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Honeywell Digital Video Manager

User Guide

Release 200

Document ZD36-003-200

Release 200

Issue 0

Date September 2005

Notice This document contains Honeywell proprietary information. Information contained herein is to be used solely for the purpose submitted, and no part of this document or its contents shall be reproduced, published, or disclosed to a third party without the express permission of Honeywell Limited Australia. While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Honeywell disclaims the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a purpose and makes no express warranties except as may be stated in its written agreement with and for its customer. In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any direct, special, or consequential damages. The information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice. Honeywell suggests the user of this product satisfy themselves that their intended use does not contravene any national or local law. Honeywell accepts no responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the customer using this product in a manner contrary to governing laws. Copyright 2005 Honeywell Limited Australia Honeywell trademarks Experion PKS, SafeBrowse, TotalPlant and TDC 3000 are U.S. registered trademarks of Honeywell International Inc. Honeywell Digital Video Manager and Honeywell Enterprise Buildings Integrator are trademarks of Honeywell International Inc. Other trademarks Microsoft and SQL Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. iOmniscient and IQ140 are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the iOmniscient company in the United states and/or other countries. Trademarks that appear in this document are used only to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of trademark infringement.

Digital signatures introduction/disclaimer Honeywell DVM R200 provides the ability to digitally sign exported video and audit logs to help verify that the files have not been tampered with after export. The main use for these digitally signed files is use as evidence in court. A digital signature is not a requirement for submitting digital video as evidence and having a digital signature will not automatically guarantee that a court will accept the signed video as evidence. The default signature provided with Honeywell DVM will provide the court with an assurance that the video and associated audit log has not been altered in any way after it was exported. The use of a third-party signature will provide the same guarantee of authenticity as the default signature, however, as the signature will be unique to one DVM system, a third-party signature can also provide a guarantee of originthe video and audit log can only have come from that one system. Both of these may cause the court to assign more weight to the evidence if they accept it but will in no way guarantee that the evidence will be accepted, as acceptance of evidence is always a matter for the court to decide. A detailed description of the legal rules of evidence is beyond the scope of this manual and any commentary here may not be applicable to your local legal system. If you require further advice on the use of video as evidence, please contact you local Honeywell representative or seek advice from a legal professional.

Contents
1 About this guide 2 Overview
13 15

Basic architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Integration with EBI or Experion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The user interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

3 Planning
Network design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network architecture options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventional design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dedicated network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About multicasting and unicasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network design tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About Image Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About MPEG and Motion JPEG compression types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calculating the disk storage requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calculating the bandwidth requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 205, 206/206W and 210/210A with Motion JPEG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 206M and 207 with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 210/210A with MPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 211/211A with MPEG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 211/211A with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 213, 231D, 232D, 240Q, 241S/241SA and 241Q/241QA with Motion JPEG. . . . Axis 221 with MPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 221 with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 231D, 232D, 241S/241SA and 241Q/241QA with MPEG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 2100 and 2110 with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axis 2120, 2130, 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2420 with Motion JPEG Axis 2400+, 2401+ and 2411 with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CamStation CS100 with MPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CamStation CS-3001V with MPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MegaChips OpennetView and MD-100 with Motion JPEG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Honeywell Digital Video Manager User Guide

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Contents

EBI or Experion integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Areas (Assets) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Security types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Windows security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 About the specialized Windows accounts and groups used by Honeywell DVM . . . . . 98 About Honeywell DVM security levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Digital signatures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 About Honeywell DVM servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Database Server redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Custom applications and scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Recording audio with Axis streamers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Supporting video intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Camera and video requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Camera types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Camera streamer types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Hardware and software requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Summary of camera streamer capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

4 Guidelines for video analytics


About video analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the Honeywell DVM video analytics algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About regions of interest and minimum object size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About Video Analytics Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Choosing the appropriate algorithm for the task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic requirements of video analytics algorithms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example scenarios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detecting vehicles that are moving in the wrong direction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring a perimeter fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring the entrance of a secure room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring people who enter the utilities room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring the direction of objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checklist for successfully implementing video analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for choosing cameras and streamers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Streamers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for placing cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic guidelines for placing cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In outdoor locations, avoid distant views with small objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In indoor locations, place the camera as high as practicable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In indoor locations, avoid placing cameras at corners or under ceilings . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid fixtures that split a critical region into separate zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid splitting a critical region into heavily shadowed and brightly lit zones . . . . . . .
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Contents

Avoid placing a camera in a confined space with inadequate lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid placing a camera opposite elevator or automatic doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid placing a camera opposite phone booths, ATMs or vending machines . . . . . . . Avoid placing a camera to the side of stairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid highly reflective, glass-like surfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In outdoor locations, shade the camera lens from the sun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid large regions of continuous motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for adjusting the field of view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restrict the field of view to what you want to monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orientate the camera to avoid a skewed field of view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjust the camera for maximum video clarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avoid zones where objects are likely to start-stop in an erratic manner . . . . . . . . . . . . Ensure that only far-field views contain intersections or footpaths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for defining regions of interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General guidelines for defining regions of interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 1: road junction and parked cars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 2: road junction with pedestrians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 3: outdoor carpark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 4: carpark and entrance road. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 5: pedestrian crossings in carpark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 6: building lobby with lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 7: shopping mall (example 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 8: shopping mall (example 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guidelines for defining the minimum object size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 1: outdoor far-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 2: outdoor mid-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 3: outdoor near-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 4: indoor far-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case 5: indoor mid-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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5 Installation and upgrade


Using the checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New installation checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: Database Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: Camera Server or Video Analytics Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: single (non-redundant) EBI or Experion server . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: redundant EBI or Experion servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: Console Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation checklist: Internet Explorer client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upgrade checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upgrade checklist: from Honeywell DVM R160.1 or R160.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upgrade checklist: from Honeywell DVM R150.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation and setup tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up the Honeywell DVM installation account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Honeywell Digital Video Manager User Guide

Contents

Installing Internet Information Services (IIS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Configuring Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Synchronizing the date and time on the servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on a non-redundant server. 224 Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on redundant servers . . 226 Installing the Honeywell DVM Camera Server components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Installing the Honeywell DVM host components on the EBI or Experion server . . . . 232 Installing the Honeywell DVM host components on a Console Station . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Installing the Honeywell DVM client components on a Station computer. . . . . . . . . . 234 Configuring Station for use with Honeywell DVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Installing the Honeywell DVM client components for an Internet Explorer client computer 237 Updating the hosts file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Pinging a device on the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Installing and configuring camera streamers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Axis 205, 206, 206M, 206W, 207, 210/210A, 211/211A, 221, 2100, 2110, 2120, 2411 and 2420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 Axis 213, 231D, 232D and 2130. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Axis 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2400+, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2401+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Axis 240Q, 241S, 241SA, 241Q and 241QA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM . . . . . 255 CamStation CS100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 CamStation CS-3001V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 MegaChips MD-100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 MegaChips OpennetView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Installing and configuring PTZ cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Pelco cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Sensomatic cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 VCL Orbiter dome cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 Honeywell KD6 digital dome cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Hernis Industrial cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Upgrade tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Planning for an upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Uninstalling your existing Honeywell DVM components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Uninstalling Honeywell DVM R200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283

6 Configuration
Configuring security for Honeywell DVM in a domain environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camera Definition tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Record Settings tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camera Control tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring privacy zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Creating a schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a quad view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring video analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring motion detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring object tracking and classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifying the folder for snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the audit log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring disk space administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring event-activated recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring multi-monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring alarm monitor cycle time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a digital certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the digital certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking that the digital certificate has been installed correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Honeywell DVM to use the digital certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining special presets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Axis Streamers for audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Axis 2191 Audio Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the streamer for audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fine tuning audio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audio operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring CamStation CS-3001V for audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hardware configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audio operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a camera to receive audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Honeywell DVM for video intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audio hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up Honeywell DVM for video intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

306 308 309 311 313 314 322 331 332 333 335 338 340 342 343 343 344 345 346 348 349 349 349 350 351 351 351 353 354 354 354 357 357

7 Operation
Using Station to view live video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Internet Explorer to view live video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the live video controls and indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the live video mouse PTZ controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using presets and tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the camera symbols in the Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the video analytics symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About snapshot files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing recorded video. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Using the playback controls and indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing a quad view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the intercom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initiating a call from the field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Answering a field-initiated call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Initiating a call by an operator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terminating a call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjusting audio for live and recorded video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjusting the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disabling audio on a scheduled recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disabling audio on a background recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exporting video with audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Searching for recorded video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doing a simple search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Doing an advanced search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the search results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preventing a video clip from being deleted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preventing a video clip from being archived . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the numeric keypad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

375 377 378 379 379 379 380 380 381 381 381 381 382 383 383 384 387 389 390 391

8 Administration

393

Giving users access to Honeywell DVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Giving a user access: Internet Explorer in a domain environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a domain environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Giving a user access: operator-based security without integrated accounts in a domain environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Giving a user access: Station-based security in a domain environment . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 Giving a user access: Internet Explorer in a workgroup environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a workgroup environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Giving a user access: operator-based security without integrated accounts in a workgroup environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Giving a user access: Station-based security in a workgroup environment . . . . . . . . . 403 Creating a Windows user account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 Adding a user to the domain group for Honeywell DVM users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Giving a user access to Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Adding Windows accounts to the DVM_Users group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Adding Windows accounts to the Honeywell Administrators group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 Exporting video clips and audit logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .411 Exporting a video clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .411 Exporting the audit log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Audited events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Exporting the audit log with a video clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414

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Packaging the exported files into a zip file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verifying the exported Honeywell DVM files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Archiving and restoring video clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatically archiving video clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manually archiving video clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restoring video clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the status of the Database Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the status of the Camera Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the disk usage details of a Camera Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manually resynchronizing redundant Database Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Re-synchronizing the date and time on the servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing basic information about your Honeywell DVM system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the Honeywell DVM license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

415 416 417 417 418 418 420 421 422 423 425 426 428

9 Troubleshooting
Using the Performance Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Engineering Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems specific to CS-3001V video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems specific to audio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems specific to EBI or Experion integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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About this guide

This guide describes how to set up and use Honeywell Digital Video Manager (Honeywell DVM), and contains the following chapters: Overview. Describes Honeywell DVMs main features and basic architecture. Planning. Provides planning and design guidelines. Guidelines for video analytics. Provides guidelines for using video analytics. Installation and upgrade. Describes how to install Honeywell DVM. Configuration. Describes how to configure cameras and video displays, and how to integrate with Honeywell Enterprise Buildings Integrator (EBI) or Experion. Operation. Describes how to use Honeywell DVM on a day-to-day basis. Administration. Describes tasks which need to be completed by the system administrator. Troubleshooting. Describes how to solve common problems.

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1 About this guide

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Overview

Honeywell Digital Video Manager (Honeywell DVM) combines the advantages of digital video with the latest Web and networking products to provide a flexible and scalable Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) system. Major features and benefits of Honeywell DVM include: Flexibility. Use of standard hardware and software makes it easier and less costly to expand and modify your system. Integration with EBI or Experion. Integration means, for example, that EBI or Experion alarms and events can initiate recordings. Ease of viewing. No special monitors are required because video is viewed on standard Windows-based computers. Video management. Operators can search for recordings based on numerous criteria including camera name, time, event and operator notes.
Go to: page 16 page 17 page 18

To learn about: The basic Honeywell DVM architecture Integration with EBI or Experion The user interface

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2 Overview

Basic architecture
The following figure shows the basic architecture of a typical Honeywell DVM system. A typical Honeywell DVM system comprises a Database Server, one or more Camera Servers, clients, camera streamers and IP cameras. The system can optionally be integrated with an EBI or Experion system. The TCP/IP network interconnects cameras, servers and Stations (the EBI or Experion user interfaces). This network-based design enables video signals to be managed, transmitted and viewed like any other type of information.
Figure 1 Basic Honeywell DVM architecture
Cameras Stations IP Streaming Camera

Camera Streamer

TCP/IP Network

EBI / Experion Server

Database Server

Camera Servers

Internet Explorer Clients

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Integration with EBI or Experion

Integration with EBI or Experion


Honeywell DVM is tightly integrated with two other Honeywell products: Honeywell Enterprise Buildings Integrator (EBI)for building management and security-related applications. Experionfor industrial applications. Alarms and events can initiate recordings. These recordings can even show what happened before an alarm/event occurred, so that operators can see what preceded the incident as well as its consequences. Honeywell DVM shares the EBI or Experion user interface (Station), which means that operators do not need to learn two applications. Users can view Honeywell DVM videos on any Station on the network. Honeywell DVM uses EBI or Experion security features that, for example, allow you to define each operators viewing rights. Honeywell DVM system alarms and events are automatically sent to EBI or Experion for inclusion in the Alarm and Event Summaries. Recordings associated with EBI or Experion alarms and/or events can be viewed directly from the EBI or Experion Alarm or Event Summary. An operator Station can control dedicated surveillance monitors. Alarms can be associated with video content and displayed on video alarm monitors.

Integration with these Honeywell products provides the following benefits:

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2 Overview

The user interface


Honeywell DVM includes an easy-to-use Web-based interface which runs on standard Windows computers. Depending on your requirements, you can access the displays (pages) using either Station or Internet Explorer. The following figure shows a typical display. The tree-style menu on the left makes it easy to navigate through complex systems with large numbers of cameras and servers. The video window provides all the controls appropriate to the selected camera, such as PTZ, presets and snapshot buttons.
Figure 2 Typical Live Video Page

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Planning

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Comments Ensure that you select an appropriate network architecture and install suitable network hardware. See Network design on page 21. Estimate your disk storage and network bandwidth requirements. See Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements on page 27.

This chapter describes how to plan for and design your Honeywell DVM system.
Issue Network design

Storage and bandwidth requirements

Integration with EBI or Experion Security Digital signatures

If you have EBI or Experion, decide how you are going to integrate it with Honeywell DVM. See EBI or Experion integration on page 91. Determine your operational security requirements. See Security on page 94. Decide whether you need to digitally sign exported videos and audit logs. See Digital signatures on page 107. Determine your hardware and software requirements for Honeywell DVM servers. See About Honeywell DVM servers on page 108 and Hardware and software requirements on page 116.

Honeywell DVM servers

Redundancy

Decide whether you need redundant Database Servers. See Database Server redundancy on page 109.

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Issue Video analytics

Comments Decide whether you can enhance the functionality of your system by making use of Honeywell DVMs video analytics capabilities. (Video analytics includes motion detection and object tracking/classification). For an introduction to video analytics and usage guidelines, see Guidelines for video analytics on page 123.

Custom applications and scripts Decide whether you can enhance the functionality of your Honeywell DVM system by writing custom applications and scripts. See Custom applications and scripts on page 111. Audio recording Video intercom Cameras and video recordings Determine your audio recording requirements. See Recording audio with Axis streamers on page 112. Determine your video intercom requirements. See Supporting video intercom on page 113. Determine your camera and video recording requirements, such as camera types, frame rates and recordings. See Camera and video requirements on page 114. Hardware and software Make sure that your hardware and software meets the requirements of Honeywell DVM. See Hardware and software requirements on page 116. Streamers Determine which streamers meet your requirements. See Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120.

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Network design

Network design
Honeywell DVM requires a well-designed and well-managed network to ensure that: Network availability meets your video performance requirements. Other network applications are not affected.
Comments Select the network architecture that best meets your needs. See Network architecture options on page 22. Optional multicast traffic If you choose to use multicasting, make sure that you consider the network design issues. See About multicasting and unicasting on page 24. Network management Ensure that you have the appropriate tools to manage the network. See Network management on page 25. Design tips Network bandwidth See Network design tips on page 26. Estimate the network bandwidth requirements. See Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements on page 27.

Issue Network architecture

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Network architecture options


You can use either of the following network architecture options to maintain network integrity.
Network architecture option Use a conventional network design, but pay particular attention to video traffic. This option may require regular monitoring to ensure integrity. Go to: page 22

Set up Virtual LANs (VLANs) which allow applications to share network page 23 hardware. Install a dedicated network for Honeywell DVM. This option maximizes integrity of Honeywell DVM by ensuring it is not competing with other applications. page 23

Conventional design
A conventional design has no physical or logical protection between the various types of traffic. The following figure shows how it is possible for Honeywell DVM to share a network with an MIS system. In a well-managed environment, this should be satisfactory. However, if the network grows rapidly, or if an application puts an unusually high load on the network, one or all of the applications may be compromised.

Station

EBI / Experion Server

Database and Camera Servers

MIS Server

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Edge switches with fast uplinks

Station

Camera

MIS Terminal

Camera

MIS Terminal

Station

Camera

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Network architecture options

VLAN
Virtual LANs (VLANs) allow you to logically organize Ethernet ports according to use, even though they share the same network hardware. In the following figure, the Honeywell DVM and EBI or Experion components (shaded) would be in one VLAN, and the MIS components (unshaded) would be in another.
EBI / Experion PKS Server Database and Camera Servers

Station

MIS Server

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Ethernet Switch

Station

Camera

MIS Terminal

Camera

MIS Terminal

Station

Camera

Dedicated network
Installing a dedicated network for Honeywell DVM ensures that existing network applications are unaffected. But a dedicated network is obviously more expensive, especially if you have only a few cameras.

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About multicasting and unicasting


Honeywell DVM uses two transmission techniques: Multicasting. This involves sending information from one device to multiple devices. For example, from the Honeywell DVM servers to two Stations. Unicasting. This involves sending information to only one device.

Although multicasting is a very useful transmission technique, it can have very significant effects on the network. Without special configuration, most equipment sends multicast traffic to all devices in the network, resulting in high network utilization across the whole network, rather than in only the relevant segments. Honeywell DVM uses multicasting and unicasting as follows: Transmission from the camera streamer to the Camera Server is unicast. Transmission from the Camera Server to Stations can be either unicast or multicast: Unicast is always used for playing back recorded video. Live video viewing can be configured on a camera-by-camera basis to be either multicast or unicast. Multicast is more efficient because several Stations can view the same live video without increasing the network usage. Unicast is less efficient because it requires a separate network stream for every Station.

Sophisticated network switches are required to correctly handle multicast traffic. Note that some network switches, such as LANE1 ATM, turn a multicast message into a broadcast one, which may quickly overload the network. Routers have special configuration requirements to enable them to handle multicast traffic. Contact your vendor for these configuration requirements.

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Network management

Network management
Network management is a complex topic that is beyond the scope of this guide. However, Honeywell DVM requires an appropriate set of network management tools that provide information such as: Network utilization, including real-time and history reports. Warning if utilization reaches a user-defined threshold. Notification if a switch fails.

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Network design tips


Use ATM, Gigabit or Fast Ethernet. Minimize the number of switches. Use switches, not hubs. Minimize the number of routers. Do not use 10 Mbps hubs. 100 Mbps hubs may be acceptable, depending on the rest of the network equipment. Isolate, as far as possible, video traffic for individual Camera Servers. Isolate, as far as possible, EBI or Experion from traffic between camera streamers and Camera Servers. Place camera streamer traffic and Station traffic on different LANs or VLANs. Consider placing multiple network cards in the Honeywell DVM servers. Camera streamers can reside on more than one VLAN. Consider using load-sharing network cards in the Database and Camera Servers.

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Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements

Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements


Because of the potentially large storage and bandwidth requirements of digital video, you need to carefully estimate your storage and bandwidth requirements. Storage and bandwidth requirements depend on: Image size. For example, a 640 480 image is four times larger than a 320 240 one. Frame rate. The standard frame rate for smooth video is 25 fps (PAL) or 30 fps (NTSC), but much lower frame rateseven 1 fpsmay be acceptable. Streamer type. The streamer type has a major impact on storage and bandwidth requirements. See Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video on page 35. Compression type. MPEG4 requires less bandwidth and storage than Motion JPEG. See About MPEG and Motion JPEG compression types on page 30. Compression level. The greater the compression, the smaller the file size, but the lower the image quality. Image complexity. Visually complex images produce larger file sizes than visually simple images. See About Image Complexity on page 28. Image type (color or black and white). A color image is slightly larger than its black and white equivalent. Audio. Video with audio will require more bandwidth and storage than video without audio. See Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio on page 90.

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About Image Complexity


The following figures show what constitutes the three levels of image complexity: complex, medium-complexity and simple. (These definitions are used in the storage and bandwidth requirements tables.) Complex image A complex image is one that contains numerous irregular patterns and wide ranges of color, for example, outside scenes and crowds of people.

Medium-complexity image A medium-complexity image is one that contains regular patterns and a range of colors, for example, corridors and general office scenes.

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Simple image A simple image is one that contains large areas of consistent color without patterns, for example, lift lobbies and areas with a narrow field of vision.

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About MPEG and Motion JPEG compression types


An MPEG streamer sends a Group of Pictures (GOP), which consists of a complete video frame followed by a series of delta frames; whereas a Motion JPEG streamer sends a complete image each frame. In MPEG, the complete video frame is called an I-Frame (Index Frame), and every other frame (known as delta frames) contains the differences between the current frame and the previous one. Because delta frames are much smaller than a complete video frame, MPEG requires less network bandwidth and storage than Motion JPEG. I-Frame recording allows you to record video at a lower frame rate than the connection frame rate. This is achieved by recording only the I-Frames, not the deltas. To find out which compression type(s) a streamer supports, see Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video on page 35. Differences between MPEG (I-Frame) and Motion JPEG
MPEG (I-Frame) Sends a GOP, which includes a complete video frame, plus delta frames. Motion JPEG Sends a complete image for every video frame.

Compression rategreater than Motion Compression ratelower than an MPEG JPEG, because a delta frame is smaller than because the complete image is larger than a a complete video frame image. delta frame. The maximum frame rate for recording is limited by the live view frame rate. See Recording frame rates using MPEG on page 297. The live view and record frame rates are independent. For example, you can view at a low frame rate, but record at a high frame rate.

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Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements

Calculating the disk storage requirements


This topic describes how to calculate the disk storage requirements. You must calculate the storage requirements for each camera. Your total storage requirements are equal to the sum of the individual camera storage requirements. Calculating the storage requirements for a camera Prerequisites You have estimated how many hours of alarm and background recording recording you want to keep online for the camera. These values are system specific and depend on factors such as: The frequency and importance of alarms The importance of what is in the camera field of viewyou may only want background recording if a continuous record of the field of view is essential

To calculate a storage requirements for a camera:


1 2 3

Determine the level of image complexitysee About Image Complexity on page 28. Select the table for the streamer to which the camera is connectedsee Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video on page 35. From the table, select the value that corresponds with your settings. (In a similar manner to that shown in the following example.)

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Calculate your storage requirements per hour for background recording. If the streamer uses: Motion JPEG, multiply the value obtained from the table by the number of frames per second (fps) used for background recording. This is the BackgroundStoragePerHour value. MPEG, the value obtained from the table is the BackgroundStoragePerHour value.

If the camera has audio, include the audio requirement in BackgroundStoragePerHour. See Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio on page 90. Calculate your storage requirements per hour for alarm recording. If the streamer uses: Motion JPEG, multiply the value obtained from the table by the number of frames per second (fps) used for event-activated recording. This is the AlarmStoragePerHour value. MPEG, the value obtained from the table is the AlarmStoragePerHour value.

If the camera has audio, include the audio requirement in AlarmStoragePerHour. See Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio on page 90. Use you estimate for how many hours of background recording you want to keep online as your BackgroundRecordingHours value. Use your estimate of how many hours of alarm recording you want to keep online as your AlarmRecordingHours value. formula:
(BackgroundStoragePerHour x BackgroundRecordingHours) + (AlarmStoragePerHour x AlarmRecordingHours)

8 9

10 Calculate the storage requirement (MB) for the camera using the following

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Calculating the bandwidth requirements


This topic describes how to calculate the bandwidth requirements for individual cameras and for the network. Calculating the bandwidth requirements for a camera To calculate the bandwidth requirements for a camera:
1 2 3

Determine the level of image complexityAbout Image Complexity on page 28. Select the table for the streamer to which the camera is connectedsee Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video on page 35. From the table, select the value that corresponds your settings. (In a similar manner to that shown in the following example.)

If the streamer uses: Motion JPEG, multiply the value obtained from the table by the highest frame rate you want to use for the camera. This is the bandwidth requirement for the camera (Kbps). (With Motion JPEG, you can specify different frame rates for live video and background recording. For example, if you specify 12 fps for live video and 24 fps for recording, you would use 24 fps in your calculation.) MPEG, the value obtained from the table is the bandwidth requirement for the camera (Kbps).

If the camera has audio, add the audio requirement to the value obtained in step 4. See Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio on page 90.

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Calculating the bandwidth requirements for the network You can calculate the bandwidth requirements for the network after you have calculated the bandwidth requirements for each camera. To determine the bandwidth requirements for the network:
1 2 3 4

Sketch out a design of your network (or proposed network). For each Ethernet link, sum the total demand across all the cameras utilizing that Ethernet link. For each router, sum the total demand across all the cameras utilizing that router. Compare the calculated demand with the rating of your network equipment. Ensure the network has greater capacity than that demanded by Honeywell DVM.

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video


The following table lists the camera streamers that supported by Honeywell DVM. The detailed storage and bandwidth requirements for each streamer are shown on the specified pages.
Type of camera streamer: Axis 205 Axis 206/206W Axis 206M Axis 207 Axis 210/210A Axis 211/211A Axis 213 Axis 221 Axis 231D Axis 232D Axis 240Q Axis 241Q/241QA Axis 241S/241SA Axis 2100 Axis 2110 Axis 2120 Axis 2130 Axis 2400 1.x Axis 2400 2.x Axis 2400+ Axis 2401 1.x Axis 2401 2.x Axis 2401+ Axis 2411 Axis 2420 CamStation CS100 CamStation CS-3001V For Motion JPEG: page 37 page 37 page 40 page 40 page 37 page 50 page 53 page 61 page 53 page 53 page 53 page 53 page 53 page 68 page 68 page 70 page 70 page 70 page 70 page 75 page 70 page 70 page 75 page 75 page 70 For MPEG: Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported page 44 page 47 Not supported page 58 page 64 page 64 Not supported page 64 page 64 Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported

Not supported page 80 Not supported page 83

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Type of camera streamer: MegaChips MD-100 MegaChips OpennetView

For Motion JPEG: page 87 page 87

For MPEG: Not supported Not supported

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Axis 205, 206/206W and 210/210A with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 205, 206/206W and 210/210A camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. The Axis 210A supports audio, see Recording audio with Axis streamers on page 112. Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 15.43 19.15 35.07 54.27 98.67 43.80 57.13 113.90 184.12 336.08 111.3 143.64 277.81 442.82 826.28 148.40 191.52 370.42 590.42 1101.70 6.78 8.42 15.41 23.85 43.36 19.25 25.11 50.05 80.91 147.69 48.92 63.12 122.09 194.60 363.10 65.22 84.16 162.79 259.46 484.14

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.9 2.4 4.4 6.8 12.3 5.5 7.1 14.2 23.0 42.0 13.9 17.9 34.7 55.3 103.3 18.6 23.9 46.3 73.8 137.7

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 10.27 11.60 16.89 23.36 40.77 24.48 27.55 44.16 66.63 127.36 58.08 65.52 105.99 161.88 326.15 77.45 87.36 141.33 215.84 434.87 4.51 5.10 7.42 10.27 17.85 10.76 12.11 19.41 29.28 55.97 25.53 28.79 46.58 71.13 143.33 34.04 38.39 62.11 94.85 191.11

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.3 1.4 2.1 3.0 5.1 3.0 3.4 5.5 8.3 15.9 7.2 8.1 13.2 20.2 40.8 9.7 10.9 17.7 27.0 54.4

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 8.93 9.78 12.77 16.57 27.55 20.52 21.66 29.54 40.69 80.48 49.20 52.02 68.39 96.84 201.45 65.61 69.37 91.19 129.13 268.61 3.92 4.30 5.61 7.28 12.11 9.02 9.52 12.98 17.88 35.37 21.62 22.86 30.06 42.56 88.53 28.83 30.48 40.08 56.75 118.04

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.1 1.2 1.6 2.0 3.4 2.6 2.7 3.7 5.1 10.1 6.15 6.45 8.55 12.075 25.2 8.2 8.6 11.4 16.1 33.6

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Axis 206M and 207 with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 206M (Megapixel) and 207 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 10 10 10 10 6 43.80 57.13 113.90 184.12 336.08 111.3 143.64 277.81 442.82 826.28 148.40 191.52 370.42 590.42 1101.70 340.53 430.17 806.67 1349.87 2804.07 441.22 538.47 1006.64 1726.99 3933.01 19.25 25.11 50.05 80.91 147.69 48.92 63.12 122.09 194.60 363.10 65.22 84.16 162.79 259.46 484.14 149.66 189.03 354.51 593.20 1232.24 193.91 236.62 442.39 758.92 1728.35

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

5.5 7.1 14.2 23.0 42.0 13.9 17.9 34.7 55.3 103.3 18.6 23.9 46.3 73.8 137.7 42.6 53.6 100.8 168.7 350.4 55.3 67.1 125.8 215.8 491.5

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(1280 720) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (1280 960) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 10 10 10 10 6 466.11 574.12 1085.07 1872.91 3922.17 251.25 296.19 552.06 970.95 2424.20

(1280x1024) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

58.4 71.6 135.6 234.1 490.2

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 24.48 27.55 44.16 66.63 127.36 58.08 65.52 105.99 161.88 326.15 77.45 87.36 141.33 215.84 434.87 177.73 196.22 307.78 493.47 1106.84 10.76 12.11 19.41 29.28 55.97 25.53 28.79 46.58 71.13 143.33 34.04 38.39 62.11 94.85 191.11 78.11 86.23 135.26 216.85 486.42

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

3 3.4 5.5 8.3 15.9 7.2 8.1 13.2 20.2 40.8 9.7 10.9 17.7 27 54.4 22.2 24.4 38.5 61.7 138.4

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(1280 720) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 10 10 10 10 6 10 10 10 10 6 230.28 245.62 384.08 631.34 1552.46 243.26 261.88 414.00 684.68 1548.19 101.21 107.94 168.79 277.44 682.25 131.14 135.11 210.63 354.95 956.93

(1280 960) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (12801024) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

28.8 30.6 48.1 78.9 194.2 30.4 32.6 51.8 85.6 193.6

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 20.52 21.66 29.54 40.69 80.48 49.2 52.02 68.39 96.84 201.45 65.61 69.37 91.19 129.13 268.61 9.02 9.52 12.98 17.88 35.37 21.62 22.86 30.06 42.56 88.53 28.83 30.48 40.08 56.75 118.04

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.6 2.7 3.7 5.1 10.1 6.15 6.45 8.55 12.075 25.2 8.2 8.6 11.4 16.1 33.6

(640 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 10 10 10 10 8 10 10 10 10 6 10 10 10 10 6 150.56 155.81 198.59 295.23 683.67 195.07 195.04 247.82 377.71 958.92 206.08 207.95 267.12 409.62 956.28 66.16 68.46 87.28 129.75 300.44 85.72 85.70 108.92 166.00 421.40 111.06 107.27 135.92 212.37 591.05

(1280 720) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (1280 960) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (12801024) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

18.8 19.3 24.8 36.8 85.5 24.3 24.1 30.9 47.0 119.9 25.7 25.7 33.3 51.0 119.6

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Axis 210/210A with MPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 210/210A camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 22 22 22 22 46.1 65.9 102.7 234.8 312.2 126.5 195.1 336.1 894.6 1181.0 251.7 397.5 681.3 1819.8 2520.6 335.5 530.0 908.4 2426.5 3360.9 Low motion 69.1 98.8 154.1 352.1 468.3 189.8 292.6 504.2 1341.8 1771.6 377.5 596.3 1021.9 2729.8 3781.0 503.3 795.0 1362.6 3639.7 5041.3 High motion 92.2 131.7 205.5 469.5 624.4 253.0 390.1 672.3 1789.1 2362.1 503.3 795.0 1362.6 3639.7 5041.3 671.1 1060.0 1816.8 4852.9 6721.7 No motion 20.25 28.94 45.15 103.16 137.20 55.60 85.72 147.72 393.11 519.01 110.59 174.69 299.39 799.73 1107.70 147.46 232.92 399.19 1066.31 1476.94 Low motion 30.38 43.41 67.72 154.74 205.80 83.40 128.58 221.58 589.67 778.52 165.89 262.03 449.09 1199.60 1661.55 221.19 349.37 598.78 1599.47 2215.40 High motion 40.51 57.89 90.29 206.32 274.40 111.20 171.44 295.44 786.23 1038.02 221.19 349.37 598.78 1599.47 2215.40 294.92 465.83 798.38 2132.63 2953.87

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 33.2 39.8 52.6 97.4 124.9 79.1 98.6 143.3 319.3 442.0 144.5 178.3 264.4 637.8 787.2 192.7 237.7 352.5 850.4 1049.6 Low motion 49.7 59.8 78.9 146.1 187.3 118.6 147.9 215.0 479.0 663.0 216.8 267.4 396.6 956.7 1180.8 289.0 356.6 528.7 1275.6 1574.4 High motion 66.3 79.7 105.3 194.8 249.8 158.2 197.1 286.6 638.7 884.0 289.0 356.6 528.7 1275.6 1574.4 385.4 475.4 705.0 1700.8 2099.2 No motion 14.57 17.51 23.13 42.79 54.88 34.76 43.32 62.98 140.34 194.24 63.50 78.35 116.18 280.28 345.94 84.67 104.47 154.91 373.71 461.26 Low motion 21.85 26.26 34.69 64.19 82.32 52.14 64.97 94.47 210.51 291.36 95.26 117.53 174.27 420.42 518.91 127.01 156.70 232.36 560.56 691.89 High motion 29.14 35.02 46.26 85.59 109.76 69.52 86.63 125.96 280.67 388.47 127.01 156.70 232.36 560.56 691.89 169.35 208.94 309.81 747.42 922.51

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 28.8 33.0 41.0 60.4 73.1 69.6 78.5 96.9 169.6 220.2 127.8 142.5 176.2 317.4 443.7 170.4 190.0 234.9 423.3 591.6 Low motion 43.3 49.5 61.5 90.5 109.7 104.4 117.7 145.4 254.4 330.3 191.7 213.8 264.3 476.2 665.5 255.6 285.0 352.3 634.9 887.3 High motion 57.7 66.0 82.1 120.7 146.3 139.2 157.0 193.9 339.3 440.4 255.6 285.0 352.3 634.9 887.3 340.8 380.0 469.8 846.5 1183.1 No motion 12.67 14.50 18.03 26.53 32.14 30.58 34.50 42.60 74.55 96.76 56.15 62.62 77.42 139.50 194.97 74.87 83.50 103.23 186.01 259.96 Low motion 19.01 21.76 27.05 39.79 48.22 45.86 51.74 63.90 111.82 145.14 84.23 93.93 116.13 209.26 292.46 112.31 125.24 154.84 279.01 389.94 High motion 25.35 29.01 36.06 53.05 64.29 61.15 68.99 85.20 149.09 193.52 112.31 125.24 154.84 279.01 389.94 149.75 166.99 206.45 372.01 519.93

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Axis 211/211A with MPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 211/211A camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 22 22 22 22 46.1 65.9 102.7 234.8 312.2 103.7 148.2 231.1 528.2 702.5 126.5 195.1 336.1 894.6 1181.0 284.7 438.9 756.3 2012.7 2657.3 335.5 530.0 908.4 2426.5 3360.9 Low motion 69.1 98.8 154.1 352.1 468.3 155.5 222.3 346.7 792.3 1053.7 189.8 292.6 504.2 1341.8 1771.6 427.0 658.3 1134.5 3019.1 3986.0 503.3 795.0 1362.6 3639.7 5041.3 High motion 92.2 131.7 205.5 469.5 624.4 207.4 296.4 462.3 1056.4 1404.9 253.0 390.1 672.3 1789.1 2362.1 569.3 877.8 1512.7 4025.5 5314.7 671.1 1060.0 1816.8 4852.9 6721.7 No motion 20.25 28.94 45.15 103.16 137.20 45.57 65.12 101.58 232.11 308.70 55.60 85.72 147.72 393.11 519.01 125.10 192.87 332.37 884.51 1167.78 147.46 232.92 399.19 1066.31 1476.94 Low motion 30.38 43.41 67.72 154.74 205.80 68.36 97.68 152.37 348.17 463.05 83.40 128.58 221.58 589.67 778.52 187.65 289.30 498.55 1326.76 1751.66 221.19 349.37 598.78 1599.47 2215.40 High motion 40.51 57.89 90.29 206.32 274.40 91.14 130.24 203.16 464.23 617.40 111.20 171.44 295.44 786.23 1038.02 250.20 385.73 664.74 1769.01 2335.55 294.92 465.83 798.38 2132.63 2953.87

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 33.2 39.8 52.6 97.4 124.9 74.6 89.6 118.4 219.1 281.0 79.1 98.6 143.3 319.3 442.0 178.0 221.8 322.5 718.5 994.5 192.7 237.7 352.5 850.4 1049.6 Low motion 49.7 59.8 78.9 146.1 187.3 111.9 134.5 177.6 328.7 421.5 118.6 147.9 215.0 479.0 663.0 266.9 332.7 483.7 1077.8 1491.7 289.0 356.6 528.7 1275.6 1574.4 High motion 66.3 79.7 105.3 194.8 249.8 149.2 179.3 236.8 438.2 562.0 158.2 197.1 286.6 638.7 884.0 355.9 443.6 644.9 1437.1 1989.0 385.4 475.4 705.0 1700.8 2099.2 No motion 14.57 17.51 23.13 42.79 54.88 32.78 39.40 52.04 96.29 123.48 34.76 43.32 62.98 140.34 194.24 78.20 97.46 141.71 315.76 437.03 84.67 104.47 154.91 373.71 461.26 Low motion 21.85 26.26 34.69 64.19 82.32 49.17 59.09 78.06 144.43 185.22 52.14 64.97 94.47 210.51 291.36 117.31 146.19 212.56 473.64 655.55 127.01 156.70 232.36 560.56 691.89 High motion 29.14 35.02 46.26 85.59 109.76 65.56 78.79 104.08 192.57 246.96 69.52 86.63 125.96 280.67 388.47 156.41 194.92 283.42 631.52 874.07 169.35 208.94 309.81 747.42 922.51

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 28.8 33.0 41.0 60.4 73.1 64.9 74.3 92.3 135.8 164.6 69.6 78.5 96.9 169.6 220.2 156.6 176.6 218.1 381.7 495.4 170.4 190.0 234.9 423.3 591.6 Low motion 43.3 49.5 61.5 90.5 109.7 97.3 111.4 138.5 203.7 246.9 104.4 117.7 145.4 254.4 330.3 234.8 264.9 327.1 572.5 743.1 255.6 285.0 352.3 634.9 887.3 High motion 57.7 66.0 82.1 120.7 146.3 129.8 148.5 184.6 271.6 329.2 139.2 157.0 193.9 339.3 440.4 313.1 353.2 436.2 763.3 990.8 340.8 380.0 469.8 846.5 1183.1 No motion 12.67 14.50 18.03 26.53 32.14 28.52 32.63 40.57 59.68 72.32 30.58 34.50 42.60 74.55 96.76 68.80 77.62 95.84 167.73 217.71 74.87 83.50 103.23 186.01 259.96 Low motion 19.01 21.76 27.05 39.79 48.22 42.78 48.95 60.86 89.52 108.49 45.86 51.74 63.90 111.82 145.14 103.19 116.42 143.77 251.59 326.56 112.31 125.24 154.84 279.01 389.94 High motion 25.35 29.01 36.06 53.05 64.29 57.04 65.27 81.14 119.36 144.65 61.15 68.99 85.20 149.09 193.52 137.59 155.23 191.69 335.46 435.42 149.75 166.99 206.45 372.01 519.93

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Axis 211/211A with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 211/211A camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. The Axis 211A supports audio, see Recording audio with Axis streamers on page 112. Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 20 20 20 25 25 20 18 16 20 20 16 14 12 14 12 12 11 7 15.43 19.15 35.07 54.27 98.67 24.63 32.13 64.07 103.57 189.05 43.80 57.13 113.90 184.12 336.08 77.86 101.56 202.49 327.33 597.48 148.40 191.52 370.42 590.42 1101.70 6.78 8.42 15.41 23.85 43.36 10.83 14.12 28.15 45.51 83.08 19.25 25.11 50.05 80.91 147.69 34.22 44.63 88.98 143.84 262.56 65.22 84.16 162.79 259.46 484.14

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.9 2.4 4.4 6.8 12.3 3.1 4.0 8.0 13.0 23.7 5.5 7.1 14.2 23.0 42.0 9.7 12.7 25.3 40.9 74.7 18.6 23.9 46.3 73.8 137.7

