (Business Etiquette continued) Professional Image and Business Etiquette (continued) Keys to Effective Presentations: Using Positive Emotion to Persuade Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes
.7
CEU

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • March 11, 2008 • October 15, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

Approved for .7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
COMMUNICATION SERIES

Course materials include Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers, Common Sense by Keith Evans. Rules of Advocacy
Keith Evans

Registration Fee: $495
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

for Lawyers

8

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/csp.htm or CommunicationSkillsforProfessionals.com

COURSES
Congress in a Nutshell
Understanding Congress
Our Washington insiders provide an exceptional overview of the process, the leadership and the politics of Congress for those who need to know more than the basics about the legislative branch. This course explores: • The constitutional powers granted to Congress • Legislative branch structure • House and Senate formal and informal leadership • How power politics play in the hallways and cloakrooms • How a bill becomes law from introduction and referral of legislation through presidential action Our basic congressional primer is an intensive half-day session covering the House and Senate, their differences, congressional leadership and more. This class is an excellent introduction to Congress for anyone new to government affairs or needing a refresher. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Strategic Thinking • Political Savvy

Rave Reviews
“An incoming budget analyst should be required to take this.”
Program Analyst, Budget Division, National Science Foundation

“Excellent overview of the government and the legislative process.”
Workshop Attendee, Sandia National Laboratories

Agenda
9:00 10:00 10:10 11:40 11:50 1:00 Introduction to Congress and Capitol Hill Break The Path of Legislation Break Politics and Leadership in Congress Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“I would encourage people with the same work experience [5 years] to attend this program. It has enhanced my understanding, cleared confusion, and dusted off previous knowledge.”
Manager, Food Distributors International

“Would recommend to someone with little or no previous Congressional experience.”
Program Analyst, DEA

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 1:00 pm • February 14, 2008 • June 5, 2008 • September 17, 2008 • December 2, 2008 • February 19, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
.4
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Related Training:
• Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Capitol Hill Workshop • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

Approved for .4 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Course materials include Chapter 8 from the Congressional Deskbook.

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Registration Fee: $395
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/cn.htm or CongressInaNutshell.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

9

Rave Reviews
“Highly recommended.”
Workshop Attendee, Office of the Secretary of the Navy

Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process
Do you need to understand, or train others in, how a bill becomes law, basic congressional operations, the amendment tree or where in the legislative and public policy process you can have an impact? Do you have questions about Capitol Hill dynamics that no one can answer (or that you’re too afraid to ask)? If your job requires you to understand and follow legislation, or if you’re new to government affairs, here's your chance to get up to speed in one information-packed day. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of congressional operations, House and Senate legislative procedures, the work of committees, floor procedures, reconciliation of differences between houses and presidential action. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Strategic Thinking • Accountability Partnering • Political Savvy

“Perfect balance of basic historical background and complex procedural info. Strongly recommend.”
Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Justice Programs

“Tons of info. Very good program.”
Manager State Government Affairs, Eastman Kodak Co.

“I have tried to learn this info by watching C-SPAN and reading, but this class is what I needed to bring it all together.” “Very helpful seminar—useful for anyone trying to make sense of the US legislative process. Thanks!!”
Vice President of Public Affairs, WesCorp

Agenda
9:00 Overview of the Legislative Process 10:10 Introduction and Referral of Legislation 10:40 The Work of Committees: Hearings, Markups and Committee Reports 12:00 Networking Lunch 1:00 How the Senate Schedules and Votes on Legislation; How Legislation Gets to the House Floor and House Floor Procedures 2:45 Reconciling Differences Between the House and Senate; Presidential Action 4:30 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates

Related Training:
• Capitol Hill Workshop • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Congress in a Nutshell • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

9:00 am to 4:30 pm • February 15, 2008 • April 9, 2008 • June 6, 2008 • September 18, 2008 • December 3, 2008 • February 20, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net .6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Deskbook Congressional Deskbook.
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Course materials include the Training Edition of the

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

10

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/cdlp.htm or CongressionalDynamics.com

COURSES
Congressional Oversight and Investigation
Members of the 110th Congress are conducting vigorous oversight and investigations. As an agency official or member of the private sector, you need to be prepared when your organization is investigated. This course teaches both agency and private sector employees how congressional investigations are conducted. We’ll discuss what powers and tools Congress has at its disposal and how you can strategize and prepare a response. You’ll learn about key hearing dynamics and best practice ways to prepare witnesses. This program covers: • Congress’s legal authority to conduct oversight • Inspectors general and GAO roles • Total response package preparation • Press ramifications, response and management • Witness preparation for congressional hearings Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Influencing Written Communication • Political Savvy

Related Training:
• Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Giving Great Presentations • Effective Executive Briefings • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations

Agenda
8:30 9:30 10:15 11:45 The Role of Congressional Oversight What Does This Letter Mean—Are They Investigating Us? Strategic Plan for Response and Actions to be Taken Are They Entitled to this Information? Should We Hold Anything Back? Press Ramifications The Hearing Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

1:15

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 1:15 pm • October 3, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.4
CEU

Approved for .4 CEU credits from George Mason University.
COMMUNICATION SERIES

Registration Fee: $395
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course materials include Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers, Common Sense by Keith Evans. Rules of Advocacy
Keith Evans

for Lawyers

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/coi.htm or CongressionalInvestigation.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

11

Related Training:
• Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Communication Skills for the Professional • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies

Crisis Communications Training
This intensive training helps individuals and organizations prepare for a crisis. We’ll help you plan and draft a crisis communications plan, establish an internal crisis communications system, select the right spokesperson and media center. Students also learn what to do when a crisis occurs. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Creativity and Innovation • External Awareness • Flexibility Resilience • Strategic Thinking • Vision • Conflict Management Decisiveness • Political Savvy

Agenda
8:30 9:30 10:45 11:30 11:45 1:00 2:30 3:30 4:30 Preparing for the Crisis: The Crisis Communications Plan Establishing an Internal Crisis Communications System Selecting the Right Media Spokesperson Selecting a Media Center Networking Lunch What to Do When a Crisis Occurs Types of Communications Crises in Public Affairs and How to Handle Them Simulation Exercise Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • May 8, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

12

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/cct.htm or CrisisCommunicationsTraining.com

COURSES
The Defense Budget
Held each year in late-February, this course concentrates on the President’s new fiscal year defense budget proposal and how Congress responds to it. Experienced faculty members explore and study key documents, charts and graphs, budget allocations and projections provided in this budget. The defense budget request is carefully analyzed, focusing on winners and losers, DoD’s budget authority by title, weapons systems, budget by service, military transformation and Congress’ response. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Financial Management • Strategic Thinking • Accountability Decisiveness • Entrepreneurship • Financial Management Political Savvy

Related Training:
• Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election • The New Congress 2009 • The President’s Budget • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations • Advanced Federal Budget Process • Update on the 110th Congress, 2008

Agenda
8:30 9:30 9:45 Appropriations and Authorizations in a Nutshell Break Analysis of the President’s Defense Budget Request • Winners and Losers • Breakdown of DoD’s budget authority by title 11:00 Break 11:15 Analysis of the President’s Defense Budget Request (continued) • Weapons Systems • Budget by Service 12:30 Networking Lunch 1:45 Military Transformation 2:45 Break 3:00 Congressional Response and How to Protect Your Programs’ Appropriations 4:15 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:15 pm • February 29, 2008 • February 27, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/db.htm or TheDefenseBudget.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

13

Rave Reviews
“Will directly aid in my legislative drafting skills.”
Deputy Director, Legislative Reference Service, DoD

Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments
A Hands-on How to Program
This course helps anyone draft and revise bills and amendments, with lessons especially useful to those who prepare reports, legislation and other documents. In this course, instructors explain the role of the OMB, examining various formats and exploring ways to choose the most appropriate one for your issue. We discuss how to: • Define your audience and broaden your measure’s appeal • Assess existing law and policy objectives before putting pen to paper • Structure bills and amendments to streamline the drafting process • Comply with the U.S. Code rules of construction, style, grammar and punctuation guide • Use drafting styles that work in your favor • Apply drafting language to your ideas and goals via hands-on exercises Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Influencing/Negotiating • Strategic Thinking Written Communication

“Excellent! Really enjoyed the practical exercises. Very helpful, excellent instruction.” “We have been on the fringe of legislative drafting. This will help us move into this arena effectively.”
Director of Federal Affairs, HIMSS

“Have a much better understanding of presenting alternatives to proposed legislation. The materials are wonderful.” “Even for individuals involved in legislation on a daily basis, this program has something for everyone.”
Associate Director, American College of Cardiology

Agenda
9:00 11:15 12:00 1:00 2:10 2:25 3:10 4:10 4:30 Preparing to Put Pen to Paper Organization and Structural Guidelines Networking Lunch Drafting “Rules,” Style and Practical Tips OMB Approval and Transmittal Processes for Federal Agencies Mini-Practicum Legislative Drafting Practicum: Putting Your Skills to the Test Insights, Observations and Suggestions Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:30 pm • July 29, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
.6
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook
A Practical Guide
By Tobias A. Dorsey

Course materials include the Training Edition of the Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook, by Tobias A. Dorsey, and other course materials.

14

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/defla.htm or DraftingLegislation.com

COURSES
Earmarks
Everything You Need to Know
This important course gives students a solid overview of the federal budget process, highlighting ways beneficiaries of earmarks, i.e., directed congressional appropriations, influence the legislative process. Students also learn how to formulate and implement political and lobbying strategies when making their case on the Hill. Participants leave with a clear understanding of: • Timetables and deadlines: When you need to act • The Budget Resolution and Section 302(a) and 302(b) allocations • Earmarks: What they are and what they’re used for • Developing and framing a powerful message • Understanding public and agency criticism of “pork” • Generating earmarks by lobbying the process from the outside • How to make your case during each step in the legislative process • Where to find earmarks Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Financial Management • Political Savvy

Rave Reviews
“One day, concise, packed! Great examples of documents.”
Senior government relations professional

“Discussion was very important. Great to have presenters who have had first-hand experience.”

Related Training:
• Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations • Advanced Federal Budget Process • Working with Congress and Congressional Staff • Congresional Dynamics and the Legislative Process

Agenda
8:30 10:15 10:45 11:15 11:45 12:45 2:30 3:30 4:00 4:15 Overview of the Appropriations Process What are Earmarks? Formulating and Implementing Political and Lobbying Strategies Developing and Framing the Message Networking Lunch Generating Earmarks: Lobbying the Process from the Outside Making Your Case: Influencing the Legislative Process at Every Stage Documents of Trade Tying It All Together Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:15 pm • March 6, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials include more than 75 pages of charts and documentation of the budget process.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/em.htm or CongressionalEarmarks.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

15

Related Training:
• Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations

Effective Executive Briefings
The Art of Persuasion
This course provides an in-depth overview of briefing preparation including research, audience analysis and the key components of a sound argument. Students receive a briefings worksheet providing structure to improve oral delivery. Students also gain professional persuasion tips that focus on both verbal and nonverbal communication techniques. Learn how to effectively manage Q&A sessions and use visual aids to maximize impact. Some participants will deliver a short mock briefing and Q&A session, while the instructor discusses ways to build on presentation strengths and improve weaknesses. This course strengthens skills in the art of persuasion and practical presentation, ideal for GS 9+ through SES levels. It is designed to meet the executive core qualification, building coalitions/ communications, by instructing students in ways to explain, advocate and present facts and ideas in a convincing matter. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Influencing • Interpersonal Skills • Political Savvy Strategic Thinking • Written Communication • Resilience

Agenda
8:30 9:30 10:15 11:30 12:15 1:15 4:30 Briefing Preparation Drafting and Delivering Briefings Drafting and Delivering Briefings (continued) Question and Answer Techniques Networking Lunch Keys to Success and Simulated Briefing Exercise Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • April 11, 2008 • October 17, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.7
CEU

Approved for .7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
COMMUNICATION SERIES

Course materials include Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers, Common Sense by Keith Evans. Rules of Advocacy
Keith Evans

Registration Fee: $495
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

for Lawyers

16

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/eeb.htm or EffectiveExecutiveBriefings.com

COURSES
How America Governs
This course is ideal for anyone seeking a solid foundation in American governance, exploring topics on foreign legislators, how individuals work with foreign governments and their legislative make-up. This program is carefully designed to train NGOs, nonprofits, embassy staff and government agencies in the ways and reasons why the U.S. government system functions as it does. Attendees leave with a clear understanding of: • Congressional structure and organization • How a bill becomes a law • House and Senate legislative procedures • Roles and operation of legislative support agencies • The Presidency and the Executive Branch • How the media shapes policy debate and Washington decision making • Lobbying in Washington • The role of the Judicial Branch Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Strategic Vision • Planning and Quality • Identifying/Integrating Key Issues • Balancing National/Local Interests

Related Training:
• Capitol Hill Workshop • Congress in a Nutshell • Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

Agenda
8:30 9:00 10:45 11:25 12:25 1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 Overview of the U.S. Government The Dynamics of Today’s Legislative Process Formal and Informal Legislative Support Agencies The Presidency and the Executive Branch Networking Lunch Lobbying in Washington The Fourth Estate: The Media The Role of the Judicial Branch Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • October 6, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.7
CEU

Approved for .7 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/hag.htm or HowAmericaGoverns.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

17

Rave Reviews
“Great course ... merging traditional research with up-todate technological research methods.” “Very well done. Case studies and examples helpful.” “[Faculty] are incredibly experienced and authoritative.” “This was definitely a useful course. It will be an excellent resource when I am called upon to do this kind of work.” “I track bills on my job and now can get more involved in tracking the history.”

How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories
Searching for Legislative Intent
This full-day course explores effective, professional methods for locating and compiling legislative histories of federal laws. Instructors demonstrate and discuss: • Various document types necessary to research and compile legislative histories including enacted laws, bills and resolutions, floor debates and committee reports with a focus on federal (not state) legislative history research methodologies • The fastest ways to find and use print and online documents • Professional secrets and tips Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Technology Management

Agenda
9:00 Introduction and Overview Overview of Web Resources 9:45 Statutory and Code Research 10:45 Statutory and Code Research (continued) 11:15 Bills, Resolutions, and Committee Reports 12:30 Networking Lunch 1:30 Bills, Resolutions, and Committee Reports (continued) 2:00 Floor Debates 3:15 Hearings, Committee Prints, Congressional Documents, Senate Executive Reports and Executive Documents, House and Senate Journals, Calendars, CIS 4:15 Case Studies—Working Examples 4:45 Conclusion and questions 5:00 Complete Evaluations and Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Advanced Legislative Strategies • Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond Google • Congress in a Nutshell • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 5:00 pm • June 27, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course manual includes our Legislative History Reference and Research Tools handout.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

18

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/lh.htm or LegislativeResearch.com

COURSES
Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals
This course is designed to help newer public or government affairs professionals. Our media training explores essential skills to help maximize your message in the Washington media environment. Instruction includes hands-on exercises, an overview of key media players, basic message development, and effective press release and media kit preparation. Students then put everything together to form a powerful communications plan involving both the Internet and traditional message distribution. Students also gain a core understanding of basic crisis communication planning. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Creativity and Innovation • External Awareness • Flexibility Strategic Thinking • Political Savvy • Written Communication Interpersonal Skills • Technology Management • Partnering

Rave Reviews
“Excellent, very practical.” “An outstanding day of instruction. Useful in every facet of my job.”
Public Affairs Specialist, USDA

“This opened my eyes to new ways to attracting media attention that I will actively pursue.”
Program Coordinator, national association

“Great speakers, excellent materials.”
Media Relations Manager, national association

Agenda
8:30 10:15 10:30 12:00 1:00 2:15 2:30 4:30 How the Media Works and How to Work the Media Break Developing Your Basic Message Networking Lunch How to Develop an Effective Press Release and a Complete Media Kit Break Putting the Pieces Together for a Communications Plan Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“One of the best seminars I have attended. Enough information to give head start in preparing the agency’s strategic plan.”

Related Training:
• Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Effective Executive Briefings • Communication Skills for the Professional • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations • Crisis Communications Training

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:30 pm • May 6, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.7
CEU

Approved for .7 CEU credits from George Mason University.
C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

Registration Fee: $495
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course materials include Media Relations Handbook for Agencies, Associations, Media Relations Nonprofits and Congress, Handbook by Brad Fitch, Foreword by Mike McCurry.
Brad Fitch
for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress
Foreword by Mike McCurry

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/mr101.htm or MediaRelations101.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

19

Related Training:
• The President’s Budget • The Defense Budget • Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election • Update on the 110th Congress, 2008 • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Working with Congress and Congressional Staff • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

The New Congress 2009
111th Congress
Our expert faculty will provide an overview of the new leadership and new Congress, and how major issues are likely to fare in the first session of the 111th Congress. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Financial Management • Political Savvy

Topics
What Happened, Why and What Does It Mean for the Political Landscape? • Brief review of the results of the Congressional races, the Presidential race, the underlying electoral trends, and the political landscape of the U.S. • Consider the level of partisanship in the electorate, in Congress, state legislatures and governorships • Interpret what the election means for the political parties and for 2010 The New Lineup in the 111th Congress • Examine the changes in membership and formal and informal leadership in the new Congress • Analyze the “numbers game” in the House and Senate • Analyze committee-by-committee the departure of members holding senior committee and subcommittee positions as well as the entry of new members holding new agendas • Examine if and how these people changes will alter the policy-making process in committees and subcommittees Changing Priorities: Issues to Watch in 2009 • The Unfinished Agenda: Issues from the 110th to be continued in the 111th Is the Budget Process “Broken?” • The politics of deficits • Why the budget process no longer works • Prospects for the economy, tax cuts, and more
.6
CEU

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm • January 27, 2009 • February 10, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Congressional Directory
110th Congress 2nd Session/2008

Legislative Series

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

www.TheCapitol.Net

Workshop materials include the Training Edition of the Congressional Deskbook, and the then-available Congressional Directory.

20

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/nc.htm or NewCongress.com

COURSES
Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony
You know your issue better than anyone else. This course gives you the information and confidence necessary to effectively present your case to Congress. Our experienced faculty explores all aspects of testimony preparation including research, persuasion and the proper structure of both written and oral testimony. Participants learn delivery and listening techniques, ways to deal with anxiety and best practice techniques for addressing both Q&A sessions and challenging situations. This course provides ample time to discuss concerns with faculty members while helping participants feel at-ease as they prepare testimony or actually deliver testimony on the Hill. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Political Savvy • Influencing Written Communication

Rave Reviews
“Would encourage people to do this earlier in their career when they start writing testimony. All sessions very useful! Great course!” “This will be extremely helpful in prepping and calming firsttime witnesses and in drafting oral testimony. I especially appreciated the research tips.”
Policy Analyst, federal agency

Agenda
9:00 10:00 10:10 11:20 11:30 12:15 1:30 2:30 2:45 4:30 The Committee Hearing Environment Break Congressional Hearings: A Staff Perspective Break Testimony Preparation and Rehearsal Lunch Testimony Delivery and Rehearsal Break Examples of Effective and Non-effective Testimony and Question-and-Answer Techniques Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“The course is good for people who do lots of presentations as well as Congressional testimony. Well done!” “This is one of the best public communication seminars I’ve ever attended.” “Good, practical advice and insights on how to prepare and deliver testimony to Congress. Practical and worthwhile.”

