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MA R K 21

MODEL M 20 C
Copyright 2006 - All Rights Reserved Mooney Airplane Company, Inc.
Louis Schreiner Field, Kerrville, Texas 78028
POH1185
YEAR
1966
MARK 21
0 WNERS MANUAL
MODEL SERI AL NUMBERS
; Revised Nov. 1965
Thank you for choosing a Mooney.
The wisdom of your selection of a Mooney Mark 21 will
be proved many times a.s your hours in this exceptional
airplane increase.
i t takes a long time and a lot of flying to appreciate
al l of the many outstanding features built into the
Mark 21.
This owners manual will help you know your airplane
better and i3)ill make your experience with the Mark
21 more enjoyable.
Welcome to the rapidly growing family of Mooney own-
ers.
MOONE Y AI WCRAFP, I NC.
LOUI S SCHREI NER FI ELD . KERRVI LLE, T EXAS
MARK 21
OWNER'S MANUAL
PART i DESCRIPTBOH AWD OPERATIOW
OF COMPONENTS
Page
Genera 1
Propel l er
Engi ne
Engi ne Igni ti on
Fuel System
E l eet ri sal System
Ai rframe
Landi ng Gear
Fl i ght Control s
Mooney Posi t i ve Control System
Tr i m System
Fl aps
Vacuum System
Brakes
Heati ng and Vent i l at i on Systems
Pi ct ures
Genera I
Weight and Bal ance
Pre-F l i ght Inspecti on
Enteri ng the Ai rpl ane
Starting t he Engi ne
Col d Wea~her and Manual Starting
Taxi i ng and Ground Operation
Pre Take-Off Check
Take-Of f and Cl i mb
Power Changes
Crui se Procedures
Indi cated Ai rspeed
Fuel Management
Let-Down Procedures
Landi ng Procedures
Normal Landi ng
Stopping the Engi ne
PART III SERViCE AND MAINTENANCE
General
Ground Wandl ing
Propeller
Engi ne
Battery
Care of Interior
Care of Exteri or
Windows
l andi ng Gear
Vacuum Operated Step
Required Data
Service l et t er s and Bul l et i ns
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PART I V PERFORMANCE DATA
Take-Off and Clim,b Data
(Fi g. 1)
Cl i mb Performance (Fi g. 2)
Crui se ~ n d Range (Fi g. 3)
(Fi g. 3A)
(Fi g. 3B)
(Fi g. 3C)
(Fi g. 3D)
St al l Speed vs. Bank Angl e
(Fi g. 4)
Maximum Range & Gl i de Chart
( Fi g. 5)
Landi ng Data (Fi g. 6)
PART V QPERATBNG LBMITATIONS
Ai rspeed l i mi t at i ons
Engine Operating l .i mi tati ons
Engine Instrument Markings
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MARK 21
(M20C)
THREE VIEW
PART i
DESCRIPnON AND OPERATlON OF COMPONENTS
GENERAL
The Mark 21 is a single engine four-place low wing, ret ract abl e
t ri cycl e landing gear airplane. The design and operation of t hi s
ai r cr af t a r e conventional with few exceptions. Thi s section will
descri be s ome of t he components of t he Marlc 21 and operating
details.
PROPELLER
The Mark 21 uses an aluiiiinum alloy constant speed propeller
of 74 inch diameter. The pitch of the blades i s controlled by
engine oil pr essur e which act s to i ncrease or decr ease blade
angle of attack and thereby control engine speed. The propel l er
control in the cabin operat es the propeller governor which
controls the oil pr es s ur e provided to the propeller hub. The
governor setting functions to niaintain t he engine at a constant
speed by actuating blade angle of attack. In essence then, t he
function of the propel l er control in t he cabin i s to regulate and
maintain the rotational speed of the engine at a desi red setting.
The Mark 21 i s powered by the Lyco~ni ng 180 hp 0-360-A 1D
four cylinder engine. Thi s engine uses 91/98 octane fuel. Four
rubber bushings on the aft si de of the engine provide mounting
and vibration isolation. Engine manifold f r essur e i s regulated
by the push-pull throttle con:i-ol on the panel.
The fuel-to-air ratio (mixture) i s regulated by the hexagon
shaped push-pull control located between t he throttle and pro-
peller controls in the cabin. The Mark 21 engine baffling di r ect s
ai r flow over the cylinders for cooling in flight. Cowl flaps a r e
provided on t he lower cowling to allow mor e f r e e ai r flow on
t he ground a nd during low speed, high power conditions (i.e.,
climb conditions). Cowl flaps should always be open on the
ground, and prolonged engine operation on the ground should be
avoided to prevent engine overheating. A push-pull control i s
provided below the i n ~ t ~ u n ~ e n t panel and to the right of the
pilot for operation of the cowl flap.
The engine has a pressui-e-type wet-sump lubrication syst em.
It has an eight quart capacity; however, a s a general rule, when
t he oil l evel drops below six quarts, one quart i s added. This
will maintain the oil level between the six and seven quart level.
See Pa r t I11 f or type of oil used and t i ~ n e between oil chanzes.
An oil t emper at ur e thermostat, located in t he oil r eser voi r , is
s e t for 1 8 0 " ~ . t o a s s ur e adequate operating engine oil tempera-
t ures. The oil cool er is mounted on the lower left si de of the
cowling. An oil fi l t er i s available a s optional equipment.
The Mark 21 ignition syst em has the following features:
1. Two Bendix magnetos, t he left magneto being equipped with
a s et of r et ar d br eaker points.
2. A srarri ng vibrator, located on the upper firewall, which
furni shes a shower of spar ks for starting.
3. A switch which combines both ignition and st art i ng functions.
4. Shielded spar k plugs and ignition har ness to suppress radio
noises.
When t he push-type s t ar t er switch i s activated in the "st art "
position, t he s t ar t er vibrator sends an interrupted current
through t he ret ard-breaker points while t he right magneto i s
grounded out. The left magneto then provides a shower of spar ks
to each cylinder aft er t he piston has reached top dead center on
the coinpression stroke. The engine s t ar t s sooner and easi er
because of this system.
FUEL SYSTEM
Fuel i s contained in two integral sealed sections in t he front
par t of each wing root. Each tank will hold 26 gallons of gasoline.
These fuel tanks each have a s u n ~p drain under t he wing f r om
which fuel liiay be sampled to check for water or sedinlent con-
tamination. A s ~ x a l l plastic cup with an actuator prong is pro-
vided to obtain fuel s a l ~~p l e s . If water is present in the fuel, a
distinct l i ne separat i ng t he water fro111 t he gasoline lnay be
seen through t he pl ast i c cup. Water, being heavi er, will be on
the bottonl of the cup, and the light-colored fuel will be on
top.