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 20 20 25 25 20 20 17 20 20 16 14 12 14 14 12 11 10 10.27 11.60 16.89 23.36 40.77 13.77 15.50 24.84 37.48 71.64 24.48 27.55 44.16 66.63 127.36 43.53 48.98 78.51 118.45 226.41 77.45 87.36 141.33 215.84 434.87 4.51 5.10 7.42 10.27 17.85 6.05 6.81 10.92 16.47 31.48 10.76 12.11 19.41 29.28 55.97 19.12 21.52 34.51 52.05 99.50 34.04 38.39 62.11 94.85 191.11

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.3 1.4 2.1 3.0 5.1 1.7 1.9 3.1 4.7 8.9 3.0 3.4 5.5 8.3 15.9 5.4 6.1 9.8 14.8 28.3 9.7 10.9 17.7 27.0 54.4

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 20 25 25 20 18 16 18 18 16 15 14 8.93 9.78 12.77 16.57 27.55 11.54 12.18 16.62 22.89 45.27 20.52 21.66 29.54 40.69 80.48 36.48 38.51 52.51 72.34 143.08 65.61 69.37 91.19 129.13 268.61 3.92 4.30 5.61 7.28 12.11 5.08 5.35 7.30 10.06 19.90 9.02 9.52 12.98 17.88 35.37 16.04 16.92 23.07 31.78 62.88 28.83 30.48 40.08 56.75 118.04

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.1 1.2 1.6 2.0 3.4 1.4 1.5 2.1 2.9 5.7 2.6 2.7 3.7 5.1 10.1 4.6 4.8 6.6 9.0 17.9 8.2 8.6 11.4 16.1 33.6

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Axis 213, 231D, 232D, 240Q, 241S/241SA and 241Q/241QA with Motion JPEG
The following data was collected using the Axis 213, 231D, 232D, 240Q, 241S, 241SA, 241Q and 241QA Motion JPEG camera streamers for three levels of image complexity. The Axis 241SA and 241QA support audio, see Recording audio with Axis streamers on page 112. Considerations The Axis 241Q streamer supports up to four cameras, with the total available frame rate and bandwidth shared across the cameras. The 231D/232D is a PTZ camera with built in streamer. When viewed, a 4CIF Expanded image is the same size as a 4CIF Interlaced image. However, a 4CIF Expanded image is transmitted and stored in a compressed format (768 288) for PAL or (640 240) for NTSC and then expanded at the Client (768 576) for PAL or (640 480) for NTSC. The Axis 240Q supports a maximum of 5 fps for PAL and 6 fps for NTSC for each of the four ports.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 20.37 25.28 46.29 71.63 130.24 57.81 75.41 150.35 243.04 443.63 8.95 11.11 20.34 31.48 57.23 25.41 33.14 66.07 106.80 194.95

QCIF PAL (192 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.5 3.2 5.8 9.0 16.3 7.2 9.4 18.8 30.4 55.5

CIF PAL (384 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 15 22 20 17 12 11 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 16 22 21 18 12 12 103.99 140.11 281.92 443.31 789.97 195.89 252.80 488.96 779.36 1454.24 16.98 21.07 38.58 59.69 108.53 48.18 62.84 125.29 202.53 369.69 86.66 116.76 234.93 369.43 658.31 163.24 210.67 407.47 649.47 1211.87 47.02 61.57 123.89 194.81 347.16 86.09 111.09 214.88 342.49 639.07 7.46 9.26 16.95 26.23 47.69 21.18 27.62 55.06 89.00 162.46 39.18 51.31 103.24 162.34 289.30 71.74 92.58 179.07 285.41 532.56

4CIF Expanded PAL (768 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

13.4 17.5 35.2 55.4 98.7 24.5 31.6 61.1 97.4 181.8 2.1 2.7 4.8 7.5 13.6 6.0 7.8 15.7 25.3 46.3 11.2 14.6 29.3 46.2 82.3 20.4 26.3 50.9 81.2 151.5

4CIF Interlaced PAL (768 576)

QCIF NTSC (160 120)

CIF NTSC (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (640 480)

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 13 12 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 13.55 15.31 22.29 30.83 53.81 32.32 36.37 58.29 87.95 168.11 53.87 60.64 98.83 152.59 300.75 102.24 115.31 186.56 284.91 574.03 11.29 12.76 18.58 25.69 44.84 26.93 30.31 48.58 73.29 140.09 5.95 6.73 9.80 13.55 23.56 14.20 15.98 25.62 38.65 73.88 23.67 26.65 43.43 67.05 132.16 44.93 50.67 81.98 125.20 252.26 4.96 5.61 8.17 11.29 19.63 11.83 13.32 21.35 32.21 61.57

QCIF PAL (192 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.7 1.9 2.8 3.9 6.7 4.0 4.5 7.3 11.0 21.0 6.7 7.6 12.4 19.1 37.6 12.8 14.4 23.3 35.6 71.8 1.4 1.6 2.3 3.3 5.6 3.3 3.8 6.1 9.2 17.5

CIF PAL (384 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded PAL (768 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced PAL (768 576)

QCIF NTSC (160 120)

CIF NTSC (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 13 13 44.89 50.53 82.36 127.16 250.63 85.20 96.09 155.47 237.43 478.36 19.73 22.21 36.19 55.88 110.13 37.44 42.23 68.32 104.33 210.22

4CIF Expanded NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

5.6 6.3 10.3 15.9 31.3 10.7 12.0 19.4 29.7 59.8

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (640 480)

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 11.79 12.91 16.85 21.87 36.37 27.09 28.59 38.99 53.71 106.24 46.35 48.64 64.32 89.39 184.48 5.18 5.67 7.41 9.61 15.98 11.91 12.56 17.13 23.60 46.69 20.37 21.38 28.27 39.28 81.07

QCIF PAL (192 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.5 1.6 2.1 2.7 4.5 3.4 3.6 4.9 6.7 13.3 5.8 6.1 8.0 11.2 23.1

CIF PAL (384 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded PAL (768 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 22 16 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 22 16 86.61 91.57 120.37 170.45 354.56 9.83 10.76 14.04 18.23 30.31 22.58 23.83 32.49 44.76 88.53 38.63 40.53 53.60 74.49 153.73 72.18 76.31 100.31 142.04 295.47 38.06 40.24 52.90 74.91 155.81 4.32 4.73 6.18 8.01 13.32 9.93 10.47 14.28 19.67 38.91 16.98 17.82 23.56 32.73 67.56 31.72 33.53 44.08 62.43 129.84

4CIF Interlaced PAL (768 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

10.8 11.4 15.0 21.3 44.3 1.3 1.3 1.8 2.3 3.8 2.8 3.0 4.1 5.6 11.1 4.8 5.1 6.7 9.3 19.3 9.0 9.5 12.5 17.8 36.9

QCIF NTSC (160 120)

CIF NTSC (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (640 480)

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Axis 221 with MPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 221 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 57.6 82.3 128.4 293.4 390.2 129.6 185.2 288.9 660.1 877.9 158.1 243.8 420.1 1117.9 1475.9 355.7 548.5 945.2 2515.3 3320.8 419.3 662.3 1135.2 3032.3 4200.0 Low motion 86.4 123.5 192.6 440.0 585.2 194.4 277.8 433.3 990.1 1316.8 237.2 365.6 630.1 1676.9 2213.9 533.6 822.7 1417.7 3772.9 4981.2 629.0 993.5 1702.8 4548.4 6300.0 High motion 115.2 164.6 256.8 586.7 780.3 259.2 370.4 577.7 1320.1 1755.7 316.2 487.5 840.1 2235.8 2951.8 711.5 1096.9 1890.3 5030.6 6641.6 838.7 1324.7 2270.4 6064.6 8400.0 No motion 25.31 36.17 56.42 128.92 171.46 56.95 81.38 126.94 290.07 385.78 69.48 107.12 184.60 491.27 648.60 156.33 241.02 415.35 1105.35 1459.34 184.28 291.07 498.86 1332.55 1845.69 Low motion 37.97 54.25 84.63 193.38 257.19 85.42 122.07 190.41 435.10 578.67 104.22 160.68 276.90 736.90 972.90 234.50 361.53 623.03 1658.02 2189.02 276.41 436.60 748.29 1998.82 2768.54 High motion 50.62 72.34 112.84 257.84 342.91 113.90 162.76 253.88 580.14 771.56 138.96 214.24 369.20 982.53 1297.20 312.66 482.04 830.71 2210.69 2918.69 368.55 582.14 997.72 2665.10 3691.39

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 41.4 49.8 65.8 121.7 156.1 93.2 112.0 148.0 273.8 351.1 98.8 123.2 179.1 399.1 552.4 222.4 277.2 403.0 897.9 1242.8 240.8 297.1 440.5 1062.7 1311.7 Low motion 62.1 74.7 98.7 182.5 234.1 139.8 168.0 222.0 410.7 526.7 148.3 184.8 268.7 598.6 828.5 333.6 415.7 604.5 1346.9 1864.2 361.2 445.6 660.8 1594.1 1967.5 High motion 82.9 99.6 131.5 243.4 312.1 186.4 224.1 296.0 547.6 702.3 197.7 246.4 358.2 798.2 1104.7 444.8 554.3 806.0 1795.9 2485.6 481.6 594.2 881.0 2125.4 2623.4 No motion 18.21 21.88 28.90 53.48 68.58 40.97 49.23 65.03 120.33 154.31 43.44 54.13 78.71 175.38 242.73 97.73 121.80 177.09 394.60 546.15 105.81 130.55 193.58 467.02 576.42 Low motion 27.31 32.82 43.35 80.22 102.87 61.45 73.85 97.55 180.49 231.47 65.15 81.20 118.06 263.06 364.10 146.60 182.69 265.64 591.89 819.23 158.72 195.83 290.37 700.52 864.63 High motion 36.41 43.76 57.81 106.96 137.17 81.93 98.47 130.06 240.65 308.62 86.87 108.26 157.41 350.75 485.47 195.46 243.59 354.18 789.19 1092.30 211.63 261.10 387.17 934.03 1152.84

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (240 180) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (480 360) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 36.0 41.2 51.3 75.4 91.4 81.1 92.8 115.4 169.7 205.7 86.9 98.1 121.1 212.0 275.2 195.6 220.7 272.6 477.0 619.1 212.9 237.4 293.5 528.9 739.3 Low motion 54.1 61.9 76.9 113.1 137.1 121.6 139.2 173.1 254.6 308.5 130.4 147.1 181.7 318.0 412.7 293.5 331.1 408.8 715.5 928.7 319.4 356.2 440.3 793.4 1108.9 High motion 72.1 82.5 102.6 150.9 182.8 162.2 185.6 230.8 339.4 411.3 173.9 196.2 242.3 424.0 550.3 391.3 441.4 545.1 953.9 1238.2 425.8 474.9 587.1 1057.9 1478.5 No motion 15.84 18.13 22.53 33.15 40.17 35.64 40.78 50.70 74.58 90.38 38.21 43.11 53.23 93.16 120.92 85.97 97.00 119.77 209.61 272.07 93.57 104.34 129.00 232.45 324.87 Low motion 23.76 27.19 33.80 49.72 60.25 53.46 61.17 76.05 111.88 135.57 57.32 64.66 79.85 139.74 181.38 128.96 145.49 179.66 314.41 408.10 140.35 156.52 193.50 348.67 487.31 High motion 31.68 36.25 45.07 66.30 80.34 71.28 81.56 101.40 149.17 180.76 76.42 86.22 106.47 186.32 241.84 171.95 193.99 239.55 419.21 544.13 187.13 208.69 258.00 464.89 649.74

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Axis 221 with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 221 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 45 45 45 45 45 42 42 42 42 42 40 40 40 40 40 36 36 36 36 36 30 30 30 30 30 18.516 22.98 42.084 65.124 118.404 29.556 38.556 76.884 124.284 226.86 52.56 68.556 136.68 220.944 403.296 93.432 121.872 242.988 392.796 716.976 178.08 229.824 444.504 708.504 1322.04 8.136 10.104 18.492 28.62 52.032 12.996 16.944 33.78 54.612 99.696 23.1 30.132 60.06 97.092 177.228 41.064 53.556 106.776 172.608 315.072 78.264 100.992 195.348 311.352 580.968

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.28 2.88 5.28 8.16 14.76 3.72 4.8 9.6 15.6 28.44 6.6 8.52 17.04 27.6 50.4 11.64 15.24 30.36 49.08 89.64 22.32 28.68 55.56 88.56 165.24

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 45 45 45 45 45 43 43 43 43 43 41 41 41 41 41 38 38 38 38 38 32 32 32 32 32 12.324 13.92 20.268 28.032 48.924 16.524 18.6 29.808 44.976 85.968 29.376 33.06 52.992 79.956 152.832 52.236 58.776 94.212 142.14 271.692 92.94 104.832 169.596 259.008 521.844 5.412 6.12 8.904 12.324 21.42 7.26 8.172 13.104 19.764 37.776 12.912 14.532 23.292 35.136 67.164 22.944 25.824 41.412 62.46 119.4 40.848 46.068 74.532 113.82 229.332

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.56 1.68 2.52 3.6 6.12 2.04 2.28 3.72 5.64 10.68 3.6 4.08 6.6 9.96 19.08 6.48 7.32 11.76 17.76 33.96 11.64 13.08 21.24 32.4 65.28

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 45 45 45 45 45 43 43 43 43 43 42 42 42 42 42 40 40 40 40 40 35 35 35 35 35 10.716 11.736 15.324 19.884 33.06 13.848 14.616 19.944 27.468 54.324 24.624 25.992 35.448 48.828 96.576 43.776 46.212 63.012 86.808 171.696 78.732 83.244 109.428 154.956 322.332 4.704 5.16 6.732 8.736 14.532 6.096 6.42 8.76 12.072 23.88 10.824 11.424 15.576 21.456 42.444 19.248 20.304 27.684 38.136 75.456 34.596 36.576 48.096 68.1 141.648

(160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.32 1.44 1.92 2.4 4.08 1.68 1.8 2.52 3.48 6.84 3.12 3.24 4.44 6.12 12.12 5.52 5.76 7.92 10.8 21.48 9.84 10.32 13.68 19.32 40.32

(240 180)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(480 360)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Axis 231D, 232D, 241S/241SA and 241Q/241QA with MPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 231D, 232D, 241S, 241SA, 241Q and 241QA streamers using MPEG video format for three levels of image complexity. This data is based on a GOP (Group of Pictures) value of 8 (the default value used by Honeywell DVM). The levels of motion are defined as follows: No motion is a constant image. Low motion is when approximately 25% of the image is continually changing. High motion is when approximately 50% of the image is continually changing.

Considerations The Axis 241Q streamer supports up to four cameras, with the total available frame rate and bandwidth shared across the cameras. The 231D/232D is a PTZ camera with built in streamer. When viewed, a 4CIF Expanded image is the same size as a 4CIF Interlaced image. However, a 4CIF Expanded image is transmitted and stored in a compressed format (768 288) for PAL or (640 240) for NTSC and then expanded at the Client (768 576) for PAL or (640 480) for NTSC.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion QCIF PAL (192 144) NTSC (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 82.6 118.1 184.2 421 560 Low motion 124 177.2 276.4 631.6 840 High motion 165.3 236.2 368.5 842.1 1120 No motion 36.32 51.91 80.97 185.03 246.03 Low motion 54.49 77.87 121.46 277.55 369.14 High motion 72.65 103.82 161.95 370.07 492.18

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Resolution

Compression Maximum frame rate

Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 340.3 524.8 904.4 2406.8 3177.6 622.8 986.4 1742.4 4805.6 6630.4 902.8 1426 2444 6528.4 9042.4 High motion 453.8 699.7 1205.8 3209 4236.8 830.4 1315.2 2323.2 6407.4 8840.5 1203.7 1901.3 3258.6 8704.5 12056.5 No motion 99.75 153.75 264.96 705.11 930.93 182.46 288.98 510.46 1407.89 1942.5 264.49 417.77 716.01 1912.61 2649.14 Low motion 149.58 230.62 397.44 1057.67 1396.40 273.69 433.47 765.70 2111.83 2913.75 396.73 626.66 1074.02 2868.92 3973.71 High motion 199.45 307.5 529.92 1410.23 1861.87 364.92 577.96 1020.93 2815.78 3885 528.98 835.54 1432.03 3825.23 5298.28

CIF PAL (384 288) NTSC (320 240) PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480) PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 18 18 18 18 18

226.9 349.8 602.9 1604.5 2118.4 415.2 657.6 1161.6 3203.7 4420.2 601.8 950.6 1629.3 4352.2 6028.2

4CIF - Expanded Maximum

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full 1-hour recording disk space (MB) frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 NTSC) fps NTSC) No motion QCIF PAL (192 144) NTSC (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 59.4 71.46 94.4 174.6 224 Low motion 89.2 107.2 141.6 262 336 High motion 118.9 142.9 188.8 349.3 448 No motion Low motion 26.13 31.40 41.48 76.75 98.43 39.19 47.10 62.22 115.13 147.65 High motion 52.26 62.81 82.96 153.51 196.87

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Resolution

Compression Maximum frame rate

Bandwidth (Kbps) at full 1-hour recording disk space (MB) frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 NTSC) fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 212.8 265.2 385.6 859.2 1189.2 356.8 444 646.8 1605.2 2240.4 518.4 639.6 948.4 2288 2824 High motion 283.7 353.6 514.1 1145.6 1585.6 475.7 592 862.4 2140.2 2987.2 691.2 852.8 1264.5 3050.6 3765.3 No motion Low motion 62.34 77.62 112.94 251.76 348.34 104.53 130 189.42 470.27 656.38 151.83 187.36 277.84 670.36 827.38 93.51 116.54 169.45 377.57 522.59 156.79 195.11 284.23 705.41 984.55 227.81 281.07 416.77 1005.45 1241.01 High motion 124.68 155.39 225.93 503.43 696.79 209.06 260.15 378.98 940.54 1312.73 303.76 374.76 555.70 1340.62 1654.68

CIF PAL (384 288) NTSC (320 240) 4CIF Expanded PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480) PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 21 21 21 21 21

141.8 176.8 257 572.8 792.8 237.8 296 431.2 1070.1 1493.6 345.6 426.4 632.2 1525.3 1882.6

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum

Simple image
Resolution Compression Maximum frame rate Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion QCIF PAL (192 144) NTSC (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 25 25 25 25 25 51.7 59.2 73.6 108.2 131.2 Low motion 77.6 88.8 110.4 162.4 196.8 High motion 103.4 118.4 147.2 216.5 262.4 No motion 22.73 26.015 32.34 47.57 57.65 Low motion 34.10 39.02 48.51 71.36 86.48 High motion 45.468 52.031 64.68 95.15 115.31

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Resolution

Compression Maximum frame rate

Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame 1-hour recording disk space rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 187.2 211.2 260.8 456.4 592.4 311.6 348.8 430.8 764 1070.4 458.4 511.2 632 1138.8 1591.6 High motion 249.6 281.6 347.7 608.5 789.8 415.4 465 574.4 1018.6 1427.2 611.2 681.6 842.6 1518.4 2122.1 No motion 54.84 61.87 76.40 133.71 173.55 91.28 102.18 126.21 223.82 313.59 134.29 149.76 185.15 333.63 466.28 Low motion 82.26 92.81 114.60 200.56 260.33 136.93 153.28 189.31 335.74 470.39 201.44 224.64 277.73 500.44 699.43 High motion 109.68 123.75 152.81 267.42 347.10 182.57 204.37 252.42 447.65 627.18 268.59 299.53 370.31 667.26 932.57

CIF PAL (384 288) NTSC (320 240) 4CIF Expanded PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480) PAL (768 576) NTSC (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25

124.8 140.8 173.8 304.2 394.9 207.7 232.5 287.2 509.3 713.6 305.6 340.8 421.3 759.2 1061

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum

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Axis 2100 and 2110 with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 2100 and 2110 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 15 13 13 12 10 13 12 12 10 5 33.70 43.36 87.60 146.55 688.85 116.28 151.88 309.17 503.39 2250.42 14.81 19.05 38.49 64.40 302.72 51.10 66.74 135.86 221.22 988.95

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4.2 5.5 11.0 18.3 86.1 14.5 19.0 38.6 63.0 281.3

Large (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 15 13 13 13 11 14 12 12 11 6 20.28 23.36 36.97 56.36 425.37 69.73 77.73 127.64 205.30 1952.28 8.92 10.27 16.25 24.77 186.93 30.64 34.16 56.09 90.22 857.94

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.5 3.0 4.6 7.0 53.2 8.7 9.7 16.0 25.7 244.0

Large (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 15 15 14 13 12 15 13 12 11 7 17.17 18.46 26.95 39.27 377.73 60.85 64.77 86.79 135.15 1753.82 7.55 8.11 11.84 17.26 166.00 26.74 28.46 38.14 59.39 770.72

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.1 2.3 3.3 4.9 47.2 7.6 8.1 10.8 16.9 219.2

Large (640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Axis 2120, 2130, 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2420 with Motion JPEG
The following data was collected using the Axis 2120, 2130, 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2420 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Considerations Axis 2120 only supports PAL resolution. The Axis 2400 streamer supports up to four cameras, with the total available frame rate and bandwidth shared across the cameras. Not all camera streamers support all resolutions. The Axis 2400 1.x and 2401 1.x streamers do not support the 4CIF-Expanded resolution. The 4CIF-Expanded resolution is only supported using the latest streamer firmware for the other streamers listed.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 21 12 16 16 16 16 8 16.85 20.64 39.79 63.25 261.01 44.48 57.23 115.63 193.44 909.28 87.48 114.27 232.62 378.75 1693.21 7.41 9.07 17.48 27.80 114.70 19.55 25.15 50.81 85.01 399.59 38.44 50.21 102.22 166.44 744.08

QCIF PAL (176 144) Small CIF PAL (352 288) Medium 4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.1 2.6 5.0 7.9 32.6 5.6 7.2 14.5 24.2 113.7 10.9 14.3 29.0 47.3 211.6

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 8 8 8 8 4 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 22 13 16 16 16 16 10 8 8 8 8 5 153.49 200.48 408.11 664.48 2970.56 14.04 17.20 33.16 52.71 217.51 37.07 47.69 96.36 161.20 757.73 72.90 95.22 193.85 315.62 1411.01 127.91 167.07 340.09 553.73 2475.47 67.45 88.10 179.34 292.01 1305.42 6.18 7.56 14.57 23.17 95.58 16.29 20.96 42.34 70.84 332.99 32.03 41.84 85.18 138.70 620.07 56.21 73.42 149.45 243.34 1087.85

4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576) Large QCIF NTSC (176 112) Small CIF NTSC (352 240) Medium 4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480) 4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480) Large

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

19.2 25.1 51.0 83.1 371.3 1.8 2.2 4.2 6.6 27.2 4.7 6.0 12.1 20.2 94.8 9.1 11.9 24.2 39.5 176.3 16.0 20.9 42.5 69.3 309.4

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 14 14 14 14 14 7 8 8 8 8 4 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 12.43 14.08 21.07 29.60 158.45 26.77 30.83 48.80 74.40 561.49 52.46 58.48 96.03 154.46 1468.89 92.05 102.61 168.48 270.99 2577.01 10.36 11.73 17.56 24.67 132.04 22.31 25.69 40.67 62.00 467.91 5.46 6.19 9.26 13.01 69.63 11.77 13.55 21.45 32.70 246.75 23.05 25.70 42.20 67.88 645.51 40.45 45.09 74.04 119.09 1132.48 4.55 5.16 7.72 10.84 58.03 9.81 11.29 17.88 27.25 205.63

QCIF PAL (176 144) Small CIF PAL (352 288) Medium 4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576) 4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576) Large QCIF NTSC (176 112) Small CIF NTSC (352 240) Medium

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.6 1.8 2.6 3.7 19.8 3.3 3.9 6.1 9.3 70.2 6.5 7.2 12.0 19.3 183.5 11.5 12.8 21.1 33.9 322.1 1.3 1.5 2.2 3.1 16.5 2.8 3.3 5.1 7.8 58.5

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 14 14 14 14 7 8 8 8 8 4 43.7247 48.7407 80.028 128.7231 1224.081 76.71 85.51 140.40 225.83 2147.51 19.2147 21.4206 35.169 56.5668 537.9261 33.71 37.58 61.70 99.24 943.73

4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480) 4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480) Large

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

5.4 6.1 10.0 16.1 152.9 9.6 10.7 17.6 28.3 268.4

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 12 14 14 14 14 9 10.67 11.52 16.32 21.49 136.48 22.67 24.37 35.57 51.84 498.61 45.78 48.72 65.29 101.68 1319.57 4.69 5.06 7.17 9.45 59.98 9.96 10.71 15.63 22.78 219.12 20.12 21.41 28.69 44.68 579.88

QCIF PAL (176 144) Small CIF PAL (352 288) Medium 4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.3 1.4 2.0 2.7 17.1 2.8 3.0 4.4 6.5 62.3 5.7 6.0 8.1 12.7 164.9

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 8 8 8 8 5 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 14 14 14 14 14 9 8 8 8 8 5 80.32 85.49 114.56 178.40 2315.04 8.89 9.60 13.60 17.91 113.73 18.89 20.31 29.64 43.20 415.51 38.15 40.60 54.41 84.74 1099.64 66.93 71.24 95.47 148.67 1929.20 35.30 37.57 50.34 78.40 1017.35 3.91 4.22 5.98 7.88 49.98 8.30 8.93 13.03 18.98 182.60 16.76 17.84 23.91 37.23 483.24 29.42 31.31 41.95 65.33 847.79

4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576) Large QCIF NTSC (176 112) Small CIF NTSC (352 240) Medium 4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480) 4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480) Large

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

10.0 10.7 14.3 22.3 289.4 1.1 1.2 1.7 2.3 14.3 2.3 2.5 3.7 5.4 51.9 4.7 5.0 6.7 10.6 137.4 8.3 8.9 11.9 18.6 241.2

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Axis 2400+, 2401+ and 2411 with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the Axis 2400+, 2401+ and 2411 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Considerations The Axis 2400+ streamer supports up to four cameras, with the total available frame rate and bandwidth shared across the cameras. When viewed, a 4CIF Expanded image is the same size as a 4CIF Interlaced image. However, a 4CIF Expanded image is transmitted and stored in a compressed format (704 288) for PAL or (704 240) for NTSC and then expanded at the Client (704 576) for PAL or (704 480) for NTSC. The Axis 2411 does not provide support for controlling PTZ cameras.

Complex image

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 13 13 13 13 13 8 16.85 20.64 39.79 63.25 261.01 44.48 57.23 115.63 193.44 909.28 86.24 112.91 232.91 378.61 1897.17 7.41 9.07 17.48 27.80 114.70 19.55 25.15 50.81 85.01 399.59 37.90 49.62 102.35 166.38 833.72

QCIF PAL (176 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

2.1 2.6 5.0 7.9 32.6 5.6 7.2 14.5 24.2 113.7 10.8 14.1 29.1 47.3 237.1

CIF PAL (352 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 8 8 8 8 5 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 15 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 153.49 200.48 408.11 664.48 2970.56 14.04 17.20 33.16 52.71 217.51 37.07 47.69 96.36 161.20 757.73 71.87 94.09 194.09 315.51 1580.98 127.91 167.07 340.09 553.73 2475.47 67.45 88.10 179.34 292.01 1305.42 6.18 7.56 14.57 23.17 95.58 16.29 20.96 42.34 70.84 332.99 31.58 41.35 85.29 138.65 694.77 56.21 73.42 149.45 243.34 1087.85

4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

19.2 25.1 51.0 83.1 371.3 1.8 2.2 4.2 6.6 27.2 4.7 6.0 12.1 20.2 94.8 9.0 11.8 24.3 39.4 197.6 16.0 20.9 42.5 69.3 309.4

QCIF NTSC (176 120)

CIF NTSC (352 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480)

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 13 13 13 13 13 8 8 8 8 8 5 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 12.43 14.08 21.07 29.60 158.45 26.77 30.83 48.80 74.40 561.49 48.21 53.87 87.73 139.41 1310.35 92.05 102.61 168.48 270.99 2577.01 10.36 11.73 17.56 24.67 132.04 22.31 25.69 40.67 62.00 467.91 5.46 6.19 9.26 13.01 69.63 11.77 13.55 21.45 32.70 246.75 21.19 23.67 38.55 61.27 575.84 40.45 45.09 74.04 119.09 1132.48 4.55 5.16 7.72 10.84 58.03 9.81 11.29 17.88 27.25 205.63

QCIF PAL (176 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.6 1.8 2.6 3.7 19.8 3.3 3.9 6.1 9.3 70.2 6.0 6.7 11.0 17.24 163.8 11.5 12.8 21.1 33.9 322.1 1.3 1.5 2.2 3.1 16.5 2.8 3.3 5.1 7.8 58.5

CIF PAL (352 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576)

QCIF NTSC (176 120)

CIF NTSC (352 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 15 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 40.18 44.89 73.11 116.18 1091.96 76.71 85.51 140.40 225.83 2147.51 17.66 19.73 32.13 51.06 479.87 33.71 37.58 61.70 99.24 943.73

4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

5.0 5.6 9.2 14.4 136.5 9.6 10.7 17.6 28.3 268.4

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480)

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 13 13 13 13 13 8 10.67 11.52 16.32 21.49 136.48 22.67 24.37 35.57 51.84 498.61 42.51 45.55 62.35 93.6 1178.67 4.69 5.06 7.17 9.45 59.98 9.96 10.71 15.63 22.78 219.12 21.19 23.67 38.55 61.27 575.84

QCIF PAL (176 144)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.3 1.4 2.0 2.7 17.1 2.8 3.0 4.4 6.5 62.3 5.3 5.7 7.8 11.7 147.3

CIF PAL (352 288)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 8 8 8 8 5 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 15 15 15 15 15 10 10 10 10 10 5 80.32 85.49 114.56 178.40 2315.04 8.89 9.60 13.60 17.91 113.73 18.89 20.31 29.64 43.20 415.51 35.43 37.96 51.96 78.00 982.23 66.93 71.24 95.47 148.67 1929.20 35.30 37.57 50.34 78.40 1017.35 3.91 4.22 5.98 7.88 49.98 8.30 8.93 13.03 18.98 182.60 17.66 19.73 32.13 51.06 479.87 29.42 31.31 41.95 65.33 847.79

4CIF Interlaced PAL (704 576)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

10.0 10.7 14.3 22.3 289.4 1.1 1.2 1.7 2.3 14.3 2.3 2.5 3.7 5.4 51.9 4.4 4.8 6.5 9.8 122.8 8.3 8.9 11.9 18.6 241.2

QCIF NTSC (176 120)

CIF NTSC (352 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Expanded NTSC (704 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4CIF Interlaced NTSC (704 480)

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CamStation CS100 with MPEG


The following data was collected using the CamStation CS100 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Considerations No motion is considered to be a reasonably constant image. Low motion is when approximately 25% of the image is continually changing. High motion is when approximately 50% of the image is continually changing.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 148 164 189 212 244 294 328 385 479 598 473 524 612 761 943 Low motion 222 246 283 318 366 441 492 577 718 897 709 786 918 1141 1414 High motion 296 328 378 424 488 588 656 770 958 1196 946 1048 1224 1522 1886 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 65.16 72.19 83.20 93.16 107.46 129.61 144.14 169.22 210.82 263.09 208.24 230.63 269.18 334.45 414.49 Low motion 97.74 108.28 124.80 139.74 161.19 194.41 216.21 253.83 316.23 394.63 312.36 345.94 403.77 501.67 621.73 High motion 130.32 144.38 166.40 186.32 214.92 259.22 288.28 338.44 421.64 526.18 416.48 461.26 538.36 668.90 828.98

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 109 112 114 122 128 206 210 219 235 251 273 282 290 307 324 Low motion 163 168 171 183 192 309 315 328 352 376 409 423 435 460 486 High motion 218 224 228 244 256 412 420 438 470 502 546 564 580 614 648 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 48.16 49.45 50.51 53.79 56.37 90.94 92.46 96.33 103.48 110.39 120.35 123.98 127.50 135.12 142.73 Low motion 72.24 74.17 75.76 80.68 84.55 136.41 138.69 144.49 155.22 165.58 180.52 185.97 191.25 202.68 214.09 High motion 96.32 98.90 101.02 107.58 112.74 181.88 184.92 192.66 206.96 220.78 240.70 247.96 255.00 270.24 285.46

Simple image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion (160 120) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 100 101 104 107 111 Low motion 150 151 156 160 166 High motion 200 202 208 214 222 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 44.18 44.77 45.94 47.11 49.1 Low motion 66.27 67.15 68.91 70.66 73.65 High motion 88.36 89.54 91.88 94.22 98.20

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Resolution

Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 270 277 282 294 343 367 375 379 396 412 High motion 360 370 376 392 458 490 500 506 528 550

1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 79.34 81.45 82.97 86.13 101.02 108.05 110.16 111.45 116.02 120.94 Low motion 119.01 122.17 124.45 129.19 151.53 162.07 165.24 167.17 174.03 181.41 High motion 158.68 162.90 165.94 172.26 202.04 216.10 220.32 222.90 232.04 241.88

(320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

180 185 188 196 229 245 250 253 264 275

(640 480)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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CamStation CS-3001V with MPEG


The following data was collected using the CamStation CS-3001V camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Considerations When viewed, a 4CIF Expanded image is the same size as a 4CIF Interlaced image. However, a 4CIF Expanded image is transmitted and stored in a compressed format (704 288) for PAL or (640 240) for NTSC and then expanded at the Client (704 576) for PAL or (640 480) for NTSC. No motion is considered to be a reasonably constant image. Low motion is when approximately 25% of the image is continually changing. High motion is when approximately 50% of the image is continually changing. Depending on the complexity of the image, the CS-3001V may not support all combinations of resolution and compression.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion CIF PAL (352 288) NTSC (320 240) PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum 161 275 363 427 852 343 617 796 975 1675 Low motion 241.5 412.5 544.5 640.5 1278 514.5 925.5 1194 1462.5 2512.5 High motion 322 550 726 854 1704 686 1234 1592 1950 3350 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 71.02 121.05 159.73 187.73 374.77 151.05 271.52 350.16 428.55 736.29 Low motion 106.53 181.57 239.59 281.59 562.15 226.57 407.28 525.24 642.82 High motion 142.04 242.10 319.46 375.46 749.54 302.10 543.04 700.32 857.10

4CIF - Expanded Maximum

1104.43 1472.58

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Resolution

Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 645 1380 1821 2283 354 757.5 1000.5 1255.5 2239.5 585 1252.5 1654.5 High motion 860 1840 2428 3044 472 1010 1334 1674 2986 780 1670 2206 -

1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 189.14 404.41 533.91 669.26 103.96 222.28 293.46 367.85 656.25 171.75 367.22 484.80 Low motion 283.71 800.86 155.94 333.42 440.19 551.77 984.37 257.62 550.83 727.2 High motion 378.28 1067.82 207.92 444.56 586.92 735.70 1312.50 343.50 734.44 969.60 -

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) D1 - Expanded PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) D1 - Interlaced PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

430 920 1214 1522 236 505 667 837 1493 390 835 1103 -

606.615 808.82 1003.89 1338.52

Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion CIF PAL (352 288) NTSC (320 240) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 75 95 111 166 318 Low motion 112.5 142.5 166.5 249 477 High motion 150 190 222 332 636 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 33.06 41.85 48.91 72.95 139.93 Low motion 49.59 62.77 73.36 109.42 209.89 High motion 66.12 83.70 97.82 145.90 279.86

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Resolution

Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion Low motion 240 321 366 568.5 937.5 204 435 576 721.5 1315.5 112.5 240 316.5 397.5 723 184.5 396 523.5 655.5 1195.5 High motion 320 428 488 758 1250 272 580 768 962 1754 150 320 422 530 964 246 528 698 874 1594

1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 70.31 93.87 107.23 166.52 274.92 59.78 127.82 168.74 211.52 385.55 32.86 70.25 92.75 116.26 211.91 54.28 116.06 153.23 192.07 350.09 Low motion 105.46 140.80 160.84 249.78 412.38 89.67 191.73 253.11 317.28 578.32 49.29 105.37 139.12 174.39 317.86 81.42 174.09 229.84 288.10 525.13 High motion 140.62 187.74 214.46 333.04 549.84 119.56 255.64 337.48 423.04 771.10 65.72 140.50 185.50 232.52 423.82 108.56 232.12 306.46 384.14 700.18

4CIF - Expanded Maximum PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) D1 - Expanded PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) D1 - Interlaced PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

160 214 244 379 625 136 290 384 481 877 75 160 211 265 482 123 264 349 437 797

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum

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Simple image
Resolution Compression Bandwidth (Kbps) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion CIF PAL (352 288) NTSC (320 240) PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) PAL (704 576) NTSC (640 480) D1 - Expanded PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) D1 - Interlaced PAL (720 576) NTSC (720 480) Maximum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum Maximum High Medium Low Minimum 56 60 102 114 204 120 134 224 261 402 88 187 246 309 564 48 102 135 170 310 79 169 224 281 512 Low motion 84 90 153 171 306 180 201 336 391.5 603 132 280.5 369 463.5 846 72 153 202.5 255 465 118.5 253.5 336 421.5 768 High motion 112 120 204 228 408 240 268 448 522 804 176 374 492 618 1128 96 204 270 340 620 158 338 448 562 1024 1-hour recording disk space (MB) at full frame rate (25 fps PAL, 30 fps NTSC) No motion 24.79 26.38 45.06 50.36 90.01 52.73 59.18 98.79 114.96 176.84 38.45 82.22 108.54 136.06 247.99 21.13 45.19 59.66 74.78 136.31 34.92 74.65 98.56 123.54 225.19 Low motion 37.18 39.57 67.59 75.54 135.01 79.09 88.77 148.18 172.44 265.26 57.67 123.33 162.81 204.09 371.98 31.69 67.78 89.49 112.17 204.46 52.38 111.97 147.84 185.31 337.78 High motion 49.58 52.76 90.12 100.72 180.02 105.46 118.36 197.58 229.92 353.68 76.90 164.44 217.08 272.12 495.98 42.26 90.38 119.32 149.56 272.62 69.84 149.30 197.12 247.08 450.38

4CIF - Expanded Maximum

4CIF - Interlaced Maximum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video

MegaChips OpennetView and MD-100 with Motion JPEG


The following data was collected using the MegaChips OpennetView (ONV) and MD-100 camera streamer for three levels of image complexity. Considerations The MegaChips MD-100 supports up to four cameras with the total available frame rate and bandwidth shared across the cameras.

Complex image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 19 13 22 14 9 4 2 22 14 9 4 2 13.55 22.24 36.69 57.01 83.47 48.75 78.29 124.53 135.20 138.77 48.75 77.81 123.68 138.67 140.69 5.95 9.77 16.13 25.05 36.68 21.42 34.41 54.73 59.41 60.98 21.42 34.20 54.35 60.94 61.83

Small (160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.7 2.8 4.6 7.1 10.4 6.1 9.8 15.6 16.9 17.3 6.1 9.7 15.5 17.3 17.6

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

Large (640 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Medium-complexity image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 16 10 25 25 25 16 10 7.68 10.61 15.52 22.40 34.77 22.88 30.93 44.37 67.52 109.33 22.88 31.09 44.69 67.52 108.59 3.38 4.66 6.82 9.84 15.28 10.05 13.59 19.50 29.67 48.05 10.05 13.66 19.64 29.67 47.72

Small (160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

1.0 1.3 1.9 2.8 4.3 2.9 3.9 5.5 8.4 13.7 2.9 3.9 5.6 8.4 13.6

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

Large (640 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

Simple image
Resolution Compression Image Size (KB) Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 25 5.28 6.88 9.39 13.01 19.84 2.32 3.02 4.13 5.72 8.72

Small (160 120)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

0.7 0.9 1.2 1.6 2.5

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Resolution

Compression

Image Size (KB)

Max Frame Bandwidth 1-hour Rate (fps) per fps (Kbps) recording disk space per fps (MB) 25 25 25 25 18 25 25 25 25 18 36.11 37.07 37.76 39.20 61.33 16.05 20.00 26.03 36.69 61.81 15.87 16.29 16.59 17.23 26.95 7.05 8.79 11.44 16.13 27.16

Medium (320 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

4.5 4.6 4.7 4.9 7.7 2.0 2.5 3.3 4.6 7.7

Large (640 240)

Maximum High Medium Low Minimum

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Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for audio


If you use audio, you must add the following audio requirements to the video requirements: 42 Kbps for the bandwidth 5KB per second for storage

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EBI or Experion integration

EBI or Experion integration


Issue Event-activated recording Comments Determine which alarms and events need video recordings. You also need to determine the quality requirements (frame rate, recording duration and so on) for each event-activated recording. Determine which Stations need to view cameras. See Stations on page 92. Areas (assets) Areas (assets) need to be configured in EBI or Experion before they can be assigned in Honeywell DVM. See Areas (Assets) on page 93. Security Consider your security requirements for an integrated system. See Security on page 94. Custom displays Determine whether you want to include Honeywell DVM functionality in custom displays. See the Honeywell DVM Object Model Reference.