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:30 pm • July 30, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
.6
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Related Training:
• Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Effective Executive Briefings • Communication Skills for the Professional • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/testify.htm or CongressionalTestimony.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

21

Related Training:
• The New Congress 2009 • The Defense Budget • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations • Advanced Federal Budget Process • Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election • Update on the 110th Congress, 2008

The President’s Budget
This course, held each year in mid-February, focuses on the President’s next fiscal year budget proposal released in early February. Instructors discuss how Congress will respond to it, referring to released documents, charts and graphs, financial figures and projections. Students participate in a comprehensive overview and analysis of the President’s budget, trends, Congressional response, appropriations and authorizations process reviews. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Strategic Thinking Financial Management • Political Savvy

Agenda
8:30 10:00 10:15 11:15 11:30 12:30 1:45 3:00 3:15 4:15 Appropriations and Authorizations in a Nutshell Break Overview of the President’s Budget Break Analysis of the Budget Submission Networking Lunch Trends Break Congressional Response Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:15 pm • February 26, 2008 • February 24, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Includes more than 75 pages of charts and documentation of the budget process.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

22

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/pb.htm or PresidentsBudget.com

COURSES
Public Affairs and the Internet
Advanced Techniques and Strategies
Are you maximizing your organization’s use of the Internet? Learn how an online public affairs toolkit can benefit your organization, how to create compelling content, and how to retrofit your organization. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Creativity and Innovation • External Awareness Flexibility • Strategic Thinking • Vision • Entrepreneurship Technical Credibility • Technology Management • Political Savvy

Rave Reviews
“[Most useful aspect was] finding out how online media is changing and the new ways to use it in P.R.”
Public Affairs Specialist, USDA Food and Nutrition Service

Agenda
9:00 10:00 10:15 11:15 11:25 1:00 2:30 3:00 4:00 The Evolving Internet: What This Means for the Public Affairs Professional Break The Online Public Affairs Toolkit Break The Online Public Affairs Toolkit (continued) Networking Lunch How to Create Content Retrofitting Your Organization Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“Complicated info. was broken down very easily.”
Workshop attendee, international organization

“I hope to take this knowledge back to the agency and make real changes.”
Agency staffer, USDA

Related Training:
• Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Communication Skills for the Professional • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm • May 20, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.5
CEU

Approved for .5 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/pai.htm or PublicAffairsAndTheInternet.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

23

Rave Reviews
“Provides additional avenues to information and new ways to use the web more effectively.”
Research Analyst, National Marine Manufacturers Association

Research Skills for the Real World
Going Beyond Google
This course helps anyone responsible for researching at any Washington-area organization, whether an agency, association, business, elected official or nonprofit. Are you among the 80 percent of professionals who haven’t received research skills training? Our faculty offer a minimum of 10 years’ experience in performing research in Washington. Our introductory course is designed for anyone who wants to improve their research skills. You’ll gain: • An overview of online searching, telephone and email research • A review of legislative, judicial, regulatory, factual and international research • A review of public and private information sources Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Technology Management

“[This program will] help me manage the massive amounts of info that I receive by giving me tools to be more efficient. Exposed me to resources that I didn’t know about and gave me lots of ideas on how to be more efficient and better organized. I will always come back to TheCapitol.Net and encourage my colleagues to do so.”
Senior Policy Associate, National Recreation and Park Association

Agenda
9:00 10:20 10:30 11:30 12:30 1:30 2:30 2:40 3:30 4:00 Search Techniques: Going Beyond Google Break Federal Legislative Sources Courts and Judicial Sources Lunch on your own Federal Agencies, Administrative and Regulatory Sources Break Identifying Information Sources; People Interviewing Tips Review of Online Search Tips, and Q&A Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“I learned some really great techniques and tips today.”
Public Policy Manager, United Health Care

Related Training:
• Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Congress in a Nutshell

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm • June 25, 2008 • December 16, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Research Skills Series

Real World Research Skills
An Introduction to Factual, International, Judicial, Legislative, and Regulatory Research

Includes Real World Research Skills by Peggy Garvin.

Registration Fee: $395
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

By Peggy Garvin

24

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/rs.htm or WashingtonResearchSkills.com

COURSES
Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations
Get expert guidance on writing speeches and preparing oral presentations. This course shows you how to prepare for and draft an effective speech, focusing on organization, sequence, support and style. Attendees also get tips and guidance from a professional speechwriter. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Influencing • Political Savvy • Strategic Thinking Written Communication

Rave Reviews
“Excellent presentation. Effectively answered questions and used real-world examples.”
Public Affairs Specialist, federal agency

“It gave me the tools/info I had been missing in speechwriting. Gave me confidence.” “Wonderful— far exceeded expectations— offered practical, solid work suggestions/tools.”
Public Affairs Specialist, federal agency

Topics
8:30 Preparation • Audience Analysis • Setting • Topic 9:30 Break 9:45 Preparation (continued) 10:15 Drafting the Speech • Introduction • Body 12:15 Networking Lunch 1:30 Speech Construction Methods 1:45 Conclusion 2:15 Break 2:30 Handling Questions and Answers 3:00 Delivery Techniques 3:30 Tips for the Speechwriter 4:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Effective Executive Briefings • Communication Skills for the Professional • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Crisis Communications Training • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:00 pm • March 28, 2008 • October 10, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Course materials included.

Registration Fee: $495
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/speech.htm or PreparingSpeeches.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

25

Rave Reviews
“Outstanding insight & essential practical advice on how to effectively navigate through the sometimes overwhelming myriad of Congressional documents.”
Senate Fellow, U.S. Coast Guard

Tracking and Monitoring Legislation
How to Find and Use Congressional Documents
Are you responsible for legislative tracking? Do you know which online resources are most useful for your particular task? Do you need to know alternative methods for monitoring legislative changes and ways to better utilize your resources (saving time in the process)? This course helps students: • Quickly locate and use online and print congressional documents corresponding to each step in the legislative process • Effectively track, monitor or research legislation • Research and analyze legislative history • Delve beyond monitoring legislation in the news and track real time progress in Congress You’ll learn different types and versions of bills, committee and conference reports, and leadership documents. Students also find out about The Congressional Record, Congress’ official activity account. Learn about legislation tracking, monitoring and the complexities of how a bill becomes a law. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Technology Management

The reference materials alone are worth the trip to DC!” “I can look at documents and have a better understanding of what they mean and how to deal with them. They don’t seem so much like Greek.”
Congressional Researcher, Litton Industries

Agenda
9:00 10:00 10:10 10:45 12:00 1:00 Overview of Congressional Documents Break Committee Documents Leadership Documents and Legislative Advisories Research Tools, Search Tips, and Web Sites Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“Picked up lots of new info, also developed new ideas. Lots of new web sites to review.”
Legislative Research Specialist, USDA

Related Training:
• Advanced Legislative Procedure • Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond Google • Congress in a Nutshell This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net .4
CEU

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 1:00 pm • June 26, 2007 • September 16, 2007 • December 12, 2007
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

Approved for .4 CEU credits from George Mason University. Includes extensive course manual of more than 225 pages, including material from the Congressional Deskbook.

Registration Fee: $395
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

26

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/tml.htm or TrackingLegislation.com

COURSES
Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations
Who has the most to gain in the budgeting process? Where are you most effective? Where does your power lie in the budget process? This engaging course explores basic congressional budget process concepts along with key players, their roles and relationships. Learn about discretionary and mandatory spending, the budget resolution and reconciliation process. Students also learn about the relationship of authorization and appropriations legislation. Hear real, modern-day examples that illustrate the process, and gain ample time to discuss concerns and roadblocks encountered with the budget process. This course covers: • The big picture of federal budgeting and spending • The crucial difference between authorizations and appropriations • What to expect and when in the budget process • The relationship between appropriations and the budget resolution • Using Internet resources to track and research congressional budget action Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Financial Management

Rave Reviews
“Anyone wanting to be current on the budget process should take this program.” “All managers/ supervisors should know this [budget] process.”
Director, National Institute of Postsecondary Education

“All employees working with legislation would gain keen knowledge in the budget process.”
Unemployment Insurance Program Specialist, Employment and Training Administration, Dept. of Labor

Agenda
8:30 10:00 11:10 12:10 1:10 3:40 4:10 Budgeting for Surpluses and Deficits The Congressional Budget Process Authorizations Networking Lunch Appropriations Internet Resources for Researching Congressional Budgeting; Case Studies Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes
This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net .6
CEU

“Good refresher into process of budget enactment including reason for and behind process changes.”
Workshop Attendee, General Dynamics Corporation

Time and Dates
8:30 am to 4:10 pm • February 26, 2008— The President’s Budget • February 29, 2008— The Defense Budget • May 16, 2008 • September 12, 2008 • November 21, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

“[Faculty] enthusiastic, experienced and encouraging. Also very effective at bringing audience members into discussion.”

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
The Federal Budget Process
§ 9.53*

Related Training:
• Advanced Federal Budget Process: Integrating Performance and the Budget • The President’s Budget • The Defense Budget • Earmarks

Formulation of President’s Budget*
Preparation of the president’s budget typically begins in the spring of each year, often nine months before the budget is submitted to Congress and about 17 months before the start of the fiscal year to which it pertains.
During calendar year prior to year in which the fiscal year begins:

Congressional Budget Process Flowchart
Approximate timeline: Fiscal Year begins

February

March

April
Congress agrees to concurrent resolution on the budget.

May
Congress implements budget resolution policies by adopting: (1) appropriations measures; (2) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation; and (3) reconciliation legislation (if required).

June–September
President signs (or vetoes) budget measures.

October 1

President submits budget proposal to Congress no later than first Monday in February. § 9.40

Execution of Federal Budget*
During fiscal year:

Budget Resolution
§ 9.50

House committees submit views and estimates to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

House floor votes on budget resolution.

House floor votes on conference report on budget resolution. Budget resolution spending levels are allocated to committees having jurisdiction over spending legislation. Allocations, referred to as 302(a) allocations, are printed in joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on the budget resolution.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of budget resolution. Senate committees submit views and estimates to Senate Budget Committee. Senate Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

Spring
• Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issues planning guidance to executive agencies. • Agencies begin development of budget requests.

Senate floor votes on budget resolution.

Senate floor votes on conference report on budget resolution.

Discretionary Spending

Appropriations process
§ 9.80

Summer
• OMB issues Circular A-11, providing detailed instructions for submitting budget data and material. • Agencies submit initial budget requests to OMB.

House Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

House Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

House floor votes on the appropriations measures.

House votes on conference reports.

Fall
• OMB staff review agency budget requests in relation to president’s priorities, program performance, and budget constraints. • President, based on recommendations by the OMB director, makes decisions on agency budget requests. Commonly referred to as the “passback,” OMB informs agencies of decisions on budget requests.

Hearings on president’s budget by House and Senate Appropriations Committees and subcommittees begin soon after it is submitted and continue through the spring.

Discretionary spending amount assumed in budget resolution allocated to House/ Senate Appropriations Committees in respective 302(a) allocations.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of the appropriations measures.

President signs (or vetoes) appropriations measures.

Senate Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

• Agencies submit apportionment requests to OMB for each budget account. • OMB apportions (either approving or modifying apportionment requests) available funds to agencies by time period, program, project, or activity. • Agencies make allotments to lower-level units, incur obligations, make outlays, and request supplemental appropriations, if necessary, to carry out programs, projects, and activities. • Agencies record obligations and outlays pursuant to administrative control of funds procedures, report to Treasury, and prepare financial statements. • President may submit supplemental appropriations request to Congress. • President may propose impoundments (e.g., deferrals or rescissions) to Congress.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Senate Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

Senate floor votes on the appropriations measures.

Senate votes on conference reports.

§ 9.82

Mandatory Spending and Revenues

Reconciliation process
§ 9.110

House authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

House floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

House votes on reconciliation conference report.

New Appropriations Subcommittee Organization
President signs (or vetoes) reconciliation legislation.
Congress annually considers regular appropriations bills to provide budget authority to agencies for the upcoming fiscal year. Each regular appropriations bill typically has been developed by the relevant House and Senate Appropriations subcommittee. At the beginning of the 109th Congress, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees reorganized their subcommittees, with the House eliminating three subcommittees and the Senate Appropriations Committee eliminating one. The subcommittee organization and the resulting regular appropriations bills will no longer be parallel and thus will require some resolution when the two committees resolve any differences before sending the measures to the president. The Appropriations subcommittees of the House and Senate are the following:

Winter
• Agencies may appeal decisions on budget requests to OMB director and in some cases directly to the president. • Agencies prepare and OMB reviews budget justification material that is presented to the responsible appropriations subcommittees during the congressional phase of the federal budget process.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Budget resolution may include reconciliation directives to authorizing committees, instructing them to recommend changes in law to achieve mandatory spending and revenue changes specified in budget resolution. Senate Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of reconciliation legislation.

Hearings on presidential and congressional mandatory spending and revenue proposals by House and Senate authorizing committees begin soon after president’s budget is submitted and continue through the spring.

Senate authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to Senate Budget Committee.

Senate floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

Senate votes on reconciliation conference report.

Individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation
§ 9.70, § 9.90

House authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House votes on conference reports.

Separate from any reconciliation directives, authorizing committees also may develop and report individual legislation changing mandatory spending and revenue laws. Any such legislation, however, must be consistent with budget resolution policies.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

President signs (or vetoes) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Agencies Department of Homeland Security

Senate
Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water, and Related Agencies State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Homeland Security Interior and Related Agencies Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Congressional Operations Poster
Copyright © 2005 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressPoster.com Sections are from and section references are to the Congressional Deskbook 2005-2007, by Judy Schneider and Michael Koempel. ISBN: 1-58733-011-3

Senate authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate votes on conference reports.

* By Bill Heniff Jr.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

§ 9.160

Budget Process Glossary
Account: Control and reporting unit for budgeting and accounting. Allowances: Amounts included in the budget to cover possible additional expenditures for statutory pay increases, contingencies, and other requirements. Appropriated Entitlement: An entitlement for which budget authority is provided in annual appropriations acts. Appropriation: Provision of law providing budget authority that permits federal agencies to incur obligations and make payments out of the Treasury. Authorization: Provision in law that establishes or continues a program or agency and authorizes appropriations for it. Baseline: Projection of future revenues, budget authority, outlays, and other budget amounts under assumed economic conditions and participation rates without a change in current policy. Borrowing Authority: Spending authority that permits a federal agency to incur obligations and to make payments for specified purposes out of funds borrowed from the Treasury or the public. Budget Authority: Authority in law to enter into obligations that normally result in outlays. Budget Resolution: Concurrent resolution passed by both houses setting forth the congressional budget for budget aggregates and possibly containing reconciliation instructions. Byrd Rule: A Congressional Budget Act rule (Section 313), named after its author, Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), that prohibits extraneous matter in a reconciliation measure considered in the Senate. Under the rule, extraneous matter includes, among other things specified in the act, any provision that has no direct budgetary effect or that increases the deficit (or reduces the surplus) in a fiscal year beyond those covered in the reconciliation measure. Continuing Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides stop-gap (or full-year) funding for agencies that have not received regular appropriations. (Also referred to as a continuing resolution.) Cost Estimate: A Congressional Budget Office estimate of outlays from reported legislation. Credit Authority: Authority to incur direct loan obligations or make loan guarantee commitments. Deferral: Action or inaction that temporarily withholds, delays, or effectively precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Direct Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in laws other than annual appropriations acts. Discretionary Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in annual appropriations acts. Earmark: For expenditures, an amount set aside within an appropriation account for a specified purpose. Entitlement Authority: Law that obligates the federal government to make payments to eligible persons, businesses, or governments. Fiscal Year: October 1 through September 30; e.g., fiscal year 2010 begins October 1, 2009. Impoundment: Action or inaction by an executive official that delays or precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Mandatory Spending: See Direct Spending. Obligation: A binding agreement that requires payment. Outlays: Payments to liquidate obligations. PAYGO (Pay-As-You-Go): Process by which new direct spending or decreases must be offset so that a surplus is not reduced or a deficit increased. Reconciliation: Process by which Congress changes existing laws to conform revenue and spending levels to the levels set in a budget resolution. Regular Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides budget authority for the next fiscal year. Reprogramming: Shifting funds from one program to another in the same appropriations account. Rescission: Cancellation of budget authority previously provided by Congress. Revenues: Taxes, fees, gifts, and other income received by the federal government. Scorekeeping: Process for tracking and reporting on the status of congressional budgetary actions affecting budget authority, receipts, outlays, the surplus or deficit, and the public-debt limit. Sequester: Cancellation of budgetary resources in response to a breach in discretionary-spending limits or a violation of the PAYGO requirement. Supplemental Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides additional budget authority during the current year when the regular appropriation is insufficient. Tax Expenditure: Loss of revenue attributable to an exemption, deduction, preference, or other exclusion under federal tax law. Transfer: Shift of budgetary resources from one appropriation account to another, as authorized by law. Views and Estimates: Annual report of each House and Senate committee on budgetary matters within its jurisdiction.

Science, the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and Related Agencies

Transportation, Departments of Treasury, Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary, and Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, Housing and Urban District of Columbia, and Development, Independent Agencies and Related Agencies District of Columbia Legislative Branch [no subcommittee, handled by full committee] Legislative Branch

Includes the Congressional Operations Poster with budget process flowchart, and more than 75 pages of charts and documentation of the budget process.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/ucba.htm or CongressionalBudgeting.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

27

Rave Reviews
“[This course will help me in] understanding the points in the system where intervention is possible and most likely to be effective.”
Counsellor (Trade Policy), Canadian Embassy

Understanding the Regulatory Process
Working with Federal Regulatory Agencies
We’ll show you exactly how the regulatory process works along with strategies and tactics that can help you work with federal regulatory agencies successfully and productively. Learn the types of rules, what triggers rulemaking, and rulemaking procedures. Get an overview of the major regulatory agencies and the issues they currently face. You’ll also find out how you can influence the exercise of regulatory power. We’ll then show you how to use scientific, economic and programmatic data effectively to support your position. Then, instructors provide guidance on using the Internet to track current and potential regulations or conduct regulatory research. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Political Savvy • Technical Credibility

“Will help me better communicate with those in my agency that are directly involved in regulatory process.”
Government Agency employee

“Extremely useful.”
Legislative Assistant, American Academy of Child & Adolescence Psychiatry

Agenda Related Training:
• Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Research Skills for the Real World

9:00 9:30 10:15 10:30 11:15 12:15 1:15 2:15 2:30 3:30 3:35 4:05

Historical Overview of the Federal Regulatory Process Overview of the Rulemaking Process Break Overview of the Rulemaking Process (continued) OMB’s Role in the Regulatory Process Networking Lunch Special Considerations for Small Businesses and Nonprofits Break Devising a Policy and Issue Management Strategy Break Internet Resources for Researching Regulations and Rulemaking/A Case Study Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:05 pm • October 7, 2008

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
The Federal Budget Process
§ 9.53*

Formulation of President’s Budget*

Congressional Budget Process Flowchart
Approximate timeline: Fiscal Year begins

February

March

April
Congress agrees to concurrent resolution on the budget.

May
Congress implements budget resolution policies by adopting: (1) appropriations measures; (2) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation; and (3) reconciliation legislation (if required).

June–September
President signs (or vetoes) budget measures.

October 1

See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

Preparation of the president’s budget typically begins in the spring of each year, often nine months before the budget is submitted to Congress and about 17 months before the start of the fiscal year to which it pertains.
During calendar year prior to year in which the fiscal year begins:

President submits budget proposal to Congress no later than first Monday in February. § 9.40

Execution of Federal Budget*
During fiscal year:

Budget Resolution
§ 9.50

House committees submit views and estimates to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

House floor votes on budget resolution.

House floor votes on conference report on budget resolution. Budget resolution spending levels are allocated to committees having jurisdiction over spending legislation. Allocations, referred to as 302(a) allocations, are printed in joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on the budget resolution.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of budget resolution. Senate committees submit views and estimates to Senate Budget Committee. Senate Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

Spring
• Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issues planning guidance to executive agencies. • Agencies begin development of budget requests.

Senate floor votes on budget resolution.

Senate floor votes on conference report on budget resolution.

Discretionary Spending

Appropriations process
§ 9.80

Summer
• OMB issues Circular A-11, providing detailed instructions for submitting budget data and material. • Agencies submit initial budget requests to OMB.

House Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

House Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

House floor votes on the appropriations measures.

House votes on conference reports.

Fall
• OMB staff review agency budget requests in relation to president’s priorities, program performance, and budget constraints. • President, based on recommendations by the OMB director, makes decisions on agency budget requests. Commonly referred to as the “passback,” OMB informs agencies of decisions on budget requests.

Hearings on president’s budget by House and Senate Appropriations Committees and subcommittees begin soon after it is submitted and continue through the spring.

Discretionary spending amount assumed in budget resolution allocated to House/ Senate Appropriations Committees in respective 302(a) allocations.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of the appropriations measures.

President signs (or vetoes) appropriations measures.

Senate Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

• Agencies submit apportionment requests to OMB for each budget account. • OMB apportions (either approving or modifying apportionment requests) available funds to agencies by time period, program, project, or activity. • Agencies make allotments to lower-level units, incur obligations, make outlays, and request supplemental appropriations, if necessary, to carry out programs, projects, and activities. • Agencies record obligations and outlays pursuant to administrative control of funds procedures, report to Treasury, and prepare financial statements. • President may submit supplemental appropriations request to Congress. • President may propose impoundments (e.g., deferrals or rescissions) to Congress.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Senate Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

Senate floor votes on the appropriations measures.

Senate votes on conference reports.

§ 9.82

Mandatory Spending and Revenues

Reconciliation process
§ 9.110

House authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

House floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

House votes on reconciliation conference report.

New Appropriations Subcommittee Organization
President signs (or vetoes) reconciliation legislation.
Congress annually considers regular appropriations bills to provide budget authority to agencies for the upcoming fiscal year. Each regular appropriations bill typically has been developed by the relevant House and Senate Appropriations subcommittee. At the beginning of the 109th Congress, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees reorganized their subcommittees, with the House eliminating three subcommittees and the Senate Appropriations Committee eliminating one. The subcommittee organization and the resulting regular appropriations bills will no longer be parallel and thus will require some resolution when the two committees resolve any differences before sending the measures to the president. The Appropriations subcommittees of the House and Senate are the following:

Winter
• Agencies may appeal decisions on budget requests to OMB director and in some cases directly to the president. • Agencies prepare and OMB reviews budget justification material that is presented to the responsible appropriations subcommittees during the congressional phase of the federal budget process.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Budget resolution may include reconciliation directives to authorizing committees, instructing them to recommend changes in law to achieve mandatory spending and revenue changes specified in budget resolution. Senate Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of reconciliation legislation.