Aluii~inum fuel lines feed t he fuel from t he tank to a two-way,
positive-setting sel ect or valve on the floor ahead of the pilot' s
seat. The sel ect or valve feeds fuel fro111 one of the tanks at a
t i l i ~e, and al so has an "off" position for extended periods of
st orage o r for emergency use. The sel ect or valve al so contains
a suiilp drai n which i s actuated by pulling the ring adjacent t o
the fuel valve handle. Switch the sel ect or valve handle to t he
right and left tanks to dr ai n the respective lines, Be s ur e sump
drai n ret urns to normal closed position after releasing t he ring.
Fuel is fed from t he sel ect or valve through the el ect r i c boost
pun~p, then to the engine driven P U I ~ ~ P and into t he carburet or.
The el ect ri c boost pulnp is turned on for take-off and landing
to provide fuel pr es s ur e if t he engine driven pul~lp malfunctions.
I WA R N I N G
Under no ci rcumst ances should aviation fuel of a
lower gr ade than 91/98 octane be used. Aviation
fuels may be distinguished by their color: 80 octane
is red, 91 octane is blue, and 100 octane is green.
If 91/98 octane is not available, 100/130 octane gas-
oline may be used.
THE ELECTRI CAL SY%"TEM
The Mark 21 el ect ri cal systelii i s provided with a 50 amp 12
volt generator and a 35 amp-hour battery which i s located on
the forward left si de of t he firewall. All el ect ri cal syst el vs can
be turned off by the inaster switch which actuates a relay located
at the battery. The inaster switch for the electrical system is
located at the left-hand side of the flight panel. The electrical
system operates all the electrical accessories listed below:
1. Radios
2. Engine st art er
3. Starter vibrator
4. Navigation lights and interior lights
5. Landing light
6. Rotating beacon (if installed)
7. Heated pitot (if installed)
8. Tur n and bank (if installed)
9. Cigarette lighter
10. El ect ri c landing gear (if installed)
11. Fuel gages
12. Electric fuel pui~lp
13. Stall warning horn
14. Landing gear warning horn and warning lights
NOTE : The engine has its own separate electrical system
and will continue to run, even though the inaster
switch has been turned off, or even though the ac-
cessory electrical systein should malfunction.
Interior Lights
Panel illumination is provided by two adjustable spot lights
~nounted on the headliner. Theselights a r e controlled by a rheostat
located on the headliner near the lights. The fuel selector valve
i s illuininated by a sinall light mounted under the panel on the
left side. The intensity of this light i s controlled by rotating
the lens housing. The cabin light, located on the headliner near
the center of the cabin, can be used to illuminate the panel if
the instrument lights malfunction.
Ammeter
The ammeter in the engine instrument cluster will indicate if
the battery is charging or discharging. A malfunction in the
generator or voltage regulator will be shown as a discharge at
the ammeter-a low battery will cause a charge indication.
The 13Icct riral Panel
'l'he elertric~al pariel is divided ir~to two parts:
a. The electrical toggle switches, on the lower left side of the
pilot's panel, act in combination both a s on-off switches and
a s breaker switches. Should any of these circuits be over-
loaded, the switch automatically turns to the " off" position.
These switches are, from left to right:
1. 'The el ert ri cal fuel pul-np
2. Ai l optional equipment switch
3. An optional equip~nent switch
4. 'She pitot heat (if installed)
5. The rotating beac.on (if installed)
6. The navigation lights
7. The landing light
b. The breaker switches which ar e located on the lower right
side of the copilot's panel: ar e covered by a special breaker
switch cover. These switches ar e of the push-to-reset type.
'She structure of the hlark 21 is of conventional all-metal design.
The cabin section corlsists of tubular steel st ruct ure covered
with aluminum sheet metal. The firewall i s stainless steel. The
wing, stabilizer, and fin have a main spar design and an aux-
iliary spar with st ressed skin to carry torsional loads. The tail
cone is a conventional semi-monocque design, The seat design
features contoured sheet metal construction.
The ent i re empennage pivots around two attachment points to
the tail cone to provide stabilizer trim. A screw ~~l echani sm
actuates the empennage ~novel~lent at the r ear bulkhead when
the t r i m control wheel is operated.
LANDlNG G E A R
Manual Syst el ~i
The landing gear of the hfai-k 21 i s urtiqrle in that it is tnanc~ally
ret ract ed by t he pilot by nieans of a lever in the cabin. The sys-
tell1 i s operated by di r ect ~ilechanical linkage and has prove11
to be orle of the 111ost rel i abl e and i ~~ai r ~t er t ar ~ce- f r ee ret ract i or~
syst el ns available. An el ect ri cal l y powered landing gear r et r ac-
tion syst em i s al so available at ext r a cost and i s described in
t he following section.
''['he rnanual systelm i s aided by bungee type springs in the fuse-
l age and assi st springs in the wing, which balance the weight of
the gear. Rubber di scs a r e used for shock absorption in t he
welded st eel tube gear st ruct ure. Gr ease fittings a r e provided
at cert ai n i i ~~por t a r ~t lubrication points on the landing gear .
The position of the gear i s indicated by lights on the panel
which will warn of an unlocked condition. These lights may be
dinillled
by rotating the l ens housing to prevent gl ar e at night.
Pr e s s the lens housing in to t est the bulbs. The red indicator
light will corne on if -the handle on the retraction lever i s not
sufficiently engaged in t he down and locked position, thereby in-
dicating an unsafe-to-land condition. The green light indicates
that the handle i s properly engaged in the down position, and the
gear i s in the landing configuration. A thumb operated latch i s
provided on the down socket to prevent unlocking of the gear
when it i s down unless it i s deliberately released.
I o r et r act the gear. depr ess the safety latch button and sl i de
the gear handle fro111 the down-lock socket. hlove the handle
I-apidly to the floor between t he seat s. Slide the gear handle into
the 11p-lock ~o c k e t , and the operation i s colilplete. The Illore
rapld the n i ~ \ ~ e ~ i ~ e n t of the handle. the easi er it i s to r et r act the
gear. The gear retracts easiest at low airspeeds.
I (1 luwcl- the gear, slide the gear handle fro111 the up-lock socket
and 111ovc the har~dlc fol-ward to the instruliient panel. Slide t he
gear handle into the down-lock socket and check t he gear warning
light for a gear-down indication (a green light).
El ect ri cal Gear Systeill (optional)
The optional el ect ri cal landing gear ret ract i on systeili is op-
erated by t he wheel-shaped switch on t he upper portion of the
flight panel. To r ai se the gear , the knob i s pulled out and t he
switch nloved up to i t s upper detent. An "ai rspeed switch" i s
incorporated in the el ect ri cal circuit which prevent s landing
gear ret ract i on until a safe airspeed i s attained. The action of
the syst eni lvay be monitored visually by watching the ~nove~nent
of t he indicator through t he gl ass in t he floorboard aft of the
nose wheel well. A liniit switch will stop the gear in i t s retracted
position and the gear switch will requi re no furt her attention un-
t i l landing. To lower the landing gear , the knob i s pulled out,
moved down, and placed in the lower detent. A liniit switch will
stop t he gear systeni when the proper locking f or ce has been
exerted to hold the pear down.