Stations

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Stations
Determine which Stations need to show video. Although any Station can, in principle, show video, such Stations need to be well equipped for satisfactory performance. Also keep in mind that excessive use of video may degrade network and system performance. See Hardware and software requirements on page 116 for the hardware and software requirements for Stations that show video.

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EBI or Experion integration

Areas (Assets)
An area (also called asset) can represent a physical part of a building or plant, or a particular process. (The terminology differs according to product: in EBI it is area; whereas in Experion it is asset.) Areas enable you to restrict access to: Cameras Quad views Camera Sequences Alarms (Operators can filter out alarms that do not belong to their area.) Points Stations (A Station assigned to a particular area can only access cameras, points, custom displays and reports that are assigned to the same area.) Operators, if you use operator-based security Custom displays Reports

If you use areas, you must carefully assign areas to the various components so that your system works as required. For example, event-activated recording will only work as expected if the following are assigned to the same area as the point: The camera used for event-activated recording The Station(s) or Internet Explorer client(s) used to view the recorded video The operator(s) that need to view the recorded video

Notes For more information about areas, refer to the EBI or Experion Configuration Guide. You must configure areas in EBI or Experion before you can assign them in Honeywell DVM.

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Security
You need to choose a security setup that best meets your needs. Honeywell DVM provides a range of security features, and supports both domain and workgroup security.
Issue Security types Comments Honeywell DVM supports several types of security. Select the type that best meets your needs. See Security types on page 95. Windows security Honeywell DVM supports domain and workgroup security. Select the security model that best meets your needs. See Windows security on page 96. Specialized Windows accounts Learn about the specialized Windows accounts and and groups groups used by Honeywell DVM. See About the specialized Windows accounts and groups used by Honeywell DVM on page 98. Honeywell DVM security levels Determine how you are going to use Honeywell DVM security levels. See About Honeywell DVM security levels on page 100. Areas (assets) If you have EBI or Experion, decide whether you want to divide your system up into areas (assets). See Areas (Assets) on page 93.

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Security types
Honeywell DVM supports three types of security: Internet Explorer security Operator-based security (only applicable if you have EBI or Experion) Station-based security (only applicable if you have EBI or Experion)

Internet Explorer security For Internet Explorer users, Honeywell DVM uses normal Windows security, but with the addition of Honeywell DVM security levels (see page 100). Operator-based security You can use operator-based security if you are using Honeywell DVM in conjunction with EBI or Experion. Notes You must configure operator-based security within EBI or Experion before you can configure security for Honeywell DVM. Users can only view live video and recordings for areas that have been assigned to them.

For detailed information about operator-based security, see the EBI or Experion Configuration Guide. Station-based security You can use Station-based security if you are using Honeywell DVM in conjunction with EBI or Experion. Notes You must configure Station-based security within EBI or Experion before you can configure security for Honeywell DVM. If you use Station-based security, there are no user IDs, only security levels. When users start Station, they are immediately assigned OPER level. If required, they can then change to a higher level providing they know the password for that level on that Station. Users can only view live video and recordings for areas that have been assigned to the Station.

For detailed information about Station-based security, see the EBI or Experion Configuration Guide.

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Windows security
Honeywell DVM supports both domain and workgroup security. For larger systems, and for systems that include EBI or Experion, we recommend domain security because it significantly simplifies the management of user accounts. Rules and guidelines for domain security All Honeywell DVM servers, EBI or Experion servers and client computers must belong to the same domain. (You cannot, for example, have some client computers outside the domain.) On the domain controller, you must create a domain user group for Honeywell DVM users. You must also: Add this domain user group to the local group, DVM_Users, on each Database Server and Camera Server. Add each user account this domain user group. We recommend the use of integrated accounts because it significantly simplifies the management of user accounts. (An integrated account combines a user's Windows account with the user's operator ID.) Stations must run under an account that belongs to the domain user group for Honeywell DVM users. If a user needs to access Station on the EBI or Experion server (the server Station), that users account must also belong to the Honeywell Administrators group.

If you use EBI or Experion:

Rules and guidelines for workgroup security Each users account must exist on: Every Database Server and Camera Server Every client computer on which the user accesses Honeywell DVM

Each users account must belong to the DVM_Users group on each Database Server and Camera Server. The password for each users account must be the same on every computer. If you have EBI or Experion:

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Each users account must belong to the Honeywell Users group (for EBI) or Engineers group (for Experion) If a user needs to access Station on an EBI or Experion server (the server Station), that users account must also belong to the Honeywell Administrators group on that server.

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About the specialized Windows accounts and groups used by Honeywell DVM
The following table describes the purpose of the specialized Windows accounts and groups used by Honeywell DVM. (Except where specified, these accounts and groups are created when installing Honeywell DVM.) Note that if you have EBI or Experion, it also uses a number of specialized Windows accounts and groups in addition to the mngr account. For details, see the associated documentation.
Account/group Windows accounts DVM_Manager DVM_Logger mngr Honeywell DVM services run under this account. Honeywell DVM uses this account to write to log files. Only applicable if you have EBI or Experion. Honeywell DVM uses this account to communicate with EBI or Experion. (It is equivalent to the DVM_Manager account because EBI or Experion services run under this account.). Note: The password for this account must be the same on all Honeywell DVM and EBI or Experion computers. Honeywell DVM installation account In order to install any Honeywell DVM components on a computer, you must create a specialized installation account (called the Honeywell DVM installation account) on that computer. (For details about the accounts requirements, see Setting up the Honeywell DVM installation account on page 217.) This account is only required during installation. When you have completed all installation tasks, you can remove the account if its existence is not approved of by your organization's security policies. Windows groups DVM_Users The group to which anyone who uses Honeywell DVM must belong. Description

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The following table shows where the specialized accounts and groups are used.
Computer Database Server Accounts DVM_Manager DVM_Logger mngr Camera Server DVM_Manager DVM_Logger mngr EBI or Experion server Station Console Station Internet Explorer client DVM_Logger DVM_Logger DVM_Users Groups DVM_Users

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About Honeywell DVM security levels


The following table describes Honeywell DVMs security levels. These apply to both Station and Internet Explorer. Notes If you use Station-based security, you can jump to a particular security level by entering the password for that level on that Station. If you use operator-based security, each person is given an operator ID and assigned a specific security level. Honeywell DVM does not support LVL1 or LVL2 access if your system is divided into areas. For example, if you give LV1 operators access to a particular area, they will effectively have OPER security level within that area.
Security level number 0 1 2 3 4 5 Description Only allows viewing. This level is only available with operator-based security. Only allows alarm acknowledgement. This level is only available with operator-based security. The standard operator level that allows alarm acknowledgement and routine control. Provides access to supervisor-level functions. Provides access to engineer-level functions. Provides unrestricted access to all functions.

Security level LVL1 LVL2 OPER SUPV ENGR MNGR

Access rights for operator-based security The following table shows the default access rights for Honeywell DVM functions when using operator-based security.

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Function Camera View camera configuration details Add a camera Delete a camera Enable/Disable cameras Edit camera configuration details Add a schedule Delete a schedule Edit schedule details Delete a video clip Export a video clip Add/Delete a preset (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete a privacy zone (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete/Configure a tour Quad Views View configuration details Add a quad view Delete a quad view Edit configuration details Sequences View definitions Add a sequence Delete a sequence Change definitions Audit Log Search Redundancy Performance Monitor Configure Export Search for a clip View Redundancy details Configure the settings View

LVL1 LVL2 OPER SUPV Yes

ENGR MNGR Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Function Archive Video Export Honeywell KD6 Special Presetsi Perform the archive operation Perform the export operation Run tour 1 Run tour 2 Run tour 3 Program tour 1 Program tour 2 Program tour 3 Return to manual camera control Run vectorscan 1 Run vectorscan 2 Run vectorscan 3 Setup menu Toggle error display Toggle iris Toggle backlight control Toggle nightshot Freeze Flashback Camera reset Disk space Video Analytics View configuration details Edit configuration details View configuration details Add object tracking/classification conditions Delete object tracking/classification conditions Edit configuration details

LVL1 LVL2 OPER SUPV

ENGR MNGR Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

i You can configure these security levels. See Defining special presets on page 346.

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Access rights for Station-based security The following table shows the default access rights for Honeywell DVM functions when using Station-based security.
Function Camera View camera configuration details Add a camera Delete a camera Enable/Disable cameras Edit camera configuration details Add a schedule Delete a schedule Edit schedule details Delete a video clip Export a video clip Add/Delete a preset (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete a privacy zone (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete/Configure a tour Quad Views View configuration details Add a quad view Delete a quad view Edit configuration details Sequences View definitions Add a sequence Delete a sequence Change definitions Audit Log Search Redundancy Configure Export Search for a clip View Redundancy details Configure the settings Performance Monitor View Archive Video Export Perform the archive operation Perform the export operation Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 103 Yes Yes Yes Yes OPER SUPV Yes ENGR MNGR Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Function Honeywell KD6 Special Presetsi Run tour 1 Run tour 2 Run tour 3 Program tour 1 Program tour 2 Program tour 3 Return to manual camera control Run vectorscan 1 Run vectorscan 2 Run vectorscan 3 Setup menu Toggle error display Toggle iris Toggle backlight control Toggle nightshot Freeze Flashback Camera reset Disk space Video Analytics View configuration details Edit configuration details View configuration details Add video object tracking/classification conditions Delete video object tracking/classification conditions Edit configuration details

OPER SUPV

ENGR MNGR Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

i You can configure these security levels. See Defining special presets on page 346.

Access rights for Internet Explorer The following table shows the default access rights for Honeywell DVM functions when using Internet Explorer.

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Security

Security level Function Camera View camera configuration details Add a camera Delete a camera Enable/Disable cameras Edit camera configuration details Add a schedule Delete a schedule Edit schedule details Delete a video clip Export a video clip Add/Delete a preset (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete a privacy zone (VCL Orbiter cameras only) Add/Delete/Configure a tour Quad Views View configuration details Add a quad view Delete a quad view Edit configuration details Sequences View definitions Add a sequence Delete a sequence Change definitions Audit Log Search Redundancy Performance Monitor Archive Video Export Configure Export Search for a clip View Redundancy details Configure the settings View Perform the archive operation Perform the export operation Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 1 2 3 Yes 4 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 5 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Security level Function Honeywell KD6 Special Presetsi Run tour 1 Run tour 2 Run tour 3 Program tour 1 Program tour 2 Program tour 3 Return to manual camera control Run vectorscan 1 Run vectorscan 2 Run vectorscan 3 Setup menu Toggle error display Toggle iris Toggle backlight control Toggle nightshot Freeze Flashback Camera reset Disk space Video Analytics View configuration details Edit configuration details View configuration details Add object tracking/classification conditions Delete object tracking/classification conditions Edit configuration details Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 1 2 Yes Yes Yes 3 Yes Yes Yes 4 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 5 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

i You can configure these security levels. See Defining special presets on page 346.

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Digital signatures

Digital signatures
A digital signature is the electronic equivalent of a traditional signature. Honeywell DVM uses digital signatures to authenticate exported videos and audit logs. (When used in conjunction with chain-of-custody processes and procedures, digital signatures greatly enhance the evidential weight of exported videos in legal proceedings.) Honeywell DVM uses a digital certificate, a specialized file used to sign exported videos and audit logs. Depending on your organizations digital signature requirements, you can use: The default digital certificate which is installed on all Honeywell DVM client computers Although the default certificate creates a valid signature, its evidential/legal value is reduced because it is used on many Honeywell DVM sites and therefore does not allow you to uniquely identify the computer used to export video clips/audit logs. Purchase digital certificate(s) from a certification authority, such as VeriSign Such digital certificates are recommended if you intend to use videos and audit logs as evidence. (For information about purchasing a certificate from VeriSign, see http://www.verisign.com.) Create your own digital certificate(s) If you use Window 2000 Server or Window 2003 Server, you can create your own digital certificates. This may be appropriate if your organization has an IS department with experience in creating digital certificates.

To help assess your digital certificate requirements, contact your local Honeywell representative.

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About Honeywell DVM servers


Every Honeywell DVM system includes two types of server: Database Server. This server is responsible for: Storing the configuration and runtime information of the Honeywell DVM system Distributing state information to the clients Accepting requests from Honeywell DVM clients to view video Connecting to video sources Transmitting video from the cameras to the clients Storing recorded video Notifying the Database Server of the system state

Camera Server. This server is responsible:

If you server-based video analytics to detect motion or to track/classify objects, you also need one or more Video Analytics Servers. See About Video Analytics Servers on page 128. Notes Although you can install a Database Server and Camera Server on the same computer, such a configuration is only suitable for small systems. Because the server-based video analytics imposes an extremely high processing load on a computer, we strongly recommend that your Video Analytics Servers are on dedicated computers. For server hardware and software requirements, see Hardware and software requirements on page 116. For information about determining the storage requirements for Camera Servers, see Calculating storage and bandwidth requirements on page 27. You can have redundant Database Servers. See Database Server redundancy on page 109.

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Database Server redundancy

Database Server redundancy


Redundancy is a configuration that allows a backup Database Server to automatically continue the role of the master (referred to as preferred) Database Server in the event of a hardware or software failure on the master Database Server. The preferred Database Server is the Database Server Honeywell DVM clients will connect to if available. The backup Database Server is fully operational and ready to take over the role of Database Server if the preferred Database Server fails. The backup Database Server is constantly synchronizing with the preferred Database Server.

Preferred Database Server

Backup Database Server

Camera Server

Client

Client

Client

Client

Camera Server

Considerations Honeywell DVM only supports redundancy for Database Servers; it does not support redundancy for Camera Servers. Honeywell DVM Database Server Redundancy uses SQL Server Merge Replication to keep the SQL Database synchronized. Therefore, after a failover it is possible the data on the backup Database Server might not be consistent with that on the preferred Database Server. When the preferred Database Server is working again, the data can be synchronized between the two servers so they are restored to their correct state. It is possible to install a Camera Server on a redundant server. However, we do not recommend this configuration for large systems.

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When the primary server is restarted after a failover, it automatically resynchronizes with the backup server, providing it has not been down for more than 14 days. If it has been down for more than 14 days, you must manually resynchronize the servers (see Manually resynchronizing redundant Database Servers on page 423.) The date and time on all servers must be synchronized to ensure that all dates and/or times associated with events in the database are consistent between servers.

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Custom applications and scripts

Custom applications and scripts


You can write custom applications and scripts that use the Honeywell DVM Object Model to control Honeywell DVM. For example, you can: Integrate Honeywell DVM capabilities into your own applications Create custom views and user interfaces for live or recorded video

You can write custom applications in Visual Basic and C++, and scripts in Internet Explorer scripting languages. If you have EBI or Experion, you can also write display and server scripts that use the Honeywell DVM Object Model. For example, you can: Use server scripts to control PTZ cameras when points go into alarm Use display scripts to provide specialized controls in custom displays

For more details, see the Honeywell DVM Object Model Reference.

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Recording audio with Axis streamers


Many Axis streamers are capable of supporting audio, either built into the streamer, or available as an external audio module. To find out which streamers support audio, see Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120.

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Supporting video intercom

Supporting video intercom


Honeywell DVM supports video intercom functionality using the Megachips MD-100 streamer. The intercom conversation can be initiated from the field via a push button connected to the MegaChips MD-100 or by an operator from the Honeywell DVM live video page.

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Camera and video requirements


Issue Number and types of camera Comments Determine the number of cameras needed to adequately monitor your installation. You may be able to reduce the number of cameras by installing PTZ (pan tilt and zoom) cameras rather than fixed cameras. See Camera types on page 114 and Camera streamer types on page 115. Viewing requirements Select an appropriate frame rate for each camera. You may prefer 25 fps PAL (30 fps NTSC), but you can substantially reduce storage and networking requirements by selecting a lower frame rate, such as 10 or 15 fps. Determine the number of frames per second for each camera, and the time for which you need to store the images. Determine the number of frames per second for alarm conditions. Try to set a very conservative rate for background recording (for example, 1 frame every 2 seconds), and use a higher rate (such as 15 fps) for event-activated recording. Camera control Determine the number of cameras that require PTZ control.

Recording requirements

Camera types
Honeywell DVM supports analog cameras (conventional cameras) and network cameras (cameras with a built-in streamer). If you have an existing CCTV system, you can integrate it into your Honeywell DVM system by connecting the cameras to the network using camera streamers and standard coaxial cable. The same distance limitations apply for the coaxial cable as in a conventional CCTV system. Depending on the brand of camera and video streamer, pan tilt and zoom functions are supported via a serial cable from the camera to the streamer.

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Camera and video requirements

Camera streamer types


Honeywell DVM supports several types of camera streamers (see Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120), and all supported types of camera streamers can co-exist on the same system. These camera streamers have an RJ45 network connector that supports 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Ethernet.

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Hardware and software requirements


Database Server hardware Pentium IV 3.2 GHz or higher processor At least 512 MB of RAM (1 GB recommended) If you use pre-record you will require more than 512 MB. Contact your local Honeywell representative to discuss your requirements. Two hard drives (This enables you to load the Windows OS and executables on one drive, and use the second hard drive for the Honeywell DVM database.) If you use this computer as a client, a graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher.

Remarks The server should be optimized for hard disk storage. For example, use RAID and SCSI buses. To configure RAID for your server, refer to the computer documentation. Although you can install both the Database Server and Camera Server components on the same computer, such a configuration is only suitable for a small system with low recording requirements. (Note that if you do choose such a configuration, you need a third hard drive for video recording.)

Camera Server hardware Pentium IV 3.2 GHz or higher processor At least 512 MB of RAM (If you use pre-record you will require more than 512 MB. Contact your local Honeywell representative to discuss your requirements.) Two hard drives (This enables you to load the Windows OS and executables on one drive, and use the second hard drive for video recording.) Use NTFS formatting for video recording. If you use this computer as a client, a graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher. Online and offline storage, such as DAT/DLT. This is only required if video clips are to be archived.

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Hardware and software requirements

Remarks The server should be optimized for hard disk storage. For example, use RAID and SCSI buses. To configure RAID for your server, refer to the computer documentation.

Video Analytics Server hardware Pentium IV 3.2 GHz or higher processor At least 1 GB of RAM Two hard drives (This enables you to load the Windows OS and executables on one drive, and use the second hard drive for video analytics.)

Database Server software Either: Windows 2000 Server, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2000 Professional, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2003 Server, with Service Pack 1 Windows XP Professional, with Service Pack 2

Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, with Service Pack 1, or higher

Remarks Microsoft SQL Server 2000 license is included with Honeywell DVM.

Camera Server software Either: Windows 2000 Server, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2000 Professional, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2003 Server, with Service Pack 1 Windows XP Professional, with Service Pack 2

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, with Service Pack 1, or higher If used as a client, a graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher.

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Video Analytics Server software Either: Windows 2000 Server, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2000 Professional, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2003 Server, with Service Pack 1 Windows XP Professional, with Service Pack 2

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, with Service Pack 1, or higher

Remarks Windows 2003 Server or Windows 2000 Server is recommended if the Video Analytics Server has a dual-core CPU.

EBI hardware and software EBI R300.1 SP1 or R310.1 The standard EBI hardware and software requirements apply, except where otherwise specified in this guide. For details, refer to the EBI documentation. A graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher for EBI Stations viewing Honeywell DVM video

Experion hardware and software Experion R210 Update 1 or R300 The standard Experion hardware and software requirements apply, except where otherwise specified in this guide. For details, refer to the Experion documentation. A graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher for Experion Stations viewing Honeywell DVM video

Station hardware and software Stations used extensively for video need to be well equipped to avoid operator dissatisfaction. The recommendations for such Stations are: At least 512 MB of RAM At least a Pentium III processor A graphics card which supports 24-bit color or higher Either: Windows 2000 Server, with Service Pack 4

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Hardware and software requirements

Cameras

Windows 2000 Professional, with Service Pack 4 Windows 2003 Server, with Service Pack 1 Windows XP Professional, with Service Pack 2

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, with Service Pack 1, or higher

Honeywell DVM supports: Camera streamers See Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120. PAL and NTSC format Analog (conventional) and digital cameras PTZ cameras

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Summary of camera streamer capabilities


The following table summarizes the capabilities of camera streamers when used with Honeywell DVM. The table was accurate at the time of printing, but may change. For the latest details, contact your local Honeywell representative.
Basic features Number of video inputs Streamer type Network Camera (camera with a streamer built in) Video Streamer Compression type Video Analytics Audio Bidirectional (Intercom)

Axis 205 Axis 206/206W Axis 206M Axis 207i Axis 210/210A Axis 211/211A Axis 213 Axis 221 Axis 231D/232D Axis 240Q Axis 241S/241SA Axis 241Q/241QA Axis 2100vii Axis 2110
vii

Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (PTZ) Yes (Fixed) Yes (PTZ Dome) Yes 4 Yes 1 Yes 4 Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (Fixed) Yes (PTZ)
vii vii

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 1iv Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 4 Yes 4 Yes 4 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yesii Yesiii Yesiv

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Axis 2120 Axis 2130 Axis 2400 1.x Axis 2400 2.x Axis 2400+vii

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Object Tracking and Classification Single directional Yesv Yesvi Yes


viii

Streamer-based

Object Tracking

Motion JPEG

proprietary

Standard

Premium

MPEG1

MPEG4

Yesvi
ii ii

Yesvi

Yesvi
ii ii

Yesvi

Summary of camera streamer capabilities

Basic features Number of video inputs Streamer type Network Camera (camera with a streamer built in) Video Streamer

Compression type

Video Analytics

Audio Bidirectional (Intercom) Yes 121

Axis 2401 1.xvii Axis 2401 2.x Axis 2401+vii Axis 2411
vii vii

Yes 1 Yes 1 Yes 1 Yes 1 Yes (Fixed) Yes 1 Yes 1 Yes 1

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes


ii

Axis 2420 CS100 CS-3001V MD-100


vii vii

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

OpennetView
i ii iii iv v vi vii

Yes 1

The Axis 207 has not been qualified for this release. Only for Axis 210A streaming Motion JPEG Only for Axis 211A streaming Motion JPEG Using the Axis 213CM Communication Module Only for Axis 241SA streaming Motion JPEG Only for Axis 241QA streaming Motion JPEG These streamers are discontinued and no longer available from the manufacturer. They are supported in Honeywell DVM for backwards compatibility. viii Using Axis 2191 audio module. (Honeywell DVM only supports single directional audio (simplex-listen) using this module.)

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ii ii

Streamer-based

Object Tracking

Motion JPEG

proprietary

Standard

Premium

MPEG1

MPEG4

Yesvi

Yesvi

Yes Yes

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Guidelines for video analytics

This chapter provides guidelines for making best use of Honeywell DVMs video analytics capabilities. This chapter also includes: A number of example scenarios that describe, in a step-by step manner, how to use video analytics to solve real-life problems A checklist to help you successfully implement video analytics

Caution The basic guideline for successfully using video analytics is to be realistic as to its strengths and weaknesses. Compared with human operators, video analytics has a very low error tolerancefor example, it can be fooled by sudden changes in lighting or by objects that stop and start in an erratic manner. In order to obtain satisfactory results from video analytics, you must carefully follow the guidelines in this chapter.

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About video analytics


Video analytics involves using specialized algorithms to detect movement in the video and, optionally, to track and classify moving objects. These algorithms attempt to replicate the way in which security personnel analyze and react when they detect motion in a video.
Figure 3 A typical video, in which objects are being tracked and classified

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About the Honeywell DVM video analytics algorithms


Honeywell DVM includes the following algorithms, each of which have their own features: Motion detection algorithms Object tracking algorithm Object tracking and classification algorithm

Motion detection algorithms The motion detection algorithms only detect motionin essence, they detect changes in the video between adjacent frames. The motion detection algorithms run on either the server (server-based motion detection) or the streamer (streamer-based motion detection). Server-based motion detection imposes an extremely high load on the server because the server must decompress the incoming video and perform motion detection on each frame. Streamer-based motion detection does not impose any load on the server. (Note, however, that not all streamers support streamer-based motion detection. To find out which streamers do, see Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120 The server-based motion detection algorithms are: Standard algorithm: designed for indoor use or in scenes where the background is completely stationary Premium algorithm: designed for scenes where there is some background movement (such as trees and clouds), it can filter out this movement to prevent false alarms

Object tracking algorithm The object tracking algorithm attempts to track an object as it moves about, after it has detected the initial movement. Object tracking and classification algorithm The object tracking and detection algorithm extends the capabilities of the object tracking algorithm by classifying objects as person, vehicle and so on.

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About regions of interest and minimum object size


Depending on the algorithm, you may be able to define one or more regions of interest, and the minimum size of the objects you want the algorithm to detect. Regions of interest A region of interest (ROI) is a region within the field of view that you want the algorithm to monitor. In practice, ROIs allow you to exclude regions that you dont want to monitor, such as sky, trees and sides of buildings. You define region of interests when configuring an algorithm by drawing one or more rectangles or polygons over the video image. The following figure shows a region of interest that excludes buildings from analysis.

Minimum object size The minimum object size (MOS) is the smallest object that the algorithm is instructed to detect. You typically use the MOS to: Prevent false motion detection caused by small objects, such as leaves and rubbish Prevent detection of people, when you only want to detect vehicles

You define the MOS when configuring an algorithm by drawing a rectangle over the video image. (Note that the position of the MOS is not relevant.)

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The following figure shows a MOSthe magenta rectanglethat is sufficiently small to allow the detection of pedestrians near the end of the carpark.

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About Video Analytics Servers


Because most of the server-based video algorithms impose an extremely high processing load on a computer, we strongly recommend that you use dedicated servers for video analyticsthese are called Video Analytics Servers. Such an architecture not only improves the performance of video analytics, it also ensures that peaks in video analytics processing load (which occur when a lot of objects are being detected/tracked) do not compromise your systems recording or viewing functions. The following figure shows the basics of the recommended architecture.

Camera

Ethernet Switch

Camera Server

Video Analytics Server

Notes From a software point of view, a Video Analytics Server is actually a Camera Server that is reserved for running video analytics algorithms. Because the standard algorithm does not impose a heavy processing load, you can run it on a Camera Server, providing you carefully monitor CPU loading.

Processing capacity of a Video Analytics Server The number of video signals (server-based algorithms) a Video Analytics Server can simultaneously process depends on a number of factors, such the algorithms you use and the size of the ROIs with respect to the field of view.
Attention For maximum reliability, we recommend that the steady state CPU loading of a Video Analytics Server does not exceed 70%.

The following table specifies the approximate capacity of a Video Analytics Server that meets the hardware and software requirements specified in Video Analytics Server hardware on page 117, and which is processing CIF video signals.
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Algorithm Standard Premium Object tracking Object tracking and classification

Recommended frame rate (fps) for the algorithm 3 3 5

Capacity (video signals) >60 30 4

The following table specifies the approximate capacity of a Dual Xeon 3.2 GHz Video Analytics Server processing CIF video signals.
Algorithm Premium Object tracking Object tracking and classification Recommended frame rate (fps) for the algorithm 3 5 Capacity (video signals) 45 8

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Choosing the appropriate algorithm for the task


You need to choose the appropriate algorithm for each task. The following table summarizes the relative advantages and disadvantages of each algorithm. For examples of when to use the various algorithms, see Example scenarios on page 134.
Algorithm Streamer-based Advantages Lowest cost. Disadvantages Not generally suited to outdoor use. Summary A very cost-effective choice for low-priority motion detection.

Does not require any Video Analytics Servers. Higher risk of false detections. Standard Fairly low cost. Low processing load on Video Analytics Server. Premium Suitable for indoor and outdoor use. Several configurable parameters that help minimize the rate of false detections. Object tracking Can specify the minimum size of an object you want to track. Can raise alarms based on direction of object movement. Object tracking Distinguishes between and classification different types of object. Can specify the minimum size of an object you want to track. Can raise alarms based on direction of object movement.

Not generally suitable for A cost-effective choice for low-priority indoor motion outdoor use. detection, where your Higher risk of false streamers do not support detections. motion detection. Medium processing load Appropriate for indoor/outdoor motion on Video Analytics detection where greater Server. reliability is required.

High processing load on Video Analytics Server.

Allows you to raise alarms based on direction of object movement.

High processing load on Video Analytics Server.

Allows you to raise alarms based the type of object.

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Basic requirements of video analytics algorithms


The reliability of video analytics is heavily dependent on the suitability of the video it is analyzing. Consequently, when assessing your video analytics needs, you need to pay particular attention to the following factors: Minimum number of video frames required Frame rate and effective speed of moving objects Size/shape of moving objects Separation between moving objects Objects that become occluded Objects that split and merge Configurable algorithm properties

Minimum number of video frames required In practical terms, the video analytics algorithms require: 4 frames to detect motion, and (in the case of the object tracking algorithm) to assign a track ID 7 to 12 frames to assign a track ID and classify an object (the algorithm assigns a track ID within 4 frames, and requires an extra 3 to 8 frames to classify the object)

Frame rate and effective speed of moving objects In order to detect motion, the video analytics algorithms require an object to move at a reasonably constant rate and above a minimum speed. Note that, in the current context, speed means the change in the objects position between frames. For example, if the algorithm can detect an object when the frame rate is 5 fps, it may no longer be able to detect it if you increase the frame rate to 20 fpsbecause you have reduced the objects apparent speed by a factor of four.
Attention As a general rule, the recommended (and default) frame rates are: 3 fps for the standard and premium algorithms 5 fps for the object tracking and object tracking and classification algorithms

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Common problems relating to object speed include: If an object moves at a very low speed or starts/stops erratically, the algorithm may interpret it as several objects (each corresponding to separate bursts of motion as it moves across the field of view). In the case of the object tracking and classification algorithm, this will also result in multiple track IDs. If an object moves at a very high speed, the object tracking and classification algorithm may not have time to assign a track ID.

Size/shape of moving objects For reliable video analytics operation, the shape and size of an object should change in a steady manner as it moves within the field of view. There are many reasons why an object can appear to suddenly change shape or sizesome common examples are: The object passes behind/in front of other moving objectsfor example, people moving about in a crowded hotel lobby The object repeatedly starts/stops or changes directionfor example, people using vending machines or cars entering/exiting a carpark The object moves very close to a camera, resulting in large amounts of optical distortion The light level in the field of view suddenly changesfor example, a cloud passes overhead or car lights flash across the field of view

Separation between moving objects If there are several objects, the algorithm requires that they are separated by at least three pixels for reliable operation. If they are separated by less than three pixels, the algorithm will merge the objects. In the case of the object tracking and classification algorithm, the algorithm may also incorrectly classify the merged object. Objects that become occluded An object may become occluded for a number of reasons, for example: The object moves behind a static object such as a pillar or tree The object moves sufficiently far from the camera to become smaller than the minimum object size The object stops moving The object merges with another object

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In all these cases, video analytics maintains the track ID it has assigned to the object for 10 frames. If the object reappears during this time period, video analytics continues tracking it. If video analytics cannot redetect the object, the track is deletedfor example if a car stops for more than 10 frames and then starts moving, it will get a new track ID. Objects that split and merge If several closely positioned objectsfor example, a family groupenter the scene, video analytics will treat them as a single object. If the objects later separate, video analytics will create new a track ID as each object separates from the group. If two objects with different track IDs move sufficiently close to each other, resulting in a single blob of motion, video analytics assumes that one of the objects has been occluded. If the objects separate within 10 frames, both track IDs are maintained. If the objects continue to move together for more than 10 frames, video analytics will assign a single track ID. If they later separate, one of them will get a new track ID. Configurable algorithm properties Each algorithm has a number of properties that determine how it operatessuch as its sensitivity, the level of alarm it raises when it detects motion and the Station/monitor to which it sends the video signal. For details of these properties, see Configuring video analytics on page 313.

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Example scenarios
This section describes how you can use video analytics to solve a wide range of real-life problems.

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Example scenarios

Detecting vehicles that are moving in the wrong direction


Scenario Because of traffic congestion, some drivers who know the layout of your site have attempted to drive the wrong way in a one-way lane. You want to use video analytics to detect such attempts, so that security personnel can alert traffic wardens before the driver causes too much chaos. Solution You decide to use the object tracking and classification algorithm because it can detect movement in a particular direction, and because it can discriminate between vehicles and people. The main steps in implementing the solution are as follows:
1

You place a camera so that it has a clear view of the lane near the exit (that is, near the illegal entrance).

2 3

You select the object tracking and classification algorithm. You then define the region of interest and minimum size of an object (MOS) that can be detected as shown in the following figure. Because this region of interest excludes the footpaths, it will exclude most pedestrians. Also, the MOS is large enough to ensure that pedestrians who cross the road do not trigger false alarms.

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You define the following condition, and configure it so that it raises an urgent alarm when this condition is met.

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Example scenarios

Monitoring a perimeter fence


Scenario You want to monitor a perimeter fence to ensure that no one climbs over it into a restricted area. The security guard is notified whenever there is movement in the region of interest. Solution You decide to use the premium algorithm because it continually learns the scene, adapting to the environment. This allows it to ignore environmental changes such as rain, trees swaying and gradual light changes. The main steps in implementing the solution are as follows:
1

You place the camera so that it has a clear view of the top of the fence.

2 3

You select the premium algorithm. You then define the region of interest as shown in the following figure.

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You set the algorithms: Sensitivity property to Outdoor (Low) Minimum object size property to the maximum allowable (64 pixels) to minimize the change of birds causing false detections.

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Example scenarios

Monitoring the entrance of a secure room


Scenario You want to monitor the entrance of your secure room. There are guards watching these cameras 24 hours a day. Whenever there is a motion in front of the entrance, the guard will be notified and he has to verify that the activities are normal and authorized. Solution You decide to use the standard algorithm because it is suitable for simple indoor scenes. The main steps in implementing the solution are as follows:
1

You place the camera so that it has a clear view of the entrance you are monitoring.

You select the standard algorithm.

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You then define the region of interest as shown in the following figure.

You set the algorithms: Optimize for movement property to To/from camera. Sensitivity property to 5 (You set the sensitivity to a low value so that wind-induced vibration of the door does not result in false detections.)

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Example scenarios

Monitoring people who enter the utilities room


Scenario For auditing purposes, you want to keep a recording of everyone who enters the utilities room, which is off a hallway. Because you do not want to raise an alarm when motion is detected, you are willing to tolerate some false positives (people who trigger motion detection, but who do not enter the utilities room). Solution To keep costs down, you decide to use streamer-based motion detection. You position the camera so that it has a good view of people passing or entering the utilities room.
1

You place the camera so that it has a good view of people as they approach the door to the utilities room.

2 3

You select the streamer-based algorithm for your streamer. You configure the cameras When motion is detected properties as appropriate. For example, you set Pre-record for to 10 seconds, to maximize the change of being able to identify everyone who enters the utility room.

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Monitoring the direction of objects


Scenario You want to monitor cars moving in the wrong direction in a car park. Classification is not required because you know the moving objects are vehicles. Solution You decide to use the object tracking algorithm. The main steps in implementing the solution are as follows:
1

You place the camera so that it has a clear view of the section of the car park you are monitoring.

You select the object tracking algorithm.

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Example scenarios 3

You then define the region of interest and minimum size of an object (MOS) that can be detected as shown in the following figure.

You define the following condition, and configure it so that it raises an urgent alarm when this condition is met: Vehicle enters from top to bottom.

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Checklist for successfully implementing video analytics


This checklist summarizes the main tasks applicable to successfully implementing video analytics.
Task Assessment phase Assess your video analytics requirements for your site. To get an idea of how you can use video analytics, see Example scenarios on page 134. Planning and design phase Based on your assessment, for each video analytics task: Choose an appropriate type of camera and streamer. Assess the lighting to ensure that it does not affect the reliability of video analytics. Decide where to place the camera. Decide how to optimize the cameras field of view. Choose the appropriate algorithm. Define the region(s) of interest within the field of view. Define the minimum size of objects you want to detect. (Only applicable to the object tracking algorithms.) page 145 page 148 page 150 page 168 page 130 page 177 page 195 Go to: Done?

If you have chosen any server-based algorithms, estimate the page 128 number of Video Analytics Servers you require. Implementation phase Install the cameras as planned. If you need any Video Analytics Servers, install and configure them. Configure the cameras (and video analytics) as planned. Check the real-life operation of video analytics for each camera. If the operation is not satisfactoryfor example, it raises too many false alarmstune the configuration. For example, change the field of view, the size and shape of the region(s) of interest, and the minimum object size. On each Video Analytics Server, use the Windows Task Manager to check that the steady state CPU loading is not greater than 70%. page 128 page 290

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Guidelines for choosing cameras and streamers

Guidelines for choosing cameras and streamers


This section provides guidelines for choosing cameras and streamers. You must ensure that you choose suitable cameras and streamers because video analytics is much more sensitive to the quality of the video signal than human operators.
Attention The reliability of video analytics is highly dependent on the quality of the cameras and streamers. You must therefore purchase cameras/streamers that are suited to your video analytics tasks.

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Cameras
Use fixed cameras in preference to PTZ cameras For reliability reasons, we strongly recommend that you use fixed cameras for video analytics. Although you can use PTZ cameras, the algorithms reliability will be affected because it has to relearn the scene each time an operator uses the PTZ controls. Even if the camera has a home preset, camera tolerances may mean that the cameras configuration may vary each time it returns to the home preset. If operators need to control a camera, consider using two cameras: A fixed camera, used exclusively for video analytics A PTZ camera for operator survelliance

Use image stabilization cameras if there is any possibility of camera vibration A camera that is mounted on tall pylon may provide an excellent view of a scene, but wind induced vibration may prevent reliable video analytics operation because the algorithms cannot not discriminate between camera movement and object movement. Consequently, in such a scenario, you should use an image stabilization camera. Consider using day/night cameras if you need to monitor a scene after dusk A day/night camera automatically switches from color to black and white (B/W) when light falls below a predefined level. In practice, video analytics cannot reliably analyze color signals when the light level falls below about 300 lux; however, it can handle B/W signals down to about 170 lux. You should consider using day/night cameras if, for example, you need to monitor a carpark after dusk. Consider using infrared or thermal cameras for night-time survelliance Infrared cameras require the scene to be illuminated with infrared lights (typically banks of infrared LEDs). Thermal cameras detect the infrared radiation emitted by warm objects. Consequently, they are suitable for large-area survelliance, such as perimeter fences and large factory sites.

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Streamers
Power supply filtering Video analytics is highly sensitive to any noise in the video signal, which can be caused by spikes in the power grid. You should therefore consider filtering streamer power supplies to minimize such interference. Dual-signal streamers Consider using dual-signal streamers because they can simultaneously send: A Motion JPEG signal to the Video Analytics ServerMotion JPEG is more suitable for video analytics algorithms An MPEG signal to the Camera Server for viewing and recordingMPEG is generally better for recording because it requires less disk space

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Guidelines for lighting


Even if you cannot control the lighting, you still need to assess how it will affect the reliability of video analytics. Ensure that the lighting level is adequate In practice, video analytics cannot reliably analyze color signals when the light level falls below about 300 lux; however, it can handle B/W signals down to about 170 lux. (The level of video noise (snow) increases rapidly below these levels, reducing the reliability of video analytics.) If you need to monitor a scene where the lighting level falls below 300 lux, such as a carpark after dusk, you should consider using a day/night camera. If you want to monitor a scene at night, you should consider using an infrared or thermal camera. Indoors, ensure that the lighting minimizes shadows Try to ensure that the lighting is even and minimizes shadows. For example, instead of using one bright light (which produces very strong shadows), use several lower powered, widely spaced lights. Outdoors, consider how prominent shadows move and change during the day and over the seasons The reliability of video analytics can be affected if a scene is divided up into separate zones by prominent shadowsvideo analytics has difficulty tracking objects as they move between sunny and shaded zones. You therefore need to pay particular attention to the behavior of shadows throughout the day and from season to season. For example, it is possible to place a camera such that video analytics operates well during summer; but operates erratically during winter because prominent shadows intrude into the field of view.

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Bad example The view contains long horizontal shadows because the camera is pointed due North or South.

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Guidelines for placing cameras


This section provides guidelines for addressing the specialized camera placement requirements for video analytics, and includes: Basic guidelines for placing cameras Practical examples that show both good and bad camera placement

Attention The position of a camera is much more important for video analytics than it is for human operators. A camera that is well placed for use by human operators may not be suitable for video analytics.

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Basic guidelines for placing cameras


Determine the predominant direction of movement of objects Video analytics works best when objects move either left/right across the field of view or directly towards/away from the camera. Good example The camera is placed such that its field of view is perpendicular to the road and footpath, which means that cars and most people move directly across the field of view.

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Ensure there is sufficient separation between objects As described in Separation between moving objects on page 132, video analytics needs at least three pixels separation between objects to reliably detect and track them. In most cases, this means mounting the camera high above the scene. Good example The high camera position improves the separation between people, allowing video analytics to detect and track them even if they are close together.

Bad example The low camera position means that people will often be occluded as they move behind other people.