Hearings on presidential and congressional mandatory spending and revenue proposals by House and Senate authorizing committees begin soon after president’s budget is submitted and continue through the spring.

Senate authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to Senate Budget Committee.

Senate floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

Senate votes on reconciliation conference report.

Individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation
§ 9.70, § 9.90

House authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House votes on conference reports.

Separate from any reconciliation directives, authorizing committees also may develop and report individual legislation changing mandatory spending and revenue laws. Any such legislation, however, must be consistent with budget resolution policies.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

President signs (or vetoes) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Agencies Department of Homeland Security

Senate
Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water, and Related Agencies State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Homeland Security Interior and Related Agencies Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Congressional Operations Poster
Copyright © 2005 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressPoster.com Sections are from and section references are to the Congressional Deskbook 2005-2007, by Judy Schneider and Michael Koempel. ISBN: 1-58733-011-3

Senate authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate votes on conference reports.

* By Bill Heniff Jr.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

Course materials include the Federal Regulatory Process Poster, by Ken Ackerman.

§ 9.160

Budget Process Glossary
Account: Control and reporting unit for budgeting and accounting. Allowances: Amounts included in the budget to cover possible additional expenditures for statutory pay increases, contingencies, and other requirements. Appropriated Entitlement: An entitlement for which budget authority is provided in annual appropriations acts. Appropriation: Provision of law providing budget authority that permits federal agencies to incur obligations and make payments out of the Treasury. Authorization: Provision in law that establishes or continues a program or agency and authorizes appropriations for it. Baseline: Projection of future revenues, budget authority, outlays, and other budget amounts under assumed economic conditions and participation rates without a change in current policy. Borrowing Authority: Spending authority that permits a federal agency to incur obligations and to make payments for specified purposes out of funds borrowed from the Treasury or the public. Budget Authority: Authority in law to enter into obligations that normally result in outlays. Budget Resolution: Concurrent resolution passed by both houses setting forth the congressional budget for budget aggregates and possibly containing reconciliation instructions. Byrd Rule: A Congressional Budget Act rule (Section 313), named after its author, Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), that prohibits extraneous matter in a reconciliation measure considered in the Senate. Under the rule, extraneous matter includes, among other things specified in the act, any provision that has no direct budgetary effect or that increases the deficit (or reduces the surplus) in a fiscal year beyond those covered in the reconciliation measure. Continuing Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides stop-gap (or full-year) funding for agencies that have not received regular appropriations. (Also referred to as a continuing resolution.) Cost Estimate: A Congressional Budget Office estimate of outlays from reported legislation. Credit Authority: Authority to incur direct loan obligations or make loan guarantee commitments. Deferral: Action or inaction that temporarily withholds, delays, or effectively precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Direct Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in laws other than annual appropriations acts. Discretionary Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in annual appropriations acts. Earmark: For expenditures, an amount set aside within an appropriation account for a specified purpose. Entitlement Authority: Law that obligates the federal government to make payments to eligible persons, businesses, or governments. Fiscal Year: October 1 through September 30; e.g., fiscal year 2010 begins October 1, 2009. Impoundment: Action or inaction by an executive official that delays or precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Mandatory Spending: See Direct Spending. Obligation: A binding agreement that requires payment. Outlays: Payments to liquidate obligations. PAYGO (Pay-As-You-Go): Process by which new direct spending or decreases must be offset so that a surplus is not reduced or a deficit increased. Reconciliation: Process by which Congress changes existing laws to conform revenue and spending levels to the levels set in a budget resolution. Regular Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides budget authority for the next fiscal year. Reprogramming: Shifting funds from one program to another in the same appropriations account. Rescission: Cancellation of budget authority previously provided by Congress. Revenues: Taxes, fees, gifts, and other income received by the federal government. Scorekeeping: Process for tracking and reporting on the status of congressional budgetary actions affecting budget authority, receipts, outlays, the surplus or deficit, and the public-debt limit. Sequester: Cancellation of budgetary resources in response to a breach in discretionary-spending limits or a violation of the PAYGO requirement. Supplemental Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides additional budget authority during the current year when the regular appropriation is insufficient. Tax Expenditure: Loss of revenue attributable to an exemption, deduction, preference, or other exclusion under federal tax law. Transfer: Shift of budgetary resources from one appropriation account to another, as authorized by law. Views and Estimates: Annual report of each House and Senate committee on budgetary matters within its jurisdiction.

Science, the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and Related Agencies

Transportation, Departments of Treasury, Transportation, Treasury, the Judiciary, and Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, Housing and Urban District of Columbia, and Development, Independent Agencies and Related Agencies District of Columbia Legislative Branch [no subcommittee, handled by full committee] Legislative Branch

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703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/urp.htm or AdminProcess.com

COURSES
Update on the 110th Congress, 2008
110th Congress, 2nd Session
Held in January of every even-numbered year. Our expert faculty look at the second session of the 110th Congress in terms of leadership, membership, the 2008 elections, and the anticipated legislative agenda. They will also review and analyze the major legislative initiatives and accomplishments of the first session of the 110th Congress. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Political Savvy

Related Training:
• The President’s Budget • The Defense Budget • Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election • The New Congress 2009

Agenda
9:00 Review of the First Session of the 110th Congress— Major Legislative Initiatives and Accomplishments 10:30 Break 10:45 A Look at the Leadership, Membership, 2008 Elections, and the Legislative Agenda for the Second Session 1:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 1:00 pm • January 29, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.4
CEU

Approved for .4 CEU credits from George Mason University.
Legislative Series

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress TRAINING EDITION
NOT FOR RESALE
For use in select courses offered by TheCapitol.Net

Congressional

Congressional Directory
110th Congress 2nd Session/2008

Legislative Series

Registration Fee: $395
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

www.TheCapitol.Net

Workshop materials include the Training Edition of the Congressional Deskbook, and the then-available Congressional Directory.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/uoc.htm or UpdateOnCongress.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

29

Rave Reviews
“I’ve been involved in grassroots legislative work and grassroots coalition building for ten years—this was a dynamite program.”
Assistant Legislative Director, American Legion

Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard
Washington Advocacy and Education Campaigns
Learn how to transform your communications plan into a professional educational or advocacy campaign that motivates constituents to act and ensures Washington listens. This course shows you how to recruit and motivate stakeholders with a winning educational or advocacy campaign. It also shows you how to organize a Capitol Hill Lobbying Day, form coalitions, use the media to advance your goals and track your campaign’s ultimate success. This course is designed to meet the executive core qualification, building coalitions/communications, by instructing individuals how to explain, advocate and present facts and ideas in a convincing matter. Students also find out how to develop an expansive professional network with other organizations. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Creativity and Innovation • External Awareness • Partnering Strategic Thinking • Vision • Entrepreneurship • Political Savvy

“Great info and networking opportunity.”
Grassroots Coordinator, Michigan Credit Union League

Related Training:
• Working with Congress and Congressional Staff: Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill • How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories • Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies

Agenda
9:00 Advocacy and Educational Campaigns and Doing Your Homework 10:15 Merging Policy and Media Strategies into a Successful Advocacy Campaign 11:45 Networking Lunch 1:00 Organizing a Capitol Hill Day 2:10 Building and Using Coalitions 3:10 Attendee Best Practices; Tracking and Evaluating What Happened and Lessons Learned 4:30 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:30 pm • March 4, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University.
C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course materials include Media Relations Handbook for Agencies, Associations, Media Relations Nonprofits and Congress, Handbook by Brad Fitch, Foreword by Mike McCurry.
Brad Fitch
for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress
Foreword by Mike McCurry

30

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/ugcm.htm or AdvocacyCampaigns.com

COURSES
Working with Congress and Congressional Staff
Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill
Congressional staff aren’t just your way through a member’s door; they are the door. How do you get results from these vital, behindthe-scenes individuals? This course helps you: • Understand the dos and don’ts for developing relations with congressional offices • Learn the differences between personal and committee staff • Schedule, prepare for and effectively conduct staff meetings • Understand common mistakes that will alienate both staff and members • Learn how to write a “one pager” and make your web site Hill-friendly • Use coalitions and grassroots campaigns to ensure your message is heard Students learn from a former Member of Congress and find out what tools help entice staff to your side. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: External Awareness • Strategic Thinking • Customer Service Partnering • Political Savvy • Written Communication

Rave Reviews
“Information very useful and it will greatly improve my ability to establish and maintain relationships with staff.”
Public Policy Fellow, American Psychological Association

“Good pointers on how to interact with Capitol Hill staff in a productive manner.” “Reinforces experience [10 years working with Congress] and education I have. On target.” “I work constantly with Congressional staffs and I obtained great tips.”
Congressional Affairs staffer

Agenda
9:00 Tools and Techniques for Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill 10:40 How to Write a One Pager/Backgrounder and Make Your Website Hill-Friendly 11:20 Making Your Voice Heard on Capitol Hill Through the Use of Coalitions and Grassroots Campaigns 12:30 Lunch 1:45 Communicating with Congress and Staff: A Member’s Perspective 3:00 The Work of Personal and Committee Staff 4:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

Related Training:
• Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals • Advanced Media Relations • Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard • Communication Skills for the Professional • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm • February 27, 2008 • May 14, 2008 • September 10, 2008 • February 26, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.
.5
CEU

This Congressional Quarterly Executive Conference is offered exclusively by TheCapitol.Net

Approved for .5 CEU credits from George Mason University. 75-plus page course manual included.

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/wccs.htm or CongressionalStaff.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

31

CALENDAR O
Dates and prices subject to change. Please call us or see web site for telephone seminars and current schedule: thecapitol.net/schedule.htm or AllOfOurCourses.com

January 2008
29 31 14 15 20–22 26 27 29 4 6 11 28 3 3–4 9 11 6 7 8 14
Update on the 110th Congress, 2008 Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing

February 2008
Congress in a Nutshell: Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Capitol Hill Workshop The President’s Budget Working with Congress and Congressional Staff: Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill The Defense Budget

March 2008
Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard: Washington Advocacy and Education Campaigns Earmarks: Everything You Need to Know Communications Skills for the Professional: Presentations, Briefings, Business Etiquette, and Networking Skills for Washington Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations

April 2008
Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing Writing Congressional Correspondence Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Effective Executive Briefings: The Art of Persuasion

May 2008
Media Relations for Public Affairs Professionals Advanced Media Relations Crisis Communications Training Working with Congress and Congressional Staff: Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

16 20 5 6 11–13 25 26 27 29 30

June 2008
Congress in a Nutshell: Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Capitol Hill Workshop Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond Google Tracking and Monitoring Legislation: How to Find and Use Congressional Documents How to Research and Compile Legislative Histories

July 2008
Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony

32

Check our web site

F COURSES AND WORKSHOPS
August 2008
6–8 10 12 16 17 18 24–26 3 6 7 10 15 17
Advanced Legislative Strategies

September 2008
Working with Congress and Congressional Staff: Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations Tracking and Monitoring Legislation: How to Find and Use Congressional Documents Congress in a Nutshell: Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Capitol Hill Workshop

October 2008
Congressional Oversight and Investigations How America Governs: Dynamics of the U.S. Government Understanding The Regulatory Process: Working with Federal Regulatory Agencies Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations Communications Skills for the Professional: Presentations, Briefings, Business Etiquette, and Networking Skills for Washington Effective Executive Briefings: The Art of Persuasion

November 2008
12–14 Capitol Hill Workshop: 2008 Election 20 Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing 21 Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations

December 2008
2 3 4–5 9–11 12 16 27 29 10 11–13 19 20 24 26 27
for current schedule.
Congress in a Nutshell: Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Advanced Federal Budget Process Advanced Legislative Strategies Tracking and Monitoring Legislation: How to Find and Use Congressional Documents Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond Google

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

January 2009
The New Congress 2009: Understanding The 111th Congress Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing

February 2009
The New Congress 2009: Understanding The 111th Congress Capitol Hill Workshop Congress in a Nutshell: Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process The President’s Budget Working with Congress and Congressional Staff: Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill The Defense Budget

33

Rave Reviews
“Did a good job with presentation. Made the materials interesting. Good use of examples of writing pitfalls and wrong wording. Great opportunity to review my writing skills.”
Chief, Store Planning Branch, corporation

Writing Congressional Correspondence
This course shows you how to professionally manage congressional correspondence. Agency staff learn the process for responding to congressional inquiries including proper format, style, tone and content. Students also learn how to coordinate responses and organize the approval cycle. Because congressional correspondence is a specialized form of professional correspondence, students learn special tips and tactics that ensure their message is sent and received correctly.

“Gave a lot of style direction.”
Admin Technician III (proofs/edits Congressional and other correspondence for front office signature), corporation

Agenda
Day One 9:00 am - 4:00 pm See the agenda for Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing Day Two 9:00 Congressional Inquiries and Communicating with Today’s Capitol Hill 9:30 Before Putting Pen to Paper 10:45 Break 11:00 Content and Political Issues • Format Issues • Handling Special Situations • Managing Email Responses 12:45 Additional resources for further learning 1:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“[Liked the] focus on clean, concise correspondence.” “[Liked the] Focus on clean, concise correspondence.”
Vice President, Real Estate Support Division, corporation

Related Training:
• Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm Day 1 9:00 am to 1:00 pm Day 2 • April 3-4, 2008
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.9
CEU

Approved for .9 CEU credits from George Mason University. Materials include your personal copy of The Business Writer’s Handbook and the “Writing Congressional Correspondence” manual that includes: • Sample response letters • Sample interim letters • Sample Forms of Address chart • Sample approval/coordination chart • Checklist for Congressional Correspondence

Registration Fee: $595
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

34

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/wcc.htm or CongressionalCorrespondence.com

COURSES
Writing Refresher: Critical Thinking and Writing
How to Compose Clear and Effective Reports, Letters, Email, and Memos
Do you need to improve your writing skills? This intensive one-day course helps students understand the three dimensions of professional writing: organization, format and style. In addition to reviewing and teaching specific writing techniques, our faculty show you how to: • Apply critical thinking to the writing process • Use the four keys to effective writing • Understand the five-step writing process • Develop an effective writing style Communication skills are the key to efficient and effective operations in business and government. New employees should brush-up on their basic written communication and plain English skills, while experienced professionals, burdened by the additional workload caused by downsizing and budget cuts, can also benefit from this refresher course. Leadership Competencies emphasized in this course: Influencing/Negotiating • Interpersonal Skills • Political Savvy Strategic Thinking • Written Communication

Rave Reviews
“I am glad that I took this class. This will be a benefit to me for years to come.”
Legislative Analyst, Williams & Jensen

“I called my boss during break to tell him this was a great course for clerical staff as well as professional staff in our office.”
Legislative Specialist, DOL

“Great refresher ... with concise tips for improvement.”
Unit Chief, FBI

Agenda
9:00 9:15 Welcome and Introductions Discussion: Critical Thinking and the Writing Process; Rediscovering Plain English 10:40 Managing the Writing Project 12:00 Lunch on your own 1:00 Creating and Using Style Guides 1:15 Writing Reports 2:40 Writing Letters, Email, Memos and Executive Summaries 3:45 Additional Resources 4:00 Complete Evaluations; Course Concludes

“Great tips for correcting passive writing.”
Budget Analyst, Dept. of Treasury

“Covered all materials and explained all the topics clearly.”
Supervisory Paralegal Specialist, FBI

Related Training:
• Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony • Writing Congressional Correspondence

Time and Dates
9:00 am to 4:00 pm • January 31, 2008 • April 3, 2008 • November 20, 2008 • January 29, 2009
See web site for course location in Washington, DC.

.6
CEU

Approved for .6 CEU credits from George Mason University. Materials include your personal copy of The Business Writer’s Handbook and a 70-plus page writing manual that includes a basic style guide.

Registration Fee: $295
To register, fax or mail completed registration form on inside back cover, or online.

Course URL and secure online registration: thecapitol.net/write.htm or WritingRefresher.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

35

Certificate Programs

Our comprehensive certificate programs support the education and career goals of public and private sector professionals. We offer two Certificate Programs: the Certificate in Congressional Operations and the Certificate in Communication and Advocacy.

Certificate in Congressional Operations
Our Certificate in

Required Courses (5 1/2 course-days)
• Congress in a Nutshell (1/2 day) • Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process (1 day) • Capitol Hill Workshop: Politics, Policy and Process (3 days) • Understanding Congressional Budgeting and Appropriations (1 day)

Congressional Operations
explores the legislative process and congressional communication. This program gives government employees, legislative affairs professionals, interest groups, law firms, NGOs, and media organizations the background needed to effectively participate in the legislative arena. Our courses help students understand the legislative process, prepare Congressional testimony, draft federal legislation, research legislative histories, monitor legislation, communicate with Congress, and work with federal regulatory agencies.

Elective Courses
(minimum of 6 1/2 course-days) • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony (1 day) • Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments (1 day) • The New Congress (1 day) • Advanced Legislative Strategies (3 days) • The President’s Budget (1 day) • The Defense Budget (1 day) • Advanced Federal Budget Process (2 days) • Earmarks: Everything You Need to Know (1 day) • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation (1/2 day) • Researching and Compiling Legislative Histories (1 day) • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard: Washington Advocacy and Education Campaigns (1 day) • Writing Congressional Correspondence (1-1/2 days) • Working with Federal Regulatory Agencies (1 day)

Courses
The program requires completion of at least 12 course-days within 3 years of enrollment. There are 4 required courses and 13 elective courses.

More information: thecapitol.net/cco.htm or Congressional Operations.com

36 703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

C E RT I F I C AT E P R O G R A M S
General Requirements
To enroll in our Certificate Program, please submit a letter of intent (available on our web site) prior to completion of all required courses. The letter of intent must be submitted before all required courses are completed. There are no extra fees above the regular course tuition fees to register in a Certificate program. Students may substitute relevant professional experience for one (1) required course. Please speak with our Director of Training: 703-739-3790 ext. 115 to learn more. Anyone attending our programs since January 2006 may apply attendance credit from those courses toward the course requirements. After submitting your letter of intent, you then register for courses as you normally would; tuition details are provided in each course description. Standard payment, cancellation, and transfer policies apply to all certificate program courses.

Certificate in Communication and Advocacy
Our Certificate in Communication and Advocacy gives public affairs and legislative affairs professionals the background they need to effectively communicate and advocate. Our handson training is ideal for government, public affairs, legislative affairs, and public relations professionals, interest groups, law firms, NGOs, and media organizations. Courses emphasize key skills in media relations, crisis communication, executive briefings, speechwriting, writing congressional correspondence, critical thinking and writing, Internet use in public affairs, and working with Congress and Congressional staff.

Required Courses (7 course-days)
• Capitol Hill Workshop: Politics, Policy and Process (3 days) • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, and the Media to Get Your Message Heard: Washington Advocacy and Education Campaigns (1 day) • Writing Refresher (1 day) • Communication Skills for the Professional (1 day) • Speechwriting: Preparing Speeches and Oral Presentations (1 day)

Elective Courses
(minimum of 5 course-days) • Media Relations for Public Relations Professionals (1 day) • Advanced Media Relations (1 day) • Crisis Communications Training (1 day) • Congressional Oversight and Investigation (1/2 day) • Effective Executive Briefings (1 day) • Working with Congress and Congressional Staff (1 day) • Public Affairs and the Internet: Advanced Techniques and Strategies (1 day) • Writing Congressional Correspondence (1-1/2 days) • Working with Federal Regulatory Agencies (1 day) • Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony (1 day)

Courses
The program requires completion of at least 12 course-days within 3 years of enrollment. There are 5 required courses and 9 elective courses.

More information: thecapitol.net/cca.htm or CommunicationAnd Advocacy.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

37

Convenience Learning from

Telephone Seminars and Audio Courses on CD
If you don’t have the time to personally attend one of our live courses in Washington, DC, we offer convenient telephone seminars and audio courses on CD showing you how Washington works.TM

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

How to Organize a Capitol Hill Day:
Planning, Budgeting, and Communicating with Congressional Offices

Convenience Learning from
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

PACs in a Nutshell:
Political Action Committee Basics

Telephone Seminars
Don’t have the time to attend one of our live courses in Washington, DC? Attend a convenient telephone seminar and learn how Washington works.TM Our upcoming telephone seminars are an easy and economical way to learn from Washington experts. Telephone seminars include an open Q&A session, so you can interact with our faculty. Telephone seminar registration includes participation via one single phone/speakerphone line and up to 10 participants. Registration fee per telephone, up to 10 participants, is $79. We can also customize a telephone seminar for your organization.
To see a list of current telephone seminars and secure online registration, go to thecapitol.net/ts.htm or CapitolLearning.com

Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Congress and Its Role in Climate Change Policy
Convenience Learning from
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™ MP3

Earmarks:
What They Are, Where to Find Them, and How to Get Them

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Capitol Learning Audio Courses on CD
Our Capitol Learning Audio Courses on CD are produced from our popular telephone seminars, each ranging in duration between 45 and 95 minutes long. $47 each. We can also develop a customized audio course for your organization.
Complete list of Capitol Learning Audio Courses: thecapitol.net/clac.htm or CLAudioCourses.com
All of our Audio Courses on CD can be customized with your logo. If you would like to set up a custom Telephone Seminar or Audio Course on CD, please contact your Client Liaison at 703-739-3790, ext. 114. Audio courses on CD are returnable if the security seal is unbroken.