A discharged st orage battery may prevent t he land-
ing gear from fully extending.
The r e a r e t hr ee ways t o check that t he gear is colnpletely down
and locked:
1. The green "safe-to-land" indicator light (on the left panel)
will c o n ~ e on.
2. The black indicator marks, a s seen through t he gl ass in the
floorboard, will be aligned.
3. Ret ard throttle fully and if no warning horn i s heard gear
should be down and locked.
When t hese conditions a r e fulfilled, the ai r cr af t may be landed
with no furt her attention to the landing gear syst ei ~i .
Manual Operation of the El ect ri cal Landing Gear System
If t he s e a r does not come down due to el ect ri cal malfunction,
0
erc., t he syst em inay be operated manually a s described below:
1. Pul l landing gear circuit breaker OFF.
2. Put gear switch in t he gear down position.
3. Pus h crank engage handle forward.
4. Crank clockwise approxiiixitely fifty (50) t ur ns to lower the
gear .
5. Gear i s down when gr een gear light i s on. If a total el ect r i cal
malfunction occurs, see gear visual indicator.
DO NOT RETRACT GEAR IN FLIGHT WITH MANUAL HAND
CRANK.
FLl GHT CONTROLS
The ailerons, el evat ors, and rudder of the Mark 21 operat e
conventionally. Push-pull tubes with self-aligning rod end bear-
ings act uat e t hese control surfaces. The ailerons have a differ-
ential linkage (i.e., up t r avel is great er than down travel) to
lninimize adverse yaw when they a r e deflected. Gap s t r i ps on
the hinge l i ne minimize a i r spillage froin t he high to t he low
pr es s ur e si de of t he control surfaces. The ailerons have beveled
t rai l i ng edges to lower pilot control force.
THE MOON EY POSI TI VE CONTROL SYSTEM
The Mooney Posi t i ve Control (PC) systeln provides a high de-
gr ee of rol l stability by pneumatic inputs to the rudder and ail-
er on syst ems. Thi s syst em is operating whenever the engine
is running. The engine vacuuin pump provides the pneumatic
power required. The PC systeln cut-off valve located in t he
pilot' s left-hand control wheel handle provides s ys t e n~ cut-off
when depressed. The ai r cr af t can be inaneuvered easi l y when
this valve i s held down. When t he valve is released, t he ai rpl ane
will tend to return to st rai ght and wings level flight fro111 any
attitude. The '"oil Trin?" knob provides an aileron t ri i n func-
tion. Clockwise rotation allows t r i m to the right; counterclock-
wise rotation allows t ri i n t o t he left. In the event of malfunction,
the pilot can easi l y over r i de t he syst em at any time. Complete
disengagement inay be accoinplished by depressing the cut-off
valve. In t he event of complete l oss of vacuuin (indicated by a
red light on t he gyro horizon), the PC system will aut on~at i cal l y
become inoperative. However, it should be noted that this systeln
will continue to operat e even aft er a conlplete engine power l os s
a s long as the propeller is windinilling at appi-<xiinately 1000
rwn or above.
The PC syst em does not have any electronic requirements and,
t herefore, it will operate co~npl et el y independently of t he elec-
t ri cal system.
Thi s ai rcraft i s not approved for spins. In the event that the
pilot inadvertently approaches or ent er s a spin, the Posi t i ve
Control svst em can be overpowered from either the pilot' s or
copilot's side and the controls used for normal spin recovery
techniques. The pilot should use the cut-off valve located in
the pilot's left control wheel handle to cut off the PC systeii?
when einploying spin recovery control procedures.
While taxiing before take off, the PC system should
be checked for proper functioning by noting move-
ments of the flight controls in taxi turns. When PC
is functioning properly, the control wheel will tend
to rotate in the opposite direction of the taxi turn.
The absence of flight control movement during taxi
turns, or extreme control movement in either direc-
tion without prompt return to neutral, indicates a PC
malfunction that should be corrected before flight.
The pilot must become familiar with the flight char-
acteristics of the Mark 21 with the PC system inop-
erative, This i s accomplished simply by holding
down the cut-off valve button while making turns and
maneuvers. Frequemly check the PC system during
flight to see that it i s functioning properly, particu-
l arl y if IFR conditions a r e anticipated. To check for
a malfunction while in flight, fi rst establish a mod-
erat e bank. Then release the controls to see if the
aircraft will return promptly to straight wings-level
flight as shown by the artificial horizon. Repeat the
procedure with a turn in the opposite direction.
Sluggish, errat i c, or incomplete bank recovery warns
of a malfunction in the PC system. PC is installed
to help alleviate pilot fatigue, but the system should
be monitored frequently to check for proper function-
ing like any other system in the aircraft.
THE T RI M SYSTEM
A s n ~a l l control wheel on the floor between the front seats actu-
ates the adjustable stabilizer via a gear reduction and torque
tube linkage which actuates the empennape jack screw. A fric-
tion lock i s provided on the pilot si de of' the t r i m coritrol ped-
est al . Rotating t he friction scr ew clocltwise i ncreases t r i m
friction. 'The position of the stabilizer i s indicated by a pointer
on the aft si de of t he nose wheel well. The interixediate mar k
in t he pointer range i s t he nornlal take-off setting of the t r i m
control. 'The trill7 syst em al so changes the setting of t he trill?
bungees connected to the elevator horns to obtain t ri nl assi st
froi.11 t he el evat ors.
FLAPS
'The wide span flaps a r e hydraulically controlled by a hand oper-
ated punip which actuates a hydraulic cylinder. A relief valve
i s provided which r el eases the flaps at a slow r at e a s the spri ngs
( or a i r pr essur e) r ai s e then?. Hydraulic fluid used i s t he salile
a s t he br ake syst em fluid and i s stored in t he br ake r eser voi r
on t he aft si de of t he firewall. 'To lower the flaps, f i r st s et the
flap-shaped control (adjacent to the flap handle) in the down
position. 'Then punlp the handle to obtain the desi red setting:
two st r okes for take-off; four arid one-half st r qkes for full de-
flection or ally intermediate setting. To r ai s e the flaps, place
the coritrol in t he up position. The flaps will then r i s e at a cori-
trolled r at e to t he up position or they may be stopped at an in-
terlnediate position by placing the control in t he down position
again. 'The position of the flaps i s indicated hy a pointer on the
aft si de of the nose wheel well. The intermediate mar k in the
pointer range i s t he flap take-off setting.
Do not l eave the flaps in the full-down position
while t he ai r cr af t is parked. Trapped oil in the
syst em can be expanded by sol ar heat causing
damage TO t he system.