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Control the near-view to far-view range Although human operators can easily identify and track very small and very large objects, you can improve the reliability of video analytics if you control the near-view to far-view range so that no object is too small, or too big. If you need to monitor a large area, consider using several cameras, each of which is zoomed in on a critical region. Good example The range in sizes between the nearest and most distant objects is small.

Bad examples Distant objects are too small and near objects too big.

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Vehicles at the far end of the road are very small (even vehicles at the gatethe critical region within the field of viewwould be small).

Avoid including obstructions within critical regions of the field of view The reliability of video analytics can be affected if objects become occluded by even seemingly minor obstructions. (Even if an object is not completely occluded, it willfrom the point of view of video analyticsseem to change shape as it first merges with the obstruction and then splits off from it.)

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Good example This camera angle provides a clear view of the vehicles entering and travelling along the road and is free from obstructions.

Bad example The traffic lights split the pedestrian crossing into two zones. (Note that such a minor obstruction would not worry human operators.)

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In outdoor locations, avoid distant views with small objects


In outdoor locations, distant views typically result in objects that video analytics cannot reliably detect or track. Good examples The camera has a good view of road and vehicles as the approach the gate.

Bad example Vehicles beyond the checkpoint are too small to be effectively detected/tracked, and even those at the checkpoint are small.

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In indoor locations, place the camera as high as practicable


In indoor locations, you generally need to mount cameras has high as practicable to: Increase the separation between people Minimize differences in size between people who are near to/far from the camera (This also minimizes optical distortion caused when people get too close to the camera.)

Good examples The high camera position gives it a good view of people on the concourse.

Bad example The camera is too low. Consequently, people close to the camera are much larger than those who are far away. Also, optical distortion means that people change shape as they approach the camera.

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In indoor locations, avoid placing cameras at corners or under ceilings


Placing a camera in a corner or under a ceiling may reduce the reliability of video analytics because of the way in which objects distort and change shape as they move about the field of view. The effect is particularly noticeable with wide-angle lenses. Examples of such distortion include people whose heads swell as the move close to the lens, or who bend as they enter/leave the field of view. Bad example The cameras position and wide-angle lens means results in significant distortion (change in shape) as people move around the field of view.

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Avoid fixtures that split a critical region into separate zones


Try to place the camera so that fixtures, such as pillars, do not split a critical region into separate zones. If an object becomes occluded, video analytics may treat the object as two objectsa first object that disappears when it moves behind the pillar, and a second one that appears on the other side. In the following figure, the traffic lights split the pedestrian crossing into two zones.

In the following figure, the columns split the lane on the left into several zones.

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Avoid splitting a critical region into heavily shadowed and brightly lit zones
Try to position the camera so that it does not cover both brightly lit and heavily shadowed zones. As an object moves from one zone to another, its color properties will change dramatically, making video analysis harder and less reliable. Bad examples A scene in which both people and vehicles frequently move between two zones one brightly sunlit and the other deeply shadowed.

A scene in which direct sunlight splits pedestrian mall into three zones.

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Avoid placing a camera in a confined space with inadequate lighting


Try not to place the camera in a confined space with inadequate lighting, such as narrow passages and stairs. Bad example The field of view contains a large amount of background scenery, in which the lighting produces complex variations in color and brightness.

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Avoid placing a camera opposite elevator or automatic doors


Try not to place the camera opposite elevators or automatic doors because video analytics will treat each opening/closing door as a moving object. If you want to monitor people as they use such doors, place the camera to one side. Bad example The constantly opening/closing elevator doors will result in the numerous false detections.

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Avoid placing a camera opposite phone booths, ATMs or vending machines


Avoid including phone booths, ATMs or vending machines in critical regions of the scene. Video analytics is not reliable near such devices because people tend to stop and move in an erratic manner when using them. For example, video analytics will typically create at least two objects when someone uses an ATMa first object as someone approaches the ATM and a second object as the person leaves the ATM. Bad example The view includes people queuing and using an ATM.

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Avoid placing a camera to the side of stairs


If you want to monitor stairs, try to place the camera in such a position that the hand rails (and hand rail pillars) do not break the view into separate zones. For example, if the hand rail wall is transparent, video analytics will treat each person as two objectsone object above the hand rail and another below the hand rail. Bad example The hand rail and pillars divide the stairs up into many zones.

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Avoid highly reflective, glass-like surfaces


Video analytics will not operate effectively if there are highly reflective, glass-like surfaces within critical regions of the scene. Video analytics cannot distinguish between real objects and their reflections, resulting many false detections. Bad example The lobbys floor is highly polished, which makes video analysis very difficult. (Also, the automatic doors will compound the problem.)

The highly reflective wall on the left may cause video analytics to classify reflections as separate objects.

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In outdoor locations, shade the camera lens from the sun


Ensure that the cameras lens is well shaded from the sun (or its reflections) at all times of the year. Bad example The lens is not properly shaded, causing flare (loss of definition in contrast and color).

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Avoid large regions of continuous motion


Avoid placing a camera so that it includes large regions of continuous motion such as busy roads or rivers. (If you cannot avoid including such regions in the field of view, when configuring the algorithm, you will need to use one or more ROIs to exclude them from video analysis.) Bad example Most of the view is occupied by the busy road, whereas you only want to monitor the parking bay.

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Guidelines for adjusting the field of view


This section provides guidelines for adjusting the field of view of a camera that has already been installed. (For camera placement guidelines, see Guidelines for placing cameras on page 150.) Ideally, you should adjust the field of view so that it: Only includes what you want to monitor The predominant direction of motion of objects is either to the left/right or towards/away from the camera

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Restrict the field of view to what you want to monitor


Adjust the camera orientation and lens zoom setting so that the objects you want to monitor occupy most of the field of view. Good examples A far-field view, suitable for monitoring both the road and the parked cars.

A near-field view, suitable for monitoring the road junction.

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Bad examples The trees occupy far too much of the field of view.

Much of the field of view includes walls and sky, which are of no interest.

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Orientate the camera to avoid a skewed field of view


Video analytics operates most effectively when objects move either horizontally or vertically across the field of view. A highly skewed field of view causes significant distortion when objects are near the corners of the field of viewthis effect is particularly noticeable when objects are close to the camera. Good examples Most people move directly towards or away from the camera.

Most people move towards or away from the camera.

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Bad Examples Vehicles become severely distorted when they are close to (almost under) under the camera.

People become severely distorted as they approach the door on the right.

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People become severely distorted as the approach the bottom corners of the field of view.

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Adjust the camera for maximum video clarity


Adjust the cameras video settings to maximize the clarity of the video signal. Typical faults you should eliminate include: The lens is not focused The brightness/contrast adjustment is incorrect The lens is unshadedfor example, sun shines onto the lens and cause flare

Good examples The signal from a correctly adjusted camera.

Bad examples A poor quality signal, which is badly focused and too bright.

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Avoid zones where objects are likely to start-stop in an erratic manner


Try to avoid zones where objects are likely to move in an erratic mannerfor example, near phone booths, vending machines and taxi ranks. (If you cannot avoid including such zones in the field of view, when configuring the algorithm, you will need to use one or more ROIs to exclude them from video analysis.) Bad examples The bottom right-hand corner contains a vending machine, where people frequently stop.

The taxi rank will result in a large number of duplicated moving objects because taxis are starting and stopping and people are getting into/out of them.

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Ensure that only far-field views contain intersections or footpaths


If you want to monitor intersections or footpaths, they should only appear as far-field views Bad examples A typical outdoor scene containing a corner or turning of a busy road, along with a footpathsuch a combination will cause frequent occlusions and track intersections.

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Guidelines for defining regions of interest


This section provides guidelines to defining regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs enable you to define which regions within the field of view you want video analytics to monitormore importantly, they enable you to define which regions you dont want to monitor. Typical regions you dont want to monitor include sky, trees and sides of buildings.

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General guidelines for defining regions of interest


The larger the ROI, the longer the object remains in itwhich therefore improves the algorithms ability to track objects. So, in cases where you have a choice between defining one large ROI or several small ones, you should define one large one. Irregular ROIs (polygons) are a very effective means of excluding regions of the field of view that are of no interest (such as sky or walls), or that the algorithm would have difficulty analyzing (such as dark corners or heavily shadowed/extremely bright regions).

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Case 1: road junction and parked cars


Good example The ROI includes the road and carpark, and excludes the building and sky.

Bad examples Although the ROI includes carpark, it also include the building and sky which are of no interest.

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The ROI does not include the whole road junction, and includes the pole (which splits the ROI into two zones).

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Case 2: road junction with pedestrians


Good examples The ROI includes the zone where people/vehicle movement exists, and excludes the vending machine where people tend to stand/move very slowly (Note that in this scene, vehicles would be too large to be effectively monitored.)

The ROI only includes the top half of the field of view, which contains the footpath and pedestrian crossing, and excludes the bottom half which is prone to excessive people movement, many occlusions and objects that intersect.

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Bad examples The ROI includes the vending machine which may result in too many slow-moving/standing human objects causing split tracks and incorrect classification.

The ROI excludes almost everything of interest, such as the footpath and pedestrian crossing.

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Case 3: outdoor carpark


Good examples The ROI includes the horizontal section of the road so that video analytics can monitor all vehicles moving into/out of the carpark; it also excludes very small, distant objects and the tops of the trees.

The ROI only includes the central region of the carpark, and excludes all trees.

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Bad examples The ROI includes most of the far-field scene, which mostly contains very small objects and trees.

The ROI is drawn in such a way that it excludes most of the carpark and road (Also, when cars reverse out of the parking space they will be moving slowly and will only be in the ROI for a few frames).

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Case 4: carpark and entrance road


Good examples The ROI includes the road, and excludes the top and right of the field of view which mostly contain static objects or trees.

The ROI, although a simple rectangle, includes most of what was included.

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Bad examples The ROI includes very small (far-field) objects which will pass behind the trees.

The ROIs include mostly static objects such as trees and the building (as in, the top ROI includes very small objects which pass behind trees, and the bottom ROI includes only a small portion of the road).

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Case 5: pedestrian crossings in carpark


Good examples The ROI excludes static objects such as pillars and posts, and also excludes very bright and dark regions.

The ROI only includes the central portion of the frame, where the object movement is easiest to detect and classify, and excludes peripheral regions where objects become distorted due to the cameras position.

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Bad examples The ROI includes only the exit region of the carpark, which does not allow tracking of vehicles; it also contains columns, which split the ROI into separate zones.

The ROI only includes part of the pedestrian crossing, a part of which is dominated by bright light. Also, because it is located near a corner, objects in this ROI will be distorted.

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Case 6: building lobby with lifts


Good examples The ROI excludes the elevator doors, and the stairs hand rail and pillars.

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Bad examples The ROI includes the elevator doors, which will cause false motion alarms.

The ROI includes the stairs hand rail and pillars.

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Case 7: shopping mall (example 1)


Good examples The ROI excludes the left and right sides of the shops (where the probability of people standing or moving slowly is high), but includes the central passage way, except the far-field region at the top of the frame.

The ROI only includes the central passage way, were objects are quite large (this type of ROI could also lead to missing tracks/merger of tracks if groups of people pass through the ROI).

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Bad examples The ROI includes shop windows which include reflective surfaces, and where people are likely to frequently start/stop.

The ROI includes regions where people are likely to start/stop.

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Case 8: shopping mall (example 2)


Good examples The ROI excludes all peripheral regions, which are badly illuminated and contain static objects.

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Bad examples The ROI includes the busy shop-front (where people start/stop) and which is badly illuminated.

The ROI only includes a small region dominated by bluish light and a thick pillar. (In such a small ROI, objects may not reside long enough for reliable tracking).

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Guidelines for defining the minimum object size


This section provides guidelines to defining the minimum object size (MOS) video analytics will not detect or track objects smaller that the MOS. You need to define a MOS of an appropriate size to prevent excessive false detections, which can be caused by very small objects such as leaves and wind-blown rubbish. In practical terms, the example in Case 1: outdoor far-field on page 196 represents the smallest MOS you should definea smaller MOS would significantly increase the frequency of false detections.
Attention The MOS is only applicable to the object tracking and object tracking and classification algorithms.

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Case 1: outdoor far-field


The MOS is small enough to enable detection of people who are almost at the end of the carpark. In practical terms, this example represents the smallest MOS you should define a smaller MOS would significantly increase the frequency of false detections.

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Case 2: outdoor mid-field


The MOS enables detection of people who are at the end of the laneway.

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Case 3: outdoor near-field


The MOS enables detection of people on the far side of the road.

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Case 4: indoor far-field


The MOS enables detection of people on the far side of the arcade.

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Case 5: indoor mid-field


The MOS enables detection of people in the center of the arcade.

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Installation and upgrade

This chapter describes how to install or upgrade Honeywell DVM, including associated hardware and software. Start here to successfully install or upgrade your Honeywell DVM system!
Caution This chapter uses checklists to guide you through installation/upgrade tasks. You must use them to avoid installation/upgrade problems.

Preliminary tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Learn how to use the checklists. Read readme.txt for any last-minute instructions. It is on the Honeywell DVM CD. Select the appropriate checklists: If you are installing a new Honeywell DVM system If you are upgrading an existing Honeywell DVM system page 204 page 213 Go to: page 202 Done?

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Using the checklists


This guide makes extensive use of checklists to guide you through installation/upgrade tasks. You must use them to avoid installation/upgrade problems. Tips Print a copy of the checklists applicable to you, to make it easier to keep track of your progress. Check that you have satisfied the Prerequisites before you start the first task. Complete the tasks in order shown, unless specified otherwise. When you complete each task, return to the checklist and insert a tick in the Done column.

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Figure 4 A typical checklist

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New installation checklist


This is the top-level checklist for installing a new Honeywell DVM system. Prerequisites You have read readme.txt, which is on the Honeywell DVM CD. The computers meet the hardware and software requirements (page 116). Honeywell DVM CD. System Number and Authorization Key.

Considerations In addition to this checklist, there is a separate checklist for each major installation task, such as installing Honeywell DVM on a Camera Server. Before starting, you should print a copy of the relevant checklists to make it easier to keep track of progress.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Install Honeywell DVM on the Database Server(s). Install Honeywell DVM on the Camera Server(s). If you want to use any server-based video analytics, install Honeywell DVM on the Video Analytics Server(s). If you have an EBI or Experion system, install the Honeywell DVM host components on the server(s): Single (non-redundant) EBI or Experion server Redundant EBI or Experion servers If you have an EBI or Experion system, install the: Honeywell DVM host components on each Console Station. (Only applicable to Experion.) Honeywell DVM client components on each Station. If you want Internet Explorer clients to access Honeywell DVM, install the Honeywell DVM client components on the client computers. Install and configure camera streamers. Install and configure PTZ cameras. page 210 page 211 page 212 page 207 page 208 Go to: page 205 page 206 page 206 Done?

page 242 page 271

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Installation checklist: Database Server


This is the installation checklist for a new Database Server.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have read readme.txt, which is on the Honeywell DVM CD. The computer meets the hardware and software requirements (page 116). Honeywell DVM CD. System Number and Authorization Key.

Considerations If you have redundant Database Servers, you must first install the preferred Database Server, and then install the backup Database Server.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. Synchronize the date and time. Install Internet Information Server (IIS). If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. page 217 page 222 page 218 page 240 Go to: Done?

If you have redundant Database Servers, check that you can page 241 ping the other Database Server using the computer name. Install the Honeywell DVM components If you have a: Non-redundant system, install a non-redundant Database page 224 Server. Redundant system, install a redundant Database Server. page 226

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Installation checklist: Camera Server or Video Analytics Server


This is the installation checklist for a new Camera Server or Video Analytics Server.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed the Database Server(s). The computer meets the hardware and software requirements (page 116). Honeywell DVM CD.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks If this is a Video Analytics Server, turn Hyper threading on. Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. Synchronize the date and time. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. Check that you can ping the Database Sever using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM components Install the Camera Server. page 230 page 217 page 222 page 240 page 241 Go to: Done?

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Installation checklist: single (non-redundant) EBI or Experion server


This is the checklist for installing the Honeywell DVM host components on a single (non-redundant) EBI or Experion server.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed and configured your EBI or Experion server in accordance with the EBI or Experion documentation. You have installed the Database Server(s) and Camera Server(s). Honeywell DVM CD.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. Synchronize the date and time. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. Check that you can ping the Database Sever using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM host components Install the Honeywell DVM host components. Post-installation tasks Restart the EBI or Experion server computer(s). If you want the server Station (Station on this server) to page 234 access Honeywell DVM, install the Honeywell DVM client components. If you installed the Honeywell DVM client components, configure Station for use with Honeywell DVM. page 236 page 232 page 217 page 222 page 240 page 241 Go to: Done?

Configure Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM. page 221

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Installation checklist: redundant EBI or Experion servers


This is the checklist for installing the Honeywell DVM host components on redundant EBI or Experion servers.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed and configured your EBI or Experion server in accordance with the EBI or Experion documentation. You have installed the Database Server(s) and Camera Server(s). Honeywell DVM CD.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account on both servers. Synchronize the date and time on both servers. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. page 217 page 222 page 240 Go to: Done?

Configure Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM. page 221

On each server, check that you can ping the Database Sever page 241 using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM host components Check that the primary server is running as primary. Install the Honeywell DVM host components on the primary page 232 server. Manually fail over to the backup server. For details, see the EBI or Experion Configuration Guide. Restart the primary server. Install the Honeywell DVM host components on the backup page 232 server.

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Task Manually fail over again so that the primary server is running as primary. Restart the backup server. Post-installation tasks

Go to:

Done?

If you want the server Station (Station on this server) to page 234 access Honeywell DVM, install the Honeywell DVM client components. If you installed the Honeywell DVM client components, configure Station for use with Honeywell DVM. page 236

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Installation checklist: Console Station


This is the checklist for installing the Honeywell DVM host components on a Console Station.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed and configured the Console Station in accordance with the Experion documentation. You have installed the Database Server(s) and Camera Server(s).

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. Synchronize the date and time. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. Check that you can ping the Database Sever using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM host components Install the Honeywell DVM host components. Post-installation tasks Install the Honeywell DVM client components. Restart the Console Station computer. Configure Station for use Honeywell DVM. page 236 page 234 page 233 page 217 page 222 page 240 page 241 Go to: Done?

Configure Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM. page 221

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Installation checklist: Station


This is the checklist for installing the Honeywell DVM client components on a Station computer.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed and configured Station in accordance with the instructions in the EBI or Experion documentation. You have installed: The Database Server(s) and Camera Server(s) The Honeywell DVM host components on the EBI or Experion server(s)

A digital certificate. (Only required if this computer is to be used for exporting signed videos and audit logs, and you want to use your own digital certificate.)

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. Check that you can ping the Database Sever using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM components Install the Honeywell DVM client components. Post-installation tasks Configure Station for Honeywell DVM. If this Station is to be used for exporting signed videos and audit logs and you have your own digital certificate, configure the digital certificate. page 236 page 343 Give this Station (and its users) access to Honeywell DVM. page 394 page 234 page 217 page 240 page 241 Configure Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM. page 221 Go to: Done?

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Installation checklist: Internet Explorer client


This is the checklist for installing the Honeywell DVM client components on an Internet Explorer client computer.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the installation process.

Prerequisites You have installed the Database Server(s) and Camera Server(s). You have a Honeywell DVM license for the client. A digital certificate. (Only required if this computer is to be used for exporting signed videos and audit logs, and you want to use your own digital certificate.)

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Preliminary tasks Set up the Honeywell DVM installation account. If you have a workgroup environment, update the hosts file. Check that you can ping the Database Sever using the computer name. (If you have redundant Database Servers, ping both servers.) Install the Honeywell DVM components Install the Honeywell DVM client components. Post-installation tasks Give the users of this Internet Explorer client access to Honeywell DVM. page 394 page 237 page 217 page 240 page 241 Configure Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM. page 221 Go to: Done?

If this computer is to be used for exporting signed videos page 343 and audit logs and you have your own digital certificate, configure the digital certificate.

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Upgrade checklists

Upgrade checklists
This section contains a separate top-level checklist for each upgrade scenario. (If you want to install a new Honeywell DVM system, see New installation checklist on page 204.)
If you are upgrading from: Honeywell DVM R150.3 Honeywell DVM R160.1/160.2 Go to: page 215 page 214

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Upgrade checklist: from Honeywell DVM R160.1 or R160.2


This is the top-level checklist for upgrading from Honeywell DVM R160.1 or R160.2.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the upgrade process.

Prerequisites You have planned for the upgrade. See Planning for an upgrade on page 279.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Shut down/close every Honeywell DVM client. Remove the existing Honeywell DVM components from your servers and clients. Upgrade your servers and clients so that they meet the new hardware and software requirements. (As specified in Hardware and software requirements on page 116.) Uninstall SQL Server from the Database Server. Install Honeywell DVM R200. page 205 page 280 Go to: Done?

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Upgrade checklist: from Honeywell DVM R150.3


This is the top-level checklist for upgrading from Honeywell DVM R150.3.
Tip Print a copy of this checklist to make it easier to keep track of where you are in the upgrade process.

Prerequisites You have planned for the upgrade. See Planning for an upgrade on page 279.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Shut down/close every Honeywell DVM client. If you have EBI or Experion, stop the EBI or Experion server Remove the existing Honeywell DVM components from your servers and clients. Upgrade your servers and clients so that they meet the new hardware and software requirements. (As specified in Hardware and software requirements on page 116.) Uninstall SQL Server from the Database Server. Install Honeywell DVM R200. page 205 page 280 Go to: Done?

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Installation and setup tasks


This section contains installation and setup tasks.
Attention Only complete a task in this section if you are instructed to do so by the appropriate checklist.

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Setting up the Honeywell DVM installation account


You must use a specialized installation account to install any Honeywell DVM component on any computer. (This account is called the Honeywell DVM installation account in this guide.) The requirements for the Honeywell DVM installation account are: The password for the account is the same on all computers The account has administrator privileges on all computers If you have EBI or Experion, the account belongs to the Honeywell Administrators group (Note that this is a local group, which exists on EBI or Experion servers and Console Stations.)

If you use domain security, you can use a domain administrator account as the Honeywell DVM installation account, providing all the computers are part of the domain and it has local administrator privileges. If you do not use domain security, you can configure the default Administrator account on every computer as the Honeywell DVM installation account. Notes The Honeywell DVM installation account is only required during installation. When you have completed all installation tasks, you can remove the account if its existence is not approved of by your organizations security policies.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing Internet Information Services (IIS)


This task describes how to install and configure Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS).
If you have: Windows 2000 Professional Windows 2000 Server Windows XP Professional Windows 2003 Server Go to: page 218 page 218 page 219 page 219

Installing IIS for Windows 2000 Professional Prerequisites The Windows CD, unless you are installing from a network. (If you are installing from a network, ask your network administrator for help.) The Windows 2000 Certificate of Authenticity, which contains your Product Identification number.

To install IIS:
1 2 3 4 5

Insert the Windows CD into the CD-ROM drive. Select Start > Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs > Add/Remove Windows Components. Select Internet Information Services (IIS). Click Next. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

Installing IIS for Windows 2000 Server To install IIS:


1 2 3

Select Start > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs. Click the Add/Remove Windows Components on the left pane. Select Internet Information Services (IIS) and click Details.

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Select the following IIS components and subcomponents: (To select subcomponents of a component, select the component and click Details.) Internet Information Services Snap-in World Wide Web Server

5 6

Click Next. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

Installing IIS for Windows XP Professional To install IIS:


1 2 3 4

Select Start > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs. Click the Add/Remove Windows Components on the left pane. Select Internet Information Services (IIS) and click Details. Select the following IIS components and subcomponents: (To select subcomponents of a component, select the component and click Details.) Internet Information Services Snap-in World Wide Web Services > Printers Virtual Directory > World Wide Web Services

5 6

Click Next. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

Installing IIS for Windows 2003 Server To install IIS:


1 2

Select Start > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs. Click the Add/Remove Windows Components on the left pane.

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Select Application Server and click Details. Select the following IIS components and subcomponents: (To select subcomponents of a component, select the component and click Details.) Internet Information Services (IIS) > Common Files > Internet Information Service Manager > World Wide Web Service >> Active Server Pages >> World Wide Web Service > SMTP Service

5 6

Click Next. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Configuring Internet Explorer for use with Honeywell DVM


This task describes how to add the name(s) of the Database Server(s) to Internet Explorers trusted sites list. To add the names to the trusted sites list:
1 2 3 4 5

Open Internet Explorer. Choose Tools > Internet Options. Click the Security tab, select Trusted Sites and click Sites. Clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this Web site to this zone field:
a. Type http://DVM_ServerA and click Add.

where DVM_ServerA is the name of the preferred Database Server.


b. If you have redundant Database Servers, type http://DVM_ServerB

and click Add. where DVM_ServerB is the name of the backup Database Server.
6 7 8

Click OK to close the Trusted Sites dialog box. Click OK to close the Internet Options dialog box. Close Internet Explorer.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Synchronizing the date and time on the servers


Attention You do not need to complete this procedure if the Database Server belongs to a Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 domain, because time synchronization is already configured.

This task describes how to synchronize the date and time on the servers. (The dates and time must be synchronized to ensure that all dates and/or times associated with events in the database are consistent between servers.) Synchronizing the date and time involves selecting and setting up a preferred time source server, and then configuring every other server so that it synchronizes with that server. Considerations If you are using Honeywell DVM in conjunction with EBI or Experion, we recommend that you use the EBI or Experion server as the preferred time source server. If you have a redundant stand-alone Honeywell DVM system (without EBI or Experion), your preferred time source server can be the preferred Database Server, the backup Database Server or a network time source.

Setting up an EBI or Experion server as the preferred time source server To set up an EBI or Experion server as the preferred time source server:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Choose Start > Run and run settimesource.vbs, which is located in the server\run folder. This program is silent if successful. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services. Right-click Windows Time service and select Properties. Set the startup type to Automatic. If the Windows Time service is running, stop it. Restart the Windows Time service.

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Synchronizing the time on the other servers To synchronize the time on the other servers:
1

On the other servers, open a Command Prompt window and type: net time /setsntp:preferredtimesource where preferredtimesource is the machine name of the preferred time source server. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services. Right-click Windows Time service and select Properties. Set the startup type to Automatic. If the Windows Time service is running, stop it. Restart the Windows Time service.

2 3 4 5 6

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on a non-redundant server


This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on a non-redundant server. Considerations If you have a small system, you can also install the Camera Server.

To install:
1 2

Log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer, navigate to the Server folder on the CD and double-click setup.exe.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. When the computer restarts, log on again using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name, and then click Next. If you are installing: The Database Server, select Database Server. The Database Server and Camera Server, select Database Server and Camera Server.

4 5 6 7

8 9

Click Next. Enter the Honeywell DVM System Number and Authorization Key from your Honeywell DVM software license and then click Next. Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).

10 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM software and then click Next. 11 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM database and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows is not installed (typically the D drive).
12 If you are:

Only installing a Database Server, go to step 15. If you are installing a Database Server and Camera Server go to step 13.

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Installation and setup tasks 13 Select a folder where the video clips are to be stored, and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
14 Select a folder where the video clips are to be archived, and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
15 If Microsoft SQL Server 2000 has not been installed, select a folder to install

the software and then click Next. Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).
16 If requested, enter and confirm the password for the Windows mngr account

and then click Next.


17 Confirm the details and then click Next to begin the installation. 18 Agree to restart the computer and click Finish. You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on redundant servers


This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM Database Server components on redundant servers. You must separately install the components on each server. Note that the first server on which you install the components becomes the preferred Database Server. Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server on the first (preferred) server To install:
1 2

Log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer, navigate to the Server folder on the CD and double-click setup.exe.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. When the computer restarts, log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name and then click Next. If you are installing: The Database Server, select Database Server. The Database Server and Camera Server, select Database Server and Camera Server.

4 5 6 7

8 9

Click Next. Enter the Honeywell DVM System Number and Authorization Key from your Honeywell DVM software license, and then click Next.

10 Select I wish to install the first Database Server of a redundant pair. 11 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM software and then click Next.

Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).


12 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM database and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows is not installed (typically the D drive).

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Installation and setup tasks 13 If you are:

Only installing a Database Server, go to step 16. If you are installing a Database Server and Camera Server, go to step 14.

14 Select a folder where the video clips are to be stored and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
15 Select a folder where the video clips are to be archived and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
16 If Microsoft SQL Server 2000 is not already installed, select a folder to install

the software and then click Next. Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).
17 If requested, enter and confirm the password for the Windows mngr account

and then click Next.


18 Confirm the details and then click Next to begin the installation. 19 If requested, agree to restart the computer and log on using the Honeywell

DVM installation account.


20 If requested, agree to continue the installation. 21 When the Installation Wizard Complete screen appears, agree to restart the

computer and click Finish. Installation of the preferred Database Server of a redundant pair is now complete. Installing the Honeywell DVM Database Server on the second server To install:
1 2

Log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer, navigate to the Server folder on the CD and double-click setup.exe.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. When the computer restarts, log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name and then click Next.

4 5 6

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If you are installing: The Database Server, select Database Server. The Database Server and Camera Server, select Database Server and Camera Server.

8 9

Click Next. Enter the Honeywell DVM System Number and Authorization Key from your Honeywell DVM software license, and then click Next. Click Next.

10 Select I wish to create a redundant pair with an existing Database Server. 11 Enter the computer name of the first (preferred) Database Server computer

and then click Next.


12 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM software and then click Next.

Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).


13 Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM database and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows is not installed (typically the D drive).
14 If you are:

Only installing a Database Server, go to step 17. If you are installing a Database Server and Camera Server, go to step 15.

15 Select a folder where the video clips are to be stored and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
16 Select a folder where the video clips are to be archived and then click Next.

Choose the hard drive on which Windows and the Honeywell DVM database are not installed (typically the E drive).
17 If Microsoft SQL Server 2000 is not already installed, select a folder to install

the software and then click Next. Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive).
18 If requested, enter and confirm the password for the Windows mngr account

and then click Next.


19 Confirm the details and then click Next to begin the installation. 20 If requested, agree to restart the computer and log on using the Honeywell

DVM installation account.

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Installation and setup tasks 21 If requested, agree to continue the installation. 22 When the Installation Wizard Complete screen appears, agree to restart the

computer and click Finish.


You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM Camera Server components


This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM Camera Server components on a Camera Server. Prerequisites The name of the Database Server. (If you have redundant Database Servers, use the name of the preferred Database Server.)

To install:
1 2

Log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer and double- click setup.exe on the CD.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. After restarting, log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name, and then click Next. Select Camera Server, and then click Next. Select a folder for the Honeywell DVM software, and then click Next. Choose the drive on which Windows is installed (typically the C drive). Select a folder where the video clips are to be stored, and then click Next. Choose the hard drive on which Windows is not installed (typically the D drive). Choose the hard drive on which Windows is not installed (typically the D drive).

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 Select a folder where the video clips are to be archived, and then click Next.

11 If requested, enter and confirm the password fro the Windows mngr account,

and then click Next.


12 Enter the name of the Honeywell DVM Database Server, and then click Next.

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Installation and setup tasks 13 Confirm the details and then click Next to begin the installation.

If a dialog box appears informing you that the Database Server is not available, check that you have entered the correct name and click OK.
14 Agree to restart the computer if requested. You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM host components on the EBI or Experion server
This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM host components on an EBI or Experion server. Prerequisites The name of the Database Server. (If you have redundant Database Servers, use the name of the preferred Database Server.) EBI or Experion is running. mngr password for the EBI or Experion server.

To install the Honeywell DVM host components:


1 2 3

Log on to the EBI or Experion server using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Check that EBI or Experion is running. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer and double- click setup.exe on the CD.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. When the computer restarts, log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name and then click Next. Select Host Components and then click Next. Enter and confirm the password for the Windows mngr account and then click Next.

5 6 7 8 9

10 Enter the name of the Database Server, and then click Next. 11 Confirm the installation details and then click Next to begin the installation. 12 Click Finish. You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM host components on a Console Station


This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM host components on a Console Station. Prerequisites The name of the Database Server. (If you have redundant Database Servers, use the name of the preferred Database Server.) The Console Station is running. mngr password for the EBI or Experion server.

To install the Console Station host components:


1 2 3

Log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Ensure that Experion Console Station is running. Insert the Honeywell DVM CD into the computer. The autorun setup wizard starts. (If the wizard doesnt start, open Windows Explorer and double- click setup.exe on the CD.) If requested, click Restart to upgrade the version of Windows Installer. When the computer restarts, log on using the Honeywell DVM installation account. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next. Read the installation notes and then click Next. Enter your name and your company name and then click Next. Select Host Components and then click Next. Enter and confirm the password for the Windows mngr account and then click Next.

5 6 7 8 9

10 Enter the name of the Database Server and then click Next. 11 Confirm the installation details and then click Next to begin the installation. 12 Click Finish. You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM client components on a Station computer


This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM client components on a Station computer. To install the client components:
1 2 3 4

Log on to the computer using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Log on to Station with MNGR security level. Click on Stations toolbar to call up the System Menu. Click (the Honeywell Digital Video Manager icon) on the System Menu. Station connects to the Honeywell DVM system. (If you have an EBI system, the icon appears under Access Control and Security. If you have an Experion system, the icon appears under Options.) If requested, agree to trust information from Honeywell. When the Digital Video Client setup screen appears, click Next. Select a location for the client files and then click Next. Check the settings and then click Next to start the installation. The Importing a new private signature key screen appears. By default, the security level is set to Medium. If: This security level is correct, click OK and go to step 11. You want to change the security level, click Set Security Level. Select the required security level (as described in the following table) and click Next.
Description Users will be prompted to confirm that the digital certificate is to be used for signing. All users will have access to the digital certificate for signing.

5 6 7 8

Security Level Medium

High

Users will be required to enter a password to access the digital certificate when it is to be used for signing. Only users with the password will have access to the digital certificate for signing.

10 Click Finish and then click OK. 11 Click Finish.

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Installation and setup tasks 12 Restart Station and click OK to refresh the screen.

An error screen indicating that you do not have permission to access Honeywell DVM appears.
13 Log on as a Station user who has been assigned Honeywell DVM user

privileges.
You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Configuring Station for use with Honeywell DVM


This task describes how to configure Station for use with Honeywell DVM. To configure Station:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Log on to the computer using the Honeywell DVM installation account. Start Station. Choose Station > Connection Properties. The Connection Properties dialog box opens. Click the Web Access tab and the click Advanced to display all properties. Select The following URLs only. Click Add and type the address of each Database Server. The format of the address is: http://DVM_ServerA/* http://DVM_ServerB/* where DVM_ServerA is the name of the preferred Database Server and DVM_ServerB is the name of the backup Database Server. (Note that if you omit the asterisk, operators will only be able to access the home page.)

Click Save to save your changes to the current Station setup file.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing the Honeywell DVM client components for an Internet Explorer client computer
This task describes how to install the Honeywell DVM client components on a client computer that uses Internet Explorer to access Honeywell DVM.
Attention You do not need to complete this task if Station is on the computer, and it has been configured to access Honeywell DVM.

Prerequisites The computer meets the software requirements (page 116).

To install the client components:


1 2 3 4 5 6

Log onto Windows using the Windows account from which you installed Honeywell DVM (the Honeywell installation account). Open Internet Explorer. Choose Tools > Internet Options. Go to the Security page, select Trusted Sites and click Sites. Clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box. In the Add this Web site to this zone field, type:
a. http://DVM_ServerA and click Add.

where DVM_ServerA is the name of the preferred Honeywell DVM Database Server.
b. http://ServerB and click Add.

where DVM_ServerB is the name of the backup Honeywell DVM Database Server.
c. Click OK. 7 8

Click OK to close the Internet Options dialog box. Enter the URL to Honeywell DVMs main page (for example, http://machinename/dvm) and press ENTER. Where machinename is the name of the Honeywell DVM Database Server (in a redundant server system, the name of the preferred Honeywell DVM Database Server).

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If you have Windows 2000 or Windows XP, Agree to trust information from Honeywell and go to step 10. If you have Windows 2003, Internet Explorer displays a dialog that says, Microsoft Internet Explorers Enhanced Security Configuration is currently enabled on your server....
a. Check In the future, do not show this message. Click OK.

Internet Explorer displays a logon dialog.


b. Enter the Honeywell installation account user name and password.

Internet Explorer displays a yellow information bar across the top of the Web page stating, The previous site might require the following ActiveX control: DVSClient.cab from Honeywell Limited....
c. Click on the information bar.

A menu appears.
d. Select Install the ActiveX control.

Internet Explorer shows the Internet Explorer - Security Warning dialog that says, Do you want to install this software?.
e. Click Install.

Honeywell DVMs main page appears.


10 The Digital Video Client setup screen appears. Click Next. 11 Select a location for the Client files. Click Next. 12 If you agree with the current setting, click Next to start the installation.

The Importing a new private signature key screen appears. By default, the security level is set to Medium.
13 If:

This security level is correct, click OK and go to step 14. You want to change the security level, click Set Security Level. Select the required security level (as described in the following table) and click Next.
Description Users will be prompted to confirm that the digital certificate is to be used for signing. All users will have access to the digital certificate for signing.

Security Level Medium

High

Users will be required to enter a password to access the digital certificate when it is to be used for signing. Only users with the password will have access to the digital certificate for signing.

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Installation and setup tasks 14 Click Finish and then click OK. 15 Click Finish and agree to restart your system if requested, otherwise close and

restart Internet Explorer.


You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Updating the hosts file


If you have a workgroup environment, you must update a computers hosts file to include an IP address/computer name entry for every other Honeywell DVM computer in your system. The following table specifies the names you must include for each type of computer.
For this type of computer Include the IP address/name of the following: Every Honeywell DVM Station and Internet Explorer client computer Every EBI or Experion server (if used in conjunction with EBI or Experion) Every Console Station (if used in conjunction with Experion) Client computer (Station or Internet Explorer) EBI or Experion server Console Station (only applicable to Experion) Every Database Server and Camera Server Every Database Server and Camera Server Every Database Server and Camera Server

Database Server or Camera Server Every other Database Server and Camera Server

The hosts file is in %SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc, where %SystemRoot% is normally c:\winnt or c:\windows. Notes Use Windows Notepad, or similar text editing tool, to update the hosts file. You should ping the other computers to check that your entries are correct. See Pinging a device on the network on page 241.

Example If the name of the Database Server is DVMServer and its IP address is 192.168.0.1, you would add the following entry: 192.168.0.1 DVMServer
You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Pinging a device on the network


Pinging is a basic test that checks whether a devicesuch as a computer or network camerais connected to the network. To ping a device:
1 2

Choose Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt to open a Command Prompt window. At the c:\> prompt, type ping DeviceName where, DeviceName is the name of the device
Pinging DeviceName Reply from nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128 . . Ping statistics for nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

If the device is connected, the results will be similar to the following:

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Installing and configuring camera streamers


This section only contains installation and configuration information that is specific to Honeywell DVM. See the manufacturers documentation for detailed installation and configuration instructions.
Attention The Axis documentation refers to its streamers as camera servers. In this, and other Honeywell DVM documents, they are referred to as camera streamers.

To install and configure: Axis 205 Axis 206/206W Axis 206M Axis 207 Axis 210/210A Axis 211/211A Axis 213 Axis 221 Axis 231D/232D Axis 240Q Axis 241S/241SA Axis 241Q/241QA Axis 2100 Axis 2110 Axis 2120 Axis 2130 Axis 2400 1.x Axis 2400 2.x Axis 2400+ Axis 2401 1.x Axis 2401 2.x Axis 2401+ Axis 2411

Go to: page 243 page 243 page 243 page 243 page 243 page 243 page 244 page 243 page 244 page 250 page 250 page 250 page 243 page 243 page 243 page 244 page 245 page 245 page 245 page 245 page 245 page 245 page 243

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To install and configure: Axis 2420 CamStation CS100 CamStation CS-3001V MegaChips MD-100 MegaChips OpennetView

Go to: page 243 page 256 page 261 page 267 page 268

Axis 205, 206, 206M, 206W, 207, 210/210A, 211/211A, 221, 2100, 2110, 2120, 2411 and 2420
Considerations Use the Axis-supplied tools to configure the streamer. Test the video viewing capability of the streamer using the Axis Web pages before connecting to Honeywell DVM. The Axis 205, 206, 206M, 206W, 207, 210/210A, 211/211A, 221, 2100, 2110, 2120 and 2420 are camera streamers with built-in cameras. Hence they can be considered as fixed cameras. There are no Honeywell DVM specific setup tasks required for fixed cameras. The Axis 2411 is a camera streamer that does not support PTZ Control. Hence it can be considered to be a fixed camera. There are no Honeywell DVM specific setup instructions required for fixed camera operation. Configuring the Axis through the Axis Web pages often requires a user name and password, these are set by Axis and are often root and pass, respectively. To change the user name and password, refer to the Axis documentation for your streamer. You must define the streamers user name and password in Honeywell DVM. See Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM on page 255.