527 Overview and Update
Overview of 527s • What are 527s • Purpose • Differences between PACs and 527s • How to create a 527 and what are the necessary IRS forms to complete • What are the tax implications and other benefits of forming a 527? • Periodic reporting and disclosure requirements • Update on 527 Reform Act of 2006

MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 20, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-053-9 Total run time: 80 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

2006 Congressional Election Update: Winners, Losers, and the Makeup of the 110th Congress
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded November 21 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-048-2 Total run time: 80 minutes Includes seminar materials. Audio Course on CD: $47.

38 703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

CONVENIENCE LEARNING
2007 Farm Bill: The Players, The Stakes, and The Debate
Congress is beginning to write the 2007 farm bill. During this audio course, you will learn who the new players are and how their priorities match up with those of the ‘old iron triangle.’ What are the implications for global trade, conservation programs, and alternative-fuel production? Find out how farm policy will be shaped.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded April 17, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-027-X Total run time: 58 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

• Committee/subcommittee structure in the House and Senate • Authorizing language
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded October 27, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-029-6 Total run time: 82 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Blogs and Blogging
Are you interested in starting a blog or do you want to know how you can utilize this technology at work? This audio course teaches you the basics of blogging: how to do it effectively, what is the latest technology, how to conduct outreach to bloggers and stay on message, and how to prevent “blog swarms” or react to them when they occur.
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded November 10, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-028-8 Total run time: 84 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Advocacy Campaigns for Nonprofits
As a public affairs professional at a nonprofit, you need to know how to do more with less. This audio course will show you how to effectively and economically launch an advocacy campaign. You will learn how to: • Work with the media relations team within your organization • Target the right audience • Build an effective website • Expand your organization’s network’s influence by finding and working with other groups and building coalitions • Capitalize on off-line activities and online assets
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded April 10, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-056-3 Total run time: 85 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Budget Formulation, Justification, and Execution
The audio course gives budget analysts an overview of the federal budget process and the procedures for formulating, justifying, and executing agency budgets. Topics include: • Overview of the budget process • How to develop the unit account • Justifying your budget requests using PART findings • Implementing budget execution strategies and procedures
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded June 5, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-060-1 Total run time: 77 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Appropriations Process in a Nutshell
Learn how Congress appropriates funding during this audio course. The topics include: • Types of federal spending • Committees involved in the appropriations process • Chronology of the process • Types of appropriations measures: regular, supplemental, and continuing • The difference between 302a and 302b allocations • Form of appropriations language • Floor consideration in the House and the Senate and the role of conference committees
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded July 18, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-043-1 Total run time: 92 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Building and Nurturing Your Grassroots Campaign: Training Volunteers, Communicating with Your Grassroots Network, and Sustaining Your Network
Even though your resources may be limited, your organization can be effective in making its voice heard on Capitol Hill. This audio course describes the tools to build and maintain a successful grassroots campaign. • Identifying and mobilizing your grassroots volunteers • Giving volunteers the tools and training for success on the Hill—or back home • Setting your legislative goals and identifying members and committees who are important to your legislative agenda • How to keep your grassroots volunteers informed— newsletters, magazines, email, faxes, phone calls, websites, and fact sheets • Keys to effective legislative alerts • Keeping your volunteers on message
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded June 21, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-019-9 Total run time: 83 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Authorizations and Appropriations in a Nutshell
Would you benefit by having a working knowledge of the federal budget process? Are you new to the federal budget process? This audio course provides a basic overview of authorizations and appropriations. Topics covered include: • The budget resolution • The relationship between authorizations and appropriations • Types of appropriations measures

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

39

Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Congress and Its Role in Climate Change Policy
Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

• Learn the negotiating strategies used by the conferees during the bargaining process and how institutional differences impact the bargaining process
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded July 26, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-021-0 Total run time: 79 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Building and Nurturing Your Grassroots Campaign:
Training Volunteers, Communicating with Your Grassroots Network, and Sustaining Your Network
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Congress and Its Role in Climate Change Policy
Congress has a significant role in affecting climate change policy. During this audio course, the instructor examines: • Congress’s role in enacting legislation • Senate ratification of international climate change agreements • The power of the purse in approving budgets of federal agencies • Congressional hearings as a tool to shape national debate • Proposed policy initiatives
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded Tuesday, November 27, 2007 ISBN 10: 1587330725 Total run time: xx minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Business Etiquette: Keys to Professional Success
In just a few minutes of interaction, lasting impressions are formed. Your attire, mannerisms and hand shake are just some of the cues used in determining your character, ethics and professionalism. During this course, students learn tips and techniques for building a professional wardrobe, working a room and networking. This course shows you: • Strategies for professional attire • What body language and behaviors say about you • How to network like a pro • Best practice for written etiquette
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded April 27, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-038-5 Total run time: 86 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Congress and Its Role in Policymaking
This audio course examines Congress’s role in policymaking by focusing on its three main powers: oversight, appropriations, and reorganization. The faculty reviews congressional committees, the power of the purse, and Congressional efforts to reorganize the Executive Branch in shaping public policy. Homeland security issues serve as examples of how Congress used these three powers.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded June 21, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-061-X Total run time: 84 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Conference Committees: How The Work Gets Done
This audio course covers the role and the dynamics of the conference committee in the legislative process. Learn how differences between the House and Senate are resolved through amendments between the chambers and the advantages of using this process. Topics include: • Explore how conference committees have changed as Congress has changed (growth of subcommittee power, the rise of omnibus bills, and the use of multiple referrals) • Pre-conference maneuvering in the House and Senate and the key factors that determine whether a bill goes to conference • How the House and Senate procedures for going to conference differ

Congress and Its Role in Trade Policy
Congress’s role in trade policy is based upon express powers set out in Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. Congress exercises this power by enacting laws that authorize trade programs and govern trade policy. Congress also sets trade negotiating objectives in law; requires formal consultation from and an opportunity to advise on trade negotiations with the Executive Branch; and conducts oversight hearings on trade programs and agreements. How U.S. trade policy is fashioned and implemented has far-reaching impact. The instructor examines Congress’s role in trade policy by focusing on its authority; its goals and objectives; and its interplay with the President and the Executive Branch.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded Thursday, November 8, 2007 ISBN 10: 1587330717 Total run time: xx minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

40 703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

CONVENIENCE LEARNING
Congressional Committees and Party Leadership: Who Controls the Congressional Agenda
Who really controls the agenda on Capitol Hill? The committee system historically has been responsible for crafting legislative proposals and shepherding legislation through the process. Yet, party leadership has taken a more prominent role in setting the legislative agenda. What does this mean for your organization? • Learn about the structure of the committee system and how it has evolved • How committee rosters are determined and chairs selected • The role of party leadership in Congress • Party leadership versus committees: who controls the agenda
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded December 8, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-031-8 Total run time: 91 minutes Includes seminar materials.

Crisis Communications: Hoping That It Will Never Happen, But Glad You Planned For It
In this audio course, learn how to formulate a strong communications plan that will get your organization through a crisis. • Handling systemic, adversarial, and image crises • Streamlining media/PR operations in a crisis • How to use the web in a crisis • Act quickly-especially important for federal agencies
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 7, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-024-5 Total run time: 79 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

C-SPAN 1 Viewer’s Guide: Making Sense of Watching the House of Representatives
If you frequently watch House floor action on C-SPAN 1 and you don’t always understand the floor process, this program will demystify House floor proceedings, explain the physical layout, and clarify congressional jargon and phrases. Learn about: • Who sits where and why • The “Committee of the Whole” • Who gets to speak and when they get to speak • The implications of “moving the previous question” • The four different types of votes, and more
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded January 10, 2008 ISBN 10: 1-58733-036-9 Includes seminar materials. $47

Congressional Testimony— Tips, Tactics & Techniques for Writing
Are you responsible for writing congressional testimony? If so, this audio course provides insightful tips on research preparation, audience analysis, and persuasion. We review techniques for organizing written testimony in a way that improves its oral delivery. The instructor highlights how to write a sound argument, focusing on position, reasons, support, and explanation.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 28, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-034-2 Total run time: 69 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

C-SPAN 2 Viewer’s Guide: Making Sense of Watching the Senate: What’s Behind the Classical Music
If you frequently watch Senate floor action on C-SPAN 2 and you wonder where have all the Senators gone, this program demystifies Senate floor proceedings, explains the physical layout, and clarifies congressional jargon and phrases. Learn about: • Who sits where and why • What happens during morning hour and morning business • What are time agreements • Who gets to speak and when they get to speak • Why the classical music • The three different types of votes, and more
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 12, 2008 ISBN 10: 1-58733-054-4 Includes seminar materials. $47

Crisis Communications: Establishing an Internal Crisis Communications System
Learn how to formulate a strong internal communications system that will get your organization through a crisis. • Why is an internal crisis communications system necessary? • Objections you may face to establishing a crisis communications system • Who should be on your crisis communications team and what procedures should be enacted? • How to develop your message • Emergency response materials: information brochures, fact sheets, explanations of complicated technical systems or in-house procedures • Emergency response drills
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded January 24, 2008 ISBN 10: 1-58733-052-0 Includes seminar materials. $47

Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments in a Nutshell
For federal agency staff and those who prepare reports and documents for colleagues who draft legislation, this

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Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Earmarks:
What They Are, Where to Find Them, and How to Get Them

Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Crisis Communications
Establishing an Internal Crisis Communications System

public discussion, are devices regularly used in annual appropriations acts to direct the availability of funds for specific activities. Local governments often cannot afford new projects, so they look to the federal government for funding. If you are seriously seeking federal funding, or just curious about this process, this audio course explains what earmarks are and how they are obtained. • What are earmarks • Finding earmarks in appropriation measures, floor amendments, conference reports, and the managers’ explanatory statement • When are earmarks legally binding • How municipalities can influence the legislative process in order to be the beneficiary of an earmark
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 26, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-050-4 Total run time: 83 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

audio course discusses key drafting rules, and offers suggestions on legislative style, grammar, and wording. We review the basic rules of construction as outlined in the U.S. Code, and discuss OMB’s clearance process.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded January 26, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-032-6 Total run time: 90 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Effectively Using Persuasion in Your Oral Presentations: A Trial Lawyer’s Perspective
The ability to persuade is a trial lawyer’s lifeblood. Would you like the opportunity to hear how you can incorporate the art of persuasion into your oral presentations? A successful trial lawyer shares his insights on the following: • The importance of themes • Storytelling • Sentence structure • Pace, tone, and timing
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded July 10, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-065-2 Total run time: 80 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Earmarks: What They Are, Where to Find Them, and How to Get Them
Oftentimes referred to as “pork”, earmarks are devices regularly used in annual appropriations acts to direct the availability of funds for specific activities. Federal agencies, state and local governments, universities, and nonprofits are among the groups who need to know the inside and outside of an earmark. • What are earmarks • Finding earmarks in appropriation measures, floor amendments, and conference reports and the managers’ explanatory statement • When are earmarks legally binding • How to influence the legislative process in order to benefit from an earmark
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded June 2, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-018-0 Total run time: 79 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Effectively Using E-Newsletters, Email Alerts, Podcasts, and Your Website
In this audio course learn how to keep your members, grassroots, coalitions, and partners motivated in your cause with frequent and predictable communication from your organization. We review the use of e-newsletters, email alerts, and using your web site to your advantage. • E-Newsletters: When to publish? How long should they be? Importance of links and segmenting your email lists • Email Alerts: Tips on what should and should not be included • Podcasts: What they are and how to leverage their use • Web Sites: Linking to your web site; Making your web site “Hill friendly”
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded March 7, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-035-0 Total run time: 62 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Earmarks for Municipalities: How Local Governments Can Access a Fair Share of Federal Funding
Directed congressional appropriations, i.e., earmarks, are here to stay because Congress plays a vital and unequivocal role in building the government’s annual budget and determining funding priorities. Municipalities across the country have discovered this source of funding. Earmarks, the subject of much

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CONVENIENCE LEARNING
Federal Regulatory Process: Piecing Together the Regulatory Puzzle
This audio course shows you how the Federal Register Act and the Administrative Procedure Act drive the federal regulatory process, and how federal agencies use the regulatory process to issue and enforce legally effective regulations. • What triggers rulemaking • Types of rules • Rulemaking procedures • What avenues are available to the public seeking to influence or check the exercise of regulatory power • Regulatory oversight at OMB and OIRA’s role in the regulatory process
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded May 18, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-040-7 Total run time: 59 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

explores the history, membership, work, and power of the House Rules Committee. • Brief review of the history of the Rules Committee, its power, and its role in recent Congresses • How the resolutions or “rules” granted by the Rules Committee structure floor debate and amendment opportunities • The nuances and procedural implications of the different types of “rules”: open, modified, closed • The procedures that govern floor consideration of the “rule”
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded June 20, 2006 Total run time: 93 minutes ISBN 10: 1-58733-042-3 Includes seminar materials. $47

How Federal Agencies Can Work Effectively with Congress and Congressional Staff
As a federal employee, you work with Members of Congress and their staffs. Unlike outside interests, you cannot lobby for your issues. In this audio course learn how you can communicate and work more effectively with Congress and its staff. • Tools and techniques you can use to communicate most effectively with Congress • Working with the political appointees in your Congressional Liaison Office • Making the most of your meetings with staff • What to bring to a meeting • The importance of post meeting follow up • Restrictions on contacts: Legal and political • Jurisdictional committees
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded October 24, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-047-4 Total run time: 77 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA): Getting the Information You Need
As a media relations professional, you need to know how to obtain federal records through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). We show you how. Topics covered in this audio course include: • FOIA background and purpose • Nine exemptions and three exclusions • Where to make the request • How to make the request • Fees and response times • Administrative appeals and judicial review • FOIA reading rooms • FOIA media requests
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded December 7, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-049-0 Total run time: 91 minutes Includes seminar materials.

House Floor Procedures: An Overview of Suspension of the Rules, Special Rules, and the Amendment Process
Learn how legislation gets to the House Floor and understand House Floor procedures. • The role of the Rules Committee and open, closed, and modified rules • House calendars • Suspension of the rules • The Committee of the Whole and the amendment process
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded April 4, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-037-7 Total run time: 90 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

How the Media Works and How to Work the Media
• Introduction to who, what, and where the media is • How new technology has changed the media, and how you need to change • The mindset of, and tips for dealing with reporters • Deadlines and lead time • Getting the media interested in your organization and your story • Different approaches for pitching to TV, print, and radio reporters • What the media can do for you • Characteristics of organizations that effectively use the media
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded July 17, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-066-0 Total run time: 82 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

House Rules Committee: Gatekeeper to the Floor
Referred to as the “Gatekeeper to the Floor”, the House Rules Committee wields much power. This audio course

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Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

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How to Lobby the Executive Branch and Independent Agencies
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

The Lobbying and Ethics Reform Bill— Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007
Our Washington expert gives you an overview of the recently passed lobbying & ethics reform bill, the “Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007” and analyzes how it will affect your lobbying efforts on the Hill. Topics covered include: • Gifts, meals, drinks • Privately funded travel • Requirements of lobbyists • Post-employment (“Revolving Door”) restrictions • Reporting requirements • New bundling rules • Earmarks
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded October 24, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-051-2 Total run time: 59 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

How the Media Works and How to Work the Media
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

How to Organize a Capitol Hill Day: Planning, Budgeting, and Communicating with Congressional Offices
This audio course shows anyone how to organize a successful Capitol Hill Day. Whether you’re starting in DC or Omaha, we’ll show you how to maximize your important event by combining volunteer training with visits to congressional delegations. Learn: • How to devise efficient planning cycles • Best practice strategies for effective event budgeting • Tools helpful in planning, creating and producing an effective training event • Ways to train volunteers so they know what to expect, say, and do • How to follow-up with volunteers and keep them motivated after they leave Washington
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded April 26, 2005 Total run time: 77 minutes ISBN 10: 1-58733-016-4 Includes seminar materials. $47

Lobbying for Foreign Agents and Foreign Principals
As a foreign agent or a foreign principal, are you aware of the extensive disclosure requirements on your lobbying activities as well as restriction on campaign contributions and payment for gifts and travel for federal officials? This audio course highlights the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA), the Lobbying Disclosure Act (LDA), the Federal Elections Campaign Act, and the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives for the 110th Congress. Our faculty also offer lobbying tips and strategies.
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded October 23, 2007 ISBN 10: 1587330709 Total run time: 60 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

How to Lobby the Executive Branch and Independent Agencies
Would you like a crash course on how to best lobby the executive branch and independent agencies? What are the regulations, in place and proposed, of which you must be aware? This audio course discusses the following topics and offers many invaluable tips: • Executive Branch gift rules • The Executive Branch Reform Act of 2007 (H.R. 984) • How to develop a strategic plan, identify champions, and utilize Congressional contacts • How to “get your foot in the door”
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 25, 2007 ISBN 10: 1587330687 Total run time: 81 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

How to Work the Hill Like a Pro: Top Lobbying Strategies, Compliance, and Formulating a Legislative Action Plan
Whether you’re participating in an organized Capitol Hill Day or visiting the Hill on your own behalf, you need to know how to work the Hill and advocate your message. This audio course gives you the information necessary to ensure your message is heard. This course provides: • A profile of the 110th Congress • An explanation of the new environment • A discussion on legislative and political environments • An overview of technology trends • Strategies for building an annual legislative plan
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 26, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-063-6 Total run time: 107 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

44 703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

CONVENIENCE LEARNING
Making the Most of a Site Visit with a Member of Congress: Tips on Preparing, Conducting, and Following Up a Site Visit
Getting the attention of your Member of Congress to focus on your issue is more and more difficult. Competing interests, busy schedules, and overburdened staffs are among the hurdles you face. A cost-effective way to reach your Member is to have them visit your environment for a site visit. • The value of a site visit • Find out the most appropriate way to invite a member • How to prepare for the visit—details, details, details • Conducting the visit • Following up the visit to seal its success
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded May 4, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-039-3 Total run time: 46 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Media Relations: Merging Policy and Media Strategies
How to become more effective in getting your message heard in Washington and your community. • Secure the support of your policy wonks • Master the five management principles of online communication and how to build a top notch public affairs Web site • How to reach out to coalitions and your grassroots volunteers • Off-line activities and online assets
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded August 16, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-022-9 Total run time: 75 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Media Relations: Secrets to Changing Nattering Nabobs of Negativism into Perky Purveyors of Positivism
As the communications professional in your organization, how can you get out good news? In this audio course, we discuss how to • Overcome internal challenges • Influence policy and policy makers • Effectively use your website • Build a “positive crisis” mentality within your organization
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 28, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-046-6 Total run time: 65 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Maximizing the Internet for the Public Affairs Professional
This audio course gives you an overview of how to use the Internet to communicate effectively in public affairs (and couldn’t learn just by Googling). • The Evolving Internet • Email: The Basic Tool • Databases: The Basic Asset • The New Agenda-Setters • Creating Content • Retrofitting Your Organization • The Digital-Age Attitude
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded October 10, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-062-8 Total run time: 97 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Media Relations for the Newbie
This audio course assists the new public or government affairs professional learn how local, state and national media work, and how to work the media. Topics include: • Tips for dealing with reporters • What the media can do for you • Getting the media interested in your organization • Deadlines and lead time • Different approaches to pitching to television, print, and radio reporters
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded May 5, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-017-2 Total run time: 68 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Media Relations: Capitalizing on Your Resources, Your Office, and the Media
As a media relations professional, you operate in a very competitive environment. Have you examined your organization’s communications strategies to see if you are maximizing your resources? During this audio course, our experienced faculty discuss: • Targeting the right audience • Educating your internal audience • Capitalizing on your web strategy • Going beyond “cute” when crafting an informative press release • Using tracking, monitoring, and evaluating to build on your success
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 6, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-067-9 Total run time: 70 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

PACs in a Nutshell: Political Action Committee Basics
This introductory audio course gives you a basic understanding of how to structure a Political Action Committee (PAC). • Structure your PAC for maximum impact • A guide through the maze of FEC regulations and filings • Make the most of your PAC Dollars
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded October 24, 2007 ISBN 10: 1587330695 Total run time: 81 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

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Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