VACUUM SYSTEM
An engine-driven vacuurn pump powers the gyroscopic inseru-
ments (artificial horizon & directional gyro), the Mooney Positive
Cont rol System, and t he automatic ret ract abl e step. Vacuum
pump output is governed by a regulator. HI-LO indicator lights
on t he instrument panel will show when vacuum is above o r below
limits. Tes t t he warning lights by pressi ng forward t he l ens
housing of each light; if operatnve, the light will show redc%, To
di m t hese lights during ni gh flight, t urn t he Eens housings clock-
wise.
When the engine is st ar t ed and sufficient vacuum is produced, a
vacuum servo will raise t he cabin ent r y st ep to the stowed posi-
tion. A spring will pull the st ep down when t he engine is stopped
a-d V B C U U I ~ i s relieved.
BRAKES
The Mark 21 i s equipped with hydraulic di sc brakes on the main
, ure on the
gear which a r e operated independently by toe pr es::
rudder pedals. The brakes I-nay be set for parking by depress-
ing the toe pedals and pulling our the lock valve control which
i s located on the pane! to t he right of the pilot' s control column.
Hydraulic fluid for the brake and flap systerils i s stored in a
r eser voi r on the top aft si de of the firewall. Copilots brakes a r e
available a s optional eq~~i pi nent .
HE AT I HG A N D VEWPl LABl OH SYSTEMS
The Lower Heat and Ve n t s t e i 1 - 1
--
Cabin heat i s obtained fro111 a 111uff which surroi ~ri ds the engine
exhaust ~iianifold. l-'ronl this muff, a flexible duct t ransni i t s
heated ai r to a junction box on t he aft si de of the firewail on the
copilot' s side. Cool ai r i s also ducted to this junction box f ronl
the flush ai r scoop on the right si de of the airplane. The warnl
and cool ai r entering the junction box can be individually con-
trolled to provide rhe conibination required for the desi red teni-
perat ure. Frol n t he junction box, ai r 1s ducted to t he pilot and
copilot' s feet, the windshield defrost er, and the r ear passengers9
feet. Be s ur e the cabin heat control i s "Off" (full forward)
when operating in warm weather. Excessive hot a i r di rect ed
through the defrosting duct- work to a sun-heated windshield
could cause defor~nat i on of t he windshield.
Deflectors a r e provided on t he pilot and copilot outlets which
can be used to di rect t he a i r flow in the desired direction 01-
to provide individual volume controls. When t hese deflectors
a r e in the neutral or "off" position, the ai r flow i s forced to
the windshield defrost ers and to the aft outlets.
consists of a retractable ai r scoop
on top of the cabin section which supplies four individually con-
trolled ceiling outlets. The scoop control knob, located above
the pilot, i s turned counter-clockwise to open (extend) the scoop
to obtain r am ai r. To ininiinize drag and prevent ai r buffeting
in t he cabin at higher airspeeds, open the overhead ai r scoop
only enough to obtain sufficient ai r supply to the outlets. The
outlets can be controlled individually by turning the inner knob
to adjust t he ai r volume, and rotating the deflector to obtain
ai r flow in t he desired direction.
Left Side Air Scoop
The left si de ai r scoop. has one outlet which has a voluiile con-
t rol and can be adjusted directionally. This scoop also has two
outlets behind t he upholstery panel which provide a source of
ai r for radio cooling.
outlets on the left scoop for radio cooling
tubes, t he right si de flush ai r scoop provides ai r for the radio
vent gri l l which i s iiiounted on the firewall, directly forward of
the center radio panel. This grill directs ai r aft to insure suf-
ficient ai r flow to prevent inultiple radio installations from
overheating. The tube supplying the gri l l has a control valve
near the scoop to decrease ai r flow in exrreinely cold weather.
THE MARK 21
GEAR AND FLAP HAND$ ES
PART ll
FLIGHT PROCEDURES
GENERAL
Thi s sect i on wi l l des cr i be recommended flight pr ocedt ~i - es nec-
e s s a r y f or t he pr oper operat i on of your h.larlc 21. The ai r cr af t
is nor i i ~al l y flown fl-0177 t he left seat . Howeverl when equipped
with opt i onal dual br akes , a copilot or i nst r uct or h a s ful l con-
t r ol of t he a i r c r a f t and acces s t o al l i n s r r u i ~~e n t s and cont rol s.
Th e copilot can over r i de t he Mooney PC s ys t e m eas i l y without
depr essi ng t he cut-off val ve l ocat ed on t he l eft cant r ol wheel.
WEIGHT AND BALAHCE
The ai r cr af t weight and cent er of gravi t y l ocat i on can be de-
eer~i i i ri ed fro111 t he i nformat i on and exa~i i pl es shown i n t he
weight and bal ance dat a provided with t he ai r pl ane. Ref er t o
t he l at est FAA i ~ o r n i 337 f or t he cor r ect ed weight dat a if t he
ai r pl ane ha s beer] al t er ed si nce l eavi ng t he fact ory.
The maximu113 al l owabl e take-off weight of t he Ma r k 21, in-
cluding fuel , oil. baggage, and pas s enger s i s 2575 pounds. If
t he r e is doubt concerni ng t he weight o r C.G. l ocat i on of a pro-
posed l oadi ng, t hat loading should be checked p e r t he weight
and bal ance dat a. F o r exampl e. a l oadi ng consi st i ng of ful l fuel ,
120 por~nds baggage (maxi mum allowable), pilot. and t wo r e a r
passenger s could r esul t i n a C.G. l ocat i on exceedi ng t he r e a r -
ward l i mi t , hloving a r e a r passenger t o t he ri ght f r ont s e a t
worlld el i l i l i nat e t hi s condition.
The hat r ack a r e a aft of t he mai n baggage coi npart l nent i s in-
tended f or l i ght obj ect s.
I WARNI NG
The hat rack area i s limited to ten pounds weight
for balance purposes.
PRE- FLI GHT ONSPECPIOM
The following pre-flight inspection i s recomiilended:
1, Check al l switches off.
2, Reinove tiedowns or wheel blocks, check t i r es and prop
cl ear of rocks, holes, etc.
3, Check wings and control sur f aces cl ear of ice, snow, or
f r ost .
4. Check t he propeller blades for nicks or cracks.
5. Check t he oil level to si x quart s or above.
6. Inspect the cowling for loose attachments.
7. Inspect the t i r es for proper inflation.
8. Inspect the ai r fi l t ers for cleanliness.
9. Check the left tank for fuel level and dr ai n sump.
10. Check t he left aileron for freedoill of travel.
11. Inspect the left flap.
12. Inspect t he elevator and rudder for freedoin of travel.
(Rudder t ravel will be limited by nose gear st eeri ng i ~i ech-
anism .)