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Axis 213, 231D, 232D and 2130


Considerations Use the Axis-supplied tools to configure the streamer. Test the video viewing capability of the streamer using the Axis Web pages before connecting to Honeywell DVM. All these Axis streamers contain a built-in PTZ-capable camera. To enable Honeywell DVM to control this camera, you must define the Camera Control Type as Use streamer settings. This is done when you configure the camera in Honeywell DVM. For more information, see Camera Control tab on page 299. Configuring the Axis through the Axis Web pages often requires a user name and password, these are set by Axis and are often root and pass, respectively. To change the user name and password, refer to the Axis documentation for your streamer. You must define the streamers user name and password in Honeywell DVM. See Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM on page 255.

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Axis 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2400+, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2401+
Considerations Use the Axis-supplied tools to configure the streamer. Test the video viewing capability of the streamer using the Axis Web pages before connecting to Honeywell DVM. There are no Honeywell DVM-specific setup instructions required for fixed camera operation. There are no specific baud rates. Configuring the Axis through the Axis Web pages often requires a user name and password, these are set by Axis and are often root and pass, respectively. To change the user name and password, refer to the Axis documentation for your streamer. You must define the streamers user name and password in Honeywell DVM. See Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM on page 255.

Configuring a streamer for Pelco P protocol PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 245). Navigate to the serial port settings page. Change the camera control type to Generic. Change the protocol to RS485. Change the baud rate to 9600 unless otherwise stated in your camera manual. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 1. Set the parity to None.

10 Click Save. 11 Set the network protocol to TCP/IP. 12 Set the port to 5001. 13 Click Save and restart the camera streamer. 14 View using a Honeywell DVM client and test.

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After performing the above procedure, you will not be able to control the camera using the Axis Web pages because Axis and Honeywell DVM uses a different mechanism for camera control. The following figure is a wiring diagram for half-duplex communication between the Axis streamer and the Pelco camera.
Figure 5 Pelco Spectra II Dome-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2400+, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2401+

Rx+ Tx+ RxTxPelco Dome 78

Axis Streamer

Attention

Make sure that Rx- and Tx- are both connected to pin 7 of the Axis streamer. Rx+ and Tx+ are both connected to pin 8. Configuring a streamer for Sensomatic PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 246

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 245). Navigate to the serial port settings page. Change the camera control type to Generic. Change the protocol to RS485. Change the baud rate to 4800 unless otherwise stated in your camera manual. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 1. Set the parity to None.

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Installing and configuring camera streamers 10 Click Save. 11 Set the network protocol to TCP/IP. 12 Set the port to 5001. 13 Save the settings and restart the camera streamer. 14 View using a Honeywell DVM client and test.

After performing the above procedure, you will not be able to control the camera using the Axis Web pages because Axis camera control of Sensomatic PTZ cameras is not natively supported by Axis Web pages. The following figure is a wiring diagram for half-duplex communication between the Axis streamer and the Sensormatic camera.
Figure 6 Sensormatic SpeedDome Ultra IV-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2400+, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2401+

1 Data In +

2 Data In -

3 Data Out +

4 Data Out -

P3

RS-422
P8 J1
78

P7

Axis Streamer I/O Board

The Jumper pin (J1) must be set to terminated/unterminated according to the Sensormatic instructions. If there is only one camera connected on the RS-485, or if the camera is the last one on the daisy chain, it should be terminated. If there are multiple cameras connected on the RS-422, and it is not the last camera, it should be set to unterminated.

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Configuring a streamer for VCL protocol PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 245). Navigate to the serial port settings page. Change the camera control type to Generic. Change the protocol to RS485. Change the baud rate to 9600. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 2. Set the parity to None.

10 Click Save. 11 Set the network protocol to TCP/IP. 12 Set the port to 5001. 13 Save the settings and restart the camera streamer. 14 View using a Honeywell DVM client and test. Figure 7 VCL Orbiter Gold/Lite-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 2400 1.x, 2400 2.x, 2400+, 2401 1.x, 2401 2.x and 2401+

D+ DVCL Orbiter Gold/Lite 78

Axis Streamer

Attention

Make sure that D- is connected to pin 7 of the Axis streamer and D+ is connected to pin 8.
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Configuring a streamer for Hernis Industrial cameras Specific hardware is required to support the interface with Honeywell DVM. For information and wiring diagrams, please contact your local Honeywell representative. Configuring a streamer for streamer-based PTZ To configure the streamer to use streamer-based PTZ, go to: http://www.axis.com/techsup/cam_servers/ptz/index.htm. This site contains all the required wiring and configuration information.

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Axis 240Q, 241S, 241SA, 241Q and 241QA


To define the name and password of the streamer in Honeywell DVM, see Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM on page 255. Considerations Use the Axis-supplied tools to configure the streamer. If you have previously used the camera, log onto the Axis streamers configuration Web pages, and delete all the entries from Event Servers and Event Types. Test the video viewing capability of the streamer using the Axis Web pages before connecting to Honeywell DVM. There are no Honeywell DVM-specific setup instructions required for fixed camera operation. There are no specific baud rates. Configuring the Axis through the Axis Web pages often requires a user name and password, these are set by Axis and are often root and pass, respectively. To change the user name and password of the streamer, refer to the Axis documentation for the streamer. You must define the streamers user name and password in Honeywell DVM. See Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM on page 255.

Configuring a streamer for Pelco P protocol PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 250). Navigate to the RS485 port settings page. Change the port usage to Generic TCP/IP. Change the baud rate to 9600 unless otherwise stated in your camera manual. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 1. Set the parity to None. Set the Listener port to 5001.

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After performing the above procedure, you will not be able to control the camera using the Axis Web pages because Axis and Honeywell DVM use a different mechanism for camera control. The following figure is a wiring diagram for half-duplex communication between the Axis streamer and the Pelco camera.
Figure 8 Pelco Spectra II Dome-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 241S and 241Q

Rx+ Tx+ RxTxPelco Dome 11 12

Axis Streamer

Attention

Make sure that Rx+ and Tx+ are both connected to pin 11 and Rx- and Tx- are both connected to pin 12 of the Axis streamer. Configuring a streamer for Sensomatic PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 245). Navigate to the RS485 port settings page. Change the port usage to Generic TCP/IP. Change the baud rate to 4800 unless otherwise stated in your camera manual. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 1.

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Set the parity to None. Set the Listener port to 5001.

10 Click Save. 11 Connect via Station and Honeywell DVM and test.

After performing the above procedure, you will not be able to control the camera using the Axis Web pages because Axis camera control of Sensomatic PTZ cameras is not natively supported by Axis Web pages. The following figure is a wiring diagram for half-duplex communication between the Axis streamer and the Sensormatic camera.
Figure 9 Sensormatic SpeedDome Ultra IV-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 241S and 241Q

1 Data In +

2 Data In -

3 Data Out +

4 Data Out -

P3

RS-422
P8 J1
11 12

P7

Axis Streamer I/O Board

The Jumper pin (J1) must be set to terminated or unterminated according to the Sensormatic instructions. If there is only one camera connected on the RS-485 or if the camera is the last one on the daisy chain, it should be terminated. If there are multiple cameras connected on the RS-422 and it is not the last camera it should be set to unterminated. Configuring a streamer for VCL protocol PTZ cameras To configure a streamer:
1 2

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 250).

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Navigate to the RS485 port settings page. Change the camera control type to Generic TCP/IP. Change the baud rate to 9600. Change the data bits to 8. Change the stop bits to 2. Set the parity to None. Set the Listener port to 5001.

10 Click Save. 11 Connect via Station and Honeywell DVM and test. Figure 10 VCL Orbiter Gold/Lite-Axis Wiring Diagram for Axis 241S and 241Q

D+ DVCL Orbiter Gold/Lite 11 12

Axis Streamer

Attention

Make sure that D- is connected to pin 12 of the Axis streamer and D+ is connected to pin 11. Configuring a streamer for Hernis Industrial cameras Specific hardware is required to support the interface with Honeywell DVM. For information and wiring diagrams, please contact your local Honeywell representative.

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Configuring a streamer for streamer-based PTZ To configure a streamer for streamer-based PTZ:
1 2 3 4 5

Connect to the streamer directly using Internet Explorer. This causes a series of Axis pages to be shown. Log on as root with a password of pass (or the new password you entered on page 250). Navigate to the RS485 port settings page or the RS232 port settings page depending on the type of communications to the camera. Change the port usage to Pan Tilt Zoom. Click on the Upload button to upload a PTZ driver to the streamer. PTZ drivers are available from: http://www.axis.com/techsup/cam_servers/ptz/ drivers.php. Click on the Port Options to configure the necessary baud rate, data bits, stop bits and parity to communicate to the camera.

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Defining the user name and password of an Axis streamer in Honeywell DVM
You must define the user name and password of Axis streamers in Honeywell DVM. To define the name and password:
1 2

On the Database Server, choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblCamera and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the StreamerUsername field for the camera, enter the name that you entered on the Axis Web page. In the StreamerPassword field for the camera, enter the password that you entered on the Axis Web page.

3 4 5

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CamStation CS100
Prerequisites Set up the IP address of the CamStation CS100 streamer, using the CamStation software supplied with the streamer. For more information, see the CamStation User Manual.

Considerations No Honeywell DVM-specific setup tasks are required on the CamStation CS100 streamer unless you are using camera control. Defining camera control is done when you add and configure the cameras. For more information, see Camera Control tab on page 299. You must ensure that the dip switch on the CS100 streamer is set to RS485. This is regardless of whether you are using RS-232 or not. RS-232 is not supported in Honeywell DVM and the streamer must be set to RS485. You must ensure that the CS100 streamer is configured for Generic camera control which is explained below. In short, you will need to Telnet to the streamer and use the command Set generic and then select Honeywell camera control.

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RS-485 connection The following diagram shows the pin-out at the back of the CamStation CS100 streamer.

REAR

RS-232

ALARM I/O

10BASE-T

DC Input 5V

I/O Port

LAN Port

ALARM (Out +) Sensor (IN)

TBD

RX+

TX+

ALarm (Out-)

GND

GND

RX-

TX-

A RS-485 connector must be used to wire the camera control head to the CamStation CS100 streamer. The following table identifies where the wires need to be connected.
CamStation CS100 streamer RX+ RXTX+ TXPelco P camera TX+ TXRX+ RXSensomatic camera Data Out+ Data OutData In+ Data In-

The jumper setting on the front of the CamStation CS100 streamer must be set to RS485. If it is not set to RS485, change it and power the streamer off and on. To check if the streamer has been wired correctly, use the CamStation CS100 software to see if the video is streaming and can be viewed. If it is, the wiring is correct.

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Pelco P or Sensormatic PTZ cameras Considerations When you configure the Camera Control settings, you must define the Camera Control Type as either Pelco Dome or Sensormatic.

To configure the streamer for Pelco P or Sensormatic PTZ cameras:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type telnet a.b.c.d and click OK, where a.b.c.d is the IP address of the CamStation CS100 streamer. At the login prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the Password prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the CamStation prompt, type set generic and press ENTER. Select the same baud rate setting which is configured on the camera head and press ENTER. Do not change the default printing mode. press ENTER. Select the Honeywell PTZ Control Mode setting and press ENTER. For the Generic PTZ Port Number, type 5001 and press ENTER.

10 When you have finished, type exit to end the Telnet session.

Example This is an example of what the Telnet session could look like.
CamStation> set generic The command of this field is only for Honeywell company.

Baud Rate Setting Current Baud Rate : 4800 Choose Baud Rate(1.2400, 2.4800, 3.9600, 4.19200, 5.38400) : 2

Printing Mode Setting. Current Printing Mode : printing Choose printing mode(1.printing, 2.no printing):

PTZ Control Mode Setting. Current PTZ Control: sjcnc ptz Choose PTZ Control(1.sjcnc ptz, 2.honeywell ptz) : 2 Generic PTZ Port Number[5001] : CamStation> 5001

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Streamer-based PTZ Considerations When you configure the Camera Control settings, you must define the Camera Control Type as Use streamer settings. This is done when you configure each camera in Honeywell DVM. For more information, see Camera Control tab on page 299. Step pan, tilt and zoom are the only camera control movements supported by streamer-based control for a CamStation CS100 streamer.

To configure the streamer for streamer-based PTZ:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type telnet a.b.c.d and click OK, where a.b.c.d is the IP address of the CamStation CS100 streamer. At the login prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the Password prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the CamStation prompt, type set ptz and press ENTER. A list of cameras will appear, including their current PTZ control settings. To change the PTZ settings, enter the number of the cameras you want to change and press ENTER. Type Y to confirm you want to change the setting and press ENTER. Leave the default PTZ Address number and press ENTER. Repeat steps 7 and 8, until you have changed the setting on all the required cameras. CS100 will support.

10 From the list of available camera heads, select the type that the CamStation 11 When you have finished, type exit to end the Telnet session.

Example This is an example of what the Telnet session could look like
login: camstation Password: camstation

CamStation> set ptz

[PTZ Control Settings]

Camera 1 PTZ Control : N Camera 2 PTZ Control : N

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Camera 3 PTZ Control : N Camera 4 PTZ Control : N PTZ Controller : Sungjin

Number of Camera to change setting (0-all, 1 - 4) : 0 Camera 1 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[1] : Camera 2 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[2] : Camera 3 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[3] : Camera 4 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[4] :

PTZ Controller - [Sungjin] (1.SUNGJIN, 2.PELCO P, 3.SMARTSCAN, 4.V1311RB_3W, 5.PELCO D) : 5 CamStation>

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CamStation CS-3001V
Prerequisites Set up the IP address of the CamStation streamer, using the CamStation software supplied with the streamer. For more information, see the CamStation User Manual.

Considerations Honeywell DVM client computers need to have at least 16MB of video memory to be able to view video from the CS-3001V streamer. If there is not enough video memory, client computers will display a black image. No Honeywell DVM-specific setup tasks are required on the CamStation streamer unless you are using camera control. Defining camera control is done when you add and configure the cameras. For more information, see Camera Control tab on page 299. An audio source can be connected to the CS-3001V streamer by plugging the audio source into the input audio channel on the rear panel of the streamer. The CS-3001V expects an amplified signal as an input as it does not have an internal pre-amp. You must ensure that the dip switch on the CS-3001V streamer is set to RS485. This is regardless of whether you are using RS-232 or not. RS-232 is not supported in Honeywell DVM and the streamer must be set to RS485. You must ensure that the CS-3001V streamer is configured for Generic camera control which is explained below. In short, you will need to Telnet to the streamer and use the command Set generic and then select Honeywell camera control.

Network The CS-3001V streamer is a half duplex streamer. Any traffic sent to the streamer can cause network collisions and interrupt the video stream being sent to Honeywell DVM. This can cause a significant degradation in the streamers ability to deliver high frame rates to Honeywell DVM. For this reason, care should be taken to minimise traffic to the streamers. This traffic usually comes from three sources: Communications from the Honeywell DVM system. This is required for normal operation and is minimal. The streamer can easily handle this level of return traffic with no loss of performance. Broadcast traffic on the LAN. Mishandled multicast traffic on the LAN.

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While the streamer can handle the return traffic produced by Honeywell DVM, if there is significant broadcast activity and/or the network is not set up correctly for multicast traffic (multicasts are treated as broadcast), there can be significant loss of performance if this traffic is allowed to reach the network segments containing the streamers. You can identify an issue with the network if there are a lot of collisions happening on the port CamStation is connected to. This is usually indicated by an orange flashing LED on most network switches. Possible remedies for this issue are: Use managed network switches that can handle multicast and broadcast traffic properly. Note that not all network switches are capable of doing this and generally send all multicast packets to all network ports. This can cause collisions at the port the CamStation is connected to. You will need to ensure that the switch you select stops such packets from going to the port that the CamStation is connected to. Use VLANs to segregate the CamStations from the rest of the network. This will minimise the amount of return traffic and stop multicast packets from reaching the CamStation streamers and hence maximise performance.

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RS-485 connection The following diagram shows the pin-out at the back of the CamStation CS-3001V streamer.

REAR

RS-232

ALARM I/O

10BASE-T

DC Input 5V

I/O Port

LAN Port

ALARM (Out +) Sensor (IN)

TBD

RX+

TX+

ALarm (Out-)

GND

GND

RX-

TX-

A RS-485 connector must be used to wire the camera control head to the CamStation CS-3001V streamer. The following table identifies where the wires need to be connected.
CamStation CS100 streamer RX+ RXTX+ TXPelcoP camera TX+ TXRX+ RXSensomatic camera Data Out+ Data OutData In+ Data In-

The jumper setting on the front of the CamStation CS-3001V streamer must be set to RS485. If it is not set to RS485, change it and power the streamer off and on. To check if the streamer has been wired correctly, use the CamStation CS-3001V software to see if the video is streaming and can be viewed. If it is, the wiring is correct.
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Pelco P or Sensormatic PTZ cameras Considerations When you configure the Camera Control settings, you must define the Camera Control Type as either Pelco Dome or Sensormatic.

To configure the streamer for Pelco P or Sensormatic PTZ cameras:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type telnet a.b.c.d and click OK, where a.b.c.d is the IP address of the CamStation CS-3001V streamer. At the login prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the Password prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the CamStation prompt, type set generic and press ENTER. Select the same baud rate setting which is configured on the camera head and press ENTER. Do not change the default printing mode. press ENTER. Select the Honeywell PTZ Control Mode setting and press ENTER. For the Generic PTZ Port Number, type 5001 and press ENTER.

10 When you have finished, type exit to end the Telnet session.

Example This is an example of what the Telnet session could look like
CamStation> set generic The command of this field is only for Honeywell company.

Baud Rate Setting Current Baud Rate : 4800 Choose Baud Rate(1.2400, 2.4800, 3.9600, 4.19200, 5.38400) : 2

Printing Mode Setting. Current Printing Mode : printing Choose printing mode(1.printing, 2.no printing):

PTZ Control Mode Setting. Current PTZ Control: sjcnc ptz Choose PTZ Control(1.sjcnc ptz, 2.honeywell ptz) : 2 Generic PTZ Port Number[5001] : CamStation> 5001

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Streamer-based control Considerations When you configure the Camera Control settings, you must define the Camera Control Type as Use streamer settings. This is done when you configure each camera in Honeywell DVM. For more information, see Camera Control tab on page 299. Step pan, tilt and zoom are the only camera control movements supported by streamer-based control for a CamStation CS-3001V streamer. For information setting up the audio configuration, see Configuring CamStation CS-3001V for audio on page 351.

To configure the streamer for streamer-based control:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type telnet a.b.c.d and click OK, where a.b.c.d is the IP address of the CamStation CS-3001V streamer. At the login prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the Password prompt, type CamStation and press ENTER. At the CamStation prompt, type set ptz and press ENTER. A list of cameras will appear, including their current PTZ control settings. To change the PTZ settings, enter the number of the cameras you want to change and press ENTER. Type Y to confirm you want to change the setting and press ENTER. Leave the default PTZ Address number and press ENTER. Repeat steps 7 and 8, until you have changed the setting on all the required cameras. CS-3001V will support.

10 From the list of available camera heads, select the type that the CamStation 11 When you have finished, type exit to end the Telnet session.

Example This is an example of what the Telnet session could look like
login: camstation Password: camstation

CamStation> set ptz

[PTZ Control Settings]

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Camera 1 PTZ Control : N Camera 2 PTZ Control : N Camera 3 PTZ Control : N Camera 4 PTZ Control : N PTZ Controller : Sungjin

Number of Camera to change setting (0-all, 1 - 4) : 0 Camera 1 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[1] : Camera 2 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[2] : Camera 3 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[3] : Camera 4 PTZ Control [N](Y/N) : y PTZ Address number[4] :

PTZ Controller - [Sungjin] (1.SUNGJIN, 2.PELCO P, 3.SMARTSCAN, 4.V1311RB_3W, 5.PELCO D) : 5 CamStation>

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MegaChips MD-100
Considerations Follow the MegaChips instructions for setting up the MD-100. There are no Honeywell DVM-specific setup instructions required for fixed camera operation.

Streamer-based PTZ To configure the streamer for streamer-based PTZ:


1 2 3 4 5

Start Internet Explorer. Enter the IP address of the OpennetView streamer. Click System Settings > Device Settings and the Enter Network Password dialog box will appear. Enter the User name, the default is administrator, and click OK. (There is no password.) In the Camera Type field, select the required camera and click the Submit button.

Pelco P Protocol PTZ cameras To configure the streamer for Pelco P Protocol PTZ cameras:
1 2 3 4 5

Start Internet Explorer. Enter the IP address of the OpennetView streamer. Click System Settings > Device Settings and the Enter Network Password dialog box will appear. Enter the User name, the default is administrator, and click OK. (There is no password.) In the Camera Type field, select TYPE B and click the Submit button.

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MegaChips OpennetView
Considerations Follow the MegaChips instructions for setting up the OpennetView. There are no Honeywell DVM-specific setup instructions required for fixed camera operation.

Streamer-based control To configure the streamer for streamer-based control:


1 2 3 4 5

Start Internet Explorer. Enter the IP address of the OpennetView streamer. Click Environment Setup and the Enter Network Password dialog box will appear. Enter the User name, the default is administrator and click OK (there is no password). In the Camera Type field, select the required camera and click the Submit button.

Pelco P Protocol PTZ cameras To configure the streamer for Pelco P Protocol PTZ cameras:
1 2 3 4 5

Start Internet Explorer. Enter the IP address of the OpennetView streamer. Click Environment Setup and the Enter Network Password dialog box will appear. Enter the User name, the default is administrator and click OK (there is no password). In the Camera Type field, select TYPE B and click the Submit button.

The OpennetView streamer communicates to PTZ cameras via RS-232 while the Pelco uses RS-485. Hence a RS-232 to RS-485 converter is required. The recommended converter is a Black Box IC109A.

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The following table shows the pin wiring between the IC109A and the Pelco camera.
Table 1 IC109A to Pelco Cable Connections IC109A TxA RxA TxB RxB Pelco RxTxRx+ Tx+

IC109A to OpennetView cable If you experience problems sending PTZ commands, try the following cable solution with a pinout box.
Figure 11 Cable Solution with Pinout Box

25-pin IC109A Pinout Box RS-422 (4-wire)

Straight-Through Cables OpennetView

25 to 9-pin Converter

Pelco Dome

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Figure 12 Pinout Box Wiring


IC109A (25 Pin) Tx 2 Rx 3 SG 7 RTS 4 CTS 5 DSR 6 CD 8 DTR 20 OpennetView (25 Pin) 2 Tx 3 Rx 7 SG 4 RTS 5 CTS 6 DSR 8 CTS 20 DTR

Configuring the IC109A Control of Pelco cameras requires conversion of the OpennetView RS-232 signal to RS-485. You can convert the signals using the IC109A converter from Black Box. The configuration details for the IC109A are as shown in the following tables.
Table 2 Switch/Jumper Settings Switch/Jumper XW1 S1 Switch S2 Switch S3 Switch W5 Jumper W8 Jumper W9 Jumper W15 Jumper W16 Jumper W17 Setting A position & DCE Normal position Off Off BC position (RTS/CTS/CD) AB position (4 wire) D position (CTS follows RTS) AB (RTS/CD enabled) A (0 ms) E (0.15 ms)

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Installing and configuring PTZ cameras


This section only contains installation and configuration information that is specific to Honeywell DVM. See the manufacturers documentation for detailed installation and configuration instructions.
Camera type Pelco cameras Sensomatic cameras VCL Orbiter dome cameras Honeywell KD6 Hernis Industrial cameras Go to: page 272 page 273 page 274 page 275 page 277

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Pelco cameras
Considerations Some Pelco cameras use DIP switch positions, other than the ones listed below. If this is the case, configure them to: P type protocol. There are no specific settings for the Address and Baud rate, but the settings must match those selected in the streamer.

The following settings are required for a Pelco camera to communicate with Honeywell DVM.
Switch bank SW1 SW2 Settings 1 = Off 2-8 = On (P type protocol) 1-5 = Off (Address = 1) 6 = On 7-8 = Off (4800 Baud)

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Sensomatic cameras
To enable the Sensomatic camera to communicate with Honeywell DVM, set the address switches on the base of the removable camera unit to 0.

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VCL Orbiter dome cameras


Attention Honeywell Video Solutions Orbiter dome cameras are referred to in this guide as VCL cameras, or as VCL Orbiter cameras.

To enable the VCL Orbiter cameras to communicate with Honeywell DVM using the VCL protocol, set the protocol switch settings as follows.
Switch S1 S2 S3 S4 Function OFF OFF OFF OFF

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Honeywell KD6 digital dome cameras


Honeywell KD6 digital dome cameras have an inbuilt Axis streamer. The following instructions complement the instructions in the cameras user manual. Setting the hardware address Configure switches S1 through S3 to a unique address for your installation. Valid addressing range is 1-989.
Switch S1 S2 S3 Function Ones digit Tens digit Hundreds digit

Setting the communications protocol Set the camera to communicate via VCL or Pelco protocols by setting the camera according to the following table. (Note that: ON = CLOSED, OFF = OPEN.)
Protocol Switch S4 1 VCL Pelco ON 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Communications Baud Parity Data Stop Bits Bits 8 8 1 1

OFF ON

OFF OFF ON OFF ON

OFF OFF 9600 N

OFF OFF ON

OFF OFF OFF 4800 N

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Setting the IP address If your Honeywell KD6 camera has a digital dome, you need to assign an IP address to it. To do this, refer to the cameras user guide. To configure for Honeywell DVM:
1

When you are installing a digital dome, select the streamer type to match your camera from the following table.
Streamer type Axis2401+ Axis241S

Camera KD6i-VIP HD6i-VIP 2

Under camera control, select either VCL or Pelco, to match the protocol you configured on the camera.

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Hernis Industrial cameras


To enable a Hernis Industrial camera to communicate with Honeywell DVM, you must configure it as a Pelco Dome (Pelco P protocol). When configuring the camera, in the Camera control type list (on the Camera Control tab) select Pelco Dome.

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Upgrade tasks
This section contains upgrade tasks.
Attention Only complete a task in this section if you are instructed to do so by an upgrade checklist.

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Planning for an upgrade


This topic describes planning issues you need to address before you start upgrading Honeywell DVM.
Issue Hardware and software Comments Upgrade your hardware and software as necessary. To check whether your existing hardware or software needs updating, see Hardware and software requirements on page 116. Check whether the streamer manufacturers have issued any updates for your streamers. Install updates as necessary. (Contact your local Honeywell representative for details about supported firmware versions.) Read this for any last-minute information that may affect the upgrade. It is on the Honeywell DVM CD. If you use Honeywell DVM in conjunction with EBI or Experion, check whether you also need to upgrade it. See Hardware and software requirements on page 116. Previous releases of Honeywell DVM calculated the Delete after and Archive after durations from the start of a recording. Honeywell DVM now calculates these durations from the end of the recording. Consequently, if you do not adjust the Delete after and Archive after values, the storage requirements will increase by the amount recorded during the length of an average recording. Changes to the Object Model The following properties are no longer supported. (consequently, you will have to update any scripts/applications that use these properties): LowDiskSpaceAlarmLimitMB LowLowDiskSpaceAlarmLimitMB StartRecordingLimitMB StopRecordingLimitMB Custom applications Custom applications built for your existing system that use the Honeywell DVM Object Model must be re-compiled and re-linked using an appropriate development environment.

Steamer firmware

readme.txt EBI or Experion

Changes to the definitions for start and end of recording

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Uninstalling your existing Honeywell DVM components


This task describes how to uninstall your existing Honeywell DVM components. You must uninstall the existing components before you install the new Honeywell DVM components. Considerations Depending on which version of Honeywell DVM you are removing, the uninstall wizard may indicate the release number (Rxxx). For example, if you are removing the client components, you may be prompted to select Honeywell DVM RxxxClient or Honeywell DVM Client.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Remove the Honeywell DVM client from the Camera Server(s). If you have separate Camera Servers (not combined with a Database Server), remove Honeywell DVM from those Camera Servers. Remove the Honeywell DVM client from each client computer (including Station computers if you have EBI or Experion). Go to: page 280 page 281 Done?

page 281

If you have EBI or Experion, remove the Honeywell DVM page 281 host components from the EBI or Experion servers. Remove Honeywell DVM from the Database Server (or combined Database and Camera Server). page 282

Removing the Honeywell DVM client from a Camera Server To remove the Honeywell DVM client:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM RxxxClient and click Change/Remove. Click Yes (or OK) to confirm you want to uninstall that application. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

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Upgrade tasks

Removing Honeywell DVM from a Camera Server To remove Honeywell DVM:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Rxxx and click Change/Remove. Click Yes to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application. When the uninstall is complete, click Finish. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing the Honeywell DVM client from a client computer To remove the Honeywell DVM client:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM RxxxClient and click Change/Remove. Click Yes to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application. When the uninstall is complete, click Finish. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing the Honeywell DVM host components from the EBI or Experion servers To remove the Honeywell DVM host components:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Rxxx. Click Change/Remove. Click Yes to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application. When the uninstall is complete, click OK.

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Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing Honeywell DVM from the Database Server (or combined Database and Camera Server) To remove Honeywell DVM:
1 2 3

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Depending on the release, select: Honeywell DVM R150Primary Video Server and click Change/Remove. Honeywell DVM R160.2Database Server and Camera Server and click Change/Remove.

Click OK to continue with the uninstall. A message appears, asking whether you want to back up your existing Honeywell DVM database and Windows account. If you are upgrading or re-installing Honeywell DVM on this computer:
a. Click Yes. b. Enter the name of the folder where you want to back up the database, and

then click Next. Note that backing up the database takes several minutes.
6

When the uninstall is complete, select Yes, I want to restart and click Finish.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Uninstalling Honeywell DVM R200

Uninstalling Honeywell DVM R200


Prerequisites The Honeywell DVM client must not be running on any Database Servers, Camera Servers or any client computers (Stations or Internet Explorer clients).

Considerations Uninstalling Honeywell DVM from a Camera Server, does not remove the folders that contain recordings.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order:


Task Go to: Done?

Remove the Honeywell DVM client from Database Servers page 283 and Camera Servers. If you have separate Camera Servers (not combined with a Database Server), remove Honeywell DVM from those Camera Servers. page 284

Remove the Honeywell DVM client from each client page 284 computer (including Stations if you have EBI or Experion). If you have EBI or Experion, remove the Honeywell DVM page 284 host components from the EBI or Experion servers. If you have Experion, remove the Honeywell DVM Server host components from each Console Station. page 285

Remove the Honeywell DVM Database Server (and Camera page 285 server, if applicable) from the Database Server (or the combined Database and Camera Server).

Removing the Honeywell DVM client from Database Servers and Camera Servers To remove Honeywell DVM client:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Client 200.x and click Change/Remove. Click OK to continue with the uninstall. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.
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Removing the Honeywell DVM Camera Server from the Camera Servers To remove Honeywell DVM:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Server 200.xCamera Server and click Change/Remove. Click OK to continue with the uninstall. If you are upgrading or re-installing Honeywell DVM, select Yes to keep the DVM Users Group. Otherwise select No. When the uninstall is complete, click Finish. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing the Honeywell DVM client from a client computer To remove the Honeywell DVM client:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Client 200.x and click Change/Remove. Click OK to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application. When the uninstall is complete, click Finish. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing the Honeywell DVM host components from the EBI or Experion server To remove the host component:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Server 200.xHost Components. Click Change/Remove. Click Yes to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application.

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When the uninstall is complete, click OK. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing the Honeywell DVM host components from a Console Station To remove the host components:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Server 200.xHost Components. Click Change/Remove. Click Yes to continue with the uninstall. Click Yes to confirm you want to uninstall that application. When the uninstall is complete, click OK. Close the Add/Remove Programs dialog box. Restart the computer.

Removing Honeywell DVM from the Database Server (or combined Database and Camera Server) To remove Honeywell DVM:
1 2 3

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. Select Honeywell DVM Server 200.xDatabase Server or Honeywell DVM Server 200.xDatabase Server and Camera Server and click Change/Remove. Click OK to continue with the uninstall. A message appears, asking whether you want to back up your existing Honeywell DVM database and Windows account. If you are upgrading or re-installing Honeywell DVM on this computer:
a. Click Yes. b. Enter the name of the folder where you want to back up the database, and

then click Next. Note that backing up the database takes several minutes.

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When the uninstall is complete, select Yes, I want to restart and click Finish.

You have completed this task. Return to the checklist you came from.

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Configuration

This chapter describes how to configure your Honeywell DVM system. Tasks The following checklist lists the major configuration tasks for Honeywell DVM. Perform the mandatory tasks in the specified order. You can perform the optional tasks in any order. (Note that some tasks may not be applicable to your system.)
Task Mandatory tasks If you have a domain environment, configure security for Honeywell DVM. page 289 Go to: Done?

Give engineers access to Honeywell DVM, so that they can page 394 configure the system. Configure each camera. Optional tasks Create schedules. page 306 Create quad views. (A quad view shows four videos, which page 309 switch cameras at regular intervals.) Create sequences. (A sequence shows one video, which switches cameras/presets at regular intervals.) Configure video analytics (motion detection, and object tracking and classification Specify the default folder for snapshots. Configure the audit log. Configure disk space administration. Configure event-activated recording. Configure multi-monitors. Configure the digital certificate. page 311 page 313 page 331 page 332 page 333 page 335 page 338 page 343 page 290

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Task Define special presets (pre-programmed functions specific to each type of camera). Configure Axis Streamers for audio. Configure the Axis 2191 Audio Module. Configure the CamStation CS-3001V for audio. Configure Honeywell DVM for video intercom.

Go to: page 346 page 348 page 349 page 351 page 354

Done?

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Configuring security for Honeywell DVM in a domain environment

Configuring security for Honeywell DVM in a domain environment


This topic is only applicable if you use domain security. This topic describes how to create a special domain group for Honeywell DVM users. (Only users who have been added to this group can access Honeywell DVM.) After configuring security, you can give users access to Honeywell DVMsee Giving users access to Honeywell DVM on page 394. Prerequisites You must have access rights on the domain controller that allow you to create user groups.

To configure security:
1 2 3

Log on to the domain controller with a suitable account. Create a domain user group for Honeywell DVM users. For example, create a group called DVM Domain Users. On each Database Server and Camera Server:
a. Log on as a local administrator. (For example, log on using the Honeywell

DVM installation account you created before installing Honeywell DVM.)


b. Add the domain user group you created in step 2 to the local group,

DVM_Users.

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Configuring a camera
Configuring a camera involves defining how it is set up and how operates within your Honeywell DVM system. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task.

To add and configure a camera:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Camera > New. The Camera display opens at the Camera Definition tab. Fill in the relevant details on this tab and then click New. See Camera Definition tab on page 291. The new camera appears under Camera in the Navigation Pane. Configure the other camera properties, as appropriate.
Go to: page 295 page 299 page 306 page 313

To configure: Recording Camera controls (such as presets and tours) Schedules Video analytics (motion detection, or object tracking and classification)

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Camera Definition tab


This tab defines the cameras main parameters.
Property Camera name Description The cameras name. The name can contain a maximum of 16 characters and they must all be alphanumeric. The name appears in the Navigation Pane so that users can easily select the camera. It must be unique. Camera number The unique number that identifies the camera. By default, Honeywell DVM automatically allocates the next available number. Operators can use the number to quickly view live video from the camera. See Using the numeric keypad on page 391. Camera server The name of the Camera Server on which video for this camera is managed and stored. If you change servers, video stored on the old server is not lost because the Honeywell DVM database stores the location of every piece of captured video. Location You can make it easier for users to find cameras by defining the same location for related cameras. For example, you may want to group cameras according to Car park, Factory, Office and so on. The camera is listed under its location in the Navigation Pane. Description Hostname or IP address A 255-character description of the camera. This appears above all displays relating to the camera. The IP address (or name if you have a Domain Name Server) of the camera streamer sending video from the camera to the Camera Server. See Installing and configuring camera streamers on page 242. The type of device used to connect the camera to the network. The type of compression used in transmitting the video. If your streamer only supports one type, you will not need to make a selection. The supported types are: Motion JPEG MPEG1 MPEG4

Camera streamer type Compression format

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Property Limit stream by

Description The type of data limiting your streamer allows. If your streamer only supports one type, you will not need to make a selection. The supported types are: Frame Rates Bandwidth MPEG4 streamers do not support bandwidth streaming.

Stream type

Defines whether audio is streamed with your video or not. If your streamer only supports one type, you will not need to make a selection. The options are: Video Only Audio/Video Intercom/Video

Frame delivery

The transmission technique. The supported types are: Unicast Multicast See About multicasting and unicasting on page 24.

Streamer video input number

(Only applicable to Axis 240Q, Axis 241Q, Axis 2400 1.x, Axis 2400 2.x, Axis 2400+ and MD-100) Enter the port number that the video is to be streamed from.

Area

The area (if you have EBI) or asset (if you ave Experion) to which the camera belongs. See Areas (Assets) on page 93. The EBI or Experion control level. Used to determine operator security privileges. Determines if a user is allowed to operate the PTZ controls for a camera. See Security types on page 95. For general information about areas, see the EBI or Experion documentation.

Control level

Camera reservation period

When a particular user is controlling a camera, no other user can control that camera until this reservation period has expired. The period can be between 0 and 255 seconds. The folder on the Camera Server where the video clips are stored. Use a UNC path (a UNC path is of the format \\computername\folderpath. Note: This folder must already exist on the Camera Server. Do not terminate the path with a backslash.

Video Clip Directory

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Property Video Format

Description The video format, which must match the cameras format. The supported types are: PAL NTSC

Resolution

The resolution of the image that is streamed from the camera streamers. Supported resolutions depend on the streamer selected, for example: For Axis 2401 1.x in NTSC, supports: Small Medium Large For Axis 241S in PAL, supports: QCIF (192 144) CIF (384 288) 4 CIF Expanded (768 576) 4 CIF Interlaced (768 576) The actual pixel resolution is dependent on the streamer and color standard (PAL or NTSC). Refer to the streamer documentation.

Compression ratio

The compression ratio affects the size of the digital image files sent by the camera streamer. The higher the compression ratio the smaller the file sizewhich means that less network bandwidth to transmit images and disk space to store images are required. The trade-off is that higher compression ratios result in lower image quality (as bits of data are lost to make the image smaller). The supported ratios are: Minimum (not recommended as the image size is very large therefore requiring greater bandwidth and disk space whilst the image resolution is much the same as Low compression) Low (recommendedexcellent quality, but images are bigger than Medium) Medium (highly recommendedbest compromise between image quality and image size) High Maximum (not recommendedthe compression causes the image to lose a lot of detail)

Color

(Only applicable to Axis 2100, 2400 1.x and 2401 1.x) Image type: Color or Monochrome.

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Property GOP

Description (Only applicable to some streamers when they are connected using an MPEG compression format) Group of pictures. This is the number of frames between successive I-Frames. For more information, see About MPEG and Motion JPEG compression types on page 30.

Frame rate

The rate at which video frames are sent by the camera streamer when someone is viewing live video. The supported rates vary, depending on which streamer is chosen. (Only applicable to some streamers when they are connected using an MPEG compression format) The interval between frames sent by some camera streamers is not constant. This can be corrected when live video is displayed by applying smoothness correction. The correction is applied by introducing a small degree of latency between frames so that Honeywell DVM can render each frame at a regular interval. A higher smoothness correction level introduces more latency but results in smoother video. Higher smoothness correction may be inappropriate for PTZ cameras as the latency introduced may affect the responsiveness of the PTZ commands.

Smoothness Correction

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Record Settings tab


This tab defines the cameras recording-related properties for the following types of recording: User-activated recording. Recording that occurs when an operator clicks the Record button while viewing live video. Background recording. Recording that occurs continuously in the background. Event-activated recording. Recording that occurs in response to an alarm or event in EBI or Experion.

For the recording properties related to video analytics, see Configuring video analytics on page 313.
Property User Activated Pre-record for The duration of video that Honeywell DVM keeps in memory for user-activated recording. When a user activates a recording, Honeywell DVM inserts this pre-record segment at the start of the recording. The pre-record period on the recording allows you to view what was happening immediately before the user-activated the recording. For example if you set this to 10 seconds, the recording shows the 10 seconds of video before the recording was activated by the user. Record for Record frame rate The duration for which recording takes place after the user action. The frame rate at which video is recorded for user-activated recordings. If you are using MPEG compression (defined by the Compression format property on the Camera Definition tab), see Recording frame rates using MPEG on page 297. Archive after The period for which user-activated recordings are available for playback before they are automatically archived. If set, this must be less than the Delete after period. The duration commences at the video clips end date and time. The duration for which user-activated recordings are stored before being automatically deleted. The duration commences at the video clips end date and time. Description

Delete after

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Property Background Recording Start background recording Clip duration

Description Background recording occurs if you select this check box. The duration of background recording video clips. For practical reasons, background recording is broken into a series of discrete clips of the specified duration. Choose a duration that results in a easily manageable clip size. To calculate clip size, see Typical storage and bandwidth requirements for video on page 35. The frame rate at which video is recorded for background recordings. If you are using MPEG compression (defined by the Compression format property on the Camera Definition tab), see Recording frame rates using MPEG on page 297.