PACs in a Nutshell:
Political Action Committee Basics

Public Affairs Primer for Nonprofits and Associations: Formulating Strategies and Influencing Congressional Action
For the newer public or government affairs professional, this audio course covers: • Basics of federal, state, and local government relations functions • Strategies for working effectively within your organization • Ways to applying strategic planning and performance measurements • How to enhance government affairs activities and their effectiveness • Ways to implement an effective issues management program • How to demonstrate bottom-line business impacts
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded May 8, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-058-X Total run time: 77 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Public Affairs Primer for Nonprofits and Associations:
Formulating Strategies and Influencing Congressional Action
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Preparing for Congressional Oversight and Investigation: A “How-To” for Agency Officials and Members of the Private Sector
Members of the 110th Congress are conducting vigorous oversight and investigations. As an agency official or member of the private sector, you need to be prepared. This audio course discusses: • What you can expect from a congressional investigation • How you can develop a strategic response plan • Actions you can take • Strategies for oversight hearing preparation
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded March 1, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-064-4 Total run time: 80 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Researching Legislative Histories: Finding Legislative Intent in Bills and Committee and Conference Reports
Learn where to start your legislative history research. This audio course provides a framework for researching legislative histories of federal laws. Legislative documents such as bills, joint resolutions, and committee and conference reports are analyzed and discussed. A brief review of statutory research is also provided. • Where is the best place to start your research • Learn what laws are codified • U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code Congressional & Administrative News, U.S. Code, U.S. Code Annotated, U.S. Code Service • What can you find in committee reports
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 14, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-033-4 Total run time: 96 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Press Conferences and Media Interviews for Scientists and Engineers
• When to hold a press conference— is there news? • Who’s on stage? • Press conference checklist • Preparation tips • Follow-up strategy • Steps for media interview preparation— with the reporter—with your office • Developing the message; staying on point; and going on the offensive • Developing positive interview answering skills • Mastering the art of transitioning • Tips for the principal
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded April 24, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-057-1 Total run time: 62 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Senate Amendment Procedure
Confused about how legislation is amended on the Senate floor? This audio course demystifies the amendment procedure in the Senate. Topics include: • The role of nongermane amendments • Forms of amendments: Degree of amendment, Substitute and Perfecting, Amending previously amended material, Principles of Precedence, Amendment Trees • Amendment Process: Working through the amendment trees • Voting • Third Reading
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded June 6, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-041-5 Total run time: 88 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

46 703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

CONVENIENCE LEARNING
Senate Scheduling and Floor Procedures: The Role of the Majority Leader, Raising Measures, and the Use of Amendments
Learn what takes place during the various stages of a typical day on the Senate floor. • The Senate’s two calendars: Executive Calendar and the Calendar of Business • Compare and contrast the scheduling of minor versus major legislation • Analyze the role of unanimous consent and other means of bringing bills to the floor • How important is the floor manager’s role? • What are the rules pertaining to filibuster, cloture, and post-cloture filibusters?
Audio CD format plays in all CD/DVD drives and all CD players. Recorded August 30, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-023-7 Total run time: 89 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Visiting Capitol Hill for First Time Grassroots Advocates: An Introductory Course
First-time grassroots advocates receive comprehensive information and advice for a successful Hill visit. Topics include: • Components of a good grassroots strategy • Identifying key members and champions • Creating your message • How to make sure that Congress is in session • Physical layout of the House and Senate office buildings and the Capitol • Organization of a typical House office • Senate offices and staff • Personal versus committee staff • Tips for a successful meeting • What to bring to the meeting
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded February 28, 2008 ISBN 10: 1-58733-055-5 Includes seminar materials. $47

Tracking and Monitoring Legislation: How to Find and Use Congressional Documents
How can you best track legislation for your organization? Learn from our expert faculty about the key resources that will help you quickly find, track, and monitor federal legislation. These resources include: • Committee Documents: Calendars, Prints, Markups, Reports • Leadership Documents and Legislative Advisories: House Calendar, Resolutions from the House Rules Committee, Senate Calendar of Business, Senate Executive Calendar, Senate Unanimous Consent Agreements, Whip Notices, Congressional Record
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded September 12, 2006 ISBN 10: 1-58733-045-8 Total run time: 93 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Writing Congressional Correspondence for Agency Staff
Writing and handling congressional correspondence is both an art and a science. In this audio course, agency staff learn a process for responding to congressional inquiries. Topics covered include: • Understanding the audience • Creating standard responses • Using an appropriate style and tone • Managing email responses
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded May 22, 2007 ISBN 10: 1-58733-059-8 Total run time: 76 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Convenience Learning from
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Understanding the Path of Legislation: A Primer on How a Bill Becomes a Law
This audio course provides an introduction to how a bill becomes a law. The following topics are addressed: • Introduction and referral of legislation • Committee action, types of hearings, committee markup, and committee reports • Scheduling, rules committee, the amendment process, and floor action • Conference Committees and reconciling differences between the houses • Final passage and presidential passage
MP3 format plays in all CD/DVD drives and many CD players. Recorded November 22, 2005 ISBN 10: 1-58733-030-X Total run time: 98 minutes Includes seminar materials. $47

Visiting Capitol Hill for First Time Grassroots Advocates:
An Introductory Course

Convenience Learning from
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

Senate Scheduling and Floor Procedures:
The Role of the Majority Leader, Raising Measures, and the Use of Amendments
Capitol Learning Audio Course on CD MP3

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CUSTOM TRAINING
All of our programs can be tailored for on-site training.
We have tailored hundreds of private on-site training programs for agencies, law and lobbying firms, unions, foreign delegations, associations and corporations, delivering exceptional insight on how Washington works.TM
Our custom training services include: • Professional Materials—We provide both training materials and publications that show how Washington works. Our publications are designed both as course materials and as invaluable reference tools. • Experienced Faculty—More than 150 faculty members provide independent subject matter expertise. Each program is designed using the best faculty member for each session. • Non-partisan Instruction—TheCapitol.Net is non-partisan and the exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences. (CQ logo) Businesses, agencies and military organizations rely on TheCapitol.Net to keep their staff highly effective and aware. Our popular Capitol Hill Workshop and budget training sessions ensure clients stay at the cutting edge at all times. Associations and coalitions also rely on us to increase the effectiveness of their annual Capitol Hill Day programs. Choosing custom training from TheCapitol.Net means you: • Professionally train staff or members dealing with Congress and legislative matters • Cut travel time and expense • Organize training to align with your schedule • Ensure topics meet staff and member needs and organizational training goals • Discuss sensitive or proprietary issues in confidence • Integrate your own presentations among our topics • Have organization-specific issues addressed by faculty Our customized course materials are an invaluable reference delivering ongoing value. Course materials can include the Congressional Deskbook, Media Relations Handbook, Real World Research Skills, Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook, among others. Expert faculty members include: • Reporters and editors who know Congress inside and out • Current and former Members of Congress • Experienced Congressional staff and legislative counsels • Policy experts • Analysts and scholars We have conducted hundreds of custom training programs for our clients, including:
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Army and Air Force Exchange Service Army Special Operations Command Canadian Embassy Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Crowell & Moring Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) Defense Logistics Agency Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Government Accountability Office (GAO) Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory National Affordable Housing Management Association National Business Travel Association National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Pork Producers Council Patton Boggs Philip Morris Sandia National Laboratories Social Security Administration Time Warner United Fresh Produce Association U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Coast Guard U.S. Department of Agriculture U.S. Department of State U.S. Department of the Treasury U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs U.S. Navy U.S. Postal Service U.S. Senate Veterans of Foreign Wars

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What our clients say about our custom on-site training:
“The location was great because we did not have to leave the office.” “I’ve been with the FAA for 37 years and this is one of the best courses I’ve ever taken!” “Info provided broadens my understanding of Congress and its oversight authority, which impacts my job daily.”
—Attendee, Dept. of Education

“It is nice to take a course that is relevant and tailored to my job.” “A very good and informative week. Really enjoyed.”
—Deputy Director, DFAS

“[As a result of this program] we will revamp how we do our Hill visits and follow up.”
—Assistant Station Director, U.S. Forest Service

“It will help me more effectively support my assigned executives with the lobbying effort.”
—Administrative Assistant, Fortune 500 company

“Our nonprofit organization needs to be doing more grassroots lobbying and this [Grassroots Advocacy on-site training] is an excellent program to help us get started correctly and effectively.”
—Co-Executive Director, Alliance for Lung Cancer Advocacy, Support and Education

“Gave me better insight on the pressures and issues affecting how we operate as an agency.”
—Program Manager, FAA

“It helped me learn what my bosses are up against. The whole program helped me better understand the legislative process.”
—Senior Administrative Assistant, Fortune 500 company

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49

Legislative Series

Congressional Deskbook:
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress Fifth Edition
Authors: Michael L. Koempel and Judy Schneider
Contributing Authors: Eugene Boyd, Peggy Garvin, Bill Heniff Jr., Henry Hogue, and Robert Keith

Congressional

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress FIFTH EDITION
Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider

Paperback: 716 pages ISBN 10: 1587330970 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-097-1 ISSN: 1531-0116 OCLC: 60514840 Published 2007 Dimensions: 8.25 x 10.75 x 1.5 Weight: 3.2 pounds $57

Now in its Fifth Edition, the Congressional Deskbook is the complete guide to Congress, clearly describing the legislative and congressional budget processes in 15 chapters that discuss all aspects of Congress. Our comprehensive guide to Congress is ideal for anyone who wants to know how Congress really works, including federal executives, attorneys, lobbyists, media and public affairs staff, government affairs, policy and budget analysts, congressional office staff and students.

The Authors: Michael L. Koempel is a Senior Specialist in American National Government and Judy Schneider is a Specialist on Congress with the Congressional Research Service (CRS) in the Library of Congress.

Summary Table of Contents
Ch 1 Ch 2 Ch 3 Ch 4 Ch 5 Ch 6 Ch 7 Ch 8 Ch 9 Ch 10 Being a Member of Congress Pressures on Congress: Campaigns and Elections Pressures on Congress: Constituents, Media, President and Courts Pressures on Congress: Lobbying and Congressional Ethics Supporting Congress: Allowances and Staff Supporting Congress: The Capitol Complex Organizing Congress: Members, Leaders and Committees Legislating in Congress: Legislative Process Legislating in Congress: Federal Budget Process Legislating in Congress: Special Procedures and Considerations The Training Edition is included in these courses: Ch 11 Congressional Documents: • Congressional Dynamics Overview, Legislation and Laws and the Legislative Process Ch 12 Congressional Documents: • Advanced Legislative Strategies Committee, Chamber, Party and • Capitol Hill Workshop Administrative Publications Related Publications: Ch 13 Legislative Research: Private and • Congressional Directory Government Information Providers Related Audio Ch 14 Legislative Research: How to Courses on CD: Monitor and Research Congress • Conference Committees: Ch 15 Putting It All Together: How The Work Gets Done • House Floor Procedures A Working Example • Senate Amendment Procedure Glossary of Legislative Terms • Senate Scheduling and Appendices Floor Procedures • Understanding the Path Table of Web Sites of Legislation Index

“A valuable, detailed, and highly functional synthesis of information about the legislative branch. Summing up: Highly recommended. All collections.”
CHOICE

“A consistently reliable tool for any student of Congress and any legislative practitioner, regardless of their level of experience.”
Martin B. Gold, Covington & Burling, Washington, DC

50

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P U B L I C AT I O N S
Congressional Directory 2008
110th Congress, 2nd Session
This comprehensive directory lists all Included in this course: • Capitol Hill Workshop members of the U.S. Senate and House Related Publication: of Representatives, complete with color • Congressional Deskbook photos and a fold-out map of Capitol Hill. Related Audio The 2008 Congressional Directory is wireCourses on CD: spiral bound for flat-fold reference and • Conference Committees: How The Work Gets Done durability. • How to Organize a • Color photographs Capitol Hill Day • How to Work the Hill • Wire spiral bound allows all pages Like a Pro • Congressional Committees to lie flat and Party Leadership: • Terms of Congress Who Controls the Congressional Agenda • Legislative Documents Online • The House Rules Committee: Gatekeeper to the Floor • Legislative process flowchart from the Congressional Deskbook • List of frequently mispronounced names of Members of Congress • Current Member photos, room, phone and fax numbers, and many email addresses • Key Congressional staff • Biographical data for each Member of Congress • District office information • Fold-out 9" x 10" map of Capitol Hill, tips on writing and visiting a Member, and how a bill becomes a law Available in Alphabetical and State-by-State versions.
Sample Sections, and secure ordering online: thecapitol.net/dir.htm or CongressionalDirectory.com
Legislative Series

Congressional Directory
110th Congress 2nd Session/2008

Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

www.TheCapitol.Net

Ships within 1 business day Spiralbound: 200+plus pages with fold-out 9” x 10” map of Capitol Hill 2008 Alpha Version (Separate sections for Governors, Senators, and Representatives, then in alphabetical order by last name) ISBN 10: 1587330997 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-099-5 ISSN 1546-6574 OCLC: 53067198 Dimensions: 4.4 x 9 x 0.4 Weight: 0.7 pounds 2008 Standard Version (State-by-State; Governor, Senators, and Representatives are listed together under their state) ISBN 10: 1587331012 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-101-5 Dimensions: 4.4 x 9 x 0.4 Weight: 0.7 pounds $17.95 Available March, 2008 The 2009 Congressional Directory will be available in March or April, 2009. 2009 Alpha Version ISBN 10: 1587331063 2009 Standard Version ISBN 10: 1587331039

Coming in 2008!

Lobbying and Advocacy:
The Complete Lobbyist Handbook
By Deanna Gelak • Top Government Affairs Strategies • Best Resources • Best Engagement Practices • Ethical Considerations • Practical Tips • For Federal and State Lobbyists
ISBN 10: 1587331004 ISBN 13: 9781587331008

thecapitol.net/la.htm or LobbyingAndAdvocacy.com

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51

Legislative Series

Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook
A Practical Guide
Author: Tobias A. Dorsey
Contributing Author: Clint Brass

Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook
A Practical Guide

By Tobias A. Dorsey

The Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook offers practical advice and insight for those engaged in legislative drafting, those more interested in policy than drafting itself, or those interested in reading and interpreting the law. The Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook helps anyone understand why laws are drafted the way they are.
The Author: Tobias A. Dorsey is an attorney in the Office of the Legislative Counsel of the U.S. House of Representatives. Within that office, he works primarily on issues relating to national defense, homeland security, and civil and criminal justice. He has taught at drafting seminars and is an active member of various drafting and professional associations. He serves on the governing council of the Capitol Hill Chapter of the Federal Bar Association.

Ships within 1 business day Hardbound: 640 pages ISBN 10: 1-58733-015-6 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-015-5 LCCN: 2006923333 Published 2006 Dimensions: 7.25 x 10.25 x 1.25 Weight: 3.4 pounds $150

Summary Table of Contents
Ch 1 Ch 2 Ch 3 Ch 4 Ch 5 Ch 6 Ch 7 Ch 8 Ch 9 Ch 10 Being a Drafter Understanding How Laws Are Made Considering the Courts: Statutory Interpretation Thinking Through the Policy Choosing the Right Measure Writing Effectively Organizing and Arranging Using the Right Style Affecting and Amending Other Laws Working in, and Working with, The Training Edition is the Executive Branch included in this course: Appendices • Drafting Effective Federal
• The Impact of Information Technology on Drafting • Suggestions for Further Reading • Useful Web Sites • The Legislative Process—A Working Example • Positive Law and Non-Positive Law • Concerning Birds and Ponies, Poultry and Rabbits • The Federal Legislative Measures— Some Examples • The Federal Drafting Styles—Some Examples • Executive Branch Materials • A Drafting Practicum • The Constitution of the United States
Legislation and Amendments (special softbound Training Edition)

“Excellent.”
David DeVries, The Public Lawyer, Summer 2007

“An essential tool for anyone who drafts legislation or interprets the law.”
William K. Suter, Clerk of the United States Supreme Court

“A valuable and practical tool for all legislative drafters.”
Bruce Feustel, Senior Fellow, National Conference of State Legislatures

Related Publications:
• Drafting Federal Grant Statutes

Related Audio Courses on CD:
• Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments in a Nutshell • Researching Legislative Histories • How Federal Agencies Can Work Effectively with Congress and Its Staff

Complete Table of Contents and Index, Sample Sections, and secure ordering online:

52

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thecapitol.net/ldd.htm or LegislativeDraftersDeskbook.com

P U B L I C AT I O N S
Real World Research Skills
An Introduction to Factual, International, Judicial, Legislative, and Regulatory Research
Author: Peggy Garvin
This book can help anyone involved in government research by increasing their information literacy, improving their research effectiveness and efficiency.
The Author: Peggy Garvin is an independent information consultant. Ms. Garvin has worked with government information, libraries, and information technology over her twenty-year career with the Library of Congress Congressional Research Service and in the private sector.

Research Skills Series

Real World Research Skills
An Introduction to Factual, International, Judicial, Legislative, and Regulatory Research

By Peggy Garvin

Summary Table of Contents
Ch 1 Going Beyond Google Ch 2 Legislative Branch Research Ch 3 Judicial Branch Research Ch 4 Executive Branch Research Ch 5 State and International Research Ch 6 Experts and Insiders Table of Web Sites Index
Included in this course:
• Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond Google

Ships within 1 business day Paperback: 116 pages ISBN 10: 1-58733-007-5 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-007-0 Published 2006 Dimensions: 6.1 x 9.2 x 0.25 Weight: 0.5 pounds $23.97 Hardbound: 116 pages ISBN 10: 1-58733-093-8 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-093-3 Published 2006 Dimensions: 6.25 x 9.5 x 0.5 Weight: 0.8 pounds $30.97

Related Audio Courses on CD:
• Researching Legislative Histories • Tracking and Monitoring Legislation • Getting the Information You Need: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Complete Table of Contents and Index, Sample Sections, and secure ordering online:

thecapitol.net/rwrs.htm or RealWorldResearchSkills.com

“Recommended. All levels.”
CHOICE

How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level
Stage How to influence
Write–Call–Meet with elected officials and staff Draft legislation Build coalitions Write opeds and letters to editor, comments on blogs Conduct grassroots advocacy

Who to contact
Your Representative, Senators and personal and committee staff Washington, State and District offices Trade associations/nonprofits Think tanks (and web sites) Local and national newspapers Legislative/public affairs offices Lobbying firms Government agencies Interest groups (and web sites)

Where to find, track and monitor
www.house.gov www.senate.gov gao.gov cbo.gov www.gpoaccess.gov General newspapers (Washington Post, WSJ) Congressional and Federal YellowBooks Washington Information Directory Congressional Directory Hill periodicals (CQ Today, Roll Call, The Hill) www.OpenSecrets.org–check prior hearings on topic Trade newsletters and special interest magazines Thomas–check prior bills www.house.gov www.senate.gov gao.gov cbo.gov www.gpoaccess.gov CQ (cq.com) and other services Thomas (http://thomas.loc.gov/) (check companion bills and action) Congressional directories Newsletters and special interest magazines and web sites Congressional Record

Training from TheCapitol.Net
Capitol Hill Workshop Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill Advocacy Campaigns in Washington Drafting Effective Federal Legislation and Amendments Media Relations 101 Advanced Media Relations Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Research Skills for the Real World: Going Beyond GoogleTM

“An essential desk book for the serious researcher.”

Legislative process
Before legislation introduced

Legislation introduced

Write–Call–Meet with elected officials and staff Find co-sponsors Build coalitions Write opeds and letters to editor, comments on blogs Conduct grassroots advocacy

Your Representative, Senators and personal and committee staff Washington, State and District offices Local and national newspapers Legislative/public affairs Think tanks (and web sites) Lobbying firms Trade associations/nonprofits Interest groups (and web sites) Your Representative, Senators and personal and committee staff Washington, State and District offices Congressional leadership Trade associations/nonprofits (and web sites) Lobbying firms Interest groups (and web sites) Staff of leadership

Understanding Congress Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Capitol Hill Workshop Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill Advocacy Campaigns in Washington Tracking and Monitoring Legislation

Legislation considered

Prepare testimony, submit testimony and testify at hearings Write–Call–Meet with elected officials and staff Contact Congressional leadership Find co-sponsors Build coalitions Develop grassroots campaigns Prepare position papers Conduct Washington Lobby day Draft amendment(s) or floor strategy

CQ and other services (check companion bills and amendments) OMB–statements of Administration policy Congressional directory Newsletters and special interest magazines Check companion bills AND amendments, and floor debate and committee reports Internet words and phrases on Google

Congressional Dynamics and the Legislative Process Capitol Hill Workshop Communicating Effectively with Capitol Hill Advocacy Campaigns in Washington Preparing and Delivering Congressional Testimony Advanced Legislative Procedure Tracking and Monitoring Legislation

How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level (chart)
Information-packed two-sided, laminated sheet showing how to monitor and influence federal policy. Front shows the legislative process, back shows regulatory process through implementation and enforcement of a statute and rule. This chart can be customized with your logo in quantities of 250 to 10,000 copies.