13. Inspect the right Flap.
14. Inspect the right aileron for freed0111 of travel.
15. Check the right fuel tank for fuel level and drai n sump.
16. Check lights if flight i s at. night.
E NT E RI NG THE AI RPLANE
After entering t'he cabin, cl ose t he door by pulling on the pull
s t r a p and rotating the handle forward to the latched position.
DO NOT SLAM THE DOOR. Check that the gear retraction handle
(or el ect r i c gear switch) i s in the gear down and locked position.
Drai n t he fuel sel ect or valve on the floorboard and t urn the
sel ect or to the proper tank. Be s ur e t he drai n ret urns to "OFF"
position and that the pull ring is properly positioned in t he cavity
provided. If t he flight i s at night, check to as s ur e a flashlight i s
on board.
STARTI NG THE ENGl NE
The following st art i ng procedures a r e recommended; however,
the st art i ng charact eri st i cs of each engine may vary slightly
which could necessitate soine variation froill these reconxmenda-
tions.
1.
Gas selector on fullest tank.
2.
Al l radio switches and electrical switches off.
3. Brakes on.
4. Carburetor heat control (OFF) position.
5. Cowl flaps open.
6. Mixture control full forward (rich).
7. Propeller control full forward (high rpin).
8. Master switch on (green gear indicator light, "Low Vacu-
um" warning light, and the electric turn and bank indicator
should come on).
9. Turn boost pump on and note fuel pr essur e indication.
10. Pui11p the throttle twice to prime the engine.
11. Set the throttle approxiinately 1/4" open.
12. Turn ignition switch to "Start" and pr ess in.
13. When engine fires, hold st art switch on for another second.
then allow the spring loaded switch to return to "Both",
COLD WEATHER AND MANUAL STARTl NG
In extrei~lely cold weather, it nlay be necessary to provide ad-
ditional fuel priming to the engine by puinping the Qrot t l e t hr ee
or four tiiiles. It may be necessary to preheat: the engine and
engine oil prior to starting.
NOTE: If oil pressure i s not indicated on engine gage within
30 seconds, stop engine i~nillediately and determine
cause.
In the event that it becoines necessary to st ar t the engine with
a low bartery and no external battery source i's available, use
the following procedures:
1. A s the engine i s "propped," hold the i~iagneto switch in the
"start" position to operate the starrer vibrator and furnish
a retarded spark to the engine.
I WARNI NG
When "'hand propping" the engine, do not push for-
ward the magneto switch-this will engage the st art er.
2.
When the engine st art s, release the switch to the "Both"
position.
TAXI I NG AND GROUND OPERAWI ON
The nose gear of the Mark 21 i s linked directly to the rudder
pedals to provide steering. The brakes inay be applied indepen-
dently to assi st steering for sharper turns.
Caution should be used when operating on rough terrain. It i s
recommended that ininimui?~ power be used for starting to taxi
on sod or gravel fields. Too much power will cause the propeller
to suck up stones and thus nick the blades. Excessive speed
over rough ground should be avoided to preclude pitch down of
the nose.
The Lycoii?ing 0-360- A 1D i s an ai r pr essur e cooled engine that
depends on the forward speed of the airplane to iiiaintain proper
cooling. It i s recommended that the following precautions be
observed for proper engine cooling:
1. When stopped, head t he airplane into the wind.
2. Operate rhe engine on the ground only with t he propeller
in high rplil setting (control forward).
3. Keep lllixrure "Full Rich" (control forward).
4. Do not overheat engine by prolonged ground running. Moni-
t or the cylinder head t e~nper at ur e gauge.
%$RE TAKE- OFF CHECK
When operating on gravel fields, it is recoinil~ended that the
run-up be made while taxiing to avoid nicking the propeller.
War111 up the engine at 1000 to 1200 rpm. Avoid prolonged idling
at low engine speeds a s this practice niay result in fouled spark
plugs. The engine is warm enough for take-off when it can de-
velop full rpln and the throttle can be opened without backfiring
or skipping of the engine or the throttle can be opened without
a reduction in oil pressure.
Check the following items before take-off:
1. Check flight controls for travel and slnoothness of operation.
2. Check fuel quantity indicator, selector valve, and fuel
pressure.
3. Check instruments.
a. Set altimeter to field elevation.
b. Check oil pressure and temperature.
c. Check ammeter or electrical load meter for indication,
d. Check cylinder head temperature.
e. Set clock.
f. Check inanifold pr essur e gauge and r a~hoi i l et e~ for read-
ings proportional to engine power.
g. Check rat e of cliiiib. airspeed, and turn and bank indi-
cator for zero readings.
h. Check artificial horizon and directional gyros for pro-
per orientation.
i. Test gear indicator lights and vacuuin warning lights.
4. Set t r i m to take-off setting (see indicator).
5. Check cowl flaps open.
6. Set wing flaps to take-off setting (see indicator).
7, Turn on boost pump.
8. Check niagnetos at 1700 RPM for ~11100th operation and
~ilaximum drop of 125 RPM.
NOTE: If one iilagneto runs rough, turn the switch back to
the "both" position and reduce the power to 800
RPM. Allow the engine to run for a minute and
then slowly increase the power to 2200 RPM and
recheck the i~lagnetos. Thi s operation will usually
burn out the carbon deposits and allow the inag-
netos to check properly.
9. Exerci se the propeller at 1800-2000 RPM by pulling t he
propeller control to the "full-out" position. After the rach-
oiilecer has shown a drop-off of 100 RPM, push the propeller
control to the "full-in" position.
10. Check mixture rich (full forward).
11. Check lights if flight i s ar night.
12. Check all seat belts.
13. Close door and pilot window and latch shut.
14. Cl ear floor for retraction handle clearance.
TAKE- OFF AND CLI MB
When applying power for take-off, move the throttle to t he full
open position slowly t o avoid picking up loose stones, etc., with
the propeller. Apply back pressure to the control wheel at about
65-75 lnph airspeed. When the Mark 21 breaks ground, i t will
tend to ' Yock9' into a nose-high attitude. To compensate for
this tendency, relax some of the elevator back pr essur e as the
nose-wheel leaves the ground. For best results and a smoother
take-off, do not allow the nose of the Mark 21 to lift above the
horizon during take-off. After some practice, you will find that
you can make your slnoothest take-offs by applying elevator
back pressure a s flying speed i s approached and then slowly
reducing the back pr essur e as you feel the nose wheel lififng
from t he ground, Thi s will allow the aircraft to fly slnoothly
from the runway without any abrupt change in pitch attitude,
A s soon a s t he Mark 21 is airborne and under good control, per -
form t he following procedures:
1. Apply brakes to stop wheel rotation.
2. Retract t he gear.
3. Reduce the propeller rpnl to 2550-2600.
4. Retract the flaps.
5. Establish climb-out attitude.
6. Turn el ect ri c fuel pump to the "off" position.
(Note fuel pr essur e indication to verify that the engine
driven fuel pun~p will provide fuel pressure.)