Record frame rate

Archive each clip after

The period for which background recordings are available for playback before they are automatically archived. If set, this must be less than the Delete each clip after period. The duration commences at the clips end date and time. The duration for which background recordings are stored before being automatically deleted. The duration commences at the clips end date and time. The duration of video that Honeywell DVM keeps buffered in memory for event-activated recording. When an event activates a recording, Honeywell DVM inserts this pre-record segment at the start of the recording. The pre-record period on the recording allows you to view what was happening immediately before the event activated the recording. For example if you set this to 10 seconds, the recording will show the 10 seconds of video before the recording was activated by the event.

Delete each clip after

Event Activated Pre-record for

Record frame rate

The frame rate at which video is recorded for event-activated recordings. If you are using MPEG compression (defined by the Compression format property on the Camera Definition tab), see Recording frame rates using MPEG on page 297.

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Property Archive events after

Description The period for which event-related recordings are available for playback before they are automatically archived. If set, this must be less than the Delete events after period. The duration commences at the clips end date and time. The period for which each level of alarm-related recordings are available for playback before they are automatically archived. If set, this must be less than the corresponding delete alarm after period. The duration for which event-related recordings are stored before being automatically deleted. The duration commences at the clips end date and time. The period for which each level of alarm-related recordings are stored before being deleted.

Archive low alarms after Archive high alarms after Archive urgent alarms after Delete events after

Delete low alarms after Delete high alarms after Delete urgent alarms after

Recording frame rates using MPEG If you use MPEG compression and set the Record frame rate property to Full frame-rate, the record frame rate is the same as the live view frame rate (the Frame rate property on the Camera Definition tab). However, if you set Record frame rate to a value other than Full frame-rate, the record frame rate is defined using the following formula: LiveViewFrameRate/(AdjustmentFactor x GOP) where: LiveViewFrameRate is cameras live view frame rate. AdjustmentFactor is adjustment factor for the selected record frame rate:
Adjustment factor Record frame rate value 1 2 3 Every I-Frame Every Second I-Frame Every Third I-Frame

GOP is the Group of Pictures value used by the camera streamer to which the camera is attached.

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For example, if you set Frame rate to 25 and Record frame rate to Every third I-Frame, and the GOP is 10, the record frame rate would be 0.833, that is: 25/(3*10). For Axis MPEG4-capable streamers, the GOP is always 8. For CamStation CS100 and CS-3001V streamers, the GOP varies according to the Frame rate setting, as specified in the following table.
Table 3 Recording frame rates for CamStation CS100 and CS-300V streamers Frame rate (fps) GOP Recording frame rates for the following settings Full frame-rate PAL video format 25 12.5 6.25 3 1 30 15 7.5 3.75 1 16 8 8 4 4 16 8 8 4 4 25 12.5 6.25 3 1 30 15 7.5 3.75 1 1.56 1.56 0.78 0.75 0.25 1.88 1.88 0.94 0.94 0.25 0.78 0.78 0.39 0.38 0.13 0.94 0.94 0.47 0.47 0.13 0.52 0.52 0.26 0.25 0.08 0.63 0.63 0.31 0.31 0.08 Every I-Frame Every Second I-Frame Every Third I-Frame

NTSC video format

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Camera Control tab


This tab defines the characteristics of the camera controls. Considerations VCL Orbiter Lite is also known as Ademco RapidDome. VCL Orbiter Gold is also known as Ademco RapidDome Gold. The following table shows the differences between the VCL Orbiter Lite and the VCL Orbiter Gold.
VCL Orbiter Lite VCL Orbiter Gold 64 2 1 128 4 128 28

Feature Presets Tours Privacy zones

Presets per tour 128

Property Camera Control Camera control type

Description Specifies the type of camera control protocol supported by this camera. The types are: Pelco Dome = supports Pelco P protocol Fixed Camera = no camera control Sensormatic = supports Sensormatic RS-485 protocol VCL Orbiter Gold VCL Orbiter Lite Use streamer settings (If you select this you must go to the Web page for your streamer and enter the type of camera. For more information, see the streamer manufacturers documentation.) Honeywell KD6 (Pelco) Honeywell KD6 (VCL) Enabling camera control causes the PTZ controls to appear on the Live Video tab.

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Property Pan speed Tilt speed Zoom speed Focus speed Iris speed

Description (Only applicable to the PTZ live video controls and indicators.) These properties only appear if they are appropriate to the selected Camera Control Type. They specify the speed at which a user can change the cameras movement or focus. The values range between 0 and 100. (The larger the value, the faster the camera movement/focus changes.) You need to optimize these values by testing the cameras operation.

Continuous Pan/Tilt speed

The speed of the mouse and joystick controls. A higher speed results in the mouse or joystick shifting the cameras pan and tilt faster. (Only applicable to Honeywell KD6 (Pelco) and Honeywell KD6 (VCL), Pelco Dome Camera Control Type, and VCL) Identifies the camera on a multi-dropped cable. This is configured on the PTZ head.

Camera hardware ID

Presets Presets Lists the presets, special presets and privacy zones configured for the camera. To configure: Presets, see Using presets and tours on page 369 Special presets, see Defining special presets on page 346 Delete Preset Deletes the selected preset or privacy zone. (To delete a special preset, see Defining special presets on page 346.) (Only applicable if at least one preset has been defined for the camera.) The preset to which the camera returns after control is completed and the length of time specified in Return to home preset has elapsed. The operator can select a VCL tour to be a home preset. If special presets are configured to be used as presets or tours, the operator can select a special preset to be a home preset. For more information on special presets, see, Defining special presets on page 346. Return to home preset The number of seconds the camera waits after its reservation has expired before returning to the home preset or tour. The values range between 0 and 600.

Home Preset/Tour

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Property Receive Data Enable

Description (Only applicable to Pelco Dome, Honeywell KD6 (Pelco), Use streamer settings and Sensormatic Camera control type) Select this if you want Honeywell DVM to wait for an ACK before sending the next command.

Flip camera when tilt angle is at (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter 90 degrees Lite Camera control type) Auto-flip feature. This allows the dome to rotate 180 degrees and reposition itself for continuous viewing of a person who passes directly beneath the dome. Allow Digital Zoom (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) If you select Allow Digital Zoom, digital zooming is used when an camera reaches its optical zoom range. Note: Loss of picture quality will occur in the digital zoom range. Reset Camera Deletes the presets, privacy zones and tours from the camera, before re-applying the settings for the camera in Honeywell DVM. This is used to resynchronize the cameras and Honeywell DVMs settings.

Enable infrared sensitive mode (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter in low light Lite Camera control type) Optimizes the image quality for infrared lighting sources. Select this if an infrared light source is used to illuminate the cameras field of view. Tours (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) List of configured VCL tours. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304. New (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) Creates a new tour. The default name is VCL_Tourx where x is the number of the tour. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

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Property Delete

Description (Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) Deletes the selected tour. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

Preset Name

(Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) Name of the preset. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

Speed (1-100)

(Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) The PTZ speed the camera will move at to reach the next preset. The default is 50. This is a relative value where 1 is the slowest speed and 100 is the fastest speed. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

Dwell Time (s)

(Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) The time in seconds the camera will spend at that preset. The default is 50 and the maximum value is 120. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

Insert

(Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) Allows you to add presets to a tour. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

Remove

(Only applicable to VCL Orbiter Gold and VCL Orbiter Lite Camera control type) Removes the selected preset from the tour. For more information, see Configuring tours on page 304.

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Configuring privacy zones


A privacy zone is a section of live video which is covered with a grey box to prevent operators from viewing that section. You must have a VCL camera to configure privacy zones. (In practical terms, a privacy zone is a specialized preset.) Only VCL cameras support privacy zones. Prerequisites You must have MNGR security level to perform this task.

Considerations By default, privacy zones are not listed in the presets/tours list in the live video window.

To configure one or more privacy zones:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Use the cameras controls to zoom in to the section you want to define as the privacy zone. Click the list and type an appropriate name. Click . Repeat steps 3 to 5 to create more privacy zones. If you want to make the privacy zone(s) visible to operators:
a. Click the Camera Control tab. b. In the Presets list, clear the Hidden check box for each privacy zone you

want to make visible. To delete a privacy zone:


1 2

Click the Camera Control tab. Select it in the Presets list and click Delete Preset.

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Configuring tours
A tour is a predefined sequence of presets stored in a camera. When a tour is activated the camera moves through the presets. Each preset has a dwell time and PTZ speed. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task. You must create the presets before you can add them to a tour. See Using presets and tours on page 369.

Considerations Tours are only supported by VCL Camera control type. Tours can be specified as the Home position for a camera. This means that a camera can return to a tour after the camera control reservation period and return to home preset period have expired. The default name is VCL_Tourx where x is the number of the tour. You can change this to a more appropriate name. When you add a preset to a tour, by default the first preset name is added. After it has been added you can change it to the required preset. The default PTZ speed is 50.The slowest speed is 1 and the fastest is 100. The default dwell time is 50. The maximum dwell time is 120 seconds.

To create a tour:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Click New. Select the default tour name and enter an appropriate name. Click Insert to add a preset to the tour. To change the preset, select the preset name and the list of preset names will be available. Select the required preset name. To change the speed, select the value and enter the required speed. To change the dwell time, select the value and enter the required dwell time. Repeat steps 3 to 6 until all of the required presets have been added to the tour.

To remove a preset from a tour:


1 2

Select the Preset Name you want to remove. Click Remove.

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To delete a tour:
1 2

Select the tour from the Tours list. Click Delete.

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Creating a schedule
A schedule defines when recording or video analytics functions are performed for a camera. A recurring schedule is a schedule that occurs at regular intervals. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task.

Considerations Video Analytics schedules must not overlap. If you want to create a recurring schedule with long-duration recordings, you should consider using background recording instead, because background recording requires significantly less management effort. Background recording is configured on the cameras Record Settings tab.

To create a schedule:
1 2 3 4 5

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Schedule tab, and then click Create a new schedule. The schedule properties appear. Specify the schedule details as described in the following table. Click OK.
Description The type of schedule: Recording = records video as specified on this tab. Video Analytics = controls when video analytics is enabled for the camera. See Configuring video analytics on page 313.

Property Schedule Details Type

Start End Notes

The date/time at which the schedule starts and stops. To specify the times, click each unit (hour and minute) and type the appropriate value. Any comments about the schedule. (When searching for recordings associated with this schedule, you can enter words and phrases contained in these notessee Searching for recorded video on page 383.)

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Property Frame rate Archive after

Description (Only applicable to a Recording schedule.) The frame rate at which the video is recorded. (Only applicable to Recording schedule.) The period for which scheduled recordings are available for playback before they are automatically archived. If set, this must be less than the Delete After period.

Delete after

(Only applicable to Recording schedule.) The time the recording is kept before it is automatically deleted.

Recurrence Details Recurring Select No if you only want one recording. Otherwise, select how often you want the recording to take place: Daily Weekly Monthly End after (Only applicable if you select a recurrence.) The number of days the before the schedule expires.

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Deleting a schedule
Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task.

To delete a schedule:
1 2 3 4 5 6

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Schedule tab. In Schedules on, select the start day for the schedule. The schedules for that day appear in the list. From the list, select the schedule you want to delete. The schedules details appear below. Click the Delete button, and click Yes in response to the confirmation prompt.

To delete a recurring schedule:


1 2 3 4 5 6

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Schedule tab. In Schedules on, select the start day for the schedule. The schedules for that day appear in the list. From the list, select the schedule you want to delete. The schedules details appear below. If you only want to delete the schedule for that day, click Delete. If you want to delete all occurrences of the schedule, click Delete all occurrences. (This button only appears when you select a recurring schedule.)

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Creating a quad view


A quad view simultaneously shows four live videos. Each quadrant (window) shows the video stream from a single camera or switches between video streams from many cameras at predefined intervals. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task.

Considerations A quad view can result in a large processing load on the client computer if you select many cameras that are set to a resolution other than Medium (set on the Camera Definition tab tab). If a video is not set to this resolution, the client computer must convert the video from the specified resolution to Medium so that it can be shown in quad view. If you do not need to simultaneously view several video streams, consider creating a sequence (see Creating a sequence on page 311).

To create a quad view:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Quad Views >New. Specify the following properties.
Description The name of the quad view. The unique number that identifies the quad view. By default, Honeywell DVM automatically allocates the next available number. Operators can use the number to quickly call up the quad view. See Using the numeric keypad on page 391.

Property Name Number

Area

The area to which the quad view belongs. Only operators assigned to this area can see it. Note: All the cameras in the quad view must also be assigned to the operators area.

Switch view every

The time (in seconds) that a video is shown before switching to the next video. Note: This property only appears if you add more than one camera to a quadrant.

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Add one or more cameras to each quadrant in the required order:


a. In Available cameras list, select a camera. b. Click the appropriate Add button to add it to the quadrant list.

Click Save.

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Creating a sequence
A sequence shows live video which switches at a specified interval to the next camera/preset in the sequence list. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task. Presets have been defined for the cameras if you want to include them in the sequence. See Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364.

Considerations You can include special presets in a sequencethese are shown enclosed within parentheses, for example: (Setup menu). For more information on special presets, see Defining special presets on page 346. As an alternative to a sequence, consider creating a quad view (see Creating a quad view on page 309).

To create a sequence:
1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Sequences > New. The Sequence display opens at the Definition tab. Specify the following properties.
Description The name of the sequence. The a unique number that identifies the sequence. By default, Honeywell DVM automatically allocates the next available number. Operators can use the number to quickly call up the sequence. See Using the numeric keypad on page 391.

Property Name Number

Area

The area to which the sequence belongs. Only operators assigned to this area can see it. Note: All the cameras in the sequence must also be assigned to the operators area.

Switch view every

The time (in seconds) that a video is shown before switching to the next video. Note: This property only appears after you add the second camera to the sequence.

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Add each camera/preset to the sequence in the required order:


a. In Available cameras list, select a camera and click Add to add it to the

list on the left.


b. If the camera has a preset, select it from the Preset column. 5

Click Save.

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Configuring video analytics


Configuring video analytics involves using specialized algorithms to analyze video streams and take appropriate action when pre-determined events are detected. For an introduction to video analytics and usage guidelines, see Guidelines for video analytics on page 123.
To configure: Motion detection Object tracking, or object tracking and classification Go to: page 314 page 322

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Configuring motion detection


Configuring motion detection involves defining one or more regions of interest rectangles or polygons in the field of view, and then tuning the operation of the motion detection algorithm within those regions. For an introduction to video analytics and usage guidelines, see Guidelines for video analytics on page 123.
Figure 13 A typical scene with two regions of interest (marked by white borders)

Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task. A license if you want to use the Premium algorithm. To find out whether your system is licensed to use the Premium algorithm, see Viewing basic information about your Honeywell DVM system on page 426.

Considerations If the streamer supports streamer-based motion detection, use it instead to reduce the load on the computer. See Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120. To learn about the motion detection symbols (and other video analytics symbols), see About the video analytics symbols on page 371. Motion detection recording and alarming is disabled while you are configuring motion detection (when you click Start Tuning). If you select the Premium algorithm, the algorithm uses the first 20 frames to learn the statistics of the field of view, and the next 60 frames to set up the information that was learned during the first 20 frames. Therefore motion will not be detected in the field of view during the first 80 frames.

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To configure motion detection:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Video Analytics tab. Select the Video Analytics enabled check box. Configure the General properties as appropriate. See General properties on page 316. Click Start tuning. Define one or more regions of interest. See Defining regions of interest on page 315. Configure the algorithms Tuning properties as appropriate: Standard (Low CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties on page 317 Premium (High CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties on page 318 Streamer-based (No CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties for Axis Streamers on page 319 Streamer-based (No CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties for CamStation Streamers on page 320

Check that the algorithm is operating as required. (Tuning the algorithms operation is typically an iterative taskyou may have to change the values several times before you achieve satisfactory results.)

10 When you are satisfied, click Finish tuning. 11 Configure the When motion is detected properties as appropriate. See

When motion is detected properties on page 320. Defining regions of interest Note that there is a default region of interestyou can move and modify it as appropriate. To define a rectangular region of interest:
1 2

Drag the pointer diagonally over the area you want Honeywell DVM to track and classify objects. As you drag a box marks the region of interest. In the Region name box, type a suitable name for the region.

To define an irregular region of interest:


1 2

Move the pointer to the location of the first vertex and then click to mark its location. Move the pointer to the second vertex and click again.
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Repeat step 2 for each other vertex, except the last vertex. Double-click to mark the last vertex. In the Region name box, type a suitable name for the region.

To select a region of interest Click it. (If regions of interest overlap, click the edge of the region of interest you want to select.)

To modify a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Selection handles appear. Drag a selection handle as required. The vertices move as you drag.

To move a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Drag it required. (Do not drag it by a selection handle because this will change its shape.)

To delete a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Press DELETE.

General properties
Property Algorithm Description Select either: Premium (High CPU) Standard (Low CPU) Streamer Based (No CPU) Motion server (Only applicable to server-side algorithms.) Select the Video Analytics Server you want to use to run the algorithm. See About Video Analytics Servers on page 128.

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Property Detection type

Description Specifies when motion detection occurs: Continuous = 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Scheduled = the time(s) at which motion detection is enabled is specified in one or more schedules. See Creating a schedule on page 306. Note: Changing from Scheduled to Continuous will delete all video analytics schedules for the camera. The default is Continuous.

Standard (Low CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties


Property Detection frame rate Description The frame rate you want the motion detection algorithm to run at. (An object is considered to be moving if it moves inside a region of interest for at least two consecutive frames.) The chance of motion being detected depends on: The frame ratea higher frame rate increases the chance of motion being detected. The size of the region of interestthe larger the region of interest, the longer the object takes to move through it. The speed of the objectthe faster the object moves the shorter the amount of time required to pass through the region of interest. The default is 3 frames per second. Note: This setting has a high impact on the loading of the server (the higher the frame rate the higher the load on the CPU) and also impacts the bandwidth used by the streamer when motion detection is activated. Optimize for movement (Applicable to the selected region of interest) Allows you to optimize the algorithm to more successfully detect movement either across or down the field of view. The options are: In any direction (the default) Across field of view To/from camera

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Property Sensitivity

Description (Applicable to the selected region of interest) Indicates how sensitive the algorithm should be to detecting movement. Values are between 1 and 100 and the higher the value the more sensitive to motion. The default is 40%. Note: If the viewing resolution is changed it will affect this value.

Premium (High CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties


Property Detection frame rate Description The frame rate you want the motion detection algorithm to run at. (An object is considered to be moving if it moves inside a region of interest for at least three consecutive frames.) The chance of motion being detected depends on: The frame ratea higher frame rate increases the chance of motion being detected. The size of the region of interestthe larger the region of interest, the longer the object takes to move through it. The speed of the objectthe faster the object moves the shorter the amount of time required to pass through the region of interest. The default is 3 frames per second. Note: This setting has a high impact on the loading of the server (the higher the frame rate the higher the load on the CPU) and also impacts the bandwidth used by the streamer when motion detection is activated. Sensitivity Specify whether the camera is aimed at an Indoor (High) or Outdoor (Low) scene. The default is Indoor (High).

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Property Sub-sampling

Description Reduces the effective resolution of the image used for detecting motion. The greater the level of sub-sampling, the lower the load on the CPU required for motion detection. The values are: 1 = no sub-sampling (the resolution of the image is not changed) 2 = the resolution of the image and the load on the CPU are halved 4 = the resolution of the image and the load on the CPU are quartered The default is 2. Note: Reducing the resolution of the image may increase the chance of a false motion detection.

Minimum object size

The minimum size of an object for which motion can be detected, expressed in pixels. The minimum size you can specify is limited by the Sub-sampling property, according to the following formula: 4 x (sub-sampling)2. For example, if you set Sub-sampling to 2, the minimum object size you can specify is 16 pixels. The maximum object size is 64 pixels.

Streamer-based (No CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties for Axis Streamers


Property Sensitivity Description (Applicable to the selected region of interest) Defines how subtle a change of color or variation needs to be before motion is detected. For example, motion is detected for normal colored objects on normal backgrounds when this is set to a higher value. If it is set to a low value, motion will only be detected for very bright objects on a dark background. The values are between 1% and 100%. The default is 85%. Minimum object size (Applicable to the selected region of interest) Defines how large a moving object must be before motion is detected. The value selected is relative to the size of the area defined in the motion detection window. The values are between 1% and 100%. The default is 10%.

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Property History

Description (Applicable to the selected region of interest) Defines elapsed time between the current image and the image which it is compared against. If your value is low, the camera will compare the image with the one taken previously. A low level setting will cause the reference image to update frequently. Therefore, any object in the image area will only be active for a short period before being seen as identical to the updated reference image. This setting is useful for when you do not want slight variations in the motion detection area to activate an alarm. If your value is high, the camera will compare the image with one taken over an hour ago. A high level setting means the image is updated very infrequently. Therefore, any significant change in the image initiates an alarm that remains active for a long period of time. The values are between 1% and 100%. The default is 75%.

Streamer-based (No CPU) Algorithm Tuning Properties for CamStation Streamers


Property Sensitivity Description Defines how sensitive the algorithm is to identifying motion. The values are between 1% and 100%. The default is 50%.

When motion is detected properties


Property Generate an alarm Description Sends an alarm to the EBI or Experion server at the specified Alarm level when motion is detected. Note: The alarm is not latched to a point.

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Property Alarm level

Description Select either: Urgent High Low Journal (the default) All alarms, except for Journal, appear in Stations Alarm Summary. Journal alarms do not appear in the Station Alarm Summary, but are written to the event file and appear in the Event Summary. Ensure that all operators who are required to view these alarms have access to the EBI or Experion system area in which the alarms are being raised.

Start a recording

Starts a recording when motion is detected. Selecting this allows you to specify Pre-record for, Record frame rate, Record for and Archive after and Delete after properties for video clips created when motion is detected. The duration of video that Honeywell DVM keeps in memory for motion detection recordings. When motion is detected and a recording is started, Honeywell DVM inserts this pre-record segment at the start of the recording. The pre-record period on the recording allows you to view what was happening immediately before the motion was detected and a recording started. For example if you set this to 10 seconds, the recording will show the 10 seconds of video before the recording was activated.

Pre-record for

Record for

The length of time (in seconds) recording takes place for, after motion is detected. If you select Until motion finishes, the recording will continue until no motion is detected in the scene for the length of time specified in the Consider motion finished after property.

Record frame rate Archive after

The frame rate at which video is recorded for motion detection recordings. The period for which a motion detection recording is available for playback before being archived. The duration commences at the video clips end date and time.

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Property Delete after

Description The duration for which motion detection recordings are stored before being automatically deleted. The duration commences at the clips end date and time. If selected, video is automatically shown in the specified Station(s) when motion is detected. If a Station has an alarm monitor, the video is displayed on the alarm monitor.

Send video to station(s)

Station number All stations in area

The number of the Station video is sent to if you select the Send video to Station(s) check box. The area containing the Stations video is sent to if you select the Send video to Station(s) check box.

Consider motion finished after The length of time, after motion was last deduced, that motion is considered to have stopped. This property affects the other When motion is detected properties as follows: A new alarm will not be generated until after this time has expired. A new recording will not start until after this time has expired. Also, if you set the Record for property to Until motion finishes, recording will continue until this time has expired. Video will not be resent to a Station until after this time has expired.

Configuring object tracking and classification


Configuring object tracking and classification involves defining one or more regions of interestrectangles or polygons in the field of view, and then tuning the operation of the associated tracking algorithm within those regions. In addition to defining the region(s) of interest, you must also define: The minimum size of the object that is to be tracked The condition(s) that an object must meet for each region of interest before Honeywell DVM takes the specified actionsuch as raising an alarm or starting a recording

For an introduction to video analytics and usage guidelines, see Guidelines for video analytics on page 123.

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Figure 14 A typical scene with two regions of interest (marked by white borders) and the minimum object size rectangle

Figure 15 A typical conditionHoneywell DVM will take the specified action if an object meets this condition

Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform this task. A license for the algorithm. To find out whether your system is licensed to use the algorithm, see Viewing basic information about your Honeywell DVM system on page 426.

Considerations To learn about the object tracking and classification symbols (and other video analytics symbols), see About the video analytics symbols on page 371. Video analytic-triggered recording and alarming is disabled while you are configuring object tracking and classification (when you click Start tuning).

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To configure object tracking and classification:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Video Analytics tab. Select the Video Analytics enabled check box. Configure the General properties as appropriate. See General properties on page 324. Click Start tuning. Define one or more regions of interest. See Defining regions of interest on page 315. Define the minimum size of an object that is to be tracked. See Defining the minimum object size on page 326. Configure the algorithms Tuning properties. See Tuning properties on page 327. For an introduction to the motion detection symbols, see About the video analytics symbols on page 371. See Defining conditions on page 327.

10 Define the condition(s) moving objects must meet for each region of interest. 11 When you are satisfied, click Finish tuning. 12 Configure the When tracking is detected properties as appropriate. See

When motion is detected properties on page 320. General properties


Property Algorithm Description Select the algorithm: Object Trackingtracks objects Object Tracking and Classificationtracks and attempts to classify objects Motion server (Only applicable to server-side algorithms) Select the Video Analytics Server you want to use to run the algorithm. See About Video Analytics Servers on page 128.

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Property Detection type

Description Specifies when object tracking and classification occurs: Continuous = 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Scheduled = the time(s) at which object tracking is enabled is specified in one or more schedules. See Creating a schedule on page 306. Note: Changing from Scheduled to Continuous will delete all video analytics schedules for the camera. The default is Continuous.

Defining regions of interest Initially, there is a default region of interestyou can move and modify it as appropriate. To define a rectangular region of interest:
1 2

Drag the pointer diagonally over the area you want Honeywell DVM to track and classify objects. As you drag a box marks the region of interest. In the Region name box, type a suitable name for the region.

To define an irregular region of interest:


1 2 3 4 5 Tip You can cancel defining a region of interest at any time by right-clicking, or pressing ESC.

Move the pointer to the location of the first vertex and then click to mark its location. Move the pointer to the second vertex and click again. Repeat step 2 for each other vertex, except the last vertex. Double-click to mark the last vertex. In the Region name box, type a suitable name for the region.

To select a region of interest Click it. (If regions of interest overlap, click the edge of the region of interest you want to select.)

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To modify a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Selection handles appear. Drag a selection handle as required. The vertices move as you drag.

To move a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Drag it to required position. (Do not drag it by a selection handle because this will change its shape.)

To delete a region of interest:


1 2

Click the region of interest to select it. Press DELETE.

Defining the minimum object size The minimum object size that is tracked by the algorithm is defined by the magenta rectangle. (Note that the position of the rectangle is not relevant.) To define the minimum object size:
1 2

Select the rectangle. Its selection handles appear. Drag a selection handle until the rectangle is of the required size and shape.

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Tuning properties
Property Detection frame rate Description The rate at which you want the algorithm to run. The default is 5 frames per second. This setting has a high impact on the loading of the server. The higher the frame rate, the higher the load on the CPU. It also impacts the bandwidth used by the streamer when object tracking is activated. The chance of an object being tracked/classified depends on: The frame ratea higher frame rate increases the chance of and object being tracked/classified The size of the region of interestthe larger the region of interest the longer the object takes to move through it. The speed of the objectthe faster the object moves the shorter the amount of time it will take to pass through the region of interest. Sensitivity Shadow correction Processing type Indicates whether the scene is indoor or outdoor. If there are many shadows in the scene, turn shadow correction on to reduce the risk false detections. Indicates whether the algorithm analyzes the entire image (Full Frame) or only the regions of interest drawn (ROI Only). Full Frame processing provides more accurate resultsespecially for small regions of interest because the algorithm has more time (more frames) to analyze objects. However, it does increase the load on the CPU. Note: Even if you select Full Frame, the conditions (and associated responses, such as raising alarms) only apply when the object enters a region of interest.

Defining conditions To define a condition:


1 2

Select a region of interest by clicking it. Click New. A condition row is added to list.

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Define the condition by selecting appropriate values for the three condition properties: Object type, Behavior and Direction. (As you select a value for each property, the condition in the list is updated.) Configure the remaining properties in the following table to define what happens when a object satisfies the condition.
Description The type of object you want the algorithm to detect. Valid types are: person vehicle other Object any Object When any Object is selected, it detects any moving object greater than the minimum object size. Note: You cannot select Object type when using the object tracking algorithm. It is available only when using the object tracking and classification algorithm.

Property Condition properties Object type

Behavior

The objects behavior that triggers the event. Valid behaviors are: enterenters the region exitexits the region startstarts moving within the region stopstops moving within the region any behaviormatches any behavior start and stop are only applicable if the Processing type property is set to Full Frame.

Direction

The direction in which the object must move in order to trigger the event (the exact wording depends on whether you set Behavior to enter or exit): to/from the Right to/from the Left to/from the Bottom to/from the Top any Directiondetects movement from any direction Note: Direction is with respect to the field of view not the ROI, which may have an irregular shape.

These properties define what happens when an object satisfies the selected condition

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Property Generate an alarm

Description Sends an alarm to the EBI or Experion server at the specified Alarm level when an object satisfies the condition. Note: The alarm is not latched to a point. The level of the alarms that are generated: Urgent High Low Journal (the default) All alarms, except for Journal, appear in Stations Alarm Summary. Journal alarms do not appear in the Station Alarm Summary, but are written to the event file and appear in the Event Summary. Ensure that all operators who are required to view these alarms have access to the EBI or Experion system area in which the alarms are being raised.

Alarm level

Start a recording

Selecting this allows you to specify Pre-record for, Record frame rate, Record for and Archive after and Delete after properties for video clips created when an object satisfies the condition. The duration of video that Honeywell DVM keeps in memory for motion detection recordings. When motion is detected and a recording is started, Honeywell DVM inserts this pre-record segment at the start of the recording. The pre-record period on the recording allows you to view what was happening immediately before the motion was detected and a recording started. For example if you set this to 10 seconds, the recording will show the 10 seconds of video before the recording was activated.

Pre-record for

Record for

The length of time (in seconds) recording takes place for, after motion is detected. If you select Until motion finishes, the recording will continue until no motion is detected in the scene for the length of time specified in the Consider motion finished after property.

Record frame rate

The frame rate at which video is recorded for motion detection recordings.

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Property Archive after

Description The period for which a motion detection recording is available for playback before being archived. The duration commences at the video clips end date and time. The duration for which motion detection recordings are stored before being automatically deleted. The duration commences at the video clips end date and time. If selected, video is automatically shown in the specified Station(s) when an object satisfies the condition. If a Station has an alarm monitor, the video is displayed on the alarm monitor.

Delete after

Send video to station(s)

Station number All stations in area Do not raise repetitive events for the same object for

The number of the Station video is sent to if you select the Send video to Station(s) check box. The area containing the Stations video is sent to if you select the Send video to Station(s) check box. The length of time, after the object has moved outside the region of interest, that new alarms, recordings and video streams to Station are inhibited. This property affects the other properties in this table as follows: A new alarm will not be generated until after this time has expired. A new recording will not start until after this time has expired. Also, if you set the Record for property to While object in the region, recording will continue until this time has expired. Video will not be resent to a Station until after this time has expired.

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Specifying the folder for snapshots

Specifying the folder for snapshots


A snapshot is a single video frame that is captured and stored in the snapshot folder on the computer on which the snapshot was taken. The default folder is: \Program Files\Honeywell\EBI or Experion\Client\DigitalVideoClient\snapshot. However, if you want to save snapshots to another folder, you need to specify it in the Windows Registry. To specify the folder for snapshots:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Choose Start > Run. Type regedit and click OK. This starts the Registry Editor. Locate the entry: HKEY_Local_Machine\Software\Honeywell\DVM\Client Choose Edit > New > String Value. Type Snapshotfilepath. Select Snapshotfilepath and choose Edit > Modify. In the Value Data box enter the name of the folder. Click OK.

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Configuring the audit log


Honeywell DVM uses the audit log to provide an audit trail of all user actions and system events. The audit log is stored in the Honeywell DVM database. You cannot configure which types of events are recorded in the audit log; however, you can configure length of time events are kept. The size of the audit log depends on how often events are generated and the length of time they are kept. To avoid using unnecessary disk space, you should only keep events for as long as is necessary. A recommended setting is between a week and a month. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR level access to perform this task.

To configure the audit log:


1 2 3 4

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Select the Audit Log tab. In the Audit Log tab, enter the length of time audit events are kept.

This value is checked at approximately midnight, and any audit events that are older than the specified period are deleted.

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Configuring disk space administration


Disk space administration controls system policies when disk space runs low. Honeywell DVM can raise host alarms, automatically begin deleting video clips, or even stop recording onto a disk when free space drops below the configured minimum levels. Video clips can be automatically deleted before their configured deletion dates in order to reclaim free space for new recordings. The clips closest to their deletion dates are selected for automatic deletion. Clips marked Keep Forever are never deleted. Automatic clip deletion provides the administrator with an effective means of managing available space. Ideally, having configured the system correctly, space should never be unavailable. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR level access to perform this task.

Considerations Even after you have configured disk space administration, the disk can still run out of space if: The rate at which recordings are being made is greater than the rate at which old recordings are being deleted No clips suitable for automatic deletion can be found on the disk

If you configure the deletion threshold at a value larger than the volume of the disk, Honeywell DVM disables automatic clip deletion for that disk. A host alarm is raised to notify the operator that automatic clip deletion is disabled for the drive. When Honeywell DVM determines that there is a need for automatic clip deletion on a disk, it raises a host alarm. Host alarms are raised each time Honeywell DVM begins automatic clip deletion. Alarms are then raised every ten minutes until the available disk space exceeds the configured automatic clip deletion value. This may mean that alarms are raised more frequently if the amount of free disk space oscillates around the automatic clip deletion value.

To configure disk space administration:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the Disk Space tab.

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In the Camera server box, select the Camera Server whose disk space you want to configure. In the Disk box, select the disk whose space you want to configure. Configure the properties as appropriate.
Description Honeywell DVM raises a low disk space host alarm if the free disk space falls below this value (MB). Minimum value is 1000. If selected, Honeywell DVM automatically deletes video clips when the free space on the disk falls below this value (MB). Minimum value is 1000. This value must be less than the low disk space alarm value.

Property Raise a low disk space alarm when free disk space reaches Automatically delete clips when free disk space reaches

Allow deletion of clips marked for If selected, Honeywell DVM deletes video clips that archiving are marked for archiving, even if they have not been archived. Raise a very low disk space alarm Honeywell DVM raises a very low disk space alarm if when free disk space reaches the free disk space falls below this value (MB). Note: If this type of alarm is raised, the system administrator must manually intervene to prevent Honeywell DVM from suspending recording due to lack of free disk space. Minimum value is 1000. This value must be less than the automatic clip deletion alarm value. Start recording again when free disk space reaches The minimum free disk space required before Honeywell DVM will resume recording after having stopped recording due to insufficient free space. Minimum value is 1000. This value must be less or equal to the value for very low disk space alarm. Stop recording when free disk space reaches Honeywell DVM will stop recording if the minimum free space falls below this value. Minimum value is 1000. This value must be less than the start recording again value. Disk Usage These are read-only properties for the selected Camera Server. For details about these properties, see Viewing the disk usage details of a Camera Server on page 422.

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Configuring event-activated recording


Event-activated recording is the technique of starting a recording when an associated EBI or Experion point changes to a specific statetypically, when a point goes into an alarm state.
Attention In order for event-activated recording to work, you must ensure that the following are also assigned to the same area as the point: The camera used for event-activated recording The Station(s) and Internet Explorer client(s) used to view the recorded video The operator(s) that need to view the recorded video

You configure event-activated recording when configuring the point in Quick Builder. (Quick Builder is the main configuration tool supplied with EBI or Experion.) The following procedure only describes the steps specific to configuring event-activated recording. For detailed information on configuring points and using Quick Builder, see Quick Builders help. Considerations Do not use a special preset with event-activated recording unless you know that it is suitable. (Most special presets are not suited for use with event activation.)

To configure a point in Quick Builder:


1 2 3

Add the point to a Quick Builder project in the normal manner. Click the Main tab. In the Action Algo box, select: Algo 71 - Access Point Task Request if this is an access point (only applicable to EBI) Algo 71 - Queued Task Request if this is a status point and you have Experion Algo 92 - Queued Task Request if this is a status point and you have EBI

Click the Action Algo tab.

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Configure the algorithms properties as appropriate. See: Algorithm properties for an access point on page 336 Algorithm properties for a status point on page 336

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Configure the points other properties in the normal manner. Save and download the project in the normal manner.

Algorithm properties for an access point


Property LRN of requested task States to request task Parameter Block Word 1 Word 2 The camera number, as specified in the Camera number property on the Camera Definition tab. This number represents a set of control flags that specify what action(s) to perform when an event occurs. See Word 2 control flags on page 337. The Station or area ID. Preset number. Pre-record period in seconds. Note that the Event Activated Pre-record for property on the Record Settings tab defines the upper limit. For example, if you set Word 5 to 30 s, but and Event Activated Pre-record for is set to 10 s, only 10 s of pre-record will be collected. Word 6 Post-record period in seconds. If you set both Word 5 and Word 6 to zero, the recording is a snapshot (single frame). Description Set to 181. Select the states that cause event-activated recording, for example Denied: expired card.

Word 3 Word 4 Word 5

Algorithm properties for a status point


Property LRN of requested task States to request task Parameter Block Word 1 The camera number, as specified in the Camera number property on the Camera Definition tab. Description Set to 181. Select the states that cause event-activated recording.

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Property Word 2

Description This number represents a set of control flags that specify what action(s) to perform when an event occurs. See Word 2 control flags on page 337. (Internal use only) Station or area ID. Pre-record period in seconds. Post-record period in seconds. If you set both Word 7 and Word 8 to zero, the recording is a snapshot (single frame).

Word 3 to Word 5 Word 6 Word 7 Word 8

Word 9 Word 10

Preset number. Not used.

Word 2 control flags The Word 2 control flags specify what action is performed when an event occurs. (A number is used to represent the control flags. For example the decimal value 3 means that bits 0 and 1 are set and bit 2 is unset.)
Control flag Bit 0 (least significant bit) Bit 1 Action Start a recording. 1 = record. Change display. 1 = change display. If you set this bit and an alarm monitor is configured for the Station specified in Word 3 (access points) or Word 6 (status points), the camera is displayed on the alarm monitor. If a queue of alarm monitors is configured for the Station, the camera is displayed at an appropriate position within the queue of monitors according to alarm priority and time of activation. (For more information see Configuring multi-monitors on page 338.) Bit 2 Display change option: 0 = change display on a Station 1 = change display on all Stations in an area Bit 2 is ignored if Bit 1 is not set.

Example If you set Word 2 to 3 (decimal), bits 0 and 1 are set, and bit 2 is unset. This causes recording to occur and a display change for the Station specified in the param block to the specified camera.

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Configuring multi-monitors
Honeywell DVMs multi-monitor capabilities allows an operator to use a single keyboard to control the viewing of cameras on multiple monitors. It allows a Station to be set up to mimic a traditional CCTV workstation. Typically a multi-monitor operator Station will consist of one or more monitors driven by one or more computers installed with the Honeywell DVM client components. A computer may support multiple monitors depending on the graphics card installed. Monitors can be: Surveillance monitorsthe camera displayed on the monitors is controlled by the operator. Alarm monitorsthe camera displayed on the monitors is controlled by the event-activation task or video motion detection. (For more information see Configuring event-activated recording on page 335.)

Following are some examples of typical multi-monitor scenarios and configuration: Bank of surveillance monitorsan operator has a bank of monitors, each configured as a surveillance monitor. From the single operator keyboard, the operator is able to throw a camera onto any of the monitors. Single alarm monitora single monitor is configured as an alarm monitor. When event-activation or video analytic detection occurs in EBI or Experion, the camera associated with the event-activation or video motion detection is displayed on the monitor. Camera views cycle when more than one activated camera view is sent to the alarm monitor. The operator is able to clear camera views from the alarm monitor using the operator keyboard. Queue of alarm monitorsa queue of monitors are configured as alarm monitors. When event-activation or video motion detection occurs in EBI or Experion, the camera associated with the event-activation or video analytics is placed at an appropriate position within the queue of monitors according to alarm priority and time of activation. All existing camera views are shifted to accommodate the new camera view. The monitor at the end of the queue cycles when there are more activated camera views than there are configured monitors. The operator is able to clear camera views from any monitor in the alarm queue using the operator keyboard.

For more information on carrying out multi monitor tasks using the operator keyboard see Using the numeric keypad on page 391.

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Prerequisites A static Station (Rotary Stations are not suitable because their Station number changes at each connection.) Each computer that hosts a multi-monitor must have the Honeywell DVM client components installed. Each computer hosting a multi-monitor must be able to ping the Database and Camera Servers using their computer names.

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Configuring the monitors


You configure monitors in the SQL server table, tblMultiMonitor. Prerequisites You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform this task. (For example, use the Database Servers default Administrator account, or the Honeywell DVM installation account.)

Considerations The live video will expand to fill the entire viewing area of the physical monitor.