Mary Ellen Bates, Bates Information Services Inc.

Legislative Series

Congressional
Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

Congressional Directory

C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

Legislative Series

C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

(over)

Deskbook
Judy Schneider Michael L. Koempel
Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Keith Evans

Brad Fitch

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressBooks.com
See this chart with links at InfluencePolicy.com Copyright ©2004 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Media Relations
for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress

Handbook
Foreword by Mike McCurry

Common Sense Rules of Advocacy
for Lawyers

“If you buy one book this year to assist you in researching on the web, make it this one!”
Sabrina I. Pacifici, Founder, Editor, Publisher, LLRX.com

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences www.TheCapitol.Net

Ships within 1 business day Laminated Paper: 2 pages (1 sheet, double-sided) ISBN 10: 1587330105 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-010-0 Published 2004 Dimensions: 8.5 x 11 Weight: 0.1 pounds $5.95

“Delivers a big bang for the buck”
Deborah Liptak, info2go

MonitorPolicy.com

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53

C O M M U N I C AT I O N S E R I E S

Media Relations Handbook
For Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress
Author: Brad Fitch
Brad Fitch

Foreword by Mike McCurry Contributing Author: Beth Gaston

Media Relations

Handbook
for Agencies, Associations, Nonprofits and Congress
Foreword by Mike McCurry

Next to the AP Style Guide, our Media Relations Handbook is arguably the most valuable reference available for any public affairs officer, press secretary or Beltway PR professional. The Media Relations Handbook is required reading for Capitol Hill press secretaries, federal agency public affairs officers, political campaign spin doctors, nonprofit PR professionals, lobbyists or anyone involved in garnering media coverage. In this Handbook, Brad Fitch explores theory and practice, discussing general principles and illustrating each point with real-life examples.

Ships within 1 business day Hardbound: 368 pages ISBN 10: 1587330032 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-003-2 LCCN: 2003113070 OCLC: 54982382 Published 2004 $45

The Author: Brad Fitch is CEO of Knowlegis. He was formerly Deputy Director for the Congressional Management Foundation (CMF), and served for 13 years on Capitol Hill as a communications director in the House and Senate.

Summary Table of Contents
Ch. 1 Ch. 2 Ch. 3 Ch. 4 Ch. 5 Ch. 6 Ch. 7 Ch. 8 Ch. 9 First Steps Tools of the Craft Developing a Message and Communications Plan Interacting with Reporters Overview of the Media: Print, Radio, and TV Web-Based and Online Communications Included in these courses: Dealing With the Principal • Media Relations for Public Interview Preparation Affairs Professionals Internal Issues: Experts, Policy, Numbers, • Advanced Media Relations • Using Grassroots, Coalitions, Leaks, Lawyers and Language and the Media to Get Your Ch. 10 How to Interact with Congressional Message Heard Campaign Operations Related Audio Ch. 11 Communications in a Federal Agency Courses on CD: • Media Relations for Ch. 12 Crisis Communications in Public Affairs the Newbie Ch. 13 Honest Spin: • Media Relations: Merging The Ethics of Public Relations Policy and Media Strategies • Crisis Communications: Appendices
• Thirteen Rules of Public Relations • Glossary • Public Relations Society of America Code of Ethics • Your Right to Federal Records: Questions and Answers on the Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act (General Services Administration and the U.S. Department of Justice)
Hoping That It Will Never Happen, But Glad You Planned For It • Leveraging Technology for Your Legislative Campaigns: Effectively Using ENewsletters, Email Alerts, Podcasts, and Your Website • Media Relations: Secrets to Changing Nattering Nabobs of Negativism into Perky Purveyors of Positivism

“[T]his book will be of value to students and professionals of political communications and public relations.”
CHOICE

“Provides valuable advice for those who flack for a living.”
Roll Call

“Even the most experienced public information officer can learn from this book.”
Gene Rose, Director of Public Affairs, NCSL

Epilogue Index

Complete Table of Contents and Index, Sample Sections, and secure ordering online:

54

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thecapitol.net/mrh.htm or MediaRelationsHandbook.com

P U B L I C AT I O N S
COMMUNICATION SERIES

Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers
A Practical Guide for Anyone Who Wants To Be a Better Advocate
Author: Keith Evans

Keith Evans

Common Sense Rules of Advocacy
for Lawyers
Ships within 1 business day Hardbound: 264 pages ISBN 10: 1587330059 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-005-6 LCCN: 2003113147 OCLC: 56315474 Published 2004 Dimensions: 7.25 x 7.8 x 0.8 Weight: 1.2 pounds $35

The classic advocacy guide for trial lawyers, Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers has been hailed by attorneys, mediators and professors nationwide. It’s the practical advocacy guide designed for anyone who must persuade others including attorneys, lobbyists, negotiators, account executives, law students, sales professionals, and parents. This guide provides tips and rules that help anyone—lawyer or lobbyist, account executive or negotiator—improve their advocacy skills in less than 10 minutes a day.
The Author: Keith Evans is a retired member of the Bars of both England and California, a Scholar of the Middle Temple Inn of Court in London, a member of Gray’s Inn and a former Honorary Master of San Diego’s Louis M. Welsh American Inn of Court. He has handled several hundred jury trials and has practiced in State and Federal Courts as well as, in England, every court from the Old Bailey to the House of Lords.

Summary Table of Contents
Ch 1 Ch 2 Ch 3 Ch 4 Ch 5 Ch 6 Ch 7 Ch 8 Ch 9 Ch 10 Ch 11 Ch 12 Introduction The Dimensions of Advocacy The Mandatory Rules of Advocacy Advocacy as Theater The Psychology of Advocacy The Examination of Witnesses Direct Examination Cross-Examination Re-Direct Examination The Final Argument Written Advocacy Advocacy in the Age of High Technology Ch 13 Conclusion Appendices
• Why Color is Critical • The Practical Rules at a Glance • “How to Succeed as a Lawyer,” by Roland Boyd

“Reading this book would profit any advocate of any experience level.”
George R. (Bob) Dekle, Legal Skills Professor, University of Florida, Retired Assistant State Attorney, Third Judicial Circuit of Florida (successfully prosecuted Ted Bundy)

Included in these courses:
• Communication Skills for the Professional: Presentations, Briefings, Business Etiquette, and Networking Skills for Washington • Effective Executive Briefings: The Art of Persuasion

Related Publications:
• Legal Spectator & More, by Jacob Stein

“A valuable review for the old timers and an excellent primer for those who are starting the climb.”
Jacob A. Stein, Stein, Mitchell & Mezines, Washington, DC

Related Audio Courses on CD:
• How to Work the Hill Like a Pro • Crisis Communications: Hoping That It Will Never Happen, But Glad You Planned For It • Making the Most of a Site Visit with a Member of Congress • Preparing for Congressional Oversight and Investigation

“A terrific guidebook.”
Philip H. Corboy, Corboy & Demetrio, Chicago, IL

Index

Complete Table of Contents and Index, Sample Sections, and secure ordering online:

thecapitol.net/csra.htm or RulesOfAdvocacy.com

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

55

The United States Congress
§ 8.01 § 8.151 § 7.21 § 3.16

Legislative Process Flowchart
House

Comparison of Selected House and Senate Procedures
Senate
Two calendars (Legislative and Executive) Scheduling by majority-party leadership, with broad consultation among all members Unanimous consent and complex unanimous consent time agreements to govern floor consideration Presiding officer has little discretion in recognition; rulings frequently challenged Debate rarely restricted Cloture invoked by three-fifths vote (60 senators) Germaneness of amendments rarely required Quorum calls permitted almost any time and used for constructive delay Recesses at end of most days Four calendars (Union, House, Private, and Discharge) Scheduling by Speaker and majority-party leadership, with limited consultation among members Role of Rules Committee and special rules to govern floor consideration

Terms of Congress
Congress
80th 81st 82nd 83rd 84th 85th 86th 87th 88th 89th 90th 91st 92nd

Tips for Contacting Members of Congress
Common sense probably tells us that hateful, insulting, or threatening communications do not work. Vague, unfocused, or nebulous requests for action or assistance are also ineffective.

Legislation may begin in either chamber. Similar proposals are often introduced in both chambers.
Measure introduced in the House § 8.20 Measure introduced in the Senate § 8.20

Years
1947–1949 1949–1951 1951–1953 1953–1955 1955–1957 1957–1959 1959–1961 1961–1963 1963–1965 1965–1967 1967–1969 1969–1971 1971–1973 1973–1975 1975–1977 1977–1979 1979–1981 1981–1983 1983–1985 1985–1987 1987–1989 1989–1991 1991–1993 1993–1995 1995–1997 1997–1999 1999–2001 2001–2003 2003–2005 2005–2007 2007–2009 2009–2011 2011–2013 2013–2015 2015–2017 2017–2019 2019–2021 2021–2023 2023–2025 2025–2027 2027–2029 2029–2031

Measure referred to committee, which holds hearings and reports measure to the House §§ 8.30, 8.40, 8.50, 8.60 OR
For important measures, special rule reported by the Rules Committee and adopted by the House
§§ 8.90, 8.100

Measure referred to committee, which holds hearings and reports measure to the Senate §§ 8.30, 8.40, 8.50, 8.60

Types of Communication
1. Letters, Faxes, and Email • Be brief and to the point • Write at the proper time in the legislative process • Use your own language • Stick to one issue for each communication • Personalize the issue • Write to your own representative or senator • Clearly identify the legislation, using bill numbers if possible • Know your facts • Be polite and positive • Speak for yourself • Ask for a reply and include your phone number and postal address, even on email • Write on personal stationery, if a letter 2. Telephone Calls • Be brief, to the point, and considerate of the member’s time constraints • Identify yourself as a concerned constituent • Indicate the issue • Be specific about the action you want • Be courteous and polite • Compose your thoughts before the call • Follow up with a thank-you note 3. Personal Visits • Be brief, to the point, and considerate of the member’s time constraints • Thank the staffer or member by name • Put a human face on your issue • Begin the meeting by thanking the office for any prior help • Respect member’s or staffer’s opinion • “Connect the dots” for the member or staff: explain why the member’s help is needed and what specifically the member can do to help

Presiding officer has considerable discretion in recognition; rulings rarely challenged Debate always restricted Debate-ending motions by majority vote (218 representatives) Germaneness of amendments generally required Quorum calls permitted in connection with record votes

Congressional Operations Poster
This two-sided, full-color poster includes key sections from our Congressional Deskbook plus a federal budget process flowchart. The Congressional Operations Poster is an ideal tool for agency and classroom training purposes. This poster is also used as a basket or package-stuffer for Capitol Hill Day attendees.

Leadership schedules measure for floor consideration § 8.70

Leadership schedules measure for floor consideration §§ 8.160, 8.170

Adjourns at end of day

House debates and can amend measure §§ 8.110, 8.120

Senate debates and can amend measure
§§ 8.180, 8.190, 8.200, 8.210, 8.220, 8.230

§ 8.112

93rd 94th

House passes measure
§§ 8.130, 8.140

Senate passes measure
§§ 8.240, 8.250

House versus Committee of the Whole
House
Established by Constitution Mace raised

95th 96th 97th 98th 99th 100th 101st 102nd 103rd 104th 105th 106th 107th 108th 109th 110th

Committee of the Whole
Established by House for consideration of a specific measure Mace lowered Chair of Committee of the Whole presides, appointed by Speaker Five-minute rule for amendments; special rule from Rules Committee dictates procedure, after adoption of rule by House Quorum of 100 25 members to trigger a recorded vote Motion for previous question not in order; motion to limit or end debate may be offered Motion to recommit not in order Motion to reconsider not in order Routine business of House not in order

Measures must pass both the House and the Senate in identical form before being presented to the President.
One chamber agrees to the other chamber’s version
§ 8.260

Speaker presides One-hour rule

OR

Each chamber appoints Members to a conference committee, which reconciles differences and agrees to a conference report § 8.280

OR

House and Senate exchange amendments to bill and reach agreement § 8.270

Quorum of 218 One-fifth of members (44 with minimum quorum) to trigger a recorded vote Motion for previous question in order Motion to recommit in order Motion to reconsider in order Routine business of House in order

House approves conference report

Senate approves conference report

Legislation presented to the President.
President signs measure Measure becomes law If President does not sign measure into law within 10 days § 8.290 If Congress is in session, measure becomes law If Congress is not in session, measure does not become law (“pocket veto”) President vetoes measure Measure does not become law, unless both chambers override veto by 2/3 majority

§ 8.61

111th 112th

Reading the Cover Page of a House Committee Report
1 Committee reports, including those from

113th 114th

§ 11.15
Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

conference committees, are numbered sequentially as the reports are filed by any committee with its parent chamber. “H. Rept.” denotes a report from a House committee; “S. Rept.” from a Senate committee. The numbers before the hyphen show the Congress; for example, “106” means 106th Congress. The numbers following the hyphen make up the unique, sequential number for the report.
2 If a measure is referred to more than one

} HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES { ________________________________________________________
106TH CONGRESS 1st Session REPT. 106–74 Part 3

1

115th 116th 117th

________________________________________________________ 2 3
FINANCIAL SERVICES ACT OF 1999

118th 119th 120th 121st

_______________ 4
JUNE 15, 1999.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

_______________ 5
MR. BLILEY, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the following

Congressional Operations Poster
Copyright © 2005 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressPoster.com
Legislative Series

Recorded Congressional Information
Some congressional and related information is regularly updated on telephone recordings.

Congressional Directory

Legislative Series

House of Representatives Floor Schedule Information:
Democratic Recording (advance schedule), 202-225-1600 Democratic Recording (current proceedings), 202-225-7400 Republican Recording (advance schedule), 202-225-2020 Republican Recording (current proceedings), 202-225-7430

Deskbook
The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress FIFTH EDITION
Michael L. Koempel Judy Schneider
Includes Capitol Hill and District maps

Congressional

committee, each committee reporting the measure uses the same report number. But, each committee’s report is printed separately and designated a “part” of the report. In this example, all reports were H. Rept. 106-74, but the Banking Committee reported “Part 1” and a supplement, “Part 2.” The report from the Commerce Committee was then “Part 3.” (Part designations often appear in Roman numerals.)
3 An identification of the measure, such as its

REPORT
together with

§ 3.17

6 7 8

ADDITIONAL VIEWS
[To accompany H.R. 10]

Addressing Correspondence to Members of Congress
Addressing Letters to an Individual Member
Honorable [name of representative] [room number, building] e.g., 1111 Longworth House Office Bldg. U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Dear Representative [last name]: Honorable [name of senator] [room number, building] e.g., 123 Russell Senate Office Bldg. U.S. Senate Washington, DC 20510 Dear Senator [last name]:

“popular name” or “short title.”
4 The reporting date and the calendar

designation; in this case, the “Union Calendar.”
5 The chair and committee reporting the measure. 6 The notation of minority, supplemental, or

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 10) to enhance competition in the financial services industry by providing a prudential framework for the affiliation of banks, securities firms, and other financial service providers, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.
CONTENTS
Page

9

Senate Floor Schedule Information:
Democratic Recording, 202-224-8541 Republican Recording, 202-224-8601

additional views, if one or more committee members requested their inclusion.
7 The measure that is being reported from the

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences www.TheCapitol.Net

Sections are from and section references are to the Congressional Deskbook 2005-2007, by Judy Schneider and Michael Koempel. ISBN: 1-58733-011-3

Government Printing Office:
New Congressional Publications, 202-512-1809

committee.
8 A brief description of the measure and the

White House Executive Clerk:
Status of Bills Received, 202-456-2226

committee’s recommendation to the parent chamber.
9 The report text begins, sometimes with

Office of the Federal Register:
New Public Law Numbers, 202-741-6043

a table of contents.

Amendment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Purpose and Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Background and Need for Legislation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committee Consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roll Call Votes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committee Oversight Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committee on Government Reform Oversight Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . Committee Cost Estimate, Congressional Budget Office Estimate, and Unfunded Mandates Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advisory Committee Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constitutional Authority Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applicability to Legislative Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57—325

2 98 110 120 120 120 129 129 129 129 129 129 129 130 207 336

Addressing Letters to a Committee Chair
Committee on [name] [room number, building] e.g., 2222 Rayburn House Office Bldg. U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515 Dear Chairman [last name]: Committee on [name] [room number, building] e.g., 123 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg. U.S. Senate Washington, DC 20510 Dear Chairman [last name]:

Contents
The Federal Budget Process
§ 9.53*

Formulation of President’s Budget*
Preparation of the president’s budget typically begins in the spring of each year, often nine months before the budget is submitted to Congress and about 17 months before the start of the fiscal year to which it pertains.
During calendar year prior to year in which the fiscal year begins:

Congressional Budget Process Flowchart
Approximate timeline: Fiscal Year begins

February

March

April
Congress agrees to concurrent resolution on the budget.

May
Congress implements budget resolution policies by adopting: (1) appropriations measures; (2) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation; and (3) reconciliation legislation (if required).

June–September
President signs (or vetoes) budget measures.

October 1

President submits budget proposal to Congress no later than first Monday in February. § 9.40

Execution of Federal Budget*
During fiscal year:

Budget Resolution
§ 9.50

House committees submit views and estimates to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

House floor votes on budget resolution.

House floor votes on conference report on budget resolution. Budget resolution spending levels are allocated to committees having jurisdiction over spending legislation. Allocations, referred to as 302(a) allocations, are printed in joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on the budget resolution.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of budget resolution. Senate committees submit views and estimates to Senate Budget Committee. Senate Budget Committee holds hearings and marks up budget resolution.

Spring
• Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issues planning guidance to executive agencies. • Agencies begin development of budget requests.

Senate floor votes on budget resolution.

Senate floor votes on conference report on budget resolution.

Discretionary Spending

Appropriations process
§ 9.80

Summer
• OMB issues Circular A-11, providing detailed instructions for submitting budget data and material. • Agencies submit initial budget requests to OMB.

House Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

House Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

House floor votes on the appropriations measures.

House votes on conference reports.

Fall
• OMB staff review agency budget requests in relation to president’s priorities, program performance, and budget constraints. • President, based on recommendations by the OMB director, makes decisions on agency budget requests. Commonly referred to as the “passback,” OMB informs agencies of decisions on budget requests.

Hearings on president’s budget by House and Senate Appropriations Committees and subcommittees begin soon after it is submitted and continue through the spring.

Discretionary spending amount assumed in budget resolution allocated to House/ Senate Appropriations Committees in respective 302(a) allocations.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of the appropriations measures.

President signs (or vetoes) appropriations measures.

Senate Appropriations Committee subdivides its 302(a) allocation among its subcommittees. These subdivisions are referred to as 302(b) allocations; they are the spending ceilings for the regular appropriations measures.

• Agencies submit apportionment requests to OMB for each budget account. • OMB apportions (either approving or modifying apportionment requests) available funds to agencies by time period, program, project, or activity. • Agencies make allotments to lower-level units, incur obligations, make outlays, and request supplemental appropriations, if necessary, to carry out programs, projects, and activities. • Agencies record obligations and outlays pursuant to administrative control of funds procedures, report to Treasury, and prepare financial statements. • President may submit supplemental appropriations request to Congress. • President may propose impoundments (e.g., deferrals or rescissions) to Congress.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Senate Appropriations Committee and subcommittees mark up and report separate appropriations measures.

Senate floor votes on the appropriations measures.

Senate votes on conference reports.

§ 9.82

Mandatory Spending and Revenues

Reconciliation process
§ 9.110

House authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to House Budget Committee.

House Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

House floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

House votes on reconciliation conference report.

New Appropriations Subcommittee Organization
President signs (or vetoes) reconciliation legislation.
Congress annually considers regular appropriations bills to provide budget authority to agencies for the upcoming fiscal year. Each regular appropriations bill typically has been developed by the relevant House and Senate Appropriations subcommittee. At the beginning of the 109th Congress, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees reorganized their subcommittees, with the House eliminating three subcommittees and the Senate Appropriations Committee eliminating one. The subcommittee organization and the resulting regular appropriations bills will no longer be parallel and thus will require some resolution when the two committees resolve any differences before sending the measures to the president. The Appropriations subcommittees of the House and Senate are the following:

Winter
• Agencies may appeal decisions on budget requests to OMB director and in some cases directly to the president. • Agencies prepare and OMB reviews budget justification material that is presented to the responsible appropriations subcommittees during the congressional phase of the federal budget process.
Source: Office of Management and Budget, Circular A-11 (Washington: June 2002), section 10-5.

Budget resolution may include reconciliation directives to authorizing committees, instructing them to recommend changes in law to achieve mandatory spending and revenue changes specified in budget resolution. Senate Budget Committee packages recommendations into omnibus reconciliation legislation.

Conference committee resolves differences between House and Senate versions of reconciliation legislation.