An enroute cl i n~b speed of 115-120 nlph PAS i s reconlmended
for improved cooling and good visibility. The speed for maximuill
rat e of clinlb is approximately 105 IAS. The speed for maxi n~um
angle of climb (obstacle clearance) is about 80 nlph IAS. Recom-
mended power setting for climbing is 2500 rpnl and 25 inches
manifold pressure.
POWER CHANGES
The following sequence i s recoil~nlend-d for increasing or de-
creasing power settings.
To Increase Power
Fi r st , increase engine speed (rpll~) by nieans of the propeller
control.
Second, increase n~anifold pr essur e by means of the throttle.
To Decrease Power
Fi r st , reduce manifold pr essur e by means of the throttle.
Second, decrease engine speed (rpm) by tileans of the propeller
control.
CRUI SE PROCEDURES
When the desired altitude i s reached, use the following pro-
cedures.
1. Cl osecowl fl aps.
2. Trill1 nose to level flight.
3. Reduce ~iianiford pr essur e and 1-pi11 to desired setting. See
performance charts in Section IV.
4, Set the mixture control for the fuel j ai r ratio desired. If the
optional exhaust gas teiiiperature indicator is installed, t he
iilixture is deterliiined as follows: For best econonly, lean
the mixture by pulling the control out until the indicator
shows a peak (max.i~iiuim) tenlperature and st ar t s to de-
crease. Continue leaning until the teniperature drops 25" F.
niinimun~ (one niark on t he gauge) fro111 the peak.
To obtain a best power (maximu111 airspeed) setting, lean
to peak teinperature and then enrich ~~l i x t u r e (push control
forward) until the indicator shows a 100" F. drop (four marks
on the gauge) froill the peak te~ilperature.
Do not lean the ~i ~i x t u r e at power settings above 75% rated
power.
Operation of the ~i ~i x t u r e control should be slow enough to
account for the slight lag in the EGT instruliient.
In selecting a crui se rpin, the engine must not be
operated for crui se purposes within the range of
2000 to 2250 rpm.
l NDI CATED AI RSPEED
The super i or aerodynamic efficiency of your ai rpl ane lilanifests
itself in t he normal indicated cr ui se speeds. Your airspeed in-
di cat or is marked with a green a r c to 150 nlph and a yellow a r c
st art i ng at 150 111ph and ending at 189 n~ph. When cruising at
altitudes below approxinlately 8,000 feet, it i s possible to cr ui se
at indicated ai rspeeds above 150 nlph and in t he yellow caution-
a r y ar c. The yellow a r c indicates speeds at which t he pilot 111ust
exer ci s e caution when encountering rough a i r 01- s ever e gusts.
Rough a i r i s cor~sidered to be a condition uncomfortable to pilot
and passengers. Therefore, under these conditions, do not operat e
at ai r speeds within the yellow ar c.
F U E L MA N A G E ME N T
The following method i s usef~l l for ~noni t ori ng renlainirlg fuel.
After rake-off with both tarilis fulll use one tank only r ~r ~t i l one
hour of fuel i.s 'de.pl_eted f r o ~k it. Then switch to the second tank
and re.cord the time of switch-over on the elapsed t i me indicator
on t he panel clock. Use all. t he fuel in t he second tank. Then,
the tinie of fuel remaining in the f i r st tank is the t i me it took
to deplete the second tank, l ess one hour. However, this wi l l be
cor r ect only if the cr ui se altitude and power setting remain un-
changed. If a tank runs dr y and t he e.ngine l oses power, ret ard
the thrortle before resrarting. Restarting with advanced throttle
l-nay cause engine over-speeding and can lead to ~ilechanical
ma1funt:tion.
LET-DOWN PROCEDURES
It is recorn~l ~ended that power let-downs be nlade in order to
keep t he etigine from cooling too rapidly. I3y reducitlg the man-
ifold pr e s s ur e to some figure below cr ui se setting and t her~ re-
taining cr ui s e speed, a let-down can he made l%~ithout excessive
cooling of the engine. Do not open the cowl flaps f u r !et-down.
Car bur et or heat should be applied when power is
reduced for descent or landing. Ful l carburet or
heat should be used rat her than part i al (which may
r ai se t he car bur et or ai r teinperature t o icing level)
unless a car bur et or a i r t emperat ure indicator is
used,
LANDI NG PROCEDURES
Use the following check l i st before landing:
1. Fuel selector on fuller tank.
2. Boost purilp on.
3. Mixture full ri ch (control forward).
4, Carburetor heat.
5, Landing gear down (lower at 120 i i ~ph or l essj .
NOTE: Warning horn will sound if gear is not down and
locked and t hrot t l e i s retarded. Check for greeri
"down and locked" light. If green light i s not work-
ing, ic can he screwed out and replaced in flight
with t he red "Gear UP" lighr to verify the locked
position.
6. Propel l er high rpiii (control forward).
7. Seat belts fastened.
It i s recomnlended that t he base leg he flown at 90 mph. Upon
turning final, or sooner if necessary, extend the desi red aillount
of flaps. Fl ap speed i s 100 mph. A s the flaps a r e extended, t he
ai rcraft will become nose heavy. Roll t he tri111 back s o that t he
ai rcraft will glide hands-off at approximately 80 mph. The ad-
dition of a slight ail?ount of power will flatten out t he glide con-
siderably. The st al l warning horn will blow if ai rspeed i s re-
duced to within 5 to 10 111ph of stalling speed.
Begin your flare-out for landing cl oser to t he ground than you
ordinarily would. Thi s i s done for two reasons:
1. The hIark 21 s i t s lower to the ground than t21ost ai rcraft .
2. The Mark 21 requires very little altitude TO make a transi-
tion fro111 a glide to a landing attitude. A slight addition of
back pressure i s sufficient to stop the rat e of descent.
It is r ecoi ~~l ~i ended rhat full flaps be used on all landi~zgs, be-
cause of the added visibility over the nose that it affords. How-
ever, t he use of full flaps tends to make an aircraft nose-heavy,
and it is therefore necessary to roll the t ri m well back to make
a good landing.
In a norinal final landing approach, t he aircraft should be
t ri mmed for hands-off flight t o t he point of Flare-out.
Under no circumstances should the aircraft be al-
lowed to touch'down in a nose-low attitude or at too
high an airspeed. Either of these conditions will
allow the nose wheel to contact the runway fi rst and
inay cause the ai rcraft to porpoise and the gear to
fail due to overload.
A good landing has been inade when the main gear gently touches
down before the nose wheel i s allowed to make contact with the
runway. This is the conventional and safest landing procedure
f or tricycle-gear aircraft.
STOPPI NG THE ENGI NE
Stop the engine in the following manner:
1. Idle the engine at 1000 to 1200 RPhf .
2. Pull the nlixture control to the "idle cutoff" position.
3. A s the engine stops firing, retard the throttle all the way
out to eliminate engine vibration.