To define the placement and assignment of monitors:


1 2 3

Log on to the Database Sever. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblMultiMonitor and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the tblMonitor window, configure the fields as described in the following table. Close the tblMultiMonitor window.
Description The Station number assigned to the Station in EBI or Experion. The name of the computer the monitor is physically connected to. The Windows monitor number as defined in Windows Control Panel > Display > Settings.

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Field StationNumber MachineName WindowNumber

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Field CallupID

Description A number that identifies the monitor. It must be unique for each monitor that is assigned to the same Station. The number starts at 1. Use of CallupID is different for each monitor type: Surveillance Monitorsthe CallupID identifies the monitor. For example, the keyboard command +5<Enter> on Station number 2 shows the currently viewed camera on Station number 2 onto the monitor identified in tblMultiMonitor where StationNumber=2 and CallupID=5. For more information, see Using the numeric keypad on page 391. Alarm Monitorsrequires that event-activation or video motion detection is configured to change display on that Station in the event of an alarm. The incremental sequencing of CallupIDs form a queue of alarm monitors. Newly activated alarm views are placed at an appropriate position within the alarm queue. All existing alarm views are shifted in the queue to accommodate the new view.

Surveillance

Determines whether the monitor is used as a surveillance monitor: 0 = No 1 = Yes

Alarm

Determines whether a monitor is used as an alarm monitor: 0 = No 1 = Yes

rowguid

For system use only.

Example The following entries assign surveillance monitors to two physical monitors on Machine1 when accessed from EBI or Experion Station number 1. The single monitor on Machine2 is assigned CallupID 3 as both a survelliance monitor and an alarm monitor when accessed from Station number 1.
StationNumber MachineName WindowNumber CallupID 1 1 1 Machine1 Machine1 Machine2 1 2 1 1 2 3 Surveillance 1 1 1 Alarm 0 0 1 341

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Configuring alarm monitor cycle time


If there are more activated camera views in a queue than there are monitors to display them, the last monitor cycles the surplus camera views. By default, the cycle time is set to ten seconds. You configure the cycle time in the SQL server table, tblConfiguration. Prerequisites You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform this task. (For example, use the Database Servers default Administrator account, or the Honeywell DVM installation account.)

To configure alarm monitor cycle time:


1 2 3

Log on to the Database Sever. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblConfiguration and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the tblConfiguration window, complete the fields as follows:
Enter Time in seconds that each camera view is displayed in a cycling monitor.

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In this field AlarmMonitorCycleTime

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Configuring a digital certificate


You only need to perform these tasks if you want to use a digital certificate other than the default digital certificate supplied with Honeywell DVM. (For an introduction to digital certificates, see Digital signatures on page 107.) You can obtain a digital certificate from a third party such as VeriSign, or generate one using the certificate authority component in Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2003 Server. (To find out how to create a digital certificate using Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2003 Server, contact your local Honeywell representative.) Considerations You must configure the digital certificate on each computer that is used to export signed videos and audit logs.

Tasks
Task Install the digital certificate. Check that the digital certificate is installed correctly. Go to: page 343 page 344 Done?

Configure Honeywell DVM to use the digital certificate. page 345

Installing the digital certificate


Prerequisites You must log on using the Windows account that will be used to export (sign) files. Your private key.

Considerations The certificate must be installed in the certificate store. The procedure for installing the digital certificate will vary depending on the format the certificate file is delivered in. Contact your local Honeywell DVM representative if the following procedure does not apply to you.

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If the Enable strong private key protection option is selected the user is required to confirm (medium security) or enter a password (high security) before each signing can proceed. If the Mark this key as exportable option is selected, the certificates private key can be extracted from the computer. It is recommended that this is not selected.

To install the digital certificate:


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Log on using the account that will be used to export files. Open Windows Explorer and double-click the certificate file to start the wizard which will guide you through the installation. Select or clear the Enable strong private key protection check box. Select or clear the Mark this key as exportable check box.

Checking that the digital certificate has been installed correctly


To confirm that the digital certificate has been installed correctly:
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Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type mmc.exe and click OK. Choose Console > Add/Remove Snap-in. When the Add/remove Snap-in dialog box appears, click Add. Select Certificates from the list of available snap-ins and click Add. Select My user account and click Finish. Click Close to close the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box. Click OK to close the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box. In the MMC console, under Console Root, choose Certificates - Current User > Personal > Certificates. The certificate you installed should be listed in the right pane. Double-click the certificate to view its details. On the General tab the words You have a private key that corresponds to this certificate should appear. when you configure Honeywell DVM to use this digital certificate.

10 On the Details tab, write down the thumbprint of the certificate. You need this

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Configuring Honeywell DVM to use the digital certificate


Prerequisites You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform this task. (For example, use the computers default Administrator account, or the Honeywell DVM installation account.) The thumbprint for your digital certificate (This is 40 characters long and can be entered as 20 groups of 2 characters, separated by spaces or 10 groups of 4 characters separated by spaces.)

To configure Honeywell DVM to use the digital certificate:


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Log on to the Database Sever. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblConfiguration and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the tblConfiguration window, in the ClientCertificateID box enter the thumbprint. Close the tblConfiguration window and close Microsoft SQL Server.

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Defining special presets


A special preset is a pre-programmed function that is specific to each type of camera. Special presets are usually reserved for programming, setup and special control functions. If the special presets for your cameras are not pre-defined in Honeywell DVM, you need to define them. (Currently, special presets are only defined for Honeywell KD6 cameras.) Requirements You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform this task. (For example, use the computers default Administrator account, or the Honeywell DVM installation account.) The documentation from the camera manufacturer, which specifies the details about each pre-programmed function.

Considerations If you have Honeywell KD6 cameras, you may want to change the default operator-related settingsfor example, hide some special presets from operators. If you do not hide a special preset from operators, it is shown enclosed within parentheses to distinguish it from normal presets, for example: (Setup menu).

To define or modify special presets:


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Log on to the Database Sever. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblCameraTypeSpecialPreset and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. If you are defining a new special preset, enter the details in the first blank row. (The row with the button.)

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Property CameraTypeID

Description Honeywell DVMs identification for the type of camera being addressed, as listed in the CameraTypeID field of the tblCameraTypes table. The cameras preset number, as defined in the documentation from the camera manufacturer. The name that is shown to the operators. Do not include parentheses or square brackets. You can include international characters, but special presets do not support language toggling.

PresetNumber PresetName

SecurityLevel

The minimum security level required by an operator to access the special preset: 0 = LVL1 1 = LVL2 2 = OPER 3 = SUPV 4 = ENGR 5 = MNGR For more information about security, see Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a workgroup environment on page 400.

Hidden CanActLike

Whether or not the special preset is hidden from operators. The special preset can act like: 0 = A special preset. You can call this from within Honeywell DVM, but it cannot be used as part of a tour, sequence, intercom or home preset. 1 = A real preset. Select this if you want to set up a sequence, home preset or a preset for intercom. 2 = A tour. Select this if it is the home preset on the camera control display.

rowguid

For system use only.

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Configuring Axis Streamers for audio


When audio is enabled, audio is heard when the live video from the camera is displayed. It is recorded along with video for user and event recordings. If required, audio can also be recorded with scheduled and background recordings. To find out which Axis streamers support audio, and whether a separate audio module is required, see Summary of camera streamer capabilities on page 120. Note that each type of Axis streamer is configured in its own way. For details, see the associated Axis documentation. To configure the associated cameras to receive audio, see Configuring a camera to receive audio on page 353.

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Configuring the Axis 2191 Audio Module

Configuring the Axis 2191 Audio Module


To configure a camera with audio in Honeywell DVM, the streamer must be configured for audio operation and Honeywell DVM must be configured to receive audio from the streamer.

Configuring the streamer for audio


To change the streamer for audio:
1

Configure the streamer's serial port for the Axis 2191. The exact steps required to do this are streamer specific. Please refer to your streamer documentation. Connect the Axis 2191 to the streamer. For detailed instructions see the Axis 2191 User Guide. Connect the audio source to the Axis 2191. Make sure the dip switch on the rear panel is set to int (to use the built-in microphone) or ext (to use the line input). Connect power to the Axis 2191. Configure the associated cameras to receive audio, see Configuring a camera to receive audio on page 353.

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Fine tuning audio


To compensate for differing input signal levels, the Axis 2191 has a level adjustment trimpot. To compensate for a low level signal, turn clockwise (more gain), for stronger signals turn anti-clockwise (less gain). Adjust the trimpot so that the Level In LED shows yellow occasionally but not red. Red indicates that the input is overloaded and the audio is clipped. Adjust the input levels using the audio environment that the device is exposed to under normal use. Adjust the output level of the Honeywell DVM client computers sound card using the Microsoft Windows volume control so that the sound is clear and at the desired level.

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Audio operation
When audio is enabled, audio is heard when the live video from the camera is displayed. It is recorded along with video for user and event recordings. If required, audio can also be recorded with scheduled and background recordings. When live or recorded video from a camera with audio enabled is displayed in the video player, an audio icon is shown on the video player. To adjust the volume of the audio:
1 2

Click on the audio icon. Adjust the volume control slider that appears by clicking on it and moving the mouse either up or down. Clicking off the slider will cause it to disappear again. If there is a problem obtaining the audio stream from the streamer, the audio icon will show a failed indication. For more information, see Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364.

To save on disk space, it is possible to disable the recording of audio on a scheduled recording. To do this, clear the Audio Enabled check box when creating the schedule, or clear the check box on the Schedules tab for an existing schedule.

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Configuring CamStation CS-3001V for audio

Configuring CamStation CS-3001V for audio


Prerequisites You configured a Camstation CS-3001V streamer (see CamStation CS-3001V on page 261.)

Hardware configuration
The CS-3001V streamer has an audio input port where an audio source may be connected. The streamer does not have an audio pre-amp and hence expects an amplified signal as input. Please ensure that this is the case. It is recommended that when installing the streamer, you test the audio signal with a portable audio device where the audio signal is known to be amplified. To configure the associated cameras to receive audio, see Configuring a camera to receive audio on page 353.

Audio operation
The CS-3001V audio operates in a similar way to the Axis 2191 audio. When audio is enabled, it is heard when the live video from the camera is displayed. It is recorded along with video for user and event recordings. If required, audio can also be recorded with scheduled and background recordings. When live or recorded video from an audio-enabled camera is displayed, an audio icon is shown on the video player. Considerations If a recording is performed using a low frame rate or an I-frame rate and audio is enabled, the whole audio stream is recorded. If you are doing an I-frame recording, audio can comprise a large portion of the video clip.

To adjust the volume of the audio:


1 2

Click on the audio icon. Adjust the volume control slider that appears by clicking on it and moving the mouse either up or down. Clicking off the slider will cause it to disappear again. If there is a problem obtaining the audio stream from the streamer, the audio icon will show a failed indication. For more information, see Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364.

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To save on disk space, it is possible to disable the recording of audio on a scheduled recording. To do this, clear the Audio Enabled check box on the Schedule details display when creating or editing a schedule.

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Configuring a camera to receive audio

Configuring a camera to receive audio


To configure a camera to receive audio:
1 2 3 4

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages In the Navigation Pane, click the camera under Camera. Click the Camera Definition tab. Set Stream type to Audio/Video.

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Configuring Honeywell DVM for video intercom


Considerations Although the MegaChips MD-100 supports 4 video inputs, it only supports one audio input/output. Without dedicated multiplexing or mixing electronics Honeywell DVM is limited to a single audio input/output point in the field per MD-100 streamer.

Audio hardware
The digital inputs on the rear of the MD-100 are used to notify Honeywell DVM of a request for intercom connection from the remote site. Connect a push button switch to one of the digital inputs of the MD-100. (The pinouts of the rear terminal block can be found in the MD-100 documentation.) Considerations Up to four intercom cameras can be configured on an MD-100, they will all use the same audio input/output point and may only be connected (operational) one at a time. The digital inputs number corresponds to the intercom number configured in Honeywell DVM, not the video input number on the MD100.

Alarm configuration file


The MegaChips MD-100 must also be configured to notify Honeywell DVM when the state of that digital input changes. To perform this configuration:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Choose Start > Run to open the Run dialog box. Type cmd in the box and click OK. When the command prompt appears, type ftp md100ipaddress and then press ENTER, where md100ipaddress is the address of the MD-100. Log into the MD-100. The default username is Administrator, with no password. press ENTER. Use the ascii command to set the transfer mode. Upload the file almconf.cfg, using the command get almconf.cfg. Once the file has been transferred, use the quit command to exit FTP. The following example of an FTP session is provided for reference.

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C:\> ftp xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq Connected to xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq. 220 eWatch MD-100 FTP Service User (xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq:(none)): Administrator 331 Password required for "administrator" Password: <enter> 230 User "administrator" login ok. ftp> ascii 200 TYPE command successful. ftp> get almconf.cfg 200 PORT command successful. 150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for Client. 226 Transfer complete. ftp: 216 bytes received in 0.13Seconds 1.66Kbytes/sec. ftp> quit 221 QUIT command successful.

Open almconf.cfg in an editor.

Caution The almconf.cfg file will not display correctly in Notepad. It can be edited in Notepad successfully if the word wrap option is switched on. The Edit editor that is available through the command prompt will work correctly as will most third party text editors.

In this file there are four sections which correspond to the four digital inputs. Each section begins with an [almconf] heading. These sections are ordered from input 1 at the top of the file to input 4 at the bottom of the file. Each section looks like the following:
[almconf] time=0 dly=0 log=1 web=0 id=23 eof [in_inport] pno=1 mode=1 one=0 ons=15 ond=0 ofe=1

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ofs=600 ofd=0 min=0 time=0 web=0 eof [call] ip1=xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq tcp1=14599 tel1= sub1= no=1 intv=10 msg= wfg=0 dly=0 web=0 eof

Locate the section that corresponds to the input to which the push button was attached. Under the [call] heading, replace the xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq with the IP address of the Camera Server to which the MD-100 streamer is connected. Save the file.

Attention

A new streamer will not have default settings for these alarm configuration sections. You must add one copy of the above example for each intercom button Honeywell DVM should respond to. If the streamer is ever moved to a new Camera Server, this file will need to be re-edited to reflect the new Camera Server.
10 FTP to the MD-100 again and use the Put command to load the file back to

the streamer. The following example of an FTP session is provided for reference.
C:\ >ftp xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq Connected to xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq. 220 eWatch MD-100 FTP Service User (xxx.yyy.zzz.qqq:(none)): administrator 331 Password required for "administrator" Password: 230 User "administrator" login ok. ftp> ascii 200 TYPE command successful.

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ftp> put almconf.cfg 200 PORT command successful. 150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for Client. 226 Transfer complete. ftp: 216 bytes sent in 0.00Seconds 216000.00Kbytes/sec. ftp> quit 221 QUIT command successful.

11 Power cycle the MD-100 streamer.

Audio settings
To configure the MegaChips MD-100 audio settings:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Connect a speaker and microphone to the MD-100 on either the front or rear panel inputs. Using Internet Explorer, navigate to the MD-100s Web pages: http://md100ipaddress. When the Web pages appear, select the System settings button at the top. Select Video/Audio Settings. Login to the streamer. The default username is Administrator with a blank password. Navigate to System settings. Set Audio output mode to On. Set Audio input mode to Hi Quality. Set the Volume to 5 and the front or rear input as appropriate.

Setting up Honeywell DVM for video intercom


Prerequisite To be able to listen and talk to the field, the Station or Honeywell DVM client must be equipped with a speaker and microphone.

To configure the camera:


1 2

Configure the camera using the Camera Definition display. Set the Stream type to Intercom/Video. This will enable the intercom on that camera and enable a new Intercom Definition tab.

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Go to the Intercom Definition tab and check boxes for intercoms corresponding to digital inputs configured previously. Set Alarm levels and preset positions as required for each intercom. If special presets are configured to be used as presets, select the appropriate special preset on the right. (Special presets are enclosed within parentheses, for example: (Setup menu).) For more information on configuring special presets, see Defining special presets on page 346.

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Operation

This chapter describes how to perform standard Honeywell DVM tasks in Station or Internet Explorer.

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Using Station to view live video


You use the Live Video tab on the Camera display to view and record live video for a particular camera.
Figure 16 Typical Live Video in Station (The cameras are listed in the Navigation Pane on the left.)

To view live video:


1 2 3

Click on Stations toolbar to call up the System Menu (the home page for EBI or Experion). Click to call up the Live Video tab of the Camera display. Initially, the video for the first camera listed in the Navigation Pane is shown. To see video for another camera, click it in the Navigation Pane. If the cameras are in groups, click the + sign to see the cameras in that group. To learn about the meaning of the camera symbols, see About the camera symbols in the Navigation Pane on page 370.

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If you want to use the controls, see: Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364. Using presets and tours on page 369.

Tip You can navigate between cameras using the PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN keys.

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Using Internet Explorer to view live video


You use the Live Video tab on the Camera display to view and record live video for a particular camera.
Figure 17 Typical Live Video in Internet Explorer (The cameras are listed in the Navigation Pane on the left.)

Prerequisites Your administrator has configured Internet Explorer security so that you can view live video.

To view live video:


1 2

Log on to your computer. Start Internet Explorer and type the following URL: http://machinename/dvm where machinename is the name of the Database Server. If you have a redundant Database Server, machinename is the name of the preferred server. The Honeywell DVM Live Video tab of the Camera display appears. This tab initially shows the video for the first camera listed in the Navigation Pane.

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Using Internet Explorer to view live video 3

To see video for another camera, click it in the Navigation Pane. If the cameras are in groups, click the + sign to see the cameras in that group. To learn about the meaning of the camera symbols, see About the camera symbols in the Navigation Pane on page 370. If you want to use the controls, see: Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364. Using presets and tours on page 369.

Tip You can navigate between cameras using the PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN keys.

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Using the live video controls and indicators


Note that the controls you see depend on the type of camera and the way in which your system has been configured. For example, the PTZ controls will not appear if you select a fixed camera, or if you have not been given access to those controls.
Control/indicator Description Snapshot. Each time you click this button, Honeywell DVM creates a single-frame snapshot file of the video. For details about snapshot files see, About snapshot (Appears if user-activated recordings have been enabled.) files on page 372. Record. Starts recording the current video. Recording continues until you click the Stop button, or if a recording period has been specified for the camera, (Appears if user-activated recordings have been enabled.) the recording period expires. The amount of time remaining until the recording terminates is shown in black. Stop. Stops recording. (Appears if user-activated recordings have been enabled.) The current time and date of the camera. This only appears when another user is controlling the camerafor example, using the PTZ controls. If your controls are grayed out, it means that you cannot control the camera while the other person has control. (Depending on how your system is configured, the name on the right is the operator ID or the Station that currently has control.) The time on the left is a countdown timer, which indicates how much longer before you can get control of the camera. Video analytics. Flashes blue when Honeywell DVM detects movement. (Only appears if video analytics is enabled.)

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Control/indicator

Description Regions of interest. Click this button to show or hide regions of interest.

(Only appears if video analytics is enabled, and it has regions of interest.) Presets and tours. See Using presets and tours on page 369. (Only appears on PTZ cameras.) Focus. Controls the cameras focus (so that you can clearly see an object). (Only appears on PTZ cameras.) Iris. Controls the cameras iris. (The iris controls the amount of light that reaches the camera sensor.) (Only appears on PTZ cameras.) Zoom. Controls zooming of the camera lens. (Only appears on PTZ cameras.) Pan and Tilt. Controls the cameras pan and tilt positions. (Only appears on PTZ cameras.) Enable. Video for the camera is visible while this check box is selected. Clear this check box to disable the camera, and stop the Camera Server processing its video. Volume. To adjust the volume of the audio, click and adjust the volume control slider. Clicking somewhere other than the slider causes it to disappear. If you see a flashing warning icon a problem with the audio signal. .it means there is

(Only appears on intercom or audio-enabled cameras.)

Intercom. Click a button to commence a conversation. Click again to end the conversation. (Only appears on intercom or audio-enabled cameras.) The button flashes red if there is a call waiting.

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Control/indicator

Description Annotations display mode. Click the button to shift it to the next mode. The three modes are: All annotations No annotations Event annotations The button shows the mode currently being displayed. This button appears only on video streams that are currently running algorithms that support annotations. Algorithms that support annotations are: Object tracking Object tracking and classification When annotations are switched on for object tracking and classification, it highlights all the objects being tracked and classified in the scene. The event annotation mode highlights objects that satisfy a configured condition. For a description of the symbols that appear in the video, see About the video analytics symbols on page 371.

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Using the live video mouse PTZ controls

Using the live video mouse PTZ controls


This topic is only applicable to cameras that support continuous PTZ. You can use your mouse to control the positioning of a camera, and zoom in or zoom out. When you move the mouse pointer over the video, the icon changes to an arrow or a magnifying glass. This depends upon the area of the video your mouse is hovering over. An arrow shows the direction the camera will move to and the magnifying glass will allow you to zoom in or out. The figure below shows the directions you can move the camera and the approximate zoom area. Within the circle, the mouse pointer becomes a magnifying glass, enabling you to zoom in or out.

+ -

Controlling the camera movement To control the movement of the camera with your mouse, move it over the video until you see the icon change to an arrow. There are two methods which can be used to move the camera. They are: A single click will move the camera in the direction of the arrow. Hold down the left mouse button and drag the mouse in the direction you want the camera to move to.

The speed the camera moves depends on where you click in relation to the centre of the video. The closer you are to the edge of the video, the faster the movement of the camera.

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Zooming in To zoom in, move your mouse just above the centre of the video. When the magnifying glass appears with a +, click your left mouse button. To continuously zoom in, hold down your left mouse button. To increase the speed of the zoom, drag the icon towards the top of the video and to decrease the speed drag back towards the centre of the video. Zooming out To zoom out, move your mouse just below the centre of the video. When the magnifying glass appears with a -, click your left mouse button. To continuously zoom out, hold down your left mouse button. To increase the speed of the zoom, drag the icon towards the bottom of the video and to decrease the speed drag towards the centre of the video.

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Using presets and tours

Using presets and tours


You use these controls for presets and tours. A preset is a defined PTZ setup for a camera. For example, if you frequently need to check the main entrance to a building, you could create a preset called main entrance that caused the camera to quickly zoom in on the main entrance. (A special preset is a pre-programmed function that is specific to each type of camera. Special presets are usually reserved for programming, setup and special control functions.) A tour is a predefined sequence of presets. When you activate a tour, the camera moves from one preset to the next in a specified manner. Notes The names of special presets are enclosed in parentheses, for example: (Road); and the names of tours are enclosed in square brackets, for example: [Trainline]. If a part of the cameras field of view is obscured by a gray box, this is a privacy zone. (Privacy zones are typically used to obscure private parts of change rooms.)

To view a preset:
1 2

Click

to the right of the list box to see the presets and tours.

Select the preset from the listthe camera then pans, tilts and zooms to the specified position.

To start a tour:
1 2

Click

to the right of the list box to see the presets and tours.

Select the tour from the listthe camera then starts the tour.

To create a preset:
1 2 3

Set up the camera as required, using the pan, tilt and zoom controls. Click the list. Type an appropriate name, such as Side Door, and then click (Do not include parentheses or square brackets in the name). .

To delete a preset:
1 2

Select it from the list. Click .

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About the camera symbols in the Navigation Pane


Symbol Description The camera is operating normally. The cameras video is currently being recorded. Video analytics is currently being performed on the cameras video. The camera has been disabled. The camera has failed. There is an unknown problem, possibly with the Camera Server to which the camera is attached. Someone is using intercom associated with the camera.

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About the video analytics symbols

About the video analytics symbols


Video analytics is the process of analyzing video signals to detect motion, or to track objects (and, optionally, classify of those objects). Honeywell DVM includes a range of video analytics functions (also called algorithms), each of which is optimized for a specific purpose. Honeywell DVM uses the following symbols to help you interpret the results of video analytics. Note that the symbols you see will depend on what video analytics functions are used in your system, and how they have been configured.
Symbol White square or polygon that doesnt move Blue square or polygon that doesnt move Red rectangle Description Only applicable to motion detection. The region of interest in which Honeywell DVM attempts to detect movement. Only applicable to motion detection. Indicates that Honeywell DVM has detected movement in the region of interest. Only applicable to motion detection, and only visible while configuring motion detection or when replaying a recording. The red rectangle marks the section within the region of interest where Honeywell DVM has detected motion. Moving white rectangle with symbol and number Only applicable to object tracking and classification. The white rectangle marks the object that is being tracked. The symbol indicates the classification Honeywell DVM has given the object (car or person). A question mark means that Honeywell DVM was not able to classify the object. The number is the unique ID that Honeywell DVM has assigned to that object.

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About snapshot files


When you take a snapshot by clicking on the Live Video tab, Honeywell DVM creates a snapshot file and stores it in the snapshot folder on the computer. Having created a snapshot, you can then, for example, attach it to an email. By default, snapshot files are stored in \Program Files\Honeywell\EBI or Experion\Client\DigitalVideoClient\snapshot. Each snapshot file is named as follows: CameraName(Number)_yAAAAmBBdCChDDmEEsFFmsGGG.bmp Where: CameraName is the camera name Number is the camera number yAAAAmBBdCChDDmEEsFFmsGGG is the year, month, day, hour, minute, second, milli-second when the snapshot was taken

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Viewing recorded video

Viewing recorded video


If you want to perform a more sophisticated search, see Searching for recorded video on page 383. Considerations When you choose to view full size video, another window is opened, showing the Honeywell DVM video player. Your Station or Internet Explorer client is still displayed in the background. Gray text indicates that the video has been archived. Blue text indicates that the recording has been restored from archive.

To view a recording:
1 2

In the Navigation Pane, click the camera whose recordings you want to view. Click the Recordings tab to see the recordings for that camera. Initially, the recordings for the current day are shown.

If the recording was done on another day, select the date from Recordings on. The recordings for that day appear in the list.

Tip You can see the recordings for the next/previous day by clicking the either side of the date. buttons on

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Select a video clip from the list, you will see it appear paused in the video player. To check that you have selected the correct video, you can press the play button. If the video clip selected had pre-record defined, the frame shown is the frame which was recorded when the operator pressed record or the video analytic, EBI or Experion event occurred, not the first frame of the recording. You can also: Type any relevant comments in Notes. (Adding a note can be useful because you can use the notes to retrieve the video clipsee Doing an advanced search on page 384.) Archive it immediately by clicking the Archive button, or change the default archive instructions by changing the Archive on values. Delete it immediately by clicking the Delete button, or change the default deletion instructions by changing the Delete on values. Prevent a video clip being archived or deleted by clearing the Archive on or Delete on check boxes. Export a video clip. For more information about exporting, see Exporting a video clip on page 411. Take a snapshot of part of the video clip by clicking . For more information, see Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364. View full size video by clicking on the View full size video link. This is useful when the resolution of the recorded video clip is greater than the resolution being displayed.

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Using the playback controls and indicators

Using the playback controls and indicators


When you view recorded video, following the instructions in Viewing recorded video on page 373, the video player displays the following controls and indicators.
Control/Indicator Description Play. Plays the recording. Stop. Stops the video. Pause. Pauses the video. Snapshot. Exports a single frame of the video. Fast rewind. Rewinds the video at a speed determined by the number of times you click the button. Clicking the button once rewinds the video at normal playback speed. Clicking the button two or more times increases the rewind speed as follows: 2 = 4 times normal playback speed 3 = 16 times normal playback speed 4 = 64 times normal playback speed 5 = 256 times normal playback speed 6 = 1024 times normal playback speed To slow the video, right-click the button one or more times (each right-click halves the playback speed). Fast forward and Fast rewind occur at the same speed. Frame rewind. Moves the video back a single frame. Frame Forward. Moves the video forward a single frame.

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Control/Indicator

Description Fast Forward. Plays the video at a speed determined by the number of times you click the button. Clicking the button once plays the video at normal playback speed. Clicking the button two or more times increases the playback speed as follows: 2 = 4 times normal playback speed 3 = 16 times normal playback speed 4 = 64 times normal playback speed 5 = 256 times normal playback speed 6 = 1024 times normal playback speed To slow the video, right-click the button one or more times (each right-click halves the playback speed). Fast forward and Fast rewind occur at the same speed. Regions of interest. Shows/hides regions of interest.

This button appears only on video streams that are (Appears when video analytics is currently running algorithms that supporting regions of interest. enabled only.) See About the video analytics symbols on page 371. Annotations display mode. Controls the annotation mode. Each time you click the button, the mode shifts as follows: All annotations No annotations Event annotations The button shows the current annotation mode. This button appears only on video streams that are currently running algorithms that support annotations: Object tracking Object tracking and classification When annotations are switched on, the objects being tracked and classified are highlighted. See About the video analytics symbols on page 371.

(Appears when annotations are enabled only.)

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Viewing a quad view

Viewing a quad view


A quad view simultaneously shows four live videos. To call up a quad view:
Tip Double-clicking on a camera in the quad view will change the display to show only the selected camera.

In the Navigation Pane, click Quad Views. Click the quad view you want to view.

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Viewing a sequence
A sequence shows live video that switches cameras and camera presets at a specified interval. To call up a sequence:
1 2

In the Navigation Pane, click Sequences. Click the sequence you want to view.

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Using the intercom

Using the intercom


Initiating a call from the field
Calls can be initiated from the field via the push button or by the operator from the live video page for the intercom camera.

Answering a field-initiated call


When someone in the field presses the push button, Honeywell DVM: Sends an alarm to EBI or Experion Underlines the cameras name in the Navigation Pane

Flashes (and turns red) the intercom button on the live view

Considerations A recording is automatically started when the call is answered. Audio from the field is recorded along with video but audio from the operator to the field is not recorded.

To answer the call, click the intercom button on the video player. The button will turn green to indicate a call in progress. Audio from the field can be heard from the speaker at the Station and the operator can speak to the field via the microphone at the Station.

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Initiating a call by an operator


To manually initiate a call, click the intercom button on the video player. The button will turn green to indicate a call in progress.

Terminating a call
To terminate a call, click the intercom button on the video player or navigate away from the live video page for the camera.

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Adjusting audio for live and recorded video

Adjusting audio for live and recorded video


When audio is enabled on an Axis, MD-100 or CS-3001V streamer, both live and recorded video can play the audio. (Honeywell DVM must be configured to record audio for scheduled and background recordings.) When live or recorded video from a camera with audio enabled is displayed in the video player, the video player displays an audio icon. The audio icon will show a failed indication if there is a problem obtaining the audio stream from the streamer, the audio icon will show a failed indication. For more information, see Using the live video controls and indicators on page 364 or Using the playback controls and indicators on page 375.

Adjusting the volume


To adjust the volume:
1 2

Click on the audio icon. The volume control slider appears. Drag the volume control slider up or down as appropriate.

Clicking off the slider causes it to disappear.

Disabling audio on a scheduled recording


To reduce recording disk storage, it is possible to disable the recording of audio on a scheduled recording. To do this, clear the Record Audio check box when creating the schedule, or clear the check box on the Schedule details tab for an existing schedule. (For more information on configuring a schedule, see Creating a schedule on page 306.)

Disabling audio on a background recording


There are two ways to disable audio for background recording. To disable audio recording:
1 2 3

In the Navigator, select the camera you want to configure. Select the Camera Definition tab. Set the camera to Video only. The audio is now disabled.

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To let an operator disable audio recording:


1 2 3 4 5

In the Navigator, select the camera you want to configure. Select the Camera Definition tab. Set the camera to Audio/Video. Select the Recordings tab. Clear the Audio Enabled check box (in the Background Recording section).

Exporting video with audio


If a recording contains audio, it is automatically included in an exported video clip. Considerations If an exported video clip containing audio is played on a computer without audio capabilities, Windows Media Player displays an error. You can still play the video by acknowledging this error.

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Searching for recorded video

Searching for recorded video


If you know the day on which a video clip was recorded, you can do a simple search (page 383). If you have only partial information about the recording, such as the event that initiated the recording, you need to do an advanced search (page 384). Note that Honeywell DVM only finds video clips that you are allowed to view.

Doing a simple search


A simple search searches for video clips that were recorded on a particular day, or a range of days. To do a basic search:
1

In the Navigation Pane, click Search.

Select the time range you want to search, as described in the following table and then click Go.
To find videos that were recorded: Today, starting from midnight. Yesterday, from midnight to midnight. For the last 7 days, from midnight to midnight. Honeywell Digital Video Manager User Guide 383

Select this: Today Yesterday Last Week

7 Operation

Select this: Last Month

To find videos that were recorded: From the same calendar date last month until today. For example, if today is the August 13, the videos will be from July 13 to August 13. A particular day. You must select the date from a calendar. On or before a specific date. You must select the date from a calendar. A range of dates. You must select the start and end dates from a calendar.

On On or before Between

View the results of your search. See Viewing the search results on page 387.

Doing an advanced search


An advanced search allows you to specify a wide range of search criteria including the camera that recorded the video and the user that initiated the recording. To do an advanced search:
1 2

In the Navigation Pane, click Search. Click the Advanced Search hyperlink.

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Searching for recorded video 3

Specify your search criteria, as described in the following table, and then click Go. If you specify more than one search criteria, make sure they do not conflict. For example, do not select both Activated by and Event because a video cannot be both user-activated and event-activated.
To find videos: Recorded on a particular day, or between specified dates. The values are: Today = Today, starting from midnight. Yesterday = Yesterday, from midnight to midnight. Last Week = For the last 7 days, from midnight to midnight. Last Month = From the same calendar date last month until today. On = A particular day. You must select the date from a calendar. On or before = On or before a specific date. You must select the date from a calendar. Between = A range of dates. You must select the start and end dates from a calendar.

Use this: Video recorded

On cameras

Associated the cameras listed in the left-hand box. To add all cameras to the left-hand box, click Add All. To add a specific camera to the left-hand list, click a camera in the right-hand box and then click Add. Repeat as necessary for other cameras. To remove a camera from the search, click the camera in the left-hand box and then click Remove. Note: If you do not select any cameras, the search will run on all cameras.

Activated by

Filter based on what started the recording. Choose between: All Schedule Event Operator Video Analytics Background Intercom

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Use this: Useri Point ID Event Subpriorityi Valuei


i i

To find videos: Associated with a particular user. Associated with a particular point. Whose description contains the specified text. Associated with a particular event/alarm level and subpriority. Associated with a particular point value. The values, such as fail and tamper, are the same as those that appear in the Alarm Summary display. Associated with a particular area. Whose notes contain the specified text.

Description

Areai Notesi

i You do not need to enter the complete details if you want to search using these fields. For example, if you enter smi in User, the search will return recordings initiated by jsmith, smithson and so on.

View the results of your search. See Viewing the search results on page 387.

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Searching for recorded video

Viewing the search results


The Search Results display lists all recorded videos that match your search criteria, and which you are allowed to view. A blue entry indicates that the video has been restored from archive; a gray entry indicates that the video is stored offline, and must be restored before you can view it. (If you need to restore an archived video, see Restoring video clips on page 418.)

To view a video:
1

Click an entry in the list to see a single frame in the video. (This is generally the first frame. However, if pre-record was defined, it is the frame that corresponds to the time at which the operator clicked Record, or the EBI or Experion event occurred.) If you want to view the video, use the playback controls.

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Having selected a video clip, you can: Type any relevant comments in Notes. (Adding a note can be useful because you can them to retrieve the video clip for later searches.) Archive the video clip immediately by clicking Archive. (Alternatively, change the default archive instructions by changing the Archive on values.) Delete the video clip immediately by clicking Delete. (Alternatively, change the default deletion instructions by changing the Delete on values.) Prevent the video clip being archived or deleted by clearing the Archive on or Delete on check boxes. Export the video clip. For details, see Exporting a video clip on page 411. Take a snapshot of a particular frame in the video clip by clicking
.

View the video in full size by clicking the View full size video hyperlink. This is useful when the resolution of the recorded video clip is greater than the resolution being displayed.

If you do not find the video you are looking for, click the Search again hyperlink at the top-right of the display. (This redisplays your original search criteria, which you can then modify before performing another search.)

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Preventing a video clip from being deleted

Preventing a video clip from being deleted


Honeywell DVM deletes video clips when: the deletion date for the clip has been reached the disk becomes full, triggering automatic deletion of the oldest clips

To prevent an important video clip from being deleted:


1 2

Locate the clip, either through the Recordings tab, or through the Search screen, see Searching for recorded video on page 383. Clear the Delete on check box. Honeywell DVM will now not delete the clip.

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Preventing a video clip from being archived


Honeywell DVM archives video clips when the archive date for the clip is reached. To prevent a video clip from being archived:
1 2

Locate the clip, either through the Recordings tab, or through the Search screen, see Searching for recorded video on page 383. Clear the Archive on check box. Honeywell DVM will now not archive the clip.

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Using the numeric keypad

Using the numeric keypad


When you become familiar with Honeywell DVM, you can use the numeric keypad to quickly perform many tasks. This includes the ability to call up camera views on a local Station, or display and clear multi-monitor camera views. For example, to call up camera 7 on monitor 3, you would use the following key sequence: 7 + 3 Enter (This is shorthand for typing the camera number, pressing the + key, typing the monitor number and then pressing the Enter key.) The following table describes the purpose of the command keys. Considerations Make sure the Num Lock key is turned on before entering commands using the numeric keypad.
Press: Example: n Call up camera 7 on the main monitor:

To: Specify camera n Specify preset n

7 Enter
.n Call up preset 2 for the current camera on the main monitor:

. 2 Enter
Specify monitor n Clear camera on monitor n +n Call up camera 5 on monitor 3:

5 + 3 Enter
-n Clear the surveillance camera on monitor 3:

- 3 Enter
In the case of an alarm monitor with cycling camera views, the currently displayed camera view will be cleared. To ensure the correct camera view is cleared, avoid executing a clear command near the end of a view cycle. Specify a quad view n Specify a sequence n * n Call up quad view 5 on the main monitor:

* 5 Enter
/ n Call up sequence 2 on the main monitor:

/ 2 Enter

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More examples Call up camera 27 on monitor 3: 27 + 3 Enter Call up camera 17, preset 2 on the main monitor: 17 . 2 Enter Call up camera 27, preset 2 on monitor 3: 27 . 2 + 3 Enter Call up quad view 4 on monitor 3: * 4 + 3 Enter Call up sequence 2 on monitor 3: / 2 + 3 Enter

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Administration

This chapter describes how to perform administrative tasks.

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Giving users access to Honeywell DVM


This section describes how to give users access to Honeywell DVM. The tasks you must perform to give a user access to Honeywell DVM depend on how security has been configured for your system. Use the following table to select the appropriate checklist.
If you use: Domain security And you want to give the user access to: Internet Explorer Station (and also Internet Explorer if required) Workgroup security Internet Explorer Station (and also Internet Explorer if required) And you use this type of Station security: N/A Operator-based Station-based N/A Operator-based Station-based And you use integrated Go to: accounts: N/A Yes No N/A N/A Yes No N/A page 395 page 396 page 397 page 398 page 399 page 400 page 401 page 403

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Giving users access to Honeywell DVM

Giving a user access: Internet Explorer in a domain environment


Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.
Task Go to: Done?

Add the users Windows account to the domain group for page 405 Honeywell DVM users. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 406

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Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a domain environment
Prerequisites The user has an integrated account, and can access EBI or Experion. (For details about setting up an integrated account for a user, see the EBI or Experion documentation.)

Considerations Honeywell DVM does not support Ack Only and View Only area access.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Go to: Done?

Add the users Windows account to the domain group for page 405 Honeywell DVM users. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Station on the EBI or Experion server or through a Console Station, add the users account to the Honeywell Administrators group on the domain controller. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer, add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 406

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Giving users access to Honeywell DVM

Giving a user access: operator-based security without integrated accounts in a domain environment
Prerequisites The user has an operator ID, and can access EBI or Experion. (For details about setting up an operator ID for a user, see the EBI or Experion documentation.)

Considerations Honeywell DVM does not support Ack Only and View Only area access.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task If the user logs on to: The Station computer using a Windows account before logging on to Station, add that Windows account to the domain group for Honeywell DVM users. page 405 Go to: Done?

Station without first logging on to the computer, add page 405 the Windows account under which Station runs to the domain group for Honeywell DVM users. Note: If the user uses several such Stations, you must add each of these Station Windows accounts to the domain group. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Station on the EBI or Experion server or through a Console Station, add the Windows account under which Station runs to the Honeywell Administrators group on the domain controller. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer: Add the users Windows account the domain group for Honeywell DVM users. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 405 page 406

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Giving a user access: Station-based security in a domain environment


Prerequisites Station has been configured as described in the EBI or Experion documentation.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Go to: Done?

Add the Windows account under which Station runs to the page 405 domain group for Honeywell DVM users. Note: If the user uses several such Stations, you must add each of these Station Windows accounts to the domain group. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Station on the EBI or Experion server or through a Console Station, add the Windows account under which Station runs to the Honeywell Administrators group on the domain controller. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer: Add the users Windows account to the domain group page 405 for Honeywell DVM users. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 406

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Giving users access to Honeywell DVM

Giving a user access: Internet Explorer in a workgroup environment


Attention The name and password of the users Windows account must be the same on all Database and Camera Servers and on all client computers on which the user accesses Honeywell DVM.