Hearings on presidential and congressional mandatory spending and revenue proposals by House and Senate authorizing committees begin soon after president’s budget is submitted and continue through the spring.

Senate authorizing committees mark up and submit recommended changes in law to Senate Budget Committee.

Senate floor votes on reconciliation legislation.

Senate votes on reconciliation conference report.

Individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation
§ 9.70, § 9.90

House authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House votes on conference reports.

Separate from any reconciliation directives, authorizing committees also may develop and report individual legislation changing mandatory spending and revenue laws. Any such legislation, however, must be consistent with budget resolution policies.

Conference committees resolve differences between House and Senate versions of individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

President signs (or vetoes) individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

House
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Agencies Department of Homeland Security

Senate
Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies Defense Energy and Water, and Related Agencies State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Homeland Security Interior and Related Agencies Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

Non-partisan training and publications that show how Washington works.™

Congressional Operations Poster
Copyright © 2005 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 202-678-1600 www.CongressPoster.com Sections are from and section references are to the Congressional Deskbook 2005-2007, by Judy Schneider and Michael Koempel. ISBN: 1-58733-011-3

Senate authorizing committees mark up and report individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate floor votes on individual mandatory spending and revenue legislation.

Senate votes on conference reports.

* By Bill Heniff Jr.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

§ 9.160

Budget Process Glossary
Account: Control and reporting unit for budgeting and accounting. Allowances: Amounts included in the budget to cover possible additional expenditures for statutory pay increases, contingencies, and other requirements. Appropriated Entitlement: An entitlement for which budget authority is provided in annual appropriations acts. Appropriation: Provision of law providing budget authority that permits federal agencies to incur obligations and make payments out of the Treasury. Authorization: Provision in law that establishes or continues a program or agency and authorizes appropriations for it. Baseline: Projection of future revenues, budget authority, outlays, and other budget amounts under assumed economic conditions and participation rates without a change in current policy. Borrowing Authority: Spending authority that permits a federal agency to incur obligations and to make payments for specified purposes out of funds borrowed from the Treasury or the public. Budget Authority: Authority in law to enter into obligations that normally result in outlays. Budget Resolution: Concurrent resolution passed by both houses setting forth the congressional budget for budget aggregates and possibly containing reconciliation instructions. Byrd Rule: A Congressional Budget Act rule (Section 313), named after its author, Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), that prohibits extraneous matter in a reconciliation measure considered in the Senate. Under the rule, extraneous matter includes, among other things specified in the act, any provision that has no direct budgetary effect or that increases the deficit (or reduces the surplus) in a fiscal year beyond those covered in the reconciliation measure. Continuing Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides stop-gap (or full-year) funding for agencies that have not received regular appropriations. (Also referred to as a continuing resolution.) Cost Estimate: A Congressional Budget Office estimate of outlays from reported legislation. Credit Authority: Authority to incur direct loan obligations or make loan guarantee commitments. Deferral: Action or inaction that temporarily withholds, delays, or effectively precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Direct Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in laws other than annual appropriations acts. Discretionary Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in annual appropriations acts. Earmark: For expenditures, an amount set aside within an appropriation account for a specified purpose. Entitlement Authority: Law that obligates the federal government to make payments to eligible persons, businesses, or governments. Fiscal Year: October 1 through September 30; e.g., fiscal year 2010 begins October 1, 2009. Impoundment: Action or inaction by an executive official that delays or precludes the obligation or expenditure of budget authority. Mandatory Spending: See Direct Spending. Obligation: A binding agreement that requires payment. Outlays: Payments to liquidate obligations. PAYGO (Pay-As-You-Go): Process by which new direct spending or decreases must be offset so that a surplus is not reduced or a deficit increased. Reconciliation: Process by which Congress changes existing laws to conform revenue and spending levels to the levels set in a budget resolution. Regular Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides budget authority for the next fiscal year. Reprogramming: Shifting funds from one program to another in the same appropriations account. Rescission: Cancellation of budget authority previously provided by Congress. Revenues: Taxes, fees, gifts, and other income received by the federal government. Scorekeeping: Process for tracking and reporting on the status of congressional budgetary actions affecting budget authority, receipts, outlays, the surplus or deficit, and the public-debt limit. Sequester: Cancellation of budgetary resources in response to a breach in discretionary-spending limits or a violation of the PAYGO requirement. Supplemental Appropriations Act: An appropriations act that provides additional budget authority during the current year when the regular appropriation is insufficient. Tax Expenditure: Loss of revenue attributable to an exemption, deduction, preference, or other exclusion under federal tax law. Transfer: Shift of budgetary resources from one appropriation account to another, as authorized by law. Views and Estimates: Annual report of each House and Senate committee on budgetary matters within its jurisdiction.

Science, the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and Related Agencies

Departments of Transportation, Transportation, Treasury, Treasury, and Housing and Urban the Judiciary, Development, the Judiciary, Housing District of Columbia, and and Urban Independent Agencies Development, and Related Agencies District of Columbia Legislative Branch [no subcommittee, handled by full committee] Legislative Branch

Front • Legislative Process Flowchart (§ 8.01) • Terms of Congress (§ 7.21) • Tips for Contacting Members of Congress (§ 3.17) • Addressing Correspondence to Members of Congress (§ 3.18) • Reading the Cover Page of a House Committee Report (§ 8.61) • Comparison of Selected House and Senate Procedures (§ 8.151) • Recorded Congressional Information (§ 11.15) • House versus Committee of the Whole (§ 8.112)

Ships within 1 business day Paper: 2 pages (1 poster, double-sided) Published 2008 Dimensions: 24 x 19 Weight: 0.5 pounds Rolled in tube ISBN 10: 1587331020 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-102-2 Folded flat in envelope ISBN 10: 1587331020-F ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-102-2-F $19.95 Available March, 2008

Back • Formulation of President’s Budget* • Federal Budget Process Flowchart (§ 9.53)* • Execution of Federal Budget* • New Appropriations Subcommittee Organization (§ 9.82) • Budget Process Glossary (§ 9.170) * By Bill Heniff Jr. Section § references are to the Congressional Deskbook.

Included in these courses:
• Capitol Hill Workshop • Advanced Federal Budget Process

Related Publications:
• Federal Regulatory Process Poster • How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level (chart)

Related Audio Courses on CD:
• Understanding the Path of Legislation • Senate Scheduling and Floor Procedures • Senate Amendment Procedure • House Floor Procedures

Larger image and secure ordering online:

56

703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

thecapitol.net/cop.htm or CongressPoster.com

P U B L I C AT I O N S
Federal Regulatory Process Poster
Author: Ken Ackerman
This informative two-sided color poster includes a detailed flowchart illustrating the regulatory process and where each player fits into the process, with several sections highlighting Real World Research Skills. The Federal Regulatory Process Poster is ideal for training and classroom use.
The Author: Ken Ackerman, counsel to the law firm of Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Bode Matz in Washington, DC, is a 25-year veteran of senior positions in Congress, the executive branch, and financial regulation.
The Federal Regulatory Process
By Kenneth Ackerman*
Authorization Regulatory Players:
1 The Agencies: Each organizational unit of
the United States government except Congress, the courts, the governments of the District of Columbia or territories and possessions, the military, and other offices specifically exempted.

Development

Internal Prior Review

Public Comment

Agency Finalization

Review by Congress

Implementation/ Challenge in Court Special Procedures:
Court Hears Case from “Aggrieved Party” 14 11 Congressional Review: This rarely used
process, created by the Congressional Review Act of 1996, allows Congress to review each new final “major” rule (defined to left) before it takes effect. Generally, the rule must wait 60 days after being submitted to the House and Senate, giving the two chambers the opportunity to pass a Joint Resolution of Disapproval (including concurrence by the president) to block it. Otherwise, it takes effect after the waiting period. Deadlines are adjusted in special circumstances. This process in no way diminishes Congress’s power to override or annul a regulation at any time by statute, even after it has taken effect.

2 Federal Register: The official daily publication
for the federal regulatory process, it contains full texts of all proposed and final rules, agency notices and agendas, meeting announcements, and similar items. Generally, publication in the Federal Register creates a legal presumption that the public has been notified on any regulatory matter.

Federal Courts

Generally, courts will not intervene until “final agency action.”

Finds Final Rule Defective Range of Remedies includes staying or setting aside the rule Final Rule Supported

3 Independent Agencies: Congress has
chosen to insulate certain agencies from political influence, because their work involves sensitive judgments that affect individual people, businesses, or industries. While required to follow notice-andcomment rule-making procedures, these agencies make decisions independently from the White House or OMB. Their independence is protected through legal devices such as (a) decision-making by multimember commissions, (b) political balance among members, (c) officials removable only for cause. They include: • the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; • the Commodity Futures Trading Commission; • the Consumer Product Safety Commission; • the Federal Communications Commission; • the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; • the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; • the Federal Housing Finance Board; • the Federal Maritime Commission; • the Federal Trade Commission; • the Mine Enforcement Safety and Health Review Commission; • the National Labor Relations Board; • the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; • the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission; • the Postal Rate Commission; • the Securities and Exchange Commission; • and others specified by statute.

12 Changes and revisions: The requirement
for public notice implies that if a proposed rule is changed fundamentally, it must be re-published to allow comment on the new approach. But courts have held that even significant changes in a proposed rule need not always trigger the need for republication, so long as the original notice alerted the public sufficiently to the possibility of later alterations, the changes are consistent with the original scheme or a logical outgrowth of comments received, or in similar situations.

Congress

Congress by Statute: • Creates Agency • Authorizes Agency to Act • Oversees Regulatory Process

10 Congress can intervene at any time by statute, appropriation, or oversight.

House and Senate Review Major Rules

11

No Rev. of Disapproval is adopted within deadlines

Adopts Jt. Res. of Disapproval and President concurs within deadline, usually 60 days

Rule is disapproved

Emergency or Interim rules: In exigent cases where good cause is found to exist, agencies can issue rules on an emergency or interim basis bypassing the normal notice and comment process. Full procedures, though, are generally required before an emergency or interim rule can be made permanent. 13 Internal clearances: Each agency has its own
system for clearing (approving) regulatory proposals. For large cabinet departments containing dozens of agencies, it can be very time-consuming, requiring “sign-off” by the General Counsel, the chief financial and information officers, the Secretary, the civil rights office, and a variety of program officials. For multihead commissions, it generally requires a majority vote of members following “sign-off” by staff offices.

4 Office of Management and Budget:
OMB, created in 1970, is the President’s arm in the rule-making process. Formally located within the Executive Office of the President, OMB’s role is to apply government-wide discipline to rule-making while implementing the president’s priorities and assuring consistency among federal agencies. Where disagreements arise between OMB and agency heads, the President and the White House staff must resolve them. Independent agencies (defined above) are exempt from OMB review and approval of their proposed regulations. OMB implements its regulatory responsibilities through its Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA).

4 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) OMB Prompts Agency to Act

Reviews for: • Interagency Conflict • Policy Consistency • Budget Impact

Determines if “Significant” EO 12688

9

Reviews Package: Rule plus Reports 60 days, ±30 Day Extension

Reviews: Final Package, 45 days, ±30 Day Extension

Reviews for Consistency

Approves Returns for Reconsideration Returns for Reconsideration

Approves

Interpretive letters: Agencies often set policy through less formal pronouncements that can be issued without time-consuming notice-and-comment rulemaking, such as individual letters interpreting or applying their statutes. 14 Judicial Review: Any person “aggrieved” by
a regulation can challenge it in federal court claiming, among other possible grounds, that the agency (a) was arbitrary or capricious in its action or abused its discretion, (b) exceeded its statutory authority, or (c) failed to follow required procedures. The courts, among its remedies, can hold the rule unlawful, temporarily block its implementation, require further fact-finding or other procedures, or set aside specific findings and conclusions.

12 Internal Clearances 15 6 Conducts Mandatory Reviews: • Regulatory Impact 16 (”Cost-Benefit“) Analysis if “Significant” (see Executive Order EO 12688) • Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (APA sec. 603) • Unfunded Mandates Review (UMFA 1995) • Federalism Review (EO 13132) • Intergovernmental Consultation (EO 12372) • Civil Justice Review (EO 12988) • Environmental Impact Statement 12 Revises and Resubmits to OMB or Returns for Major Rewrite Approves Package • Proposed Rule • Reg. Analysis • Reg. Flex. • Public Contact • Comment Period Agencies encouraged to engage the public in structured dialogue or proposal

13 Internal Clearances

Glossary:
5 “ex parte” contact: Oral or written
communications to agency or OMB officials involved in the rule-making that are not on the public record and without prior notice to all parties (beyond requests for simple status reports). Generally, these contacts must be publicly disclosed or are barred.

1

Agency

Drafts: • Semiannual Regulatory Agenda • Annual Regulatory Plan 8 Agency Decides to Adopt Rule Drafts Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR)— Optional

12 Reviews Comments Assembles Final Package • Address each Comment and Change • Final Reg. Flex. Analysis Revises and Resubmits to OMB or Returns for Major Rewrite Non-Major, takes effect in 30 Days, or on Effective Date Approves Final Package Submits Major Rules to Congress 7 Implements New Rule

Drafts Proposed Rule

Negotiated Rulemaking: Agencies in some situations can negotiate rules directly with affected pubic and industry representatives under procedures of the Negotiated Rulemaking Act, 5 U.S.C. 561 et seq. Paperwork Reduction: Congress, through
the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, has created a parallel process under which each new information collection requirement imposed by a federal agency must undergo a separate process of public notice and comment, including separate review by OMB. For most rules, comments on the information-collection requirement are taken simultaneously with comments on the rule itself.

12 Decides to Revise Significantly

Code of Federal Regulations: The formal
compilation of all final federal regulations from all agencies, organized in titles and sections corresponding to the U.S. Code titles of their underlying statutes.

15 Regulatory Agenda: The annual document
developed by each agency and published in the Federal Register listing all rules being considered for enactment during the year.

6 Executive Orders (E.O.): These orders,
signed by the president, have mandatory effect on all executive branch agencies but do not carry the force and effect of law or regulation and “independent” agencies (defined above) are generally exempt on matters of policy.

16 Regulatory Impact (“Cost-Benefit”) Analysis:

An analysis by the agency of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of significant rules.

7 Major Rule: A final rule that OMB determines
to have an annual impact on the economy of at least $100 million or other significant economic effects. These rules are subject to review by Congress before taking effect.

3 INDEPENDENT AGENCIES differ. They are exempt from review by OMB and mandatory Executive Order procedures.

5 Limitations on “ex parte” contacts (within red box).

For the Public, Five Bites at the Apple:
A Lobby the agency. B Submit public comments. C Appeal to Congress. D Challenge in court. E Lobby the agency again.

8 Regulation (or Rule): An agency statement
of general applicability and future effect intended to have the force and effect of law. However, rules involving (a) military or foreign functions of the United States or (b) matters relating to internal agency functions such as management, personnel, loans, grants, or contracts are generally exempt from the formal notice-and-comment process.

2

Federal Register

Publishes Agenda and Plan

Publishes ANPR

Publishes Official Public Notice

Publishes Final Rule

9 Significant Rule: A rule that OMB determines
is likely to (a) have an annual impact on the economy of $100 million or more, (b) adversely affect productivity, jobs, competition, the environment, or other interests, (c) create inconsistencies with other agencies; or (d) raise novel legal or policy issues.

Public/ Affected Industry

Public Urges (Discourages) Agency Action A

Opportunity to Submit Comments: Usually 60 Days B

10 Statute: A formal law passed by Congress and
signed by the president (or his veto overridden). Every regulation must have a statute authorizing it—usually a broad, umbrella grant—or it cannot stand.

Reviews Package. If dissatisfied, decides whether to: • Challenge in Court • Seek Congressional C Action • Work with Agency to Influence Implementation D

Comply with Rule— Urge Change if Needed E

Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

Federal Regulatory Process Poster
Copyright © 2006 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved. PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 703-739-3790 www.AgencyPoster.com *Kenneth Ackerman practices law at Olsson, Frank, and Weeda, PC, in Washington, DC.

The Federal Regulatory Process
By Kenneth Ackerman Selected Key Laws and Rules
Administrative Procedures Act,
1946 (5 U.S.C. 500 et seq.): Establishes the basic rules for Federal agency procedures, covering rule making, fact finding, adjudications, and other issues.

Agencies and Directories
Agency contacts:
White House Office of Management and Budget National Archives Government Printing Office/GPO Access
<www.whitehouse.gov/> <www.whitehouse.gov/omb/> <www.archives.gov/> <www.gpoaccess.gov/index.html>

§ 4.43 GPO Access: Federal Register
<www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/>

§ 4.47 CFR Titles
Title 1 Title 2 Title 3 Title 4 Title 5 Title 6 Title 7 Title 8 Title 9 Title 10 Title 11 Title 12 Title 13 Title 14 Title 15 Title 16 Title 17 Title 18 Title 19 Title 20 Title 21 Title 22 Title 23 Title 24 Title 25 Title 26 General Provisions [Reserved] The President Accounts Administrative Personnel Homeland Security Agriculture Aliens and Nationality Animals and Animal Products Energy Federal Elections Banks and Banking Business Credit and Assistance Aeronautics and Space Commerce and Foreign Trade Commercial Practices Commodity and Securities Exchanges Conservation of Power and Water Resources Customs Duties Employees’ Benefits Food and Drugs Foreign Relations Highways Housing and Urban Development Indians Internal Revenue Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms Judicial Administration Labor Mineral Resources Money and Finance: Treasury National Defense Navigation and Navigable Waters Education Panama Canal Parks, Forests, and Public Property Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans’ Relief Postal Service Protection of Environment Public Contracts and Property Management Public Health Public Lands: Interior Emergency Management and Assistance Public Welfare Shipping Telecommunication Federal Acquisition Regulations System Transportation Wildlife and Fisheries

Scope:
• Issues of the Federal Register published from 1994 to the current issue. • Links to page to sign up for daily Federal Register table of contents delivered via email.

Sponsor:
Government Printing Office. (Content is provided by the Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration.)

Congressional Review Act, 1996 (5 USC 801 et seq.): Creates the process allowing the House and Senate to review and block “major” new final rules by adopting a joint resolution with presidential concurrence. Freedom of Information Act,
1966 (5 U.S.C. 552): Guarantees public access to government-held information (with specified exceptions) and creates process to obtain it.

Executive branch directories:
FirstGov Library of Congress executive directory
<www.firstgov.gov/> <www.loc.gov/rr/news/fedgov.html>

Description:
The Federal Register is the official daily publication for rules, proposed rules, and notices of federal agencies and organizations, as well as executive orders and other presidential documents. GPO Access allows searches of the Federal Register by word for 1994 to present, and provides advanced searching and retrieval by page number for 1995 to present. The Federal Register is in text format for 1994, text and PDF for 1995–1999, and HTML and PDF for 2000 to present. Searchers can select a single year or search across a selection of years. Individual issues from 1998 to present can be browsed in HTML format. Items in the Federal Register are cited by volume and page number, with year; for example: 69 Fed. Reg. 29171 (2004)

Independent regulatory agencies:
Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System Commodity Futures Trading Commission Consumer Product Safety Commission Federal Communications Commission Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Housing Finance Board Federal Maritime Commission Federal Trade Commission Mine Enforcement Safety and Health Review Commission National Labor Relations Board Nuclear Regulatory Commission Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission Postal Rate Commission Securities and Exchange Commission
<www.federalreserve.gov/> <www.cftc.gov/cftc/cftchome.htm> <www.cpsc.gov/> <www.fcc.gov/> <www.fdic.gov/> <www.ferc.gov/> <www.fhfb.gov/> <www.fmc.gov/> <www.ftc.gov/> <www.fmshrc.gov/> <www.nlrb.gov/nlrb/home/default.asp> <www.nrc.gov/> <www.oshrc.gov/> <www.prc.gov/> <www.sec.gov/>

Government in the Sunshine Act,
1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b): Requires multiheaded agencies to conduct meetings in public (with specified exceptions).

Search Tips:
Use “quotes” to find phrases. Examples: “colorado river” “radiation exposure compensation act” Search for agency names in quotes. Examples: “fish and wildlife service” “national institutes of health” Search for citations to affected sections of the Code of Federal Regulations in quotes: Examples: “50 CFR Part 17” “28 CFR Part 79” Use AND to combine two or more aspects of a complex search. Examples: fisheries AND halibut “fish and wildlife service” AND “sea turtle” Use Advanced Search to limit searches to: • A specific date or date range • A specific section of the Federal Register, for example: – Final rules and regulations – Proposed rules and regulations – Notices (includes announcements of grant applications and public meetings) – Presidential documents (includes executive orders and proclamations)

Federal Privacy Act, 1974 (5 U.S.C.