4. When the propeller stops, turn the magneto and illaster
switches to the "off" position.
PART lil
SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
GENERAL
Thi s section will present ser vi ce and ii~aintenance information
that is of a general or routine nature only. For mor e detailed
inforniation concerning rilaintenance that i s i nor e extensive,
see the appropriate bfooney Service and Maintenance Manual.
In t he hack of t he Service and Maintenance Manual is a s e r i e s
of inspection guides covering recori~mended twenty-five, fifty
and one-hundred hour inspections. Tt i s recoril~ilended that you
have t hese inspections and other n~ai nt enance perforiiled at t he
nearest Mooney Servi ce Center where factory trained inechanics
a r e available.
If it becomes rlecessary to c o n s ~~l t the hlooney fact ory concern-
ing a specific problem. contact "Cuseomer Servi ce Manager",
hlooney Aircraft, Inc., Kerrville. Texas.
GROUND WANDLiNG
A slliall hand tow bar i s provided with t he ai r cr af t which fits
into the nose gear lower st ruct ure to facilitate nlaneuvering the
airplane by hand. Towing t he airplane with another vehicle is
not reco~nrllended a s damage to the gear st r uct ur e coyld resul t
if t he st eeri ng l i i i ~i t s wer e exceeded. Re ~i ~ova bl e tiedown ring$
a r e provided for t he wing which s cr ew into an attachment lxarked
"Hoist Point" outboard of each main gear. The bearing points
provided for jacking or hoisting the airplane al so s cr ew into
t hese attachments. The tail tiedown ring is located under the
t ai l skid.
P ROP ELLER
Before each flight the propeller blades should be checked for
any niclts, cracks, or signs of other damage. Nicks cause high
st r ess concentrations in the blades which could st ar t a crack.
Have a mechanic remove any nicks as soon a s possible. It i s
not unusual for the propeller blade to have a certain amount of
end-play. This i s a result of manufacturing tolerance in the
parrs. Si~lall differences at the blade root ar e magnified inany
tiines at the tip. Thi s end-play has no adverse effect on the per-
formance or operation of the propeller, As soon as the propeller
begins to rotate, the centrifugal force of the blades seat s then?
positively and rigidly against the bearing.
Soiiletiiiles it iilay be noted that the taclhometer needle wavers
in straight and level flight. If it is excessive, it may be further
checked to deteriliine if the problei?? lies in the propeller gov-
ernor systenn or in the tachometer by doing the following:
1, Move the propeller control to the "high RPM" position.
The RPM should increase to 2700.
2. Reduce the manifold pressure until the RPM is below
2700" At this time, the propeller will be in Fixed pitch,
If the tachometer needle continues to waver, the grob1el1-1 l i es
in the tachometer and cable systelil itself. I f the tachometer
needle stabilizes, then the problen? lies in the governor and
propeller system. To el i n~i nat e this condition, have your inechanic
purge, or clean the propeller system.
If surging of the propeller occurs during takeoff or cliinb our,
it rliay be caused by ai r in the system or foreign illafter in the
governor passages.
Use 91/98 or 100/130 octane aviation fuel only. The wing suinps
a r e drained with the plastic cup by inserting the center prong
into the drain hole to release the valve.
Overflow vents ar e incorporated in each fuel tank to allow for
overflow of the tank and ventilation as fuel is depleted.
The a i r filter should be removed and cleaned every 25 hours
or i nor e often if unusually dusty conditions a r e encountered.
Ref er t o Lycoixing Service Instruction No. 2024B for engine
oil t ype recornmendations and replacement intervals. Oil ca-
pacity is eight quarts-six inini~nuin for flight.
BAT T E RY
The bat t ery should be checked every 25 hours of flight or every
30 days (whichever coii-~es first) for proper fluid level. The bat-
t er y of t he Mark 21 i s located on the forward left si de of the
fi rewal l and is easily accessible through t he access panel on
the left engine cowling.
CARE QF BHTERl OR
Normal cleaning methods may be used for routine cleaning of
t he Mar k 21 interior. The* fabri c on t he s eat s and si de panels
may be cleaned with any spray-on type dr y cl eaner. The Roy-
al i t e pl ast i c used on t he si de panels and headliner may be cleaned
with a damp cloth or soap and water. Do not us e alcohol on
Royalite plastic.
CARE OF EXT ERI OR
The acryl i c e na ~ne l paint used on the hlark 21 does not requi re
waxing. However. if you desi r e to wax the ext er i or , a period of
90 days si nce the airplane was painted should he allowed before
waxing to i nsure proper curing of the paint. When washing the
hl ark 21, do not use detergents. Do not use a conibination cleaner
and wax on the exterior.
The Plexiglas windows of t he Mark 21 should be kept cl ean and
waxed. Reiiiove di r t or mud with your hand while flushing with
water. Do not rub t he windows with a cloth or chamois while
cleaning. After cleaning, r i nse and dr y with a moi st chamois.
Remove oil or gr e a s e with a cloth soaked in kerosene. Do not
us e solvents other than kerosene on Plexiglas. After cleaning,
polishing wax ivay be applied and rubbed lightly with a soft dr y
cloth. Do not us e a power buffer a s the heat generated by it imay
soften the sur f ace of the windows.
LANDI NG GEAR
The landing gear ret ract i on systeiil should be rigged only by a
mechanic faiTiiliar with t he gear rigging procedures of t he hl ark
21. The landing gear should be kept f r ee of nlud or i ce to pr e-
vent interference when ret ract ed. If you notice an unusual f or ce
when operating the iilanual retraction syst em, ret urn t he l ever
to the down and locked position and have the gear checked after
landing. The gear warning horn niay be checked in flight by
rerarding the t hrot t l e with t he gear up. The horn should sound
at about ten inc'hes Hg iiianifold pressure.
The t i r e pr es s ur e (nose and main) should beiiiaintained at 30 PSI.
VACUUM OPERAT ED STEP
The operation of t he st ep inay be checked easily on t he ground
by st art i ng the engine and illaintaining sufficient engine speed
to t urn off the "Low Vacuum" light while an observer checks
the st ep retrac-tion. The st ep should ret ract slowly and smoothly
into t he fuselage. If t her e i s evidence of binding a s the st ep r e-
t r act s, the support blocks should be exanlined for alignii~ent.
Lubricate only with a silicon-type lubricant. These subst ances
will not tend to guin t he sl i de action or collect dust on t he st ep
shaft a s do petroleum-based lubricants.
R E QU I R E D DATA
The following i t ei ~l s 111ust be car r i ed with the ai r cr af t at al l
t i mes:
1. Ai rcraft Airworthiness Ceytificare (displayed)
2. Ai rcraft Registration Certificate (displayed)
3. Owrlers Manual (or sheet containing ai r cr af t operating limita-
tions)
4. Weight and Balance Data (including equipment list)
SERVsCE LETEERS AND BULLETINS
Servi ce l et t er s and bulletins a r e available only on subscription
fro111 Mooney Distributors. It i s reconlmended that al l owners
maintain contact with authorized ser vi ce operat ors listed in
t he Mooney Service Directory to be assured of factory recoil?-
i~iended servi ce.
PARWV
PERFORMANCE DATA
Fl Gl l RE 9
TARE OF F AND CLI MB DATA
TAKE OFF CONFIGURATION:
*
Gear down, f ul l r i c h mi xture, 15' (t ake of f posi t i on) f l aps
Wind cal m- hard surf ace runway
CLI MB CONFIGURATION:
Gear Up - Best Power Mi xt ur e - Cowl Fl aps Open- Fl aps Up
P-
IP)
RATE OF CLIMB FEET PER MI NUTE
I NDI CATED
AIRSPEED
MILES PER HOUR
CRUISE & RANGE DATA
WEIGHT ~2200 LBS.: BEST POWER MIXTURE
52 GAL. USABLE FUEL; NO RESERVE FOR RANGE CALCULATIONS
STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ALTI TUDE 25.00' MSL
M. P. B.HoP. % & TFK ENDUR.
II.I.HG.
B.H.P. HOUR
HOUR SPEED HR:MIN.
XANGE
Statute
MI LES
667
* MAXIMUM RANGE
ACCURACY OF DATA IS k 3%
EACH 100 LBS, CHANGE I N AI RPLANE WEIGHT
WI LL AFFECT TAS BY 1.2 MPH.
CRUI SE & RANGE DATA
WEIGHT =2280 1-BS.: BEST POWER MIXTURE
52 GAL. USABLE FUEL; NO RESERVE FOR RANGE CALCULATIONS
STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ALTI TUDE 500Q9 MSL
* MAXI MUM RANGE
ACCURACY OF DAT A IS + 3%
EACH I00 LBS. CHANGE I N AI RPL ANE WEI GHT
WI L L A F F E CT TAS B Y 1.2
MPH.
CRUISE d RANGE DATA
WElGHT=2200 LBS.: BEST POWER MIXTURE
52 GAL. USABLE FUEL; NO RESERVE FOR RANGE CALCULATIONS
SPANBARB ATMOSPHERE
* MAXI MUM RANGE
ACCURACY OF DATA IS 2 3%
EACH 100 LBS. CHANGE IN AI RPLANE WEIGHT
WI LL AFFECT TAS BY 1.2 MPH.
CRUl SE d RANGE DATA
WEIGHS -2200 LBS.: BEST POWER MIXTURE
52 GAL. USABLE FUEL; NO RESERVE FOR RANGE CALCULATIONS
STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ALTI TUDE 10,0QO%SL
M. P. % LBS. / TRUE ENDUR.
Statute
RoPoM*
IN.HG.
B9H- P- B.H.P. HOUR
OUR Si AFD HR:MIN.
* MAXI MUM RANGE
ACCURACY OF DAT A IS 1- 3?.
EACH 100 LBS. CHANGE I N AI RPL ANE WEI GHT
WI LL AF F ECT TAS B Y 1.2 MPH.
CRUI SE & RANGE DATA
WEIGHT =2200 LBS.: BEST POWER MIXTURE
52 GAL. USABLE FUEL; NO RESERVE FOR RANGE CALCULATIONS
STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ALTI TUDE '15,000' MSL
caL,
HOUR
* MAXI MUM RANEE
ACCURACY OF DATA IS i 3%
EACH 100 LBS, CHANGE I N AI RPL ANE WEI GHT
WI L L A F F E CT TAS B Y 1,2 MPH.
FIGURE 4
STALL SPEED VS. BANK ANGLE
GROSS WEIGHT 2575 LBS.; I.A.S. MPH; POWER OFF
FIGURE 5
SPEED FOR MAXIMUM
(MAX. RANGE & GLIDE)
The speed a t whi ch t he MZOC i s most ef f i ci ent (i .e. t he Rat i o of L i f t
t o Dr ag i s a t a Maxi mum) i s 105 MPH I NDI CATED AI RSPEED, Gear
Up & Fl aps Up. Fl y i ng a t t hi s ai r speed wi l l gi ve maxi mum range or
mi ni mum gl i de angl e, under zer o wi nd condi t i ons,
5 10 15 20 25
GROUND DISTANCE STATUTE MILES
LAMBING DATA
LANDI NG CONFI GURATI ON:
APPROACH I A S 10 MPH
A I R DI S TANCE ROUND ROLL
TOVAL DI S T ANCE
LANDI NG DI S TANCES
STANDARD ATMOSPHERE, NARD SURFACE RUNWAY.
WI ND CALM. BRAKES AP P L I E D DURI NG ROLL OUT.
MARK 21 (M20C) -OPERATING LIMITATIONS
(These liinitarions a r e in addition to t he weight and balance
dat a and all information on pl acards and markings in the ai r -
craft.)
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
The following are the certificated calibrated air speeds for your
Mooney Mark 21.
Maximum (Glide or dive-smooth air) 189 MPH (Red Line)
Caution Range (Level flight or
climb-smooth air) 150-189 MPH (Yellow Arc)
Normal Range (Level flight
or climb) 70-150 MPN (Green Arc)
"Maximum Maneuvering Speed 132 MPN
Maximum Gear Operating Speed 120 MPH
Maximum Gear Extended Speed 120 MPH
Fl ap Operating Range 63-100 MPH (White Arc)
"The maximum speed at which you can use abrupt full control
travel without danger of exceeding the design load factor.
ENGINE OPERATING L,IMITATIONS
Power and Speed 180 MP at 2700 WPM
ENGINE INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
Oil Temperature
Radial Red Line (Maximum)
Green Arc (Operating Radge)
Oil Pressure
Radial Red Line (Minimum
Idling)
Radial Red Line (Maximum)
Green Arc (Operating Range)
Yellow Arc (Idling Range)
Yellow Arc (Starting &
Warm-Up Range)
Cylinder Head Temperature
Radial Red Line (Maximum)
Green Arc (Operating Range)
245 Degrees F.
100-225 Degrees F.
25 PSI
100 PSI
60-90 PSI
25-60 PSI
90-100 PSI
500 Degrees F.
350-450 Degrees F. k
Tachometer
Radial Red Line (Rated)
Green Arc-Narrow (Rated
Operating Range)
Green Arc-Wide (Recommended
Operating Range)
Red Arc-Narrow (No Continuous
Operating in this Range)
Fuel Pressure
Radial Red Line (Minimum)
Radial Red Line (Maximum)
Green Line-Wide (Desired
Range)
Green Arc-Narrow (Normal
Operating Range)
2700 RPM
2300-2700 RPM
2300-2500 RPM
2000-2250 RPM
0.5 PSI
6.0 PSI
2.5-3.5 PSI
0.5-6.0 PSI