Considerations If you change a users security level while the user is accessing a Honeywell DVM display, the changes will not take effect until the user refreshes the display.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Create the users Windows account on every client computer used to access Honeywell DVM. Create the users Windows account on every Database Server and Camera Server. Add the users Windows account to the DVM_Users group on every Database Server and Camera Server. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 404 page 409 page 406 Go to: Done?

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Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a workgroup environment
Attention The name and password of the users Windows account must be the same on all computers that need that account.

Prerequisites The user has an integrated account, and can access EBI or Experion. (For details about setting up an integrated account for a user, see the EBI or Experion documentation.)

Considerations Honeywell DVM does not support Ack Only and View Only area access.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Create the users Windows account on every Database Server and Camera Server. Add the users Windows account to the DVM_Users group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers. Create the users Windows account on the EBI or Experion Servers and Console Stations. Add the users Windows account to the Honeywell Administrators group on the EBI or Experion Servers and Console Stations. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer, add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. Go to: page 404 page 409 page 404 page 410 Done?

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Giving a user access: operator-based security without integrated accounts in a workgroup environment
Attention The name and password of each Windows account must be the same on every computer that needs that account.

Prerequisites The user has an operator ID, and can access EBI or Experion. (For details about setting up an operator ID for a user, see the EBI or Experion documentation.)

Considerations Honeywell DVM does not support Ack Only and View Only area access.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task If the user logs on to: The Station computer using a Windows account before logging on to Station, create the users Windows account on every Database Server and Camera Server. page 404 Go to: Done?

page 404 Station without first logging on to the computer, create the Windows account under which Station runs on every Database Server and Camera Server. Note: If the user uses several such Stations, you must create each of these Station Windows accounts on every Database Server and Camera Server. Add the account(s) identified above to the DVM_Users group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer: Create the users Windows account on every Database page 404 Server and Camera Server. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 406 page 409

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Task

Go to:

Done?

Add the users Windows account to the DVM_Users page 409 group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers.

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Giving users access to Honeywell DVM

Giving a user access: Station-based security in a workgroup environment


Attention The name and password of each Windows account must be the same on every computer that needs that account.

Prerequisites Station has been configured as described in the EBI or Experion documentation.

Tasks Complete the tasks in the following order.


Task Go to: Done?

Create the Windows account under which Station runs on page 404 on every Database Server and Camera Server. Note: If the user uses several Stations, you must create each of these Station Windows accounts on every Database Server and Camera Server. Add the Windows account under which Station runs to the page 409 DVM_Users group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers. Note: If the user uses several Stations, you must add each of these Station Windows accounts to the DVM_Users group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Station on the EBI or Experion server or through a Console Station, add the Windows account under which Station runs to the Honeywell Administrators group on the server. If the user needs to access Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer: Create the users Windows account on every Database page 404 Server and Camera Server. Add the user to the list of Honeywell DVM users in the Honeywell DVM database. page 406 page 410

Add the users Windows account to the DVM_Users page 409 group on all Database Servers and Camera Servers.

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Creating a Windows user account


Prerequisites The name and password of the Windows account, as specified on client computers.

To create a user account:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Log on to Windows as an administrator. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management to open the Computer Management dialog box. Under Local Users and Groups, click Users. Choose Action >New User. Enter the account name and password (both must be the same as that specified on client computers). Enter an appropriate full name and description. Click Create and then click Close. Log out and back in for the changes to take effect.

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Adding a user to the domain group for Honeywell DVM users


This topic is only applicable if you use domain security. This topic describes how to add users Windows account to the domain group for Honeywell DVM users. (Only users who have been added to this group can access Honeywell DVM.) Prerequisites The domain group for Honeywell DVM has been configured. (See Configuring security for Honeywell DVM in a domain environment on page 289.) You have access rights on the domain controller that allow you to add users to groups.

To add a user to the Honeywell DVM user group:


1 2 3

Log on to the domain controller with a suitable account. Add the user to the group that was created for Honeywell DVM users. Log out and back in for the changes to take effect.

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Giving a user access to Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer


To give a user access to Honeywell DVM through Internet Explorer, you must add their details to the following tables in the Honeywell DVM database: tblOper tblOperAreaonly applicable if you use areas (assets)

Prerequisites You must have Windows administrator privileges to perform this task. (For example, use the account used to install Honeywell DVM.)

Considerations Data you enter is case sensitivethis is critical in the case of Windows accounts and areas. Delete any spaces at the beginning of a field.

To give an Internet Explorer user access:


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Log on to the Database Server. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, expand the Microsoft SQL Servers group as follows: Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group > DatabaseServerName > Databases > DVM > Tables where DatabaseServerName is the name of the Database Server Right-click tblOper and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the tblOper window, complete the fields as follows:
Description The users unique identification number. A number equal to or greater than 5001. The name of the users Windows account.

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Field OperNumber OperName

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Field OperLevel

Description The users security level number, which must correspond with the security level defined in EBI or Experion.: 0 = LVL1 1 = LVL2 2 = OPER 3 = SUPV 4 = ENGR 5 = MNGR

OperControlLevel

The users control level, as configured in EBI or Experion. This ranges from 0 to 255.

6 7 8

Close the tblOper window. If you use areas, right-click tblOperArea and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. In the tblOperArea window, complete the fields as shown in the following table.
Enter The users unique identification number, as specified in tblOper. The area code, as defined in EBI or Experion.

In this field OperNum AreaCode 9

If the user has access to more than one area, repeat step 8 for the other areas. (A separate row is required for each area the user needs to access.)

10 Close the tblOperArea window.

Examples If jsmith is working on a domain and requires access to engineer-level functions and has a control level of 240, the database entry would be:
OperNumber 5001 OperName jsmith OperLevel 4 OperControlLevel 240

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If jsmith (whose OperNumber is 5001) was allowed to access areas A1 and A3, the database entries would be:
OperNum 5001 5001 AreaCode A1 A3

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Adding Windows accounts to the DVM_Users group


To add Windows accounts:
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Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management to open the Computer Management dialog box. Under Local Users and Groups, click Groups. Double-click DVM_Users and click Add. Select the account and click Add. Repeat this step until you have listed all the accounts in the lower box. Click OK. Click Apply in the DVM_Users properties dialog box, then click Close. Log out and log back in for the changes to take effect.

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Adding Windows accounts to the Honeywell Administrators group


To add Windows accounts:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management to open the Computer Management dialog box. Under Local Users and Groups, click Groups. Double-click Honeywell Administrators and click Add. Select the user, click Add. Click OK. Click Apply in the Honeywell Administrators properties dialog box, then click Close. Log out and log back in for the changes to take effect.

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Exporting video clips and audit logs

Exporting video clips and audit logs


When you export files, Honeywell DVM digitally signs the exported files. The digital signature file has a .sig extension and is saved in the same folder as the exported video and audit log files. For more information, see Configuring a digital certificate on page 343.

Exporting a video clip


Honeywell DVM can export video clips in Windows Media Format which can then be viewed using Windows Media Player. You can export either a whole clip or part of a clip from the Recordings tab or the Search Results page. You can also export the Honeywell DVM audit log. For more information see, Exporting the audit log on page 412. When you export a video clip, up to four files can be generated. Honeywell DVM can package these files into a single zip file. For more information, see, Packaging the exported files into a zip file on page 415. Considerations If you want to export more than one MPEG4 video clip, you should wait until the current clip has been exported before exporting the next clip. (During the export process, the video clip is compressed which dramatically increases the load on the CPU. Simultaneously compressing two clips may result in corrupted exported files.)

To export a video clip:


1 2 3 4 5

Select the clip you want to export from the Recordings tab or Search Results page. Click Export. Select the section of the clip you want to export. Click Export. Specify the filename and folder you want the file saved to. Click Save. The Status dialog box will appear. Once the file has been exported, click OK. Click Go back to return to the Recordings tab or Search Results page.

Example If you export a video clip with a filename Frontdoor, the following files will be generated:

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Filename Frontdoor.wmv Frontdoor.wmv.sig Frontdoor.log Frontdoor.log.sig

File contains: The video clip The digital signature for the video clip The text file containing the audit log The digital signature for the audit log

Exporting the audit log


The Honeywell DVM audit log traces users actions and system events and provides an audit trail. These audit events are stored in the Honeywell DVM database. When you export the audit log, system events and the events for the appropriate camera are exported.

Audited events
The following table lists the events that are audited.
Event group Camera events Event start viewing camera enable camera disable camera add camera delete camera move camera to a preset change camera setting Quad view events start viewing a quad view stop viewing a quad view add quad view delete quad view change quad view property add camera to a quad view delete camera from a quad

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Event group Camera sequence events

Event start viewing camera sequence stop viewing camera sequence add camera sequence delete camera sequence change camera sequence property add camera (and preset) to a camera sequence delete camera (and preset) from a camera sequence

Schedule events

add a recording schedule add a video analytics schedule delete a recording schedule delete a video analytics schedule change a recording schedule change a video analytics schedule

Recording events

start user-activated recording end user-activated recording start scheduled recording end scheduled recording start event-activated recording end event-activated recording delete a user-activated recording delete a scheduled recording delete a background recording video clip delete an event-activated recording delete a video analytics recording

Export events Honeywell DVM camera service events Multimonitor

request export of video clip request export of audit log start the Honeywell DVM camera service stop the Honeywell DVM camera service surveillance camera sent to multi-monitor screen camera cleared from multi-monitor screen sequence view sent to multi-monitor screen quad view sent to multi-monitor screen alarm view sent to multi-monitor screen

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Event group Streamer events Video analytics events

Event streamer not responding streamer back to normal enable video analytics disable video analytics start video analytics schedule end video analytics schedule start video analytics activated record end video analytics activated record enter video analytics tuning mode exit video analytics tuning mode start video analytics activity end video analytics activity change video analytics setting

Clip deletion

video clip deletion

Exporting the audit log with a video clip


You can export the Honeywell DVM audit log when you export a video clip. When you export the audit log you can specify how much of the audit log to export with the video clip. Considerations Exporting a large number of events will use a large amount of your system resources. The Export display indicates the limit of events that can be exported. If you want to export more than one MPEG4 video clip, you should wait until the current clip has been exported before exporting the next clip. (During the export process, the video clip is compressed which dramatically increases the load on the CPU. Simultaneously compressing two clips may result in corrupted exported files.)

To export the audit log with a video clip:


1 2

Select the clip you want to export, click Export. Select the section of the clip you want to export.

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Select Export audit log and specify the part of the audit log to be exported as described in the following table:
Description Exports the events which occurred during the specified date and times. Exports the events which occurred from the date and time specified in the Export from property. Exports events which occurred prior to the to property.

Property between these dates and times from the start date and time onwards up to the end date and time

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Click Export. Specify the filename and folder you want the files saved to. Click Save. The Status dialog box will appear. Both files will have the same filename, but the audit log will be saved with a .log extension. Once the files have been exported, click OK. Click Go back to return to the Recordings tab or Search Results page.

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Packaging the exported files into a zip file


Up to four files are generated during the export operation, therefore you might want to package all the exported files into a single zip file. The zipped exported files are saved in the same folder as the exported files and will have the same filename with a .zip extension. To package the exported files into a zip file:
1 2 3 4

Select the video clip you want to export, click Export. Select the section of the video clip you want to export. Select Package up exported files into a single zip file. If you want to export the audit log, select Export audit log and specify the part of the audit log to be exported as described in the following table:
Description Exports the events which occurred during the specified date and times. Exports the events which occurred from the date and time specified in the Export from property. Exports events which occurred prior to the to property. Honeywell Digital Video Manager User Guide 415

Property between these dates and times from the start date and time onwards up to the end date and time

8 Administration 5 6

Click Export. Specify the filename and folder you want the files saved to. Click Save. The Status dialog box will appear. All files will have the same filename, but the audit log will be saved with a .log extension and the zip file will be saved with a .zip extension. Once the files have been exported, click OK. Click Go back to return to the Recordings tab or Search Results page.

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Example If you export a video clip named Frontdoor.wmv, the zipped file will be named Frontdoor.zip.

Verifying the exported Honeywell DVM files


Exported Honeywell DVM files containing a digital signature can be verified by using the Honeywell DVM Video Export Player application. To verify an exported Honeywell DVM file:
1 2

Choose Start > Run, type HWDVSVerifyExports.exe and click OK. The Honeywell DVM Video Export Player will start. Click Browse, select the video clip file and click Open. Honeywell DVM Video Export Player will load the video and any attached audit log file and will attempt to verify the digital signature on the files.

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Archiving and restoring video clips

Archiving and restoring video clips


You use any suitable form of media to archive video clips off-line, such as DVD, CD or tape. As a first step to archiving video clips off-line, Honeywell DVM moves the clips to the archive folder (specified during installation of Honeywell DVM). When Honeywell DVM moves a clip, the clip is longer available from the short or medium term storage, and its status changes to off-line. You can then archive the clips in the archive folder to the media using any backup program, for example NTBackup. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform these tasks.

Automatically archiving video clips


To automatically archive video clips: You can use the Archive After period to set a default period after which the recording clip will be archived. On this date, the clip is archived without operator intervention. You can set the archive after property of every type of recording. (See the Configuration chapter to learn how to configure each recording types Archive After period.) Operators can modify this date by viewing the recording details and changing the Archive on value for the individual recording. When archived, each clip has its own folder and uses the following naming convention: XXXX_mmddyyhhmmss_TTTTTTT_zzzz where XXXX is the camera number mmddyyhhmmss is the date and time the recording was activated by an event or a person. TTTTTTT is the type of recording. The types are user, schedule, event or motion zzzz is the duration in seconds

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Manually archiving video clips


To manually archive video clips:
1 2 3

Go to the Recordings tab. Select the clips, on the clip selection grid. (You can select multiple clips for archiving.) Click Archive. Each clip has its own folder and uses the following naming convention: XXXX_mmddyyhhmmss_TTTTTTT_zzzz Where: XXXX is the camera number mmddyyhhmmss is the date and time the recording was activated by an event or a person TTTTTTT is the type of recording. The types are user, schedule, event or motion zzzz is the duration in seconds

Once the clips have been moved, the clip data is no longer available from the short or medium term storage and marked as off-line in the Honeywell DVM database. The text will also be grayed in the clip grid.

Restoring video clips


Prerequisites The files you want to restore must be in the folder to which they were archived. Use the Restore to original location option in your backup package to copy the files from the off-line storage media to the original folder.

To restore video clips:


1 2 3

Go to the Recordings tab. Select the off-line recording in the Recordings grid. (You restore recordings one at a time.) Click Restore. If all the files for the recording are available, it will be restored.

The video clip is now marked in the Honeywell DVM database as restored and is displayed in blue in the clip grid. The status is the same as the original clip type.

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Next time the restored clip is selected for archiving, a second copy will not be made on tape. The data is deleted from short or medium term storage and the clip is marked as off-line in the clip grid. If an archived clip is selected for deleting, the record in the database and all files that exist on the Honeywell DVM system for that clip (restored or in the archive buffer on disk) are deleted.

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Viewing the status of the Database Server


If you have a redundant Database Servers, you use the Redundancy display to view the servers redundancy status. You can also specify which server is the preferred Database Server. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform these tasks.

To view the redundancy status:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the Redundancy tab.
Description The name of the current preferred Database Server. A list of the available Database Servers and their status. Shows if the servers are replicating correctly. Shows if the redundant pair is still connected.

Property Preferred server Database Servers Replication status Redundant pair connected

To change the preferred Database Server:


1 2 3 4

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the Redundancy tab. From the Preferred server list, select the Database Server you want to make the preferred Database Server.

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Viewing the status of the Camera Servers

Viewing the status of the Camera Servers


You use the Server Status display to view the status of each camera server, which is either: OK or Software Fault. Note that this display is dynamically updated. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform these tasks.

To view the status of the Camera Servers:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the Server Status tab.

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Viewing the disk usage details of a Camera Server


Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR level access to perform this task.

To view disk space details:


1 2 3 4

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the Disk Space tab. In the Camera Server box, select the Camera Server whose disk usage you want to view. The disk usage details are shown in the Disk Usage table. Each row shows the details for a folder that the Camera Server is currently writing to. (To learn about the other properties, see Configuring disk space administration on page 333.) If you want to update the details as you are viewing it, click Refresh. (The details are not automatically updated.)
Description The folder in which video clips are stored. The amount of space (GB) used by completed video clips. (Video clips that are still being recorded are not included in this value.) Remaining free disk space, expressed in (GB) and as a percentage. An indication of the rate at which videos are being stored on the disk. Note that the value is only based on the usage rate for the minute before you called up the display, or since you last clicked Refresh.

Property Directory DVM Clips (GB)

Free Space (GB) Free Space (%) Hourly Usage (MB/hr)

Disk Health

Indicates the disks health, either: OK or Fault.

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Manually resynchronizing redundant Database Servers


This topic is only applicable if you have redundant Database Servers and one of the servers (primary or backup) has not been in service for more than 14 days. (If a server has been out of service for less than 14 days, the servers will automatically resynchronize when the server is returned to service.) In this procedure, publisher refers to the primary (preferred) server and subscriber refers to the backup (secondary) server. To synchronize the servers:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

On the publisher server, choose Start > Programs > Open SQL Enterprise Manager. Choose Tools > Replication > Show Replication Monitor Group to show the Replication Monitor Group in the tree on the left. Expand the Replication Monitor Group until you can see Publishers > DatabaseServerName > DVM:DVM. Right-click DVM:DVM and choose Properties. If an introductory window appears, click OK. Click the Subscriptions tab. Click Push New. Click Next on the wizards startup window. When Choose Subscribers appears, select the subscriber server in the Enabled Subscribers group.

10 Click Next. 11 Check that the Subscription Database Name is DVM and then click Next. 12 When Set Merge Agent Schedule appears, click Change and set the

properties as follows: Occurs Daily Every 1 day(s) Occurs every 1 minute Starting at 12:00:00AM Ending at 11:59:00PM Start date: current date No end date

13 Click Next. 14 When Initialize Subscription appears, select No, the Subscriber already

has the schema and data and then click Next.


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proxy for the Subscriber when resolving conflict and then click Next.
16 Check that the SQLServerAgent is running and click Next. 17 Click Finish. 18 When the wizard has finished, choose Replication Monitor Group> Agents

> Snapshot Agents.


19 Right-click DVM in the right pane and choose Start Agent. 20 Wait till the agent has started (A snapshot was generated appears in Last

Action.)
21 Choose Replication Monitor > Agents > Merge Agents. 22 Right-click DVM in the right pane and choose Start Agent. 23 Wait till the agent has started. 24 Exit SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

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Re-synchronizing the date and time on the servers

Re-synchronizing the date and time on the servers


The Time Service synchronizes the system time with the preferred time source server every hour. If you change the time on the preferred time source server (or if it has been down for time), and you want all other computers to synchronize immediately, you need to stop and restart the Time Service on each computer. To re-synchronize the time:
1 2 3 4

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. Double-click Administrative Tools and open Services. Right-click on the Windows Time service and select Stop. Right-click on the Windows Time service again and select Start.

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Viewing basic information about your Honeywell DVM system


The About display shows basic details about your Honeywell DVM system. Prerequisites You must have ENGR or MNGR security level to perform these tasks.

To view the license details:


1 2 3

Navigate to the Honeywell DVM pages. In the Navigation Pane, click Administration. Click the About tab.
Description The version of Honeywell DVM you use. Either: The name of the EBI or Experion server if Honeywell DVM is used in conjunction with EBI or Experion <None> if Honeywell DVM is not used in conjunction with EBI or Experion

Property Version Information Version Host Information Host Name

General License Information Cameras IE Clients Redundancy The number of cameras licensed for your system. The number of Internet Explorer clients licensed for your system. Indicates whether Database Server redundancy is licensed for your system. Indicates whether the premium algorithm is licensed for your system. The number of cameras licensed to use the object tracking algorithm. The number of cameras licensed to use the object tracking and classification algorithm. The number of cameras licensed to use the stationary object detection algorithm.

Video Analytics License Information Premium Algorithm Object Tracking Algorithm Object Tracking and Classification Algorithm Stationary Object Detection Algorithm

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Property Third Party License Information Third Party Licenses

Description Click View Licenses to see the license details for third party products used by Honeywell DVM for specialized tasks, such as video compression.

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Changing the Honeywell DVM license


This section describes how to change the Honeywell DVM license. Prerequisites The new Honeywell DVM license.

Considerations If you have a redundant server system, you have to perform this procedure on each Database Server.

To change the Honeywell DVM license:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Log on to the Database Server as a Windows Administrator. Choose Start > Run. Type regedit and click OK. Locate the key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\software\Honeywell\DVM\Server Double-click System Number, enter the System Number and click OK. Double-click Authorization Key, enter the Authorization Key and click OK. Exit the Registry. Restart all Database and Camera Servers.

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9
Go to: page 430 page 435 page 437 page 444

This chapter describes how to use the Performance Monitor and open the log file. It also describes how to overcome common problems.
To: Use the Performance monitor Configure the Engineering log Troubleshoot common problems Troubleshoot EBI or Experion integration

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Using the Performance Monitor


You use the Performance Monitor to check a range of information, including: Camera status Requested and sent frame rates Frame sizes received by the Camera Server Network traffic (some network cards support this feature)

The following procedure describes how to add a camera parameter, such as Measured frames per second to the Performance Monitor chart. For more information about the Performance Monitor, refer to its Help. You can add a camera parameter (page 430) or a playback parameter (page 431) to the Performance Monitor. To open Performance Monitor:
1 2

In Windows, select Start > Run. The Run box appears. Type perfmon and click OK. The performance monitor appears.

Adding a camera parameter to the list To add a camera parameter to the list:
1 2 3 4 5

Click the + icon on the toolbar to open the Add to Chart dialog box. Click Select counters from computer. Either select a Camera Server from the list or type the name of the Camera Server the camera belongs to. Select DVM Camera from the Performance object list. Click Select counters from list and select the required counter. The following table describes the Honeywell DVM Camera counters.
Description Current camera status may be 0 (disabled), 1 (enabled), 2 (connecting), 3 (failed), 4 (disconnecting). Frame size is the average number of bytes per frame during the last sampling period.

Counter Current camera status Frame size (bytes)

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Counter Measured bandwidth (Kbps) Measured frames per second Measured packets per second Recorded bandwidth (Kbps) Recorded frames per second Recorded packets per second Requested bandwidth (Kbps) Requested frames per second

Description Measured bandwidth is the bandwidth at which frames were streamed from the digital camera. Measured frames per second is the rate at which frames were streamed from the digital camera. Measured packet rate is the rate at which packets are being read from the streamer. Recorded bandwidth is the bandwidth that was requested to be stored to disk. Recorded frames per second is the frame rate that is currently being recorded to disk. Recorded packets per second is the packet rate that is currently being recorded to disk. Requested bandwidth is the bandwidth that was requested of the digital camera. Requested frames per second is the frame rate that was requested of the digital camera.

6 7 8 9

Click Select instances from list and select the instance. Click Add then click Close. Right-click on the counter and select Properties to open the System Monitor Properties dialog box. Change the properties as required, click Apply then click OK.

The camera parameter appears in the chart. Adding a playback parameter to the list To add a playback parameter to the list:
1 2 3 4 5

Click the + icon on the toolbar to open the Add to Chart dialog box. Click Select counters from computer. Either select a Camera Server from the list or type the name of the Camera Server the camera belongs to. Select DVM Playback from the Performance object list. Click Select counters from list and select the required counter. The following table describes the Honeywell DVM Camera counters.

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Counter Current playback speed Current playback status Measured frames per second Measured playback packets per second

Description Current playback speed is the ratio of playback frame rate to the recorded frame rate. Current playback status may be 0 (paused), 1 (forward play), 2 (reverse play). Measured frames per second is the rate at which frames were streamed from the Camera Server. Measured packet rate is the rate at which packets were streamed from the Camera Server as specified on the Camera Definition tab.

6 7 8 9

Click Select instances from list and select the instance. Click Add then click Close. Right-click on the counter and select Properties to open the System Monitor Properties dialog box. Change the properties as required, click Apply then click OK.

The playback parameter appears in the chart.

Adding a new counter log You may want to create a new counter log and add the variables to that log. Creating a new log enables you to record the performance of a system, and to load the performance statistics into the System Monitor.
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To add a new counter log in Windows 2000:


1 2 3

From the Windows Start menu, select Run. The Run dialog appears. Type perfmon and then press ENTER. From the left-hand pane, right-click on Counter Logs, and select New Log Settings. The New Log Settings dialog appears. Enter the name of your counter log. The log file configuration window appears. Click the Add button. Select the target computer from the Select counters from computer. Select the target Performance object. (Look for DVM Camera, DVM Camera Manager Server, DVM Camera Server, etc.) Either select All Counters, or, holding down the Ctrl key, select all the individual counters you want recorded. Click the Add button.

4 5 6 7 8 9

10 Click the Close button. 11 Click OK.

The new counter log immediately begins collecting data. To add a new counter log in Windows XP and Windows 2003:
1 2 3

From the Windows Start menu, select Run. The Run dialog appears. Type perfmon and then press ENTER. From the left-hand pane, right-click on Counter Logs, and select New Log Settings. The New Log Settings dialog appears. Enter the name of your counter log. The log file configuration window appears. Click the Add Counters button. Select the target computer from the Select counters from computer. Select the target Performance object. (Look for DVM Camera, DVM Camera Manager Server, DVM Camera Server, etc.) Either select All Counters, or, holding down the Ctrl key, select all the individual counters you want recorded.

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Click the Add button.

10 Click the Close button. 11 Click OK.

The new counter log immediately begins collecting data.

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Configuring the Engineering Log

Configuring the Engineering Log


The Engineering Log records events and error messages that can help you solve problems.
Attention The Engineering Log is not the same as the audit logthe audit log contains an audit trail of user and system actions. See Configuring the audit log on page 332.

The default filename of the Engineering Log is DVM.log and its default location is as follows.
Computer Client computers Default location \Honeywell\digitalvideoclient\logs

Database and Camera Servers \Honeywell\digitalvideomanager\logs

You configure the Engineering Log using hwdvslogconfig.exe, which is located in the following folders.
Computer Client computers Location \DigitalVideoClient

Database and Camera Servers \DigitalVideoManager\Bin

You can configure the following aspects of the Engineering Log: Basic settings, such as the logs name, location and maximum file size. The paranoid levels. Each paranoid relates to a Honeywell DVM sub-system and determines what is included in the Engineering Log. The levels range from 0 to 100, the higher the level, the more information is captured in the log. The default is 10.

To configure the Engineering Log:


1 2 3

Navigate to and then double-click hwdvslogconfig.exe. Click Modify. Change the log settings and paranoid levels as appropriate.

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Click Save. If you made changes that require the DVM Logger Service to be restarted, a message will prompt you to restart the service. Click OK and then restart the DVM Logger Service.

To restart the DVM Logger Service:


1 2 3 4 5

Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools to open the Administrative Tools dialog box. Double-click Services. Right-click DVM Logger and choose Restart. A message appears informing you which other services will also be restarted. Click Yes to restart the services. Close the Services dialog box and then close the Administrative Tools dialog box.

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Common problems

Common problems
This section describes how to solve common problems. They are categorized as follows: General problems Problems specific to CS-3001V video Problems specific to audio Problems specific to EBI or Experion integration

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General problems
Text does not appear in displays If the text labels do not appear on the displays, restart IIS on the Database Server. To restart the Web site:
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On the Database Server, choose Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Internet Service Manager. Right-click on the computer name and select Restart IIS. Click OK when the dialog is displayed and wait for IIS to be restarted. Once IIS has restarted, go to the client and start Internet Explorer. From the Tools menu select Internet Options. Click the Delete Files button on the General tab. When the Delete Files dialog box appears, click OK then click OK again to close the Internet Options dialog box.

Video quality changes erratically If the video is not streaming smoothly, check the network cards are set to full duplex and you have the latest network drivers installed. Cannot see live video If you cannot see live video from a camera, try the following:
1 2

Ping the camera. If you receive time-outs then the network may not be properly configured. Navigate to the streamer Web pages. Check whether video can be streamed directly from the streamer Web pages.

Cannot record video for a camera If the camera will not record, check the following:
1 2

Make sure that there is sufficient disk space on the Camera Server. Check the area of the hard drive that you are recording to is NTFS.

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Cannot access Honeywell DVM You get the following message when you attempt to access Honeywell DVM: You do not have permission to access DVM. If you received this message when you attempted to access the Honeywell DVM Web site, check the following:
1

Check all Windows accounts and passwords have been configured correctly. For more information about security, see Giving users access to Honeywell DVM on page 394. If account names and passwords were changed, reboot the computers the changes were made on. Make sure the Honeywell DVM client was installed after Station was installed.

2 3

Text is in English instead of in your language If text is in English instead of the specified language, check the following:
1 2 3

The version of Honeywell DVM installed on your system is an internationalized version. The appropriate language pack has been installed on the server and client computers. Restart the Web server. See Text does not appear in displays on page 438, for details.

Recording icon does not appear on a live view If the recording icon does not appear on a live view, check you have specified record for on the Recordings tab for user-activated recordings. Live video mouse PTZ controls do not appear Check whether the camera supports continuous PTZ. Video does not appear in quad view If the video does not appear, check the camera is in an area that the operator is allowed to view. Zip file is not created when attempting to package exported files into a single zip file If the Honeywell DVM client has recently been installed, try closing and restarting Internet Explorer client or rebooting the Honeywell DVM client computer.
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Cannot view live video When you attempt to view live video, you get the following error message. The camera is unavailable due to problems with the cameras server Check the following:
1 2

Check that the camera service on the cameras Camera Server is running. If Honeywell DVM is configured to work in a workgroup environment, add the IP address and name of all Database and Camera Servers to the following hosts files: Camera Servers EBI or Experion servers Stations

- Internet Explorer clients For details, see Updating the hosts file on page 240. Live video window is blank except for a no video message A NO VIDEO message appear in the live video window. Some streamers (such as Axis 241S and Axis 241Q) notify Honeywell DVM when they detect video loss. In such cases, Honeywell DVM changes the camera icon in the Navigation Pane to the failed camera icon. To restore the camera to operation, find out why the streamer detects no signal from the camera. Recorded video window is blank except for a no video message After performing a search, you find that some clips are black and display the NO VIDEO message. This means that the camera failed during recording, but recording continued despite the failed camera. Camera continues to move after the last control This can occur on cameras that do not support, or have not been wired for, duplex communications. To fix the problem you need to change the value of the CommandRepeat field in Honeywell DVM Database. The value specifies how many times Honeywell DVM repeats the last sent command. Generally, the last sent command is the stop commandin which case, the camera is instructed to stop the camera movement multiple times.

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To change the CommandRepeat field on the Database Server:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

On the cameras Camera Control tab, clear the Receive Data Enabled check box. On the Database Server, choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager. In the Console Tree, double-click Microsoft SQL Servers > SQL Server Group. Expand the name of the Database Server in Databases > DVM > Tables. Right-click tblCamera and choose Open Table > Return All Rows. Select the row for the camera which is having problems and press END. In the CommandRepeat box for that camera, enter a value greater than 1. Test whether the problem still occurs. If it does, increase the value again.

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Problems specific to CS-3001V video


Video window is black, and clicking the Record button seems to work, but no video is recorded Check that your video signal works and is not simply a black video stream by making sure it is focused correctly and shows the images you expect. Check that you have enough video RAM on your client computer. The CS-3001V requires that you have at least 16MB of video memory on your video card. The camera does not fail when the video cable is pulled out of the CamStation Pulling the video cable out of the CamStation streamer should cause the camera to fail in Honeywell DVM. Check that the 75ohm resistance is set to ON. Sporadic bursts of colorful blocks appear in the video The CS-3001V streamer is sensitive to video signals, and any voltage surge or voltage imbalances can cause the video image to become blocky with various colors (usually pink, green and purple). Test the CS-3001V streamer on an isolated system to ensure that it is not the streamer that is faulty. If you find that image blockiness and various colors do show up try shielding the electronic equipment and check that the power supplies and other equipment are not faulty. Video on the CamStation is very jerky, even at low resolutions The CS-3001V streamer may have difficulty handling high-resolution images (4CIF and D1) when the scene is complex and full of motion. This is because it is unable to process the large amount of data in this particular case. So this jerky effect on the video can be normal in certain situations. If you are finding the images are extremely jerky or are still jerky at low resolutions (CIF or 4CIF Expanded) then it could be the network that is the problem. The first thing to do is monitor the amount of collisions happening on your network. The simplest test is to see if the port on the network switch that the CamStation is connected to is flashing orange or indicating that there are collisions. Please refer to the Network section of the CS-3001V User Guide for possible causes of this and possible remedies to this situation.

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Problems specific to audio


Cannot to hear audio Check that the audio source is an amplified signal. You can test this by increasing the volume of the audio source or connecting another device, where it is known that the signal is amplified. Try playing audio from Windows Media Player to verify that the Windows operating system on the client is capable of playing audio signals. When this is confirmed, try going to the Honeywell DVM pages again. Loud squealing when listening to audio This is most likely caused by audio feedback. Position the microphone further away from the speakers and/or reduce the output volume. Audio is unclear with a lot of noise/static Adjust the volume of the audio source to ensure that the audio levels are not too high.

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Problems specific to EBI or Experion integration


Error messages related to Honeywell DVM are being raised You see one or more of these error messages in Station: Unable to contact DVM server. The server may be down. or Error initializing DVM If you receive either or these error messages, check the following:
1 2

Check that the Windows accounts and passwords have been set up correctly. See Windows security on page 96. Close and restart Station.

Event-activated recording does not work correctly Check the following:


1

Check that the following items associated with the event belong to the same area: The point that triggered the event The camera that records in response to the event The Station or Internet Explorer client computer used when attempting to view the recorded video The operator who wanted to view the recorded video

2 3

Make sure that the point has been configured correctly. See Configuring event-activated recording on page 335. Check that the data and time on the Honeywell DVM and EBI or Experion servers are synchronized. See Synchronizing the date and time on the servers on page 222. Check that the Windows mngr account exists on all Honeywell DVM Database Servers and Camera Servers, and that it uses the same password as used in EBI or Experion Server. (The password for this account must be the same throughout your system.)

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Check that evtact is running on the EBI or Experion server by typing the following in a Command Prompt window: Usrlrn -a -p This lists all the tasks that are running on the server. If evtact is not listed, start it by typing: addtsk evtact 181 (181 is the LRN reserved for used by evtact.)

Cannot see a video clip See Event-activated recording does not work correctly on page 444. Cannot access Honeywell DVM You see the following message: Unable to contact DVM server. The server may be down. There are two possible causes: Honeywell DVM may not have been correctly installed on the client computer. Check the setup by clicking the DVM icon in the Station System Menu display. If an error occurs, reinstall the client as specified in New installation checklist on page 204. Security between Station, EBI or Experion server and Honeywell DVM servers has not been correctly configured. Check whether: Windows accounts have been correctly configured. See Windows security on page 96. If you use operator-based security, it may not be correctly configured. See Giving a user access: operator-based security with integrated accounts in a workgroup environment on page 400. If you use Station-based security, Station may not be correctly configured. See Giving users access to Honeywell DVM on page 394.

The video window is blank, without an error message The operator does not have access to the area in which the alarm was generated. (The operator may have an adequate security level to view the alarm, but does not have access to the area in which the alarm was raised.) See Event-activated recording does not work correctly on page 444.

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Index
A
access points, configuring event-activated recording 335 access to Honeywell, giving 394 accounts, Windows specialized Honeywell DVM 98 user 394 administration 393 alarm monitor cycle time, configuring 342 algorithms motion detection 125 object tracking 125 object tracking and classification 125 architecture, system 16 archiving configuring off-line storage 417 preventing 390 areas (assets), described 93 assets (areas), described 93 audio adjusting for live and recorded video 381 configuring Axis 2191 Audio Module 349 configuring Axis streamers 348 configuring CamStation CS-3001V 351 audit log audited events 412 configuring 332 exporting 411 Axis 2191 Audio Module, configuring 349 Axis streamers, configuring for audio 348 factors affecting 27 video 35

C
Camera Servers described 16, 108 disk usage, viewing 422 requirements for 108 viewing the status of 421 camera streamers capabilities of supported types 120 described 16 support for 115 cameras adding 290 configuration tabs Camera Control 299 Camera Definition 291 Recording Presets 295 configuring 290 controls 364 disabling and enabling 365 requirements 114 streamers 115 symbols in the Navigation Pane 370 types of 114 viewing its video 360, 362 cameras, guidelines for video analytics 146 CamStation CS-3001V, configuring for audio 351 checklist for implementing video analytics 144 configuration tasks 287 controls and indicators audio 381 live video 364 mouse PTZ 367 numeric keypad 391

B
bandwidth requirements audio 90 calculating 33

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Index

playback 375 custom applications, writing 111

H
hardware and software requirements 116 Honeywell DVM installation account, described 217 Honeywell DVM license changing 428 viewing 426 Honeywell DVM Object Model 111 Honeywell DVM version, viewing 426

D
Database Servers described 16, 108 redundancy 109 requirements for 108 viewing the status of 420 design and planning of Honeywell DVM system 19 digital certificate checking correct installation 344 configuring 343 configuring third-party digital certificate 345 installing a third party certificate 343 disabling a camera 365 disk space administration, configuring 333 displays, described 18 domain security 96

I
image complexity, described 28 installation camera streamers 242 checklists described 202 top-level 204 PTZ cameras 271 start here 201 integration with other products EBI 17 Experion 17 intercom, video support for 113 using 379

E
EBI described 17 integration issues 17, 91 server 16 enabling a camera 365 error log 435 event-activated recording, configuring 335 events that are audited 412 Experion described 17 integration issues 17, 91 exporting video and audit logs 411

K
keypad, using the numeric 391

L
license, Honeywell viewing 426 license, Honeywell DVM changing 428 lighting guidelines for video analytics 148 logs audit 332 error 435

G
groups, Windows specialized Honeywell DVM 98

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M
minimum object size (MOS), described 126 motion detection configuring 314 symbols 371 motion detection algorithms 125 Motion JPEG, described 30 mouse, using to control PTZ camera 367 MPEG, described 30 multicasting 24 multi-monitors, configuring 340

system 19 points, configuring event-activated recording 335 presets adding 369 defining special 346 described 369 recordings 295 using 369 privacy zones configuring 303 described 369 PTZ controls 367

N
network cameras, described 114 networks architecture conventional 22 dedicated 23 types of 22 VLAN 23 design issues 21 tips 26 management 25 numeric keypad, using 391

Q
quad views creating 309 described 287 viewing 377

R
recorded videos presets 295 scheduling 306 searching 383 viewing 373 recording controls 364 redundancy, Database Servers 109 region of interest (ROI), described 126 regions of interest defining for motion detection 314 defining for object tracking and classification 322 described 371 symbols 371 restoring archived video clips 418 resynchronizing redundant Database Servers 423

O
object tracking algorithm 125 object tracking and classification configuring 322 symbols 371 object tracking and classification algorithm 125 operation (using Honeywell DVM) 359 operator-based security described 95 overview of Honeywell DVM 15

P
pan and tilt, using 365 performance monitor 430 planning and design of Honeywell DVM

S
schedules creating 306 deleting 308

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Index

scripting 111 searching recorded videos 383, 387 security levels 100 managing users 394 types of 95 Windows 96 sequences creating 311 viewing 378 servers Camera 108 Database 108 Video Analytics 128 snapshots locating 372 recording 364 specifying the folder for 331 software and hardware requirements 116 special presets defining 346 described 369 Station-based security described 95 Stations described 17 requirements 92 status points, configuring event-activated recording 335 storage requirements audio 90 calculating 31 factors affecting 27 video 35 symbols camera 370 video analytics 371

using 369 transmission techniques 24 troubleshooting 429 types of 125

U
unicasting 24 uninstalling Honeywell DVM 283 upgrades checklists described 202 top-level 213 planning 279 start here 201 user interface, Honeywell DVM 18 users, giving access to Honeywell DVM 394

V
version of Honeywell DVM, viewing 426 video analytics algorithms 125 basic characteristics 131 choosing between 130 configuring 313 example scenarios 134 guidelines for cameras and streamers, choosing 145 cameras, placing 150 checklist 144 field of view, adjusting 168 introduction 123 lighting 148 MOS, defining 195 ROIs, defining 177 introduction 124 minimum object size (MOS), described 126 region of interest (ROI), described 126 symbols 371 Video Analytics Server 128 video intercom 113 configuring 354 setting up Honeywell DVM 357

T
time and date, resynchronizing 425 tours configuring 304 described 369

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Index

video requirements 114 videos exporting 411 preventing archiving 390 preventing deletion 389 searching recorded 383 viewing live 360, 362 viewing recorded 373 viewing live video Internet Explorer 362 Station 360 recorded videos 373 VLAN, described 23

W
Windows accounts and groups giving a user access to Honeywell DVM 394 specialized Honeywell DVM 98 Windows security 96 workgroup security 96

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