Contents
Front • Federal Regulatory Process Flowchart • Regulatory Players (where they fit into the process) • Glossary (terms listed on chart) • Special Procedures • For the Public (where the public can influence the process) Back • Selected Key Laws and Rules • Agencies and Directories • GPO Access: Federal Register (§ 4.43) • GPO Access: Code of Federal Regulations (§ 4.45) • Resources • CFR Titles (§ 4.47) Section § references are to Real World Research Skills, by Peggy Garvin

552a): Creates rights against agency disclosure of information on individuals.

National Environmental Protection Act, 1969 (42 USC 4331 et seq.):
Requires agencies to draft and publish environmental impact statements on environmentally sensitive rules.

Paperwork Reduction Act, 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.): Creates standards for agency imposition of informationcollection burdens on the public. Regulatory Flexibility Act, 1980 (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.): Creates procedures for agencies to consider the impact or burden of new rules on small businesses.

Executive Orders:
E.O. 12688: Regulatory planning and review: Details the role of OMB in the Federal rule-making process and requires non-independent agencies to analyze the costs and benefits of significant rules. E.O. 12988: Civil Justice Review: Requires agencies to review new rules and legislation to improve legal clarity and enhance the civil justice system. E.O. 13132: Federalism: Requires agencies to consult with state and local governments on rules that affect them. E.O. 13175 requires consultation with Indian Tribal governments. E.O. 13211: Energy: Requires agencies to analyze significant new rules involving energy supply, distribution, or use and prepare a Statement of Energy Effects. OMB Circular A-4: Updated guidelines for agencies conducting Regulatory Impact Analyses on proposed significant rules.

Resources
Federal Register:
Federal Register Federal Register, documents on public inspection Federal Register, tutorial
<www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/> <www.archives.gov/federal-register/ public-inspection/> <www.archives.gov/federal-register/tutorial/>

Title 27

§ 4.45 GPO Access: Code of Federal Regulations
<www.gpoaccess.gov/cfr/>

Title 28 Title 29 Title 30 Title 31 Title 32 Title 33 Title 34 Title 35 Title 36 Title 37 Title 38 Title 39 Title 40 Title 41 Title 42 Title 43 Title 44 Title 45 Title 46 Title 47 Title 48 Title 49 Title 50

Scope:
• Current text of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). • Text of previous editions of the CFR, going back to 1996 or 1997, depending on title.

Sponsor:
Government Printing Office. (Content is provided by the Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration.)

Code of Federal Regulations:
Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR List of CFR Sections Affected
<www.gpoaccess.gov/cfr/> http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/ text-idx?c=ecfr&tpl=%2Findex.tpl> <www.gpoaccess.gov/lsa/>

Description:
The CFR organizes the general and permanent regulations of executive branch departments and agencies into fifty broad subject areas, or titles, such as Energy, Internal Revenue, and Public Health. Each title is updated once each calendar year with the regulations issued in the Federal Register throughout the previous year: titles 1–16 are updated as of January 1; titles 17–27 as of April 1; titles 28–41 as of July 1; and titles 42–50 as of October 1. Items in the CFR are typically cited by title and section, with year; for example: 34 C.F.R. § 1100.2 (2003) GPO Access allows users to search the CFR by word, retrieve CFR sections by citation, or browse by CFR title and part.

Regulatory Process:
OMB’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs Regulations.Gov (submit comments on line) Regulations under E.O. 12866 Review The Unified Regulatory Agenda TheCapitol.Net regulatory links GSA’s regulatory guide, “RegInfo”
<www.whitehouse.gov/omb/inforeg/regpol.html> <www.regulations.gov/ fdmspublic-bld61/component/main> <www.reginfo.gov/public/do/eoPackageMain> <www.gpoaccess.gov/ua/> <www.thecapitol.net/Research/adminresearch.htm> <www.reginfo.gov/public/>

Search Tips:
• Word searching works the same as in the Federal Register on GPO Access. • To retrieve a known CFR citation, search for it in any of the following ways: – in the word search box in quotes, in this example format: “34CFR1100.2”; – with the Retrieve by CFR Citation fill-in search form; or – with the Browse feature to select title, then part, then section. • For a more precise search, use the Browse and/or Search feature and select a specific CFR title or titles to search within.

Freedom of Information Act:
Exclusive provider of Congressional Quarterly Executive Conferences

National Security Archive, FOIA guide Department of Justice, FOIA reference materials

<www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/foia.html> <www.usdoj.gov/04foia/04_7.html>

Federal Regulatory Process Poster
Copyright © 2006 by TheCapitol.Net, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 703-739-3790 PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 www.AgencyPoster.com Select sections are from Real World Research Skills, by Peggy Garvin. Paperback • ISBN: 1-58733-007-5 Hardbound • ISBN: 1-58733-093-8 Research Skills Series

Updating the CFR:
CFR titles are only updated annually. A number of tools exist to help you learn if a CFR section has been changed by any new regulations since the CFR title was last updated. Options include: • Searching the Federal Register for the time period since your CFR title was last updated. • Using the List of Sections Affected on GPO Access. Note: Although GPO Access includes instructions, this can be a tedious and confusing process. • Using the GPO Access service called e-CFR (see page 64).

Think Tanks, Outside Groups:
AEI-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies The Center for Regulatory Effectiveness
<www.aei.brookings.org/> <www.thecre.com/> <www.ombwatch.org/> <www.regscan.com/home.php> <www.mercatus.org/regradar/>

Real World Research Skills
An Introduction to Factual, International, Judicial, Legislative, and Regulatory Research

OMB Watch RegScan (subscriber service) Reg Radar (George Mason University)

e-CFR:
<www.gpoaccess.gov/ecfr/> The e-CFR database is an electronic version of the CFR that is continuously updated as new regulations are issued. It can be browsed by title, part, and section, and has advanced search features.

By Peggy Garvin

Ships within 1 business day Paper: 2 pages (1 poster, double-sided) Published 2006 Dimensions: 24 x 18 inches Weight: 0.5 pounds

Included in these courses:
• Understanding the Regulatory Process

Rolled in tube ISBN 10: 158733013X ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-013-1 Folded flat in envelope ISBN 10: 158733013X-F ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-013-1-F $14.97

Related Publications:
• Congressional Operations Poster • How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level (chart)

Related Audio Courses on CD:
• The Federal Regulatory Process: Piecing Together the Regulatory Puzzle • How Federal Agencies Can Work Effectively with Congress and Its Staff • How to Work the Hill Like a Pro

Larger image and secure ordering online:

thecapitol.net/frpp.htm or RegulatoryProcessPoster.com

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Legal Spectator & More LEGAL Author: Jacob A. Stein SPECTATOR A compilation of Washington, DC, attorney Jacob Stein’s
essays about lawyers, judges, clients, literature, and popular culture. The essays in this volume have previously appeared in Washington Lawyer, American Scholar, the Times Literary Supplement, and Wilson Quarterly.
The Author: Jacob Stein, columnist to the Washington Lawyer magazine since 1990, is a partner in Stein, Mitchell & Mezines LLP , Washington, DC. He has been a trial lawyer for more than 55 years.

&MORE
Jacob A. Stein
Paperback: 320 pages ISBN 10: 1-58733-009-1 Published 2003 Dimensions: 5.5 x 8.5 x 1 Weight: 1 pound $33

Some of the essays in this volume:

Lawyers • Was It Me or My Case They Didn’t Like? • Irving Younger and Joe DiMaggio • Atticus Finch, LLP—Formerly PC, Formerly LLC • Civility as an Art Form in Diplomacy and the Law • How to Get a Confession • I Need a Continuance • Cold Cash Upfront Judges • The Courthouse • The Visiting Judge • Outrageous in New York People • Comes the Revolution You’ll Pay the Two Dollars • An Evening with Louis Armstrong • Peter Arno Meets Somerset Maugham • The Eponymous Mr. Ponzi • Writing Like Oliver Wendell Holmes • Clinton, Asquith, and Schopenhauer • General Buck Lanham, Ernest Hemingway, and That Woman in Venice This & That • Congressional Hearings, Pardons, and Fall Guys • Daumier Motions in Court • Fighting the Blues With the Fine Arts • Keep Your Big Mouth Shut • Spies are Back at 810 F Street • Success • Keeping Secrets

“Writing in the first person and sounding very much the afterdinner raconteur, Stein tells stories that connect lawyers to their ups, downs, fears, quirks, ironies, history, and even such unlikely subjects as the French Impressionists.”
Peter D. Baird, Litigation (American Bar Association)

Related Publications:
• Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers, by Keith Evans

Selected Essays:

58

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thecapitol.net/lsam.htm or LegalSpectatorAndMore.com

CUSTOM PRODUCTS
TheCapitol.Net can customize any of our publications, booklets or audio courses, with quantity minimums as low as 250 copies. Quantity minimums drop to just 50 for our customized chart, How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level. Our informative booklets are ideal for conference sponsorship, trade show give-away, or as a member benefit. Customization services can include: • Your Logo • Your Organization History • Executive Staff listing • Your Strategic Goals • Your Mission Statement • Your Accomplishments • Your Qualifications Please call us to discuss branding opportunities for any of the following products: • Booklets • Real World Research Skills • Congressional Deskbook • Media Relations Handbook • Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers • Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook • How to Monitor and Influence Policy at the Federal Level chart • Congressional Operations Poster • Federal Regulatory Process Poster • Capitol Learning Audio Courses on CD from our popular telephone seminars • Your own telephone seminar produced as a customized audio CD To learn more, please complete our online Information Request form, or contact your Client Liaison at 703-739-3790, ext. 114. We can also customize our training for your organization! See page 48 or LegislativeTraining.com

Customizable Booklets
Our customizable booklets provide condensed, easy-to-access information and tips from several of our popular publications. We can personalize covers and internal pages to align with your brand. Booklets fit comfortably into any standard #10 business envelope.

• Pocket Dictionary of Legislative Terms:
Perfect reference tool, including congressional jargon and procedural terms.

Pocket Dictionary of

Legislative Terms

• Congress and the Legislative Process in a Nutshell: Real
world tools to use when observing, dealing with, or lobbying Congress. (Includes maps, tips and insights into operations on the Hill).

Congress and the Legislative Process in a Nutshell

• Media Relations Tips: An easy
handout for everyone in your group to make sure that they are prepared and confident if they ever have to deal with the media.

Media Relations Tips:
102 Secrets for Finding Success in Public Relations

Use customized booklets for:
• • • • • • • Trade show giveaways Legislative Conference handouts PAC contributor or new member gifts Lunch or dinner sponsorship handouts Employee education and reference Sales inventory Marketing or advertising mailers

Order standard (non-customized) booklets online or contact us to learn more about customization services. To discuss specifics, please complete our online Information Request form, or contact your Client Liaison at 703-739-3790, ext. 114.

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Selected Clients of TheCapitol.Net
TheCapitol.Net has more than 2000 clients representing Congressional offices, federal and state agencies, military branches, news media and NGOs nationwide. • Congressional Offices • Federal Agencies • Associations • • • • • • Labor Unions Think Tanks Libraries Military News Media Business • • • • • • • • • • • State and Local Government Universities and Schools NGOs and Nonprofits Diplomatic Corps Bookstores Coalitions Institutes Lobbying Firms PR Firms Law Firms Law Schools

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SELECTED CLIENTS
Selected Clients
• 9-11 Commission • ABC News • American Association for the Advancement of Science • Arizona Department of Transportation • Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. • Association for Advanced Life Underwriters • AstraZeneca • B&D Consulting • Boeing Company • Canadian Embassy • CIA • Congressional Federal Credit Union • Congressional Office of Compliance • Congressional Quarterly • Crowell & Moring • Delegation of the European Commission • DoD • Eastman Kodak Company • Embassy of Australia • Executive Office of the President • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) • Federal Trade Commission (FTC) • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) • General Dynamics • Georgetown Law Library • House Committee on Homeland Security • IBM • IRS, Treasury Acquisition Institute • Lawrence Livermore National Lab • Lockheed Martin • Mars, Incorporated • Maersk Line Limited • Military Officers Association of America • NASA • National Business Travel Association • National Cotton Council • National Institutes of Health (NIH) • National Journal • National Pork Producers Council • National Military Family Association • National MS Society • New York State Division of the Budget • Northrop Grumman Corp. • OPM • Patton Boggs • Pfizer • Save the Children • Senate Budget Committee • Shell • Social Security Administration • Society for Neuroscience • The American Legion • The New York Times • Time Warner • United Fresh Produce Association • University of Chicago • U.S. Air Force • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers • U.S. Coast Guard • U.S. Department of Agriculture • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) • U.S. Department of State • U.S. Department of Transportation • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs • U.S. Navy • Van Ness Feldman • Van Scoyoc Associates • Volunteers of America • Wiley Rein LLP • YMCA

For a larger list, see SelectedClients.com

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FA C U LT Y A N D A U T H O R S
“The highest quality of speakers I’ve ever experienced in a training program.” “Excellent choice of presenters. Would recommend this [program] to anybody interested in learning how Washington really works.” “Outstanding cast of speakers. All brought great and distinct insights.” “Quality of speakers and range of topics were excellent, however, the nonpartisan efforts were most critical/useful.” “Excellent workshop! Appreciated the openness of the knowledgeable and credible speakers.” “Speakers brought out points that aren’t usually discussed.”

Independent, subject matter experts who know how Washington works.TM TheCapitol.Net encompasses a dynamic team of more than 150 faculty members and authors, all of whom are independent subject matter experts and veterans in their fields. Faculty and authors include senior government executives, former Congressional members, Hill and agency staff, editors and journalists, lobbyists, lawyers, nonprofit executives and scholars. Our courses and publications explore how Washington works and how to work Washington.TM Our faculty and authors understand Washington, each carefully selected for their ability to teach others, both in person and in print. See “Faculty Favorites” on Hobnob Blog for places our faculty and authors like in Washington, DC. Some of the people who have written or taught for us include:
Tobias Dorsey
Author, Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook

Peggy Garvin
Garvin Information Consulting, Author, Real World Research Skills and contributing author, Congressional Deskbook

Walter Oleszek
Congressional Scholar

Patricia Schroeder
Association of American Publishers

Martha Angle
Congressional Quarterly

Mary Agnes Carey
Congressional Quarterly

James Slattery
Wiley Rein LLP

Roy Meyers
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Ann Compton
ABC News

Bill Heniff, Jr.
Contributing author, Congressional Deskbook

Peter Loge
Milo Public Affairs

Brad Fitch
Knowlegis, Author, Media Relations Handbook

Philip Joyce
George Washington University

Frank Burk
Retired Legislative Counsel, U.S. Senate

Ron Elving
National Public Radio

Sheila Kast
WYPR

Al Swift
Colling Swift & Hynes

Keith Evans
Author, Common Sense Rules of Advocacy for Lawyers

Ken Ackerman
Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Bode Matz PC Author, Federal Regulatory Process Poster

Jim Thurber
American University

Eugene Boyd
Contributing author, Congressional Deskbook

Robert S. Walker
Wexler & Walker

Steven Keller
George Washington University

Chris Davis
Congressional Scholar

Henry Hogue
Contributing author, Congressional Deskbook

Michael Koempel
Co-author, Congressional Deskbook

Sabrina Pacifici
LLRX.com

Clint Brass
Contributing author, Legislative Drafter’s Deskbook

Bob McLean
REM Association Services

Robert Gee
Law Library of Congress

James Saturno
Congressional Scholar

Ned Monroe
National Restaurant Association

Deanna Gelak
Working for the Future, LLP

Beth Gaston
Contributing author, Media Relations Handbook

Steve Roberts
Political Analyst

William LaForge
Winstead PC

Martin Gold
Covington & Burling

Judy Schneider
Co-author, Congressional Deskbook

Betsy Palmer
Congressional Scholar

Rhodes Cook
Rhodes Cook Letter

David Hawkings
Congressional Quarterly

Paul Powell
U.S. General Services Administration

Chuck Cushman
George Washington University

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703-739-3790 www.thecapitol.net

To see more of our faculty and authors visit thecapitol.net/Faculty or SelectFaculty.com

THECAPITOL.NET POLICIES
Payment—We accept MasterCard, VISA, American Express, and Discover. We also accept
PayPal and checks. Government Employees please note: You must submit payment with your training forms (Form 1556). We accept government credit cards and electronic funds transfer (EFT). All fees must be paid to attend a course. We accept purchase orders only for custom training.

Registration—There is a registration form at the back of this catalog that you can fax or mail to us. You may also go to our website at www.thecapitol.net and use our secure online registration process. Click the “Register for this course” button anywhere you see it on our web site for secure online registration. Course Location—All of our courses are held in Washington, DC. Registrants will receive
a confirmation, including the course’s location, approximately three to four weeks prior to the course. When it is available, the location will be listed on each course’s web page. All of our courses are held near Metro stops.

Walk-ins—If space is available, we accept “walk-ins.” We prefer a minimum of 24 hours notice to be sure there are spaces and course manuals available. All fees must be paid to attend. If registering less than one week prior to a course, please call us at 703-739-3790, extension 0, to ask if space is available.

The Day of the Course
• Business attire is required, military uniforms are optional. • Meeting rooms can be chilly—bring a sweater or jacket. • Arrive 15 minutes before the course is scheduled to start so you can sign in and get your materials. • Wear your name tag to all events, including meals—on your right lapel is recommended. • Introduce yourself and hand out your business card to other attendees—this is a great time to network. • Turn off cellular phones and pagers during the course.

Cancellations, Substitutions and Transfers
Submission of your registration indicates your acceptance of our Payment, Cancellation, Substitution, and Transfer policy. We deposit your check or charge your credit card upon our acceptance of your registration. All registration and administrative fees must be paid in full before attending a course. Cancellations, substitutions, and transfers for courses must be received in writing. Dates and prices subject to change. TheCapitol.Net reserves the right to cancel any course in the event of insufficient registrations. If, for any reason, TheCapitol.Net cancels a course, TheCapitol.Net assumes no responsibility for nonrefundable airline tickets or other travel costs. We will make every effort to immediately notify registrants of a cancellation.

Substitutions:
Substitutions, submitted in writing, are accepted any time prior to the start of the course at no charge.

Telephone Seminars:
For our telephone seminars, once we have issued the access code, there are no refunds.

Live Courses:
Because our faculty must commit to our live courses in Washington, DC, to the exclusion of other activities and because we must make commitments to space providers for food, beverages, and meeting space when we schedule courses, if you transfer or cancel your registration for a course, we charge an administrative fee according to the schedule below.

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63

THECAPITOL.NET POLICIES
Company Information
TheCapitol.Net, Inc. PO Box 25706 Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 703-739-3790 Fax: 703-739-1195 www.thecapitol.net FEIN: 54-1917701 DUNS number: 04-273-5071 SAN: 853-0513 SIC: 8299, 2741, 8742 NAIC: 611430, 56192, 5111, 541611

Transfer and Cancellation Fee:
Time Before Course
More than 4 weeks 2 to 4 weeks 3 days to 2 weeks 1 to 2 days day of program

Substitutions Allowed
Yes, in writing Yes, in writing Yes, in writing Yes, in writing Yes, in writing

Transfer Fee Cancellation Fee % of registration % of registration
None 25% of tuition 50% of tuition 75% of tuition 100% of tuition None 50% of tuition 75% of tuition 100% of tuition 100% of tuition

No refunds are given to no-shows. For our telephone seminars, once we have issued the access code, there are no refunds. All cancellations and substitutions must be submitted prior to the start of the course in writing (letter: PO Box 25706, Alexandria, VA 22313-5706 or fax: 703-739-1195) or via email (registrar@TheCapitol.Net). Once the course has started, there are no refunds or transfers. We mail the course materials to no-shows. Please note that if you transfer, transfer credits expire and must be used within 12 months of the initial course date.

No-Show—A “no-show” is when we have not confirmed receiving your cancellation or transfer or you do not show up, and you forfeit all registration fees. We send course materials out to fully-paid no-shows within two weeks after the course. You should always call—and follow up in writing—to be sure to let us know the circumstances of your cancellation as soon as possible.
Our complete substitution, cancellation, and transfer policy is on our web site at thecapitol.net/cancel.htm or AboutCancel.com.

Weather/Snow Policy—Courses sponsored by TheCapitol.Net and scheduled in Washington, DC, are cancelled when the federal government operating status in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area is “Federal agencies in Washington, DC, are CLOSED” according to OPM. Our complete weather policy is on our web site at thecapitol.net/snow.htm or SnowPolicy.com. CEU and CLE Credits/Certificates of Training—Our courses are approved for CEU credits from George Mason University. The number of CEU credits is listed with each course in this catalog. Many attorneys in mandatory CLE states have received credit for attending our courses. However, because we do not seek CLE accreditation, if you desire CLE credits, see our web site for information about how to apply to your state. We issue Certificates of Training for all of our courses. Custom Training—We can tailor any course to meet your training goals. Please see the Custom Training section of this catalog, or call your Client Liaison to discuss specifics: 703-739-3790, ext. 114. Audio Courses on CD—Audio Courses on CD are returnable if the
security seal is unbroken.

For more information, call us or please see our web site at

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