2 INDUSTRY INSIGHT

By Alan Forester, CPA, Attorney
4 INDUSTRY NEWS
A HERO’S WELCOME
BIN Magazine Joins forces
with Jim Beam and California
retailers to pay tribute to
Terry Farrell, a true American hero.
6 INDUSTRY EVENT
KAI VODKA
8 INDUSTRY EVENT
FOOD & WINE
CLASSIC IN ASPEN
10 COMPANY PROFILE
BANBURY CROSS
CREATIVE SERVICES
12 NEW PRODUCTS
14 NEW PRODUCTS & PROMOTIONS
16 WHAT’S BREWING
18 COVER FEATURE
A CUT ABOVE THE REST
Through painstaking craftsmanship
and highly targeted marketing,
Diamond Beverages is insuring their
ultra-premium vodka will be
“forever” in the hearts and minds of
the choosiest beverage accounts
and consumers.
28 TASTING CORNER
WINES FROM CHILE
34 CORPORATE PROFILE
BEAMGLOBAL SPIRITS & WINE, INC.
40 CATEGORY FOCUS
BROWN IS THE NEW GOLD
Bourbon & American Brown Spirits
are gaining a new patina of status
and respect, even under challenging
economic and production conditions.
50 BRAND PROFILE
SOUTHERN COMFORT
RTD COCKTAILS
52 BRAND PROFILE
JOHNNY WALKER
54 POUR OF THE MONTH
FINEST CALL MIXERS
56 INDUSTRY NEWS
58 INDUSTRY NEWS
60 INDUSTRY NEWS
62 INDUSTRY INSIGHT
By Lauren C. Tyson,
Liquor Liability Consultant
Inside Inside
40
6 16
28
4
18
BIN
BIN
2 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
POSTMASTER:
SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO:
BIN Beverage Industry News
171 Mayhew, Suite 202
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523
Southern California
Business, Production and Editorial Office
160 W. Foothill Parkway, Suite 105-95
Corona, CA 92882
951 272-4681 Fax 951 272-4816
PRESIDENT
Michael Chu
E-Mail: beverageindustrynews@gmail.com
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Kim Brandi
626 377-2510
E-Mail: beverageindustrynews@mac.com
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Juan Alverez
Kristen Wolfe Bieler
Dale DeGroff
Jeffery Lindenmuth
Ed McCarthy
Gregg Glaser
Wilfred Wong
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
Victoria Vann
951-272-4681
E-Mail: binvvann@gmail.com
ADVERTISING
Zachary Austin
951-272-4681
Northern California Office
Industry Publications Inc.
171 Mayhew Way, Suite 202
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523
925 932-4999 Fax 925 932-4966
PUBLISHER
David L. Page
E-Mail: dlpage@earthlink.net
EDITOR-AT-LARGE
Elyse Glickman
310 497-7157
E-Mail: 4elyse@earthlink.net
CIRCULATION / PRICE EDITOR
Manfred Schaffler
E-Mail: manfred.schaffler@gmail.com
BIN Beverage Industry News USPS 053-880,
ISSN 1054-0423. Is published monthly by Industry Publications,
Inc., except combined in May/June and November/December.
171 Mayhew Way, Suite 202, Pleasant Hill, CA 94523.
Subscriptions are $48 per year (tax included),
single copies are $12.00 each. Periodicals postage paid at
Pleasant Hill, California, and additional mailing offices.
BIN
Beverage Industry News
VOLUME 101, ISSUE NUMBER 36
FOUNDED IN 1934
www.binonline.net
DUI LAW IN CALIFORNIA PART III
One of the most severe ways in which courts can impose DUI penalties is through the impo-
sition of a felony offense. Typically, a felony DUI offense involves someone other than the
driver being injured or killed as a result of the offense. Aside from court imposed penalties,
a felony offense will often result in a civil action being brought by the injured party. In some
instances if a civil action is filed the driver will not be protected by the benefit of an insur-
ance policy. Often, insurance companies include a policy that says if you drink and cause an
accident they will not pay.
A felony offense counts as a strike against the driver and if convicted of a felony DUI
the driver may be sentenced to prison and fined more than $1,000. As with misdemeanor
offenses, subsequent offenses are punished more severely than previous offenses. A subse-
quent offense is one that occurs within ten years of a prior felony DUI offense. Additionally,
a prior alcohol involved reckless driving guilty plea is counted as a prior DUI conviction
when the court determines punishments.
When a driver is convicted of a felony DUI offense the state law mandates that the court
impose most minimum DUI offender sanctions. The judge then has the discretion to apply
additional sanctions or to increase the sanctions to the maximum level allowed by law.
Drivers convicted of a felony DUI will likely receive time in state prison; a fine, penalty
assessment or restitution; drinking and driving treatment; vehicle impoundment or forfei-
ture; license restriction, suspension or revocation; an ignition interlock device requirement;
or probation.
Typically, a DUI felony conviction results in a mandatory sentence ranging from 48
hours in jail to four years in prison. A prison sentence may be extended past four years if
extenuating circumstances are involved. In the case of a felony DUI offense involving mul-
tiple victims sentences are generally enhanced by one year for each victim, up to three vic-
tims. Prison time may also be extended when the felony DUI involves a hit and run.
Offenders are typically ordered to pay three types of fines: an offense fine, a penalty
assessment and restitution. Felony offense fines range from $390 to $5000 and penalty
assessments total 170% of the offense fine. Restitution fines are those that compensate the
injuries and losses of victims and range from $100 to $10,000.
As with misdemeanor offenses, the driver must complete a drinking and driving treat-
ment program prior to license reinstatement. Although a judge may also order that the dri-
ver’s car be impounded or declared a nuisance and sold at a forfeiture sale this is not typical.
However, if the vehicle owner is under 21, even if they are not in the vehicle, and a driver
or passenger in the vehicle is under 21 and illegally possesses alcohol the car is more likely
to be impounded. Becoming more common is the use of an ignition interlock device which
prevents a vehicle from being started if the driver has alcohol in his or her system. This
device is discretionary for first time offenders but is mandatory for repeat offenders. Last, a
court may order that a driver is put on probation for a period that may last from three to five
years. During this probation period a driver must ensure that they do not commit any crim-
inal offense; drive with any measurable amount of alcohol in their body; fail to pay a fine,
assessment or restitution and may not refuse to submit to a chemical test upon request.
Felony DUI offenses are more severe than misdemeanor DUI offenses in a variety of ways.
Aside from the increase in fines and prison time a driver may face a felony offense may also
subject anyone who has a professional license to sanctions by the specific regulatory agency.
Additionally, an individual holding a green card may be deported if convicted of a felony DUI
offense. Thirdly, as stated above, many insurance companies do not offer policies that pro-
tect drivers who have caused an accident because of the involvement of alcohol.
Alan Forester is an attorney, CPA and an expert witness in Alcoholic Beverage Control
Law. For more information, please visit www.ABClawyer.com or call 800-464-1040. I
Disclaimer: This article is not to be construed as legal advice. Please check with an attorney before taking action.
INDUSTRY INSIGHT
BY ALAN FORESTER, CPA, ATTORNEY
WWW.ABCLAWYER.COM 800-464-1040
=beXWb mWhc_d]$
WE MAKE OUR BOURBON CAREFULLY. PLEASE ENJOY IT THAT WAY.
Maker’s Mark
®
Bourbon Whisky, 45% Alc./Vol. ©2009 Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Loretto, KY
4 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
The charity raises money to assist fire-
fighters and their families with educational,
medical and equipment needs. The charity
was founded in honor of Terry Farrell, a dec-
orated member of the Rescue 4/FDNY
squad, who perished on September 11, 2001
in the World Trade Center attack. The 2009
California campaign designed to carry on his
legacy includes the publishing and retail sale
of 8,000 copies of The California Firehouse
Comfort Foods Cookbook (retail $9.99) and
specially labeled commemorative bottle of
Jim Beam emblazoned with the Terry Farrell
Firefighter’s Fund logo. The campaign will
run from September through December, and
100% of proceeds from the retail sales will
benefit the charity.
“The Terry Farrell Firefighter’s Fund steps
in when government agencies, insurance
companies and other entities cannot com-
pletely cover an emergency expense,”
explains Paige Guzman of Beam Global
Spirits & Wine. “While the campaign was
initially focused in New York, this is the first
year we are introducing the bottle and pro-
gram to 25 states including California. In our
state, we are selling 10,000 cases of the spe-
cial edition bottle, and all the money raised
goes to help California firefighters. We have
also developed the cookbook, going on sale
September 1, using recipes contributed by
firefighters and top chefs in California.”
According to Beam’s Mario Brossard, BIN
and Beam are working closely with Orange
County marketing company Visual Image
Events (VIE) for an ambitious campaign to get
word out to firefighters and the community
about this special promotion. VIE’s models,
after receiving training about Jim Beam and
the charity, will be visiting 25 firehouses
around Southern California to encourage fire-
fighters and their friends and families to visit
innovative liquor retailer High Times in Costa
Mesa (the first to participate) or ask their local
retailers to make the special edition package
and cookbook available.
“As a group, Southern California fire-
fighters is not just a brotherhood but also an
extension of everybody’s family,” says
Brossard earnestly. “My house in Sylmar
almost burned, and it was because of local
firefighters that my home was saved. This is
a big reason why we want to focus on this
locally. Furthermore, every community has a
firehouse, and the firemen and women who
work there also support local businesses and
retailers. The best part of what we are doing
with this charity is building awareness of
local firefighter’s contributions. Another
main goal is to let consumers and retailers
know this program is out there. It is a collec-
tive effort among VIE, BIN and Jim Beam
Southern California to take care of our own.”
Brossard also points out that it is impor-
tant to him personally as a Beam representa-
tive to convey to firefighters, other con-
sumers and retailers that bottles with Terry
Farrell packaging are the same price as regu-
lar Jim Beam bottles, and that proceeds ben-
efit local firefighters who have given them-
selves to their communities just as Terry
Farrell did on 9/11.
“Since 2005, Jim Beam’s Terry Farrell
Firefighter’s Fund has raised over $100,000,”
adds BIN president Michael Chu. “However,
our goal is now to match the $100,000 dur-
ing this year’s campaign. We at BIN are
proud to be part of the solution, and do what
we can to help Jim Beam reach that goal, as
well as guide our base of retailers and distrib-
utors to make this happen.” I
A Hero’s
Welcome
BIN MAGAZINE JOINS FORCES
WITH JIM BEAM AND CALIFORNIA
RETAILERS TO PAY TRIBUTE
TO TERRY FARRELL,
A TRUE AMERICAN HERO.
INDUSTRY NEWS
M
ichael Chu, President of Beverage Industry News,
and Beam Global Sr. Sales Manager off-premise,
Mario Brossard, announced the California unveil-
ing of a tasteful charitable campaign benefiting The Terry
Farrell Firefighter’s Fund.
From L-R: Keith Hanson, Hi-Times Wine Cellars,
Betty Yenulonis, Visal Image Events,
Michael Chu, Beverage Industry News,
Mario Brossard, Beam Global
6 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
KAI Vodka’s V.P. of Sales & Marketing, Dana
Black, along with acclaimed mixologist, Natalie
Bovis-Nelson, mixed up sensational summer KAI
cocktails: Kai Julep, The Sophisti-Kai-ted Lady
and Tropical Tipple, July 14th, at the plush pool-
side of the Viceroy Santa Monica. Guests were
invited to an evening of cocktail creation and
enjoyment as they indulged in seasonal KAI
Vodka cocktails paired alongside refreshing sum-
mer bites such as, Ginger and Star Anise Pork
Belly with Ginger Slaw. For more information on
KAI Vodka, please visit www.kaivodka.com.
1. KAI Lychee Vodka takes center stage at the Viceroy Santa Monica. 2. Dana Black, V.P.
Sales & Marketing, KAI Vodka LLC. 3. Mixologist, author, and editor of The Liquid Muse,
Natalie Bovis-Nelsen mixes up a KAI Julep. 4. Poolside at the Viceroy in Santa Monica dur-
ing the hotel’s Taste of Tuesday outdoor happy hour. For the month of July Kai Vodka was
the sponsored spirit so guests could enjoy Kai cocktails for only $5. 5. Tropical Tipple creat-
ed by Natalie Bovis-Nelsen. 2 ounces Kai vodka, 1 ounce passion syrup, 1 ounce mango juice,
3/4 ounce lemon, Fresh mango slice, sprinkled with cracked black pepper on a cocktail skew-
er (garnish). Shake all liquid ingredients with ice. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish
with fresh mango slice.
1
2
3 4
5
INDUSTRY EVENT
KAI VODKA’S
MEDIA EVENT
F
ood & Wine hosted its 27
th
annual Classic
in Aspen June 19
th
- 21
st
and more than
5,000 trade and consumer attendees
were present. Over the course of the weekend,
50,000 bottles of wine were poured and count-
less culinary superstars were on hand.
1 2
1 (L-R) Francois Thibault, Grey Goose maitre de chai and Dimi Lezinska, Grey Goose
global brand ambassador 2 Chris Haroza, United States sales manager, Terra Andina
3 Mark Vanston, VP sales and marketing, VSP Wine Group / Vino San Pedro, and his
wife, Karen 4 Lyndsey Geigle, Rob and Katie Cooper, St-Germain 5.Anthony Alba,
executive mixologist, Liquidity Global and Gaston Martinez, Milagro brand ambassador
6 Mia Malm, director of public relations, Icon Estates 7 Marcy Whitman, senior VP,
marketing; Michael Wolff, group marketing director; and Bethany Scherline, director of
public relations, Palm Bay International 8 Beth Cotenoff and Chandni Patel, Corner-
stone Communications on behalf of the Rías Baixas Albariño campaign 9 Rémy Chill
debuts in Aspen during the Food & Wine Classic 10 Rémi Brabant of Rémy Cointreau
USA explains the sensation of 0
0
F Cognac, which is generating attention in hotspots
from The Ritz Bar in London to the St. Regis in Aspen
3
4 5
6 7 8 9
10
8 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
L
iz and Jay Banbury, built graphic
design and marketing boutique
agency Banbury Cross with a
mix of striking photography, innovative
graphic and web page design, astute product
marketing campaigns and attention to
detail. Now they are ready to take their
distinctive and customized approach to
full-service marketing—at some of the most
competitive prices on the market—and
bring it into the beverage industry.
“Our approach to brand-building is in
perfect harmony with the wine and spirits
industries,” says Jay. “With so many new,
innovative products coming out in the liquor
market, and so many options in how they
can be promoted, I am condent
that what we do is as perfect a t
for a variety of liquor brands, as
well as retailers and distribution
companies.”
In the coming months, Banbury
Cross will be giving Beverage Industry
News (BIN) magazine a fresh new
look, from its color editorial pages to its
promotional materials. BIN publisher
Michael Chu was not only persuaded
by their vision of what BIN can be on a
visual level, but with their business acumen
as well. “After reviewing many creative
companies, I was really impressed with the
quality of their work,” says Chu. “However,
they also are bringing us exactly what we
need for the best prices. I recommend any
beverage product with a specic creative
vision bring it to Banbury Cross, and allow
them to present that vision in its best
possible light.”
Though many beverage companies
have turned to major public relations
rms and ad agencies in New York, Los
Angeles, Chicago and Miami for their
image-building efforts, the Amarillo-based
Banbury Cross offers both veteran brands
and hot new upstarts a viable alternative to
the traditional marketing service provider
on a variety of levels.
“When we build new relationships
with clients, establishing trust is just the
beginning,” says Liz. “ Beyond the initial
call, email or meeting, we’re thinking long
term. We take pride in the fact that we
are able to cater to clients in a way bigger
companies can’t. When you call us, you are
getting us, not an administrative assistant”.

With this
economy, companies of
all sizes are more entrepreneurial in the
way they approach product development,
launches and maintenance. In this
climate, most people cannot wait around
for somebody from a large company to get
back to them in a week. We get it, so we get
back to our clients immediately to take the
project or idea at hand to the next level.”
Jay Banbury focuses his energies on the
trend-setting graphic elements of a product’s
campaign, including photography, graphic
design and shaping marketing messages in
a visual way. Liz, meanwhile, works closely
with clients to develop a multi-level strategy
that is tailored to both the product and the
market it is going to be introduced or re-
introduced in. She also examines the results
of campaigns and strategic marketing plans
from previous rms retained by the client,
to determined what parts of the existing
program works and what other aspects
need to be rened and adapted to the
current marketplace.
“We see our
ties to each client as a
full-blown partnership,
and actively listen to
their ideas,” concludes
Liz. “From there, we
develop a uid strategy
individually tailored to a
new product to help those
ideas take ight, or take a
familiar product needing a
boost in a fresh new direction
visually and logistically. We’re
not just simply creating ads.
Instead, we intend to go beyond
the expectations of even the most
media savvy beverage companies.
While we deliver quality work on
a very timely, efcient basis, we’re not just
cranking out something fast. By putting
great quality projects out fast, we’re helping
our clients keep the attention of their target
consumers.
For more information, visit
www.banburydesign.com
By Elyse Glickman
Dynamic duo Liz and Jay Banbury prep themselves
— and clients—for beverage industry glory. — and clients—f
Dynamic duo Liz
By Elyse Glickman
. y y glor for beverage industr
y prep thems and Jay Banbur elves
custo and distinctive
are they Now detail.
campaigns marketing
d page web and graphic
phot striking of mix
Banbu agency
m and design
Ban Jay and iz
L
e call
begin
with
“W
on a v
tr the
h and
Banb
to approach omized
their take to ready e
to attention and s
duct pro astute design,
innovative , tography
a with Cross ury
boutique marketing
graphic built , nbury
thinking we’re meeting or email
in the Beyond “ Liz. says nning,”
just is trust establishing clients,
relationships new build we When
variety of levels.
prov service marketing raditional
alternative viable a upstarts new hot
br veteran both offers Cross ury
to going is it market
both to tailored is that
develop to clients with
mea Liz, . way visual a
m shaping and design
including campaign,
e graphic trend-setting
focus Banbury Jay
long
nitial
the t
ships
vider
to ve
ands
re- or duced intro be
the and duct pro the h
strategy multi-level a p
closely works anwhile,
in messages marketing
graphic , photography
s duct’ pro a of elements
the on energies his ses
as is do we what that
am I promoted, be can
many so and market,
co ducts pro innovative
. Jayy. says industries,”
with harmony perfect
to approach “Our
bring it into the bevera
on prices competitive
marketing— full-service
custo and distinctive
gettin
comp
ab are
term.
e call,
t a perfect
condent m
in options
in out ming
, new many so ith “W
spirits and wine the
in is brand-building
. age industry
market—and the n
most the of some —at
to approach omized
ho
th
ng us, not an administrative assistant”.
you us, call you When t. can’ panies
bi way a in clients to cater to ble
that fact the in pride take e W
thinking we re meeting, or email
what determined to
re rms previous from
stra and campaigns of
als She in. duced intro
to going is it market
ant”.
are u
igger
we t
long
partnership, ll
a as client each to e
our see e “W
en
the to adapted and d
aspects other w
existing the of parts
client, the by etained
plans marketing ategic
results the examines so
re- or duced intro be
l-blown
es
nt marketplace.
what
wha of vision their by
n was Chu Michael
materials promotional
edi color its from look,
magazin (BIN) News
Be giving be will Cross
mo coming the In
companies.”
and retailers as well
liquo of variety a for
can BIN at
only ot
BIN s.
pages itorial
fresh a ne
everage
onths,
d
as brands, or
p
b
pers
publ
t
n
Indust
Banbu
distribution
e’re W . logistically nd
direction new fresh a
a needing duct p
a take or ight, k
those help to duct o
a to tailored d
strategy uid a o
we there, “From
concludes ideas,” r
to listen actively d
p p,
d
pro
ke
o
dually
op
r
d
b Th h
possible light.”
tha present to them
Banb to it bring vision
with duct pro beverage
price best the for need
bringing are also they
work,” their of quality
really was I companies,
review “After well. as
th with but level, visual
li
launc
t way
a
i b
best its in vision at
allow nd Cross, bury
specic a h
I es.
exactly us g
Chu. says
impressed y
many wing
business heir
a allow and
c
recomme
w
“H
w
c
a
i l
In maintenance. and ches
developm duct pro approach they
in entrepreneurial more are sizes all in entrepreneurial more are sizes all
consumers.
at the keep clients our
o projects quality great
someth out cranking
f i , i l very a
d
this
ment,
the n
of
efcien timely s
the n
f
s
target their of ttention
helping we’re fast, out
putting By fast. hing
just not we’re b
on work quality v
companies. b
most the even of o
beyond go to i
ads. creating im
basis, nt
ver
beverage
ons
ntend
mply
efforts, image-building
an Chicago Angeles,
agencies ad and rms
maj to turned have
b many Though
projec
back
back
so for
clima
Amarillo-based the ,
their for Miami nd
Los ork, YYork, New in s
relations public jor
companies beverage
ct or idea at hand to the next leve
take to immediately clients our to
we so it, get e W week. a in them to
to company large a from dy omebo
aro wait cannot people most ate,
.banbur www w.banbur
For more infor
el.”
the e
get e
get o
ound
ydesign.com r
mation, visit or
10 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
Banbury Cross offers a mi x of stri ki ng photography, i nnovative graphic and web page desi gn, astute
product marketi ng campai gns and attenti on to detai l at some of the most competi tive prices on the
market! . Let us hel p make your busi ness i nto a work of art
| | - · ´ o ´ ` ´ . ´ ´ o · ´ o ´ ` . ´ | |
C R E A T I V E S E R V I C E S
et! . Let us hel p mak mark
oduct pr
anbury B
ur busi n o e y Let us hel p mak
t a d an pai gns cam eti ng mark
stri ki ng of mi x a offers oss Cr ry
ork of art ess i nto a w n
of some t a detai l to ttenti on
e v ti a v o i nn , y h p hotogra p ki ng
ces pri e v peti ti com most the
desi gn, page eb w d an c hi p gra
the on
astute ,
- | | · ´ o ´ ` ´ . ´ ´ o ·
S E C I V R E S E V I T A E R C
´ o ´ ` . ´ | |
12 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
La Paz Products INTRODUCES QUICKWAY COCKTAIL MIXES
La Paz Products has steadily risen to become the Latino communities'
favored brand they relate to and may be found at Ralph’s, Food 4 Less and
Smart and Final – along with Latino independent chains, such as Vallarta
Supermarkets and Superior Super Warehouse, Cardenas' Markets and El Super.
As a result of a 41-years commitment to producing quality mixes under two
successful brands, La Paz is going back to its roots and introducing their
QuickWay brand to the retail market.
QuickWay Mojito and Pomegranate Energy cocktail mixes are made with
the key energy ingredients found in your favorite energy drinks: B3, B5, B6,
B12, Taurine, Ginseng, Guarana and Caffeine. Not designed to be an energy
drink, they give just enough kick to your refreshing summer cocktails!
Christine Robinson, National Sales Manager for La Paz Products, Inc.
states, “In 1968 La Paz Products introduced a brand of sweet & sour concen-
trates specifically designed for the busy bartender. The brand was QuickWay
Professional Bar Mix. A few years later, we directed our attention to the retail
market and introduced the first margarita mix on the retail shelf, La Paz
Margarita Mix,”
Go to www.lapazproducts.com for more details or contact Young’s Market
for the full line of products.
Karlsson’s Gold THE FIRST VODKA WITH TERROIR
Karlsson’s Gold, launched in September 2007 in the United States by Spirits
of Gold. Created from the finest grade of virgin new potatoes – grown in
Sweden’s Cape Bjäre, home of the country’s highest-quality new potatoes –
and distilled as carefully as possible, Karlsson’s Gold is the first luxury vodka
that can sincerely boast its own terroir.
Karlsson’s Gold also boasts an impressive pedigree: Master Blender Börje
Karlsson, known as “the Father of Absolut” for his hand in the creation of one
of the world’s most successful vodkas.
The result of Börje Karlsson’s superior skill and masterful vision, Karlsson’s
Gold is rich in flavor, reflecting the quality of the virgin new potato varieties.
Producing a natural taste and balanced flavor, the seven varietals are: Solist,
Gammel Svensk Röd, Sankta Thora, Princess, Hamlet, Marine and Celine. By
distilling singularly and carefully, Karlsson preserves the flavors of these raw
materials to create a distinctive and complex vodka.
Karlsson’s Gold vodka (750ml/40% ABV) is available for a suggested
retail price of $39.99 at fine restaurants, bars and spirit retailers in New York,
Boston, California, New Mexico, Arizona, Georgia, Tennessee, Nevada,
Texas, Wyoming and Alberta, Canada, as well as through online merchants.
NEW PRODUCTS & PROMOTIONS
PLEASE ENJOYJEREMIAHWEED

RESPONSIBLY. J
E
R
E
M
I
A
H
W
E
E
D
H
A
L
F
&
H
A
L
F
C
o
c
k
t
a
i
l
.
1
2
.
7
%
A
l
c
/
V
o
l
.
©
2
0
0
9
T
h
e
J
e
r
e
m
i
a
h
W
e
e
d
D
i
s
t
i
l
l
i
n
g
C
o
m
p
a
n
y
,
N
o
r
w
a
l
k
,
C
T
.
• Sweet tea sales trends are up! Jeremiah Weed

Sweet Tea
Flavored Vodka is a top-10 new product in IRI after only
12 weeks in market.
1
• The vast majority of sweet tea flavored vodka
consumption is mixed with lemonade.
2
• Offer your customers a convenient and delicious
Ready-To-Serve Half & Half cocktail.
• Available in a 1.75 L convenient PET bottle—perfect for
outdoor occasions like picnics and the beach.
Also available in a 750 mL glass bottle.
• Sweet tea sales trends are up! Jeremiah Weed

Sweet Tea
Flavored Vodka is a top-10 new product in IRI after only
12 weeks in market.
1
• The vast majority of sweet tea flavored vodka
consumption is mixed with lemonade.
2
• Offer your customers a convenient and delicious
Ready-To-Serve Half & Half cocktail.
• Available in a 1.75 L convenient PET bottle—perfect for
outdoor occasions like picnics and the beach.
Also available in a 750 mL glass bottle.
12.7% ABV 12.7% ABV
JUST POUR OVER ICE FOR
ONE HELLUVA GOLFER’S TEA.
1
IRI, four weeks ending April 2009
2
Diageo Trade Audit, 2009
NOW AVAILABLE NOW AVAILABLE
1 Corzo Tequila PROVES THAT GOOD
THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES
To offer a new affordable luxury, Corzo Tequila has created a
375 ml size bottling for each of its three premium marques:
Corzo Silver, Corzo Reposado and Corzo Añejo. The new
size will mirror the brand’s distinct bottle design created by
renowned designer Fabien Baron. Corzo Silver will retail at
a suggested price of $23.99, Corzo Reposado for $26.99 and
Corzo Añejo for $28.99. Visit www.corzo.com
2 Powers Gold Label Irish Whiskey
INTRODUCES NEW LOOK
Powers Gold Label Irish Whiskey has unveiled new packag-
ing for its 750 ml and 1L bottles. The new contemporized
look features simplified lettering and eye-catching metallic
gold coloring. Powers Gold Label is a blend of pot still and
grain whiskey that is triple distilled and aged in bourbon oak
casks for four to six years. Visit www.pernodricard.com
3 Friday Monkey LAUNCHES NEW BLEND
IN LARGE FORMAT
Friday Monkey Wines introduces its Cabernet/Shiraz blend
in a large 1.5L format to select markets. Friday Monkey, the
wines for any occasion, are available in Chardonnay, Shiraz,
Cabernet/Merlot, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Rosé in
750 ml and Chardonnay, Shiraz, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon
and Cabernet Shiraz in 1.5L. Visit www.fridaymonkeywine.com

4 Bronco GOLD MEDALS AT SAN FRANCISCO
INTERNATIONAL WINE COMPETITION
Bronco Wine Company scored numerous awards at the 2009
San Francisco International Wine Competition. Among
them: Napa Creek 2007 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
(Double Gold/Best of Class), Montpellier 2007 Syrah (Dou-
ble Gold), Laurier 2006 Alexander Valley Merlot (Double
Gold), Harlow Ridge 2008 Lodi Pinot Noir (Gold Medal).
Bronco Wine Company, Ceres, CA 800-692-5780
5 Three Thieves OFFERS GREEN,
PORTABLE OPTION FOR SUMMER OUTINGS
Three Thieves and Rebel Wine Company have released a
new 500 ml package for their Bandit wines. The new size
joins the group’s 1L offerings, all of which come in a light-
weight, eco-friendly Tetra Pak package perfect for outdoor
adventures or stay-at-home revelry. The new 500 ml Tetra
Paks will be available for the group’s Cabernet Sauvignon,
Chardonnay, Merlot and Pinot Grigio wines and will retail at
a suggested retail price of $4.50 per 500 ml container.
Visit www.threethieves.com
6 Crop Organic Artisanal Vodka SOON TO BE
AVAILABLE IN 45 STATES
Crop Organic Artisanal Vodka is a super-premium USDA certi-
fied organic vodka distilled and bottled in the United States.
Using a distillation process so efficient that no carbon treatment
or charcoal fi ltering is required, Crop has a crisp, clean, pure
taste. Soon, look for Crop in 45 states. Visit www.cropvodka.com
1
5
4
2
6
NEW PRODUCTS & PROMOTIONS
3
14 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
Super-premium imported Olifant Vodka voted in 2009
as one of California’s top value brands by BIN Magazine
Crown Imports’ Jim Ryan
Named NABI Chairman
Jim Ryan has been elected chairman of
the board of directors of the National As-
sociation of Beverage Importers (NABI),
a national alcohol beverage trade associa-
tion headquartered
in Washington, DC.
Founded in 1933,
NABI is the old-
est trade association
in the U.S. serving
the alcohol beverage
industry. Ryan was
previously head of
NABI’s executive committee from March
2007 through March 2009. He’s the execu-
tive vice president of corporate communica-
tions for Chicago-based Crown Imports LLC
and has worked in the beer industry since the
late 1970s for Anheuser-Busch, Pabst and
G. Heileman.
Michelob Brewing Co. Takes
Gold, Silver And Bronze At
North American Beer Awards
With more than 1,200 beers in contention
for medals, Michelob Brewing Co. earned
four medals at the North American Beer
Awards in early June. Michelob Original
Lager and Michelob Dunkel Weisse took
gold and Michelob AmberBock garnered
a silver.
Paulaner HP USA — New Importer
Paulaner Brauerei of Munich, Germany, has
decided to once again import its own beers
in the U.S. and has formed Paulaner HP
USA, based in Colorado, as a wholly owned
subsidiary. Up until 2003, Paulaner imported
its beers before moving the brands to Star
Brands Imports, a Heineken USAsubsidiary.
Film Institute Casts Stella Artois in
Supporting Role
Stella Artois, the Belgian beer imported
by A-B InBev, is sponsoring the American
Film Institute (AFI) Fest on October 30
th
-
November 7
th
in Los Angeles. The beer was
also the sponsor of the AFI Life Achieve-
ment Award on June 11
th
.
Craft Beer Distributor
of the Year
The National Beer Wholesalers Association
(NBWA) and the Brewers Association (BA)
are accepting nominations for the Third
Annual Craft Beer Distributor of the Year
Award, presented annually to a beer distribu-
tor who actively markets, sells and promotes
craft beer. The award will be presented at the
Great American Beer Festival, hosted by BA
on September 24
th
–26
th
, in Denver, CO.
Amstel’s New Website
Heineken USA(HUSA) has redesigned the
Amstel website as part of an increased mar-
keting campaign for the light Dutch lager.
According to HUSA, www.amstellight.com
will “whisk you away to Amstel’s Amster-
dam–where much like the unconventional
and free-spirited culture of Amsterdam–
nothing is what it seems.” The website virtu-
ally recreates the streets of Amsterdam–“the
art, nightlife, music and magic”–in three
sections: Dam Good Bier, Dam Good Times
and Dam Good Culture.
Modelo Especial Named
“Hot Brand” Award Winner
By Impact Magazine
Modelo Especial was named a 2008 “Hot
Brand” award winner by Impact Magazine
last spring based on its impressive sales re-
sults. This is the 15
th
consecutive year that
Modelo Especial has received this award,
an industry honor that no other beer,
wine or spirit has been given. Modelo Es-
pecial is the number three imported beer
in the U.S. and grew at 10.6% in 2008.
It’s grown at a double-digit rate for 17 con-
secutive years, more than any other brand in
the industry.
Pilsner Urquell Partners with
Chef Michael Symon
Pilsner Urquell, the lager from the Czech Re-
public (imported by MillerCoors), continues
its beer and food push in the U.S. This time
the brand has hired celebrity chef Michael
Symon to showcase the beer. Symon is the
2009 James Beard Foundation Award recipi-
ent and can be seen regularly on the Food
Network’s “Iron Chef America” program, of
which he was a past winner. Working with
Pilsner Urquell, Chef Symon has created
original recipes that specifically pair with
the hoppy, blonde lager.
Great Brewers’ Beer Sommelier
Beer Sommelier (www.greatbrewers.com/
beer-sommelier) is a craft-beer-mapping web
site fromGreat Brewers, a consortiumof dis-
tributors, in which users can pair a wide va-
riety of food with recommended beers. Each
beer on the site includes all the stats: flavor
characteristics, ABV, glassware, etc. There
are about 2,100 beers in the database.
Samuel Adams
Beer Lover’s Choice
This year’s Samuel Adams Beer Lover’s
Choice began on July 6
th
and will continue
through September 30
th
.
The two contenders this
year are Samuel Adams
Pils and Samuel Adams
Ale. Promotions across
the country are listed at
www.samueladams.com
where people can vote for their favorite beer.
The winner will be added to the 2010 line-
up of Samuel Adams beers. Samuel Adams
Pils (5.2%) is similar to a traditional Czech
WHAT’S BREWING
News from Around the World
By Gregg Glaser
Jim Ryan
Chef Michael Symon with
MillerCoors brewmaster Manny Manuele
16 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
A CUT ABOVE
THE REST
THROUGH PAINSTAKING CRAFTSMANSHIP AND HIGHLY TARGETED
MARKETING, DIAMOND BEVERAGES IS INSURING THEIR ULTRA-
PREMIUM VODKA WILL BE “FOREVER” IN THE HEARTS AND MINDS
OF THE CHOOSIEST BEVERAGE ACCOUNTS AND CONSUMERS.
Written by Elyse Glickman
Other top-selling, ultra-premium vodkas and
spirits have exercised seemingly uncharacteristic
caution, and are playing their hand closer to the
vest and the wallet. However, the Chicago area-
based company is putting the market’s most
expensive vodka out there for all to admire and
the most discerning customers to indulge in.
Their prime selling point: putting diamond filtra-
tion (the most expensive filtration process) into
play to create what they believe is the finest,
most refined vodka on the market and tying it
together in packaging of a Saverglass™ perfume-
grade bottle adorned with Swarovski crystal.
Produced at Poland's 300 year-old Polmos
Siedlce Distillery, and made from prized
Dankowski Diamond® Rye, this singular vodka
is brought to life through an intricate process
involving four rounds of distillation, four stages
of filtration, and a carefully guarded filtration
process requiring thousands of DeBeers® dia-
monds. This $79.99 MSRP/750ml wonder
was launched over the summer in Florida,
Illinois, Nevada and California, all places
where Founder, President and General
Manager Richard Wallace knows the show
always goes on in the world of luxury goods.
He exudes confidence, observing that the
positioning of Diamond Standard Vodka is
specifically designed to distinguish it from
other products in the now-crowded field
of ultra-premium vodkas, ranging in price
from $30 to $40.
Though Diamond Standard Vodka is
just barely a year old, it is the product of
both Poland’s illustrious history as the old-
est vodka-producing country and the
craftsmanship of distiller Tad Dorda of
Polmos Distillery in Siedlce, Poland.
Dorda, up until now, was best known in
the industry for putting the ultra-premium
vodka category on the map by developing
Belvedere Vodka and Chopin Vodka
brands for Millennium Spirits in the
1990s. And for these reasons, Wallace and his
team knew he was the only distiller up to the job
of creating a vodka inspired by and forged from
actual diamonds.
“After we assessed the early marketing
efforts for Diamond Standard Vodka, we wanted
to rethink the ‘Fashion you can Drink’ and
instead reshape the lifestyle message that really
speaks to what’s inside the bottle: “What dia-
monds taste like,” Wallace says. “Our advertis-
ing is pointed directly to the fact that the word
‘diamond’ is such a great thing to build a brand
on because there are so many different ways you
can work with it. Because diamonds are regard-
ed for their simplicity, and looking great with
practically anything, we decided to tie it in with
mixology and answer the ‘what do diamonds
taste like’ question. Each one of our ads uses a
single graphic element. For example, an orange
photo accompanies a recipe for a Diamond
Standard Screwdriver; An olive is used to
depict “Standard Martini,” a mint becomes a
Diamond Standard Mojito, and so forth.
We’re also playing upon the fact that the best
diamonds, like our vodka, are setting a stan-
dard through their perfection.”
“We believe our timing is right,”
CEO Louis A. Amoroso adds. “Even
with economic fluctuations, consumers
want the opportunity to treat them-
selves, and we offer an affordable luxury
that can be savored.”
A SOLITAIRE SETTING
To further drive home the point that
Diamond Standard Vodka now stands
alone in a very elegant setting, far ahead of
other vodkas in the ultra premium catego-
ry, Wallace explains it is important for on-
and off-premise accounts to convince the
consumer that the beautiful package on
the outside clearly speaks to the quality
and purity of what’s inside of it as well as
W
hile some liquor companies pride themselves on
thinking outside the box—or the bottle, for that mat-
ter, Diamond Beverages is thinking outside the con-
straints of the economy to put forth what just may be the ultimate
vodka indulgence.
20 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
the history behind it.
“When we found out that Tad Dorda
was behind all of this incredible work (that
brought Chopin and Belvedere to life), we
wanted to see if he could do the same kind
of thing with our Rye vodka concept,” says
Wallace, a 35+ year veteran in the import-
ed vodka segment, who came out of retire-
ment just for this venture and has landmark
campaigns for Stoli and Finlandia to his
credit. “We contacted him four years ago
and told him about our vision to create the
finest, purest vodka on earth with diamond
filtration. As the category’s first real vision-
ary, however, he needed a bit of persuasion.
After he agreed to distill and filter the prod-
uct the way we wanted it and he tasted the
results, he agreed the concept was solid.
Here is a man who produced two of the very
first ultra-premium vodkas taking on the
challenge of outdoing himself. Today, he is
our greatest global sales person, and we are
proud to have him as our distiller partner.”
Even with new ventures being more
risky than ever, Wallace points out that lux-
ury vodkas ($40 and up) posted the most
growth in the category, a whopping 56.2%
in sales and 78.3% in volume. When
Diamond Standard was launched in Miami
and, later, Las Vegas, Wallace knew the tim-
ing was right for the launch because there
was always a small, but strong niche market
eagerly anticipating for the next great luxu-
ry product.
“All you have to do is look at the bot-
tle, which radiates the message that it is the
best on the market,” Wallace affirms.
“When they taste it, they understand the
external beauty equals what’s inside. What
it says to our reps and our team at Southern
Wine & Spirits in California is that people
are still drinking and demand the best vod-
kas money can buy. They may drink less
product, but they are drinking better and
smarter. This plays right into our hands,
and when you go to places like South Beach
and Las Vegas, and walk into their best bars
and restaurants, you would be hard pressed
to believe there is actually a recession going
on based on people’s drinking habits, espe-
cially as mixology trends have made them
really attuned to the quality of the cocktails
they are buying.”
A FLAWLESS APPROACH TO TARGETING
“In every major market, we are dedicating
50% of our marketing budget to placing
print ads in high-end local and regional
consumer magazines with an emphasis on
fashion and luxury lifestyles,” explains
Bruce McDonnell, Diamond Beverage’s
Executive Vice President of Marketing,
focused on directing the advertising and
marketing campaign for Diamond Standard
Vodka. During his fifteen-year run in the
adult beverage industry, prior to coming to
Diamond Beverages, he spearheaded the
development, introduction or rollout of
over 15 new upscale beverage products.
“We’re looking at consumers, young
professionals, aged 25 and up with a high
disposable income.” he continues. “These
are people driven by the good life, who fre-
quent the party scene and are willing to pay
for the best because they want the best. We
have observed that despite growth in the
ultra-premium segment, there is a bit of a
void in the momentum of that growth, and
what we are seeing is an opportunity for us
to take over the top spot for this part of the
category. A closer look at the segment
reveals that sales of some of the once very
hot ultra-premium vodkas have slowed
down considerably. Even though we are
introducing in the worst recession since the
great depression, we have a great story to
tell that we believe people will respond to.
Furthermore, we are not looking to sell to
COVER FEATURE continued
Top: Diamond Standard Vodka packaging: Saverglass™ perfume-grade bottle adorned with
Swarovski crystal. Below: “What Diamonds Taste Like” lifestyle message targets consumers who
are willing to pay for the best because they want the best.
www.thedalmore.com Imported by Shaw-Ross International Importers, Miramar, Florida- www.shaw-ross.com. Drink responsibly.
PERFECTION CAN
NOW BE DEFINED.
THE DALMORE.
2009 BEVERAGE TASTING INSTITUTE RATINGS:
THE 40 RATED 98
THE 1974 RATED 97
KING ALEXANDER III RATED 94
GRAN RESERVA RATED 91
THE 12 RATED 90
THE 40
THE 15
every single consumer. We are looking for
that select few that simply want the best
and who will pay for it.”
According to Chris Alvarez, who is an
acting Vice President concentrating on mar-
keting Diamond Standard Vodka in the
Western U.S., approaching high-end, trend-
setting California consumers requires finesse
and care. Rather than force the issue, he
believes the best way to create an enduring
following for the vodka is through subtlety,
exclusivity and quality. The tastemakers in
California and Las Vegas want to be the ones
credited for making the discovery. Working
in tandem with distributor Southern Wine
and Spirits, and through special promotions
at top hotels and resorts, Alvarez says he’s
betting on allowing them to flex their con-
sumer muscle.
“We’re not deliberately seeking people
out, but instead, creating a climate where
people will actively seek us out,” Alvarez
says. “As we see it, we’re not just at the top
end of vodka brands, but actively setting the
standard beyond a successful mass brand
like Grey Goose. We’ve worked to take it
up to the next level for consumers actively
looking to trade up from Grey Goose. In
this economy, people are looking for great
value, but they are also looking to spend on
something luxurious that won’t break the
bank, which you can do with our brand.”
With that in mind, Wallace notes that
the greatest overall marketing challenge,
over the long haul, is to convince this elite
group of consumers that they are getting
what they pay for in the same way jewelry
enthusiasts do when they shop DeBeers or
Tiffany & Co. In other words, assurance
that the incredible beauty and simplicity
consumers and bartenders see outside is
absolutely equal to what they will taste or
mix with on the inside.
“The whole project started with a singu-
lar goal to produce the finest vodka in the
world regardless of the price,” says Wallace.
“When developing this over the course of
four years with master distiller Tad Dorda,
price was not an object. Now that we’re out
there and making our way in the marketplace,
we make no excuse for our suggested retail
price because the distiller, under our direc-
tion, has created a formula that is uniquely
different from any other vodka in the world.”
DIAMOND MINING IN POLAND
While the artistry of Tad Dorda was in itself
a great impetus to formulate and execute
Diamond Standard Vodka in Poland, its his-
tory and natural attributes make this coun-
try the perfect place to begin prospecting for
future good fortune. While DeBeers dia-
monds were brought in to perfect the distil-
lation process and the smoothness of the
final product, what comes naturally was a
perfect place to start in producing some-
thing refined and unsurpassed.
“In written history, the word ‘vodka’
translates to ‘little water’ in Polish,” notes
Wallace. “As far back as we’ve been able to
research, Poland has produced longer and
more than any other country producing
vodka. This long-standing success is
because they simply have the best raw mate-
rials anywhere, from the Dankowski rye-the
best on Earth-to aquifer water. Also the fact
that this particular distillery is over 300
years old, has been operational for that
entire time and has produced some of the
best vodkas in the spirit’s history makes this
22 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
REAL GEMS:
DIAMOND STANDARD’S
SIMPLY PERFECT COCKTAILS
Thanks to the fact that less is more, any-
body can be a master mixologist when
they start off with the very best at their bar.
THE DIAMOND MARTINI
1.5 oz Diamond Standard Vodka
.75 oz dry vermouth
Shake vodka and vermouth together with
several ice cubes in a shaker. Strain into a
cocktail glass, garnish with an olive and
serve.
DIAMOND MARY
1.5 oz Diamond Standard Vodka
3 oz Bloody Mary mix
1 celery stalk
1 pinch peppers
1 pinch salt
Fill Glass with ice. Add Diamond Standard
Vodka and Bloody Mary mix. Stir well.
Garnish with salt, pepper and celery stalk.
DOUBLE DIAMOND
4 oz of Diamond Standard Vodka
Pour Diamond Standard Vodka into an old-
fashioned glass with two or three cubes of ice.
“The whole project start-
ed with a singular goal
to produce the finest
vodka in the world
regardless of the price,”
– Richard Wallace, Founder,
President and General Manager
a natural fit for being the birthplace for the
first great vodka brand of the 21st Century.
When you go to the birthplace of vodka,
work with a distiller who has changed the
course of the category’s history and, togeth-
er, pay attention to details that matter, you
are bound to wind up with an exceptional
product. Couple that with our rare and
unusual concept of Diamond Filtration
combined with the best traditional filtra-
tion, what you get is the world’s smoothest
vodka. Because of the extra care that goes
into producing our vodka, like mining the
finest diamonds, we make no excuse about
being the most expensive.”
McDonnell adds that all that work and
attention results in high-perceived value
among those consumers specifically on the
market for the best vodka money can buy. If
you are going to make claims about a great
Polish vodka, however, planning needs to
be done to ensure every aspect of the prod-
uct will live up to expectation.
“Because the product literally was five
years in the making, we must deliver,” says
McDonnell. “All of the time we took was
time needed to refine the entire formula and
product, every element inside and out of the
bottle to get it where we wanted. Packaging
was extremely complicated, as we wanted
that Swarovski crystal right in the middle of
the bottle, and it is not easy to adhere crys-
tal to glass. Our out-of-the-box success is due
to the planning, trial and error before we
were ensured we could put it out into the
bigger market place at this point in time.
With so much work, we have chosen to go
right to the consumer and stand on the fact
that we have an unbelievably high perceived
value and will stand behind the product and
the price, without the need for celebrity
endorsement or other forms of hype
employed by other ultra-premium brands.”
As it takes a highly experienced and
skilled team to get the product out of
Poland and U.S. warehouses and into the
hands of consumers, Wallace is also eager to
point out that every employee of Diamond
Beverages has had many years of experience
in the beverage industry, especially related
to fine imported vodka. Chris Alvarez, who
is getting the product in the hands of influ-
ential clients and consumers in the West, is
no exception. His work in Las Vegas in par-
ticular, gives him an edge as he boasts an
intimate knowledge of VIP-caliber vodka
drinkers who drive the market for vodka
and other luxury products.
THE GOLDEN STATE’S MANY FACETS
Alvarez maintains that what makes the
West, and California cities in particular, an
exceptional proving ground is that people
like to test every new thing that comes on
the market. He notes from experience that
niche spirits brands with high expectations
go into their marketing efforts with short-
term goals. However, he believes that tak-
ing the opposite course of action with
Diamond Standard Vodka will empower it
to endure in the long-term.
“What makes us different is that our
sales and marketing goals are long-term,”
says Alvarez. “Instead of the shotgun
approach so many new brands take, we are
moving methodically, on a three-year plan
and focusing specifically on the higher-end
clientele. They are a group that does not
like to be rushed, and has an instinct for
“We have observed that
despite growth in the
ultra-premium segment,
there is a bit of a void
in the momentum of that
growth, and what we
are seeing is an oppor-
tunity for us to take over
the top spot for this part
of the category.”
– Bruce McDonnell
Executive VP of Marketing
24 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
DIAMOND MOJITO
2 oz Diamond Standard Vodka
3 fresh mint sprigs, 2 tbsp sugar, 3 tbsp
fresh lime juice, Soda water
Muddle the mint, sugar and lime juice in a
collins glass. Fill it with ice, add Diamond
Standard Vodka and top it with soda.
Shake or mix the drink. Garnish it with a
lime wedge.
DIAMOND DRIVER
2 oz Diamond Standard Vodka
5 oz orange juice
Put 3 ice cubes into a highball glass. Pour
in Diamond Standard Vodka.
Fill balance of glass with orange juice, stir,
and serve.
DIAMOND WITH A TWIST
2 oz of Diamond Standard Vodka
3 cubes of ice
Pour Diamond Standard Vodka into an old-
fashioned glass with three cubes of ice.
Garnish with the twist of a lemon peel.
DIAMOND ON THE ROCKS
2 oz of Diamond Standard Vodka
3 cubes of ice
Pour Diamond Standard Vodka into an old-
fashioned glass with 3 cubes of ice.
The Beverage Testing Institute rated us #1 orange liqueur. So, when you
practically double your profits by pouring Gran Gala you won’t be cutting
any corners.
Gran Gala is a celebration of taste, life and expression. A triple celebration,
to match the intensity of our triple orange flavor.
Express yourself with Gran Gala and the limitless flavorful drinks you can
make with it.
PASSIONATELY ITALIAN TRIPLE ORANGE LIQUEUR™
www.grangala.com
PASSIONATELY COMMITTED
TO A BETTER MARGARITA
Rated 94
by BTI
#1 RATING IN MARGARITAS BY BEVERAGE TESTING INSTITUTE, CHICAGO, IL.
VISIT WWW.GRANGALAPROFITCALCULATOR.COM NOW! SEE HOW MUCH GREATER YOUR PROFITS CAN BE.
Gran Gala®, 40% Alc by Vol, Imported from Italy by Sazerac Co, New Orleans, LA. www.grangala.com 1-866-GRANGALA
what is the best on the market regardless of
hype. They want to know exactly what
they’re drinking and are assertive about
knowing what they like. In response, what
we’ve done is collaborated with strategic
partners like the Ritz-Carlton, Four
Seasons, Fairmount San Francisco and
Michael Mina’s restaurants to go after the
highest end of consumers, who will in turn
drive business, through word-of-mouth to
other affluent customers.”
Though there are some marketing plans
in the works for California that could not be
discussed at press time, Alvarez confirms
they are sticking with the “What diamond’s
taste like” message and presenting people
with the opportunity to experience the
Double Diamond Martini and immediately
understand what they are paying for. This is
further implemented with a cocktail menu
that places emphasis on the figurative and
literal meanings of a “diamond” standard,
where the vodka is as important as the fresh
ingredients that figure into the mixers.
“We really want to deliver a product
whose value has it all, superior flavor, style,
substance and simplicity,“ concludes
Alvarez, who is also planning an unprece-
dented campaign for Las Vegas’ Excess,
ranked the hottest nightclub in America.
The plan, like the vodka, is simple, elegant
and exclusive—making Diamond Standard
Vodka the only vodka VIP guests will expe-
rience on their visit.
DIAMONDS ARE ALSO A
BARTENDER’S BEST FRIEND
Wallace points out that because a high per-
centage of vodka purchased is consumed
mixed, and usually works with anything one
mixes into it, the only place a bartender (or
somebody entertaining at home) should
start at is with the best vodka available.
“It is nearly impossible to make a mis-
take when you’re starting with a vodka that
is of the highest quality,” he insists. This is
why our recipes that are a tied in with the
‘What diamonds taste like’ message are sim-
ple. A central idea of this campaign is two-
fold, as bartending has evolved into a fine
art. Whether you are a professional or host-
ing a party, you do not need to be an aston-
ishingly acrobatic mixologist in order to put
together a perfect cocktail. Likewise, you
don’t have to be a hardcore foodie to enjoy
the incredible smoothness when you drink
the cocktail. You are assured of the very
best results.”
Wallace acknowledges that the mixolo-
gy movement has given way to a very large
flavored vodka market in the U.S. However,
he notes that the core business of every top
brand is still the clear or neutral vodka prod-
uct, and flavors are more or less an add-on.
“If a distiller does a good job with natu-
ral flavors and can appeal to the consumer
in taste and perceived value, it will sell,” He
says. “Brand managers and owners across
the board, however, will agree that plain
vodka is their top seller. That said, flavors
do bring in audiences, and our brand will be
no exception.”
Though Wallace was not at liberty to
discuss the potential flavors at this time, he
mentions top brass at Diamond Beverages
are currently going through a process of
selecting what will become the flavored
vodka extensions with the requirement that
these line extensions will be as smooth and
as refined as they original vodka. Master
Distiller Dorda has even flown in from
Poland to be an active part of the selection
process. Even with one eye on the immedi-
ate future, however, Wallace says perma-
nence is the ultimate goal.
“We have been in business for a year,
and it has been quite a journey,” assesses
Wallace. “It has been a lot of fun selling this
product to distributors, who are effectively
the gatekeepers to business. The same is
true for the challenge of getting the con-
sumer pull-through needed to make this a
success in the long run. That said we think
the end game, tied up in the taste and word-
of-mouth, will prove its worth. Our appeal
is not even to every vodka drinker, or even
every ultra-premium vodka drinker. It is
only for the most discerning customers will-
ing to pay for the best.”
DIAMOND MINING
For those looking for a gem of a career
opportunity, Diamond Standard Vodka
proudly announces there are job openings
for qualified candidates. To view the posi-
tions and their responsibilities, visit
www.wineandspiritsjobs.com.
26 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
“Even with economic
fluctuations, consumers
want the opportunity to
treat themselves, and
we offer an affordable
luxury that can be
savored.”
– Louis A. Amoroso
CEO
Polmos Siedlce Distillery
I
f you play a game of wine-word association
with “Chile,” in all likelihood you’re going
to hear the return retort, “value” with “bar-
gains” coming a close second. And why not?
Compared to acreage prices in such lust-worthy,
well-known Cab producing areas as Bordeaux
and Napa, Chile is a bargain, and its prices have
long reflected this agricultural real estate fact.
That’s why, with its perfectly dry, sunny, ocean-influenced (and let’s not forget
phylloxera-free) climate, it has attracted investors from France and California,
with names like Rothschild and Mondavi laying claim to exemplary vineyard
land at a fraction of the cost. “Chile has so many things going for it,” says Ed
Barden, director of the Banfi South American Portfolio. “It is such a diverse
geographic country, the climate is in its favor and the fact that it has these pro-
tective boun aries that have kept out a lot of vineyard pests.” True enough—
Chile is much more than just the southern hemisphere’s version of Filene’s
to the Big Boys’ Barney’s. It is the source of some out-and-out stunning vitis
vinifera these days, with new investment, establishment of coastal and hillside
vineyards, modern winemaking techniques and state-of-the-art equipment
making for some exciting sippers taking their place at the global table.
It’s Getting Chile
Wines from this sliver of a South American country continue to climb in
popularity as an incredible source of value—and quality
By Amy Zavatto
TASTING CORNER
More and more vineyards are looking to the chilly hillsides
for planting, like these, in the shadow of the snow-capped Andes
Morning fog makes way for sunny days in
the cool Casablanca foothills
Producers like Montes have looked west in
the vine-dense Colchagua Valley toward the
slopes in the western section of Marchigue
for its cooler, marine-influenced climate

www.appletonrum.com
A
p
p
l
e
t
o
n
E
s
t
a
t
e
R
e
s
e
r
v
e
R
u
m
©
2
0
0
9
K
o
b
r
a
n
d
C
o
r
p
o
r
a
t
i
o
n
,
N
e
w
Y
o
r
k
,
N
Y
.
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
o
f
J
a
m
a
i
c
a
.
I
m
p
o
r
t
e
d
b
y
K
o
b
r
a
n
d
C
o
r
p
o
r
a
t
i
o
n
,
N
e
w
Y
o
r
k
,
N
Y
.
4
0
%
A
L
C
.
B
Y
V
O
L
.
P
l
e
a
s
e
s
i
p
r
e
s
p
o
n
s
i
b
l
y
.
SINCE 1749
“Chile on the whole over-delivers in
quality,” says Mark Vanston, VP of sales
and marketing for Viña San Pedro. “For
example, Casa Lapostolle Clos Apalta was
the number-one rated wine in Wine Spec-
tator (for the 2008 Top 100), and you can
find it on the marketplace for around $70,
unlike a $400 Château Margaux, which is
not affordable. But a $70, 96-point wine?
That’s affordable.” Walk into any wine
shop, however, and you’re even more
likely to find a veritable smorgasbord of
exceptional options for $25 and far under.
“The $20 bottles taste like $50 bottles, and
the $12 bottles like $25 bottles in compari-
son to other wines,” says Vanston. Appar-
ently, he’s not the only one who’s noticed.
Of the 70% exported, U.S. wine lists and
shop shelves have long been one of Chile’s
most enthusiastic markets. With 7,758,200
750 ml bottle cases shipped to the U.S.
last year, we are second only to the UK
in consumption of the Pacific-influenced
country’s grapes. But while in the past in-
expensive jug wines made from Pais (one
of the first grapes planted in Chile during
the 16
th
century by Spanish conquistado-
res) were the bulk focus of many wineries,
the last 20 years have
seen marked change in
Chile’s focus—and, ul-
timately, how seriously
it considers itself as a
maker of quality wine.
While Pais plantings
have been on the de-
cline, Cabernet Sau-
vignon, Merlot, Pinot
Noir, and, most ag-
gressively, Carmenère
(which until the 1990s
had often been incorrectly labeled as Mer-
lot) and Cabernet Franc, have exploded,
and their ultimate balance, varietal expres-
sion and overall quality improved by leaps
and bounds.
Change on the Range
In addition to investing millions in state-
of-the-art-facilities, like Montes’ $6.5 mil-
lion baby in the Colchagua Valley, Chil-
ean wineries have undergone re-plantings,
the switch to French oak barrels for aging,
significant development in organic and
sustainable farming and terroir-hunting
efforts to seek out potential spots for new
vineyards. Made up of the Cabernet-heavy
Maipo, Rapel, Curico and Maule valleys,
the Central Valley is not only the site
of Chile’s first vines, but also where the
brunt of export-worthy wines have been
cultivated. New research and exploration,
however, have led to some interesting dis-
coveries further afield in terms of flourish-
ing alternative varietals and new territories
upon which to grow them. Spots like the
Choapa, Limarí (where Concha y Toro
has made exciting progress with Syrah,
Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc in their
5-year-old Mycas del Limarí vineyard) and
“Chile on the whole
over-delivers
in quality.”
-Mark Vanston,
VP sales and marketing,
Viña San Pedro
PEST OF LUCK
Montes’ Colchagua Valley
state-of-the-art winery produces
over 400,00 gallons of wine
annually, and also embraces the
Asian philosophy of Feng Shui
Vineyard workers take in baskets of hand-harvested grapes
in the Luis Felipe Edwards Vineyards of Colchagua
P
hylloxera’s mysterious absence
in Chile is thought to be the luck
of geography. Its long, slender
green-bean shape runs the length, and
then some, of neighboring Argentina
with the Andes acting as a natural bor-
der to the east, and the Pacific Ocean
making a watery truncation to the west.
That, coupled with the country’s dry
acreage and natural irrigation from
the snowy melt of the mountains, has
made for not only a phylloxera-free
environment, but one that may well
have given the country a solid founda-
tion in winemaking. Prosperity in the
19
th
century led many a Chilean land
owner to express their good fortune
by modeling wineries around Santiago
after the great chateaux of Bordeaux,
importing their varietals to make the
experience that much more authentic.
Meanwhile, as European vines were
ravaged by phylloxera’s devastating
wallop, French winemakers who found
themselves jobless looked to South
America for employment where the
thriving, pest-free vineyards of Chile
beckoned and they could re-plant their
collective expertise in classic vineyard
management and winemaking.
TASTING CORNER
Elqui north of Santiago; San Antonio
and Casablanca west of Santiago; and
Bío Bío and Malleco to the south are
showing great promise with red varietals
like Carmenère, Syrah, and even Pinot
Noir, and Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling
and Gewürztraminer among the whites.
“I can’t seem to stop talking about Chile
lately. I hadn’t been in about five or six
years, but have visited a couple of times
in the last six months,” says Sandy
Block, MW and VP of beverage for
Legal Sea Foods. “I wasn’t aware of
how much development there had
been in the hillsides, and in the cooler
climate and coastal areas north and
south of Santiago.”
In the same way that Argentina
made a name with its Malbec, Carme-
nère in particular seems to be coming
into its own in Chile. Complaints in
the past of under-ripeness have given
way to vineyard-management adjust-
ments that make this once-minor Bor-
deaux blending varietal a contender
in its own right. “It needs a very, very
long growing season,” explains Block,
“so in areas where they are now able
to ripen the grape into May, sometimes
late May, it has made the Carmenère
much better.” Retailer Ryan Sciarra, a
partner in the popular Kansas City wine
shop, CellarRat, agrees. “[Viña] Errazur-
iz does a single-vineyard Carmenère and
it’s absolutely delicious. Until recently,
the reds we were getting were so under-
ripe—they were green and stemmy and
I couldn’t get past it. Now, I’m finding
that in the past year or so I’ve tasted
more wines from Chile that I’ve fallen
in love with. It’s really exciting to see
it happen—we’ve expanded our Chile
section to the point where it’s doubled
in the past six to eigh months.”
If you’re a silver-lining kind of per-
son, you might say the economic down-
turn has created a consumer Renais-
sance of sorts for this ever-improving
region, giving oenophiles the opportu-
nity to taste, discover and ultimately
save. “Value is one of the main reasons I
started to look at Chile again. I’d always
been impressed by the purity of the fruit,
but they were a little bit harder to mar-
ket five years ago,” says Block. “They do
represent value, which is definitely in
tune with what our customers are look-
ing for now. You just get more bang from
your buck with Chile than you would
from pretty much anywhere else.” Q
Q 2008 MAYCAS DEL LIMARÍ
RESERVA ESPECIAL SAUVIGNON
BLANC, LIMARÍ VALLEY, ($20):The
cooling ocean influence typical to the
Limarí Valley shows in this crisp, bone-dry
Sauvignon Blanc. The herby, lemon-verbe-
na nose has delicate floral undertones, but
it bursts onto the palate with a rush of
grapefruit, salty, prominent minerality
and mouth-watering acidity that begs
for a plate of oysters.
www.maycasdellimari.com
Q 2007 MONTES ALPHA CARMENÈRE,
COLCHAGUA VALLEY, ($24): The hue
of this inky, alluring Carmenère belies its full
nose of black plums and cinnamon. With a
year in French oak, easy tannins give gentle
but prominent structure to the plush fruit-and-
clove mouthfeel and pleasant, smoky finish.
www.monteswines.com
Q 2007 VIÑA SAN PEDRO CASTILLO DE
MOLINA PINOT NOIR, CASABLANCA VALLEY,
($12): Cool, moist foggy mornings give way to dry,
sunny days that are the lynch pin to the Casablanca
Valley’s great potential for Pinot. Viña San Pedro’s
version not only offers value, but beautiful vari-
etal clarity with aromas of cherries, mushrooms,
a hint of smoke and crisp, palate-tickling
tartness. www.sanpedro.cl
Q 2006 CONCHA Y TORO DON
MELCHOR CABERNET SAUVIGNON,
PUENTO ALTO, CHILE, ($80): Sweet
with aromas of violets and black fruit and an
herby-minty edge of eucalyptus, structured
tannins act as the palate’s perfect serving
dish for this Cab’s juicy blackberries and
black plums and heady hints of cinnamon
around the edges. www.conchaytoro.com
Q 2007 ERRAZURIZ SINGLE VINEYARD
CARMENÈRE, DON MAXIMINO ESTATE,
($25): If there was ever proof that Carmenère
can and should stand on its own, this stunning,
single-vineyard example from Errazuriz is it, with
layers of personality that will only continue to
improve over the next 5 to 10 years. The nose
is all juicy plums, blackberry and baking spice,
with an interesting minty edge. On the palate
the initial slow, sultry rush of fruit is tweaked
by black tea, a mild salty quality and lovely
balancing acidity. www.errazuriz.com
All prices are suggested retail.
BIN
BEVERAGE INDUSTRY NEWS
chilean wine selections
BINONLINE.NET
The United States is
second only to
the United Kingdom
in consumption
of exported
Chilean wine.
Vines thrive in the warm, hilly Colchagua Valley
32 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
Mist. Make Life More Flavorful.
TM
Imported and Bottled by Brown-Forman Beverages, Canadian Whisky, A Blend, 40% Alc. by Volume, Louisville, KY ©2009
For great recipes visit:
Enjoy Life. Drink Mist Responsibly.
Less coin.
More medal.
2009 Double Gold Medal
San Francisco World Spirits Competition
2008 Gold Medal
San Francisco World Spirits Competition
2008 Best In Class
International Wine and Spirits Competition
2006 Gold Medal
World Beverage Competition
CORPORATE PROFILE
2NQA
IANE?=J
'JJKR=PKNO
With a new organizational structure, and a host of new products in
the marketplace, a re-energized Beam Global makes its presence felt.
By Kristen Wolfe Bieler
“Innovation is a key driver in our business,”
says Rachel Roberts, director of new ventures &
innovation. “Even in this economic environment,
consumers still have very identifiable needs—they
still want exciting products that make them feel
good about themselves. We want to be at the fore-
front of the next wave of trends, so we are making
an even greater investment in innovation.”
Interestingly, this isn’t a new strategy for the
company. “The lifeblood of our company has al-
ways been newproducts,” says Tim Condron, group
VP national accounts/sales strategy. “It is at the
heart of what we do as the great American Spirits
T
here are few companies as busy as
Beam Global. While others in the
spirits industry are reining in new
product development, Beam is doing
the exact opposite, hiring new talent and
unveiling a number of exciting new products.
It is a progressive approach that is working for
one of the leading American spirits companies.
34 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
company.” Beam has a long history as trend-
setter, with the creation of the plastic “traveler
category,” and also with DeKuyper, when its fla-
vors changed the way people consumed cordials.
Peachtree™, introduced in the 1980s, led to
the Fuzzy Navel cocktail, while Sour Apple was
responsible for the ubiquitous Appletini in the
mid-90s. “When you do innovation right, the
trade gets energized because they have some-
thing exciting and different to talk about with
their customers,” says Condron.
And their customers agree: “Beam Global
has a true understanding of how to build brands
as well as the importance of predicting new
trends,” says Cindy Busi, director of beverage,
Hard Rock Cafe. “They continue to drive in-
novation and find new ways to get their brands
into consumer hands.”
New Flavors from
DeKuyper Burst Bar Shots
Beam saw the trend towards
ready-to-drink cocktails coming
down the pike before many oth-
ers. One of their solutions—
DeKuyper Burst Bar Shots—
answered the consumer call in
a hassle-free, timely, well-
priced way, hitting the market
in August 2008. In the wake
of that success, DeKuyper
has released three more
flavors: Lemon Drop,
Alabama Slammer and
Sex on the Beach. “These
are major shots that
consumers love, and
it takes away the
complication of having
multiple ingredients to
create them,” Roberts
explains. “It provides people with
an economic way to enjoy their
favorite cocktails.” They might seem more suited for off-premise, but
many bars are now serving them: “Some on-premise accounts don’t have
the high volume or capacity to make a number of diverse shots, so we
tested these specifically against a fresh-made bar shot, and these outperform
them,” says Roberts.
Sauza margaritas go inside-the-Box
What do you get when you combine the world’s most ordered cocktail with the number
two premium tequila in the world and put it in an innovative, super-convenient package?
The answer is Sauza’s new Margarita-in-a-Box, and it is such a good idea, it’s amazing that
no one thought of it before.
“Home entertaining is increasing right now, but consumers are still very nervous
about making cocktails because they are not experienced and they fear they will get
the proportions wrong,” says Roberts. “Margarita-in-a-Box meets two needs: It delivers
a great-tasting product that is hassle-free and on tap whenever you need it.”
Made with lime juice, Sauza Blanco Tequila, triple sec and Margarita mix, Margarita-
in-a-Box hit the market in May in a 1.75L box size—the equivalent of 15 drinks—for the
suggested retail price of $17.99, and consumers have quickly embraced the new format for
picnics, BBQs and home entertaining. “We’ve found that consumers love that it has no
excessive packaging, it’s portable and fits right in the refrigerator,” Roberts adds.
“We want to be at the
forefront of the next
wave of trends, so we
are making an even
greater investment in
innovation.”
—Rachel Roberts,
director, new ventures & innovation
36 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
EXPECT
Also try Sauza Gold
Step into the refreshing and appetizing world of Sauza® Gold and Blanco – a world where the Blue
Agave is adored and nurtured. We gently extract the flavorful juices from the agave, and then
double distill them for that smooth flavor and ultimate fresh experience you expect from Sauza
Gold and Blanco. Whether it’s shots or cocktails, Sauza has your customers covered. Step into the
unexpected, step into the world of Sauza Gold and Blanco, where you can always Expect Fresh.
MADE WITH GENTLY EXTRACTED BLUE AGAVE FOR FRESHNESS.
DRINK RESPONSIBLY. Sauza
®
Tequila, 40% alc./vol. ©2009 Tequila Import Company, Deerfield, IL.
Bourbon and Black Cherry:—Marriage Made in Heaven
Beam’s Answer to
the Ultra-Premium
Rye Craze: (rI I
-
)
1
Bucking the trend of some other
spirit categories, American whiskey
is booming right now. Condron
chalks this up to the fact that “it
is America’s spirit—it is true,
honest and made by Americans.
Consumers are gravitating to
that right now.” The category
segment creating perhaps the
most excitement right now is
rye, and last October, Beam
released their ultra-premium
offering—(rĦ)
1
(pronounced “rye
one”). While true to its tradi-
tional whiskey heritage, (rĦ)
1
is
also cutting-edge and contem-
porary, designed to appeal to
taste makers and top bartenders.
“We wanted to give the
consumer something really
unique here, so we gambled
a little bit with the non-traditional
package,” says Condron. “It has been
incredibly well-received in the mar-
ketplace.” The 92-proof spirit sells for
a suggested retail of $49.99 and offers
a spicier taste profile, which Condron
believes makes for a better Sidecar and
Manhattan.
Roberts is adamant that Beam
isn’t prioritizing innovation for its
own sake—each line extension and
new product is firmly rooted in re-
search, and aimed to answer a very
specific consumer need. With a com-
bination of focus groups, demograph-
ic studies and market analysis, Beam’s
research team is able to pinpoint
voids in the marketplace where there
are opportunities. For example, the
recently released Sauza Margarita-in-
a-Box (see sidebar) was born out of
feedback the company was receiving
from primarily female consumers who
wanted to drink cocktails at home,
but lacked the confidence or know-
how to create them on their own.
Beam was also ready for the consumer
shift towards home entertaining with
DeKuyper Burst Bar Shots, a line of
popular ready-to-drink bar shots (see
sidebar). “They offer a hassle-free, in-
expensive way to enjoy bar shots at
home, and our sales show that con-
sumers are really looking for options
like this right now,” says Condron.
Beam’s significant reorganiza-
tion last fall—under the BeAmerica
platform—enables them to get these
new products to market in a more ef-
ficient and effective way. “We restruc-
tured because we wanted to be better,
smarter and faster at what we do,”
says Condron. “Our new organization
gives us a key strategic advantage: it
allows us to spend more time with our
retail partners.”
With a new leadership team in
place, a sales force dedicated entirely to
the Beam Global brands, and distributor
alliances which strengthen the com-
pany’s route to market, the BeAmerica
structure “enables us to deliver smarter
initiatives to our customers and work di-
rectly with our sales force, bringing them
in as key consultants on the projects we
are developing,” Roberts adds. Q
“When you do innovation right, the trade
gets energized because they have something
exciting and different to talk about with
their customers.” —Tim Condron,
group VP, national accounts/sales strategy
Red Stag, the new black cherry-infused bourbon by
Jim Beam, is currently a category of one. Roll-
ing out this summer, there is simply nothing else
quite like it in the market. “Red Stag is all about
celebrating one of the things that we are great
at—creating fantastic bourbon,” says Roberts.
“This is why we refused to dilute it in any way—it
is an 80-proof spirit made with four-year-old Jim
Beam Bourbon. As the leading bourbon company,
we should be at the forefront of innovation in this
category. Besides, black cherry and bourbon were
made to go together,” she adds.
Designed to be great tasting on its own, and
when mixed with cola—“a combination that is
still a huge part of many consumers’ repertoires,”
shares Roberts—Red Stag was created to target
American whiskey drinkers. Yet it has simultane-
ously pulled in a new group of consumers. “Many
consumers who are daunted by the whiskey
category find Red Stag approachable. While we
haven’t belittled bourbon in any way, Red Stag
gives these new consumers the confidence to experi-
ment with bourbon,” adds Roberts. Cindy Busi,
director of beverages for the Hard Rock Café chain,
has found this to be true in her establishments: “I
think this product is extremely unique in that it will
open up an entire new category for consumers. In
our sampling, the feedback has been outstanding—
many people who stated that they were not bourbon
fans are now raving about it.”
In|roducing |he newes| member
ol |he ßeom lomily. Node wi|h
lour·yeor·old 1im ßeom
®
ßourbon,
ked 5|og by 1im ßeom" is slowly
inlused wi|h no|urol block cherry
llovors lor o smoo|h |os|e |ho|´s
perlec| os o sho| or mi×ed
wi|h colo.
Now available at watering
holes everywhere.
Red Stau bv Jim Beam" Kentuckv Straiuht Bourbon whiskev ínlused with hatural Flavors, 4O% Alc./\ol. ©2OOO James B. Beam Bistillinu Co., Clermont, KY.
THEREDSTAG.COM
Learn more at
A DIFFERENT
BREED
OF BOURBON.
W
e’re living in times where old pre-
conceptions surrounding familiar
spirits are falling away. This is partic-
ularly true for the Bourbon category. Not
too long ago, when people thought of
Bourbon, what often came to mind were
images of Southern Gentlemen, plantations,
rustic cabins and a men’s only drinking
experience. If you want to see just how
much times have changed, however, all you
have to do is check out cocktail menus of
bars throughout California to see just how
much the paradigm has shifted.
On the production front, as some dis-
tillers have folded or have been acquired by
larger firms, many small-batch Bourbons
have become increasingly rare. While this
and economy-driven reduced budgets have
tempered the desire of some firms to pro-
mote and advertise, this situation presents a
silver—or bronze—lining: rare, hard-to-
find Bourbons raising the bar of the entire
category. Enterprising distillers are realizing
that there is now a growing place for
Bourbon in the connoisseur market.
Furthermore, there is also the trend of
what’s old being shining and new again.
Mixologists, who have played a role in
rethinking Bourbon, are leading people
towards rediscovering and reinventing the
cocktails that made the spirits popular in
the first place.
A SIP IN TIME
In challenging economic times, fashion and
lifestyle trends lean in a nostalgic direction.
Given the fact that Bourbon can be present-
ed as Americana in a bottle or glass, it is no
surprise that what’s old and familiar has
become new again.
Paige Guzman, Whiskey Category
Leader for Jim Beam’s Bourbon Brands
(including Jim Beam, Knob Creek, Red Stag
and many of its small batch bourbons), will
attest the appeal of her catalogue rests in the
fact that people are not only reaching for
old favorites, but also finding new ways to
enjoy them and introduce them to non-tra-
ditional bourbon audiences. While her col-
league, Daniel Deephouse, who manages
Maker’s Mark for Beam on the West Coast,
draws attention to the fact that his brand
from its inception always sought ways to
BROWN
IS THE NEW
GOLD
Bourbon & American Brown Spirits
are gaining a new patina of status
and respect, even under challenging
economic and production conditions.
By Elyse Glickman
Photo courtesy of:
Tuthilltown Spirits Farm Distillery – Gardiner, NY
B O U R B O N
bTf\f!
Enjoy your bourbon responsibly.
Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey. 45.2% Alc. by Vol., The Woodford Reserve Distillery, Versailles, KY ©2009.
42 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
bring the past and present together in its appeal.
“The first barrels of what we now know to be Maker’s Mark were
distilled in the early 1950s, and the first bottles to be commercially
sold were so in 1958,” says Deephouse. “When he first got into bour-
bon-making post Prohibition, Maker’s Mark founder Bill Samuels
Senior burnt the old Family recipe in 1943 that had been used to make
their whisky since 1783. He did this to symbolize that he wanted to
start from scratch, and to find out what was the best way to make a
bourbon that would appeal to a wide audience.”
“From a marketing perspective we’re lucky with Woodford Reserve;
craftsmanship is inherent to the brand throughout the process,” adds
Laura Petry, Brand Manager of Woodford Reserve. “Our National
Landmark distillery in Versailles, Kentucky is the brand’s showcase, and
master distiller Chris Morris is the most knowledgeable in the business.
So we believe artisanal production is in the brand’s DNA.”
While some bourbons and brown spirits have come down through
American history, A.H. Hirsch Bourbon, in effect, is now history.
Henry Preiss, meanwhile, is now focused on keeping its memory and
legacy alive, according to Steven Fox, National Sales Manager at
Preiss Imports.
“The original lot of Hirsch is now sold out, except for the bottles
that are left which we are now offering in commemorative edition gift
packages, retailing for $1,200,” says Fox. “Each bottle comes with a
scroll of authenticity and is encased in a mahogany humidor-type box
with the Hirsch brand etched on the glass window artistically. The
bottle itself is in an artisanal, custom handblown glass bottle finished
with a hand cast T-cork and a refinished unique parchment style label.
The last 1000 bottles that will be labeled as the original under A.H.
Hirsch Reserve.”
The original A.H. Hirsch Bourbon Reserve was made by Adolph
Hirsch back in 1974 at Michter’s Distillery in Schaefferstown,
Pennsylvania. This facility was one of the first licensed distillers in
America and the place where President George Washington bought
his corn whiskey. In 1860, the distillery was purchased by Abe
Bomberger, whose family kept the facility operational with rye whiskey
until Prohibition.
Michter’s Distillery got a new lease on life in 1950 when new
owner Louis Forman discovered its historic records from Abe
Bomberger’s time of ownership and the methods once used to produce
whiskey. He decided to install a pot still, and hired Charles Everett
Beam (direct descendant of Jacob Beam) as master distiller to create a
fine bourbon with no expenses spared. In 1956, Adolf H. Hirsch, a for-
mer executive of the Schenley Co., bought some aged stocks of the
whiskey and marketed it under the A.H. Hirsch label, and the classic
pot still bourbon was long ago transferred to stainless steel tanks to
keep it from ageing further.
“While Preiss Imports keeps the historic brand alive, this extraor-
dinary spirit exists on borrowed time,” continues Fox. “(We) realized
that the limited amount of bourbon remaining it would inevitably sell
out one day, (especially as) bourbon enthusiasts are now very familiar
with the Hirsch label. Years ago, when we applied for the trademark
rights and copyrights, we also trademarked our lot under ‘Hirsch
Selection.’ By doing that, we becoming a merchant bottler—a com-
CATEGORY FOCUS
mon practice among Scottish distillers—
meaning that we outsource whiskey from a
variety of sources because we are no longer
able to get whiskey from the original source
anymore. We have been sourcing North
American whiskeys from Canada and the
US, and producing whiskeys of good quality
in keeping with what A.H. Hirsch set out to
accomplish. For example, we have Old
Illinois 20, which is still available and
retails for $89.99 a bottle, from a historic
Illinois distillery.”
SHAKIN’ TO THE OLDIES…
ND MIXING TO A NEW BEAT
Though bourbon and brown spirits are often
visualized as something a real man enjoys
neat or over ice, with the optional cigar or
fireplace, spirits in this category have been
enjoyed in cocktails since their first bot-
tling. As mixologists study the teachings of
Jerry Thomas, revive old cocktails or look
for alternative spirits to vodka on which to
build new cocktails, Bourbon is being seen
in a fresh new light.
According to Woodford Reserve’s Petry,
mixology and foodie trends have provided
brands across the board an opportunity to
introduce new consumers to the bourbon
franchise. Woodford Reserve’s new follow-
ers have discovered it through creative
cocktails as well as classics like the
Manhattan and Old Fashioned.
“In the on-premise we’re focusing on
the bigger trends,” she says. “The bourbon
market is growing, consumers are seeking
products with proven quality, and bar-
tenders are earning consumers’ business by
making flavorful, classic cocktails. If we
provide the right material and drink con-
cepts that support the accounts, we think
Woodford Reserve can continue to outpace
the category. During this economic time, as
the focus shifts to increased consumption at
home compared to a bar or restaurant, we’re
creating sales pieces that educate the con-
sumer on our diverse flavor profile and pro-
viding creative and classic recipes they can
try at home.”
As Makers Mark’s Deephouse sees it,
mixology is a major reason why its contin-
ued success is consumer driven and support-
ed by the bartenders who serve them. “We
have various brand ambassadors, including
mixologists, whom we educate, give them
an opportunity to have their name put on a
barrel and tell them how to reach out to
consumers. However, what is most amazing
about Maker’s Mark is that this spirit has
always has been about the taste. This has
always shifted people’s paradigm about
bourbon by showing through the flavor that
you can have a fine tasting bourbon.”
Deephouse also points out that because
Makers Mark does not have a bite like other
bourbons, as well as a smooth front-forward
finish, it has been regarded as ‘the bartender’s
bourbon since its launch. Though people on
both sides of the bar are discovering classic
cocktails, those chestnuts, in turn, are inspir-
ing some new and innovative ideas.
“We want consumers to know they can
enjoy it anyway they wish, whether
as part of a cocktail or on its own,”
he continues. “Consequently, we
are inundated with recipes from
around the world not only from our
brand ambassadors and other mixol-
ogists, but from restaurateurs whose
chefs use it in their cooking, and
general fans as well. We are con-
scious of people’s response to
Maker’s Mark, and are always here
for them.”
Beam’s Guzman also notes that
the current Mixology movement
had a very positive effect on
American brown spirits and the
BROWN IS THE
NEW DELICIOUS
MEDITERRANEAN MANHATTAN
2 oz. Woodford Reserve
1 oz. Tuaca liqueur
1/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz. simple syrup
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Twist of lemon.
FRENCH MANHATTAN
2 oz. Woodford Reserve
1 oz. Chambord liqueur
1/2 oz. sweet vermouth
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Twist of lemon.
MANHATTAN
2 oz. Woodford Reserve
1 oz. sweet vermouth
1 dash Angostura bitters
1 dash Peychaud’s bitters
Splash of cherry juice
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Maraschino Cherry.
JANE CONNOR'S MINT JULEP
1 part Maker's Mark
1 1/2 oz Fresh Grapefruit juice
1 oz Honey Water (Simple Syrup made with
Honey instead of sugar, 1:1 ratio)
3 mint leaves
Shake/Strain/Rocks. Garnish: Mint Sprig.
MANILLA PUNCH
2 parts Maker's Mark
3/4 part dry vermouth
1 1/2 oz. fresh organic pineapple juice
1 1/2 oz. ginger beer
Shake/Strain/Rocks. Top with ginger beer.
Garnish: Candied Ginger & Pineapple.
THE CATTAIL
2 parts Maker's Mark
2 parts DeKuyper's Hazelnut Bliss
1 part Ginger Ale
Delicious shaken or stirred.
THE MAKER'S MARK MANHATTAN
1.5 parts Maker's Mark
.5 parts sweet vermouth
(we recommend you try Carpano)
1 teaspoon of maraschino cherry juice
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Maraschino Cherry.
THE MUDDLED CREEK
2 parts Knob Creek Bourbon
Ginger ale, to taste
Splash of triple sec
Muddled orange slice
Combine/Rocks. Garnish: Orange Slice.
Woodford Reserve Manhattan
44 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
entire Beam portfolio. “People are getting
creative with bourbon in ways that they had
not before. We have seen everything from
the return of classic cocktails such as the Old
Fashioned and the Manhattan to original
recipes using all kinds of non-traditional
ingredients mixed with bourbon. We are
also seeing savory spice being added to cock-
tails with garnishes such as jalapeno, and
basil. Boulevard in San Francisco has creat-
ed a cocktail with chili peppers, bringing
together the sweetness and bite of bourbon
and the heat from the chilis.”
Even with all that innovation on-prem-
ise, Guzman acknowledges the economy-
driven shift from on-premise to off-premise is
prompting consumers to develop their own
mixology skills and signature cocktails for
their home entertaining. Beam has respond-
ed to that demand by offering consumers
recipe books and cards to give them inspira-
tion when they host their old cocktail party
at home. The situation has also fueled inter-
est in the newer brands in the portfolio.
“We recognize that flavored spirits were
becoming popular in every category, and
that consumers are embracing the flavored
spirits as more modern and contemporary,”
says Guzman. “One reason why we devel-
oped Red Stag was to tap into that move-
ment, and since its introduction, it is
already an early success.”
DRY BARRELS…
Serious bourbon enthusiasts who enjoy this
brown gold for their own sake have been
buzzing about recent bourbon shortages
within a number of brands. While scarcity
has upped the cache of many bourbon
brands, different companies take a variety of
tactics in addressing the problem. Some
take a path of least resistance—by letting
the shortage speak to the quality of their
product—while others are making light of
the situation and finding other ways to keep
their loyal consumers content.
According to Guzman, Beam’s Knob
Creek is the brand that just may have set the
whole Bourbon shortage rumor off. When
the company ran low on cases recently, the
marketing department openly embraced the
situation of supply not meeting demand.
“Because we are not willing to lower our
standards or years of aging to produce more
product and compromise the integrity of
Knob Creek, we won’t be able to bottle until
November,” she notes. “We’ve put together
a trade and consumer ad campaign with the
title ‘Thanks for Nothing’ Through this
campaign, we’re letting trade and consumers
know that nothing will change about the
way Knob Creek will be made, and thanking
them for the fact that we have run out of our
own bourbon. This truly shows we’re put-
ting out a product we really stand behind.”
Over at Makers Mark, Deephouse
expresses that for him, the most interesting
challenge about the bourbon shortage from
his brand’s standpoint is that maintaining
supplies is very difficult because the way it is
made is very artisanal, and very hands-on
from start to finish.
“We don’t trade our bourbon, unlike
some other bourbon houses,” Deephouse
affirms. “What we make today will be ready
to use in six years. We experienced a short-
age last year, so we took pains this year to
ensure that we would have enough supply to
meet demand. One thing that has made our
bourbon so special and desired by consumers,
nevertheless, is the fact that it is a handmade
product. Furthermore, our consumers are
our friends, and we treat them that way con-
sistently. Just because we had a spike in pop-
ularity does not mean we’re going to boost
our prices excessively. You just would not do
that to a friend. We still work within those
Kentucky values established by the family, to
be inclusive in many ways.”
While the days are certainly numbered
for original A.H. Hirsch Reserve bottles,
Preiss Imports’ Fox notes that the products
carrying on the brand’s legacy need to be
watched carefully.
“We have a Hirsch Small Batch Reserve
Bourbon selection which retails for $30 a
bottle, and we rarely get 2000 to 3000 cases
right now per year, so bourbon is generally
very hard to come by,” Fox says. “There is
now a shortage. How long it will last, I do
not know. Because there is a continuing
consolidation of bourbon distilleries, which
has been going on many years now, that has
(Ri)
1
offers consumers recipe books and cards to give them
inspiration when they host their cocktail party at home.
Knob Creek barrels.
A rack house at Jim Beam distillery.
also cut into production and created a
shortage. However, I see this as an opportu-
nity that will allow Hirsch in its new incar-
nation to continue to grow. People like the
quality of what we’re doing. As far as adver-
tising goes, because we are selling every sin-
gle drop of the product as soon as it comes
in, we do a minimal amount of specialized
advertising since these are small batch, low-
yielding products.”
“The bourbon market is so well covered
that we really don’t go after the collectors
anymore, and we’re now starting to reach
general audiences,” continues Fox. “We are
supposed to have another 1000 cases going
out this week that will probably sell out
very quickly.”
There are other brand reps, still, who
could argue that there is no shortage, based
on good planning and preparedness. “One
or two brands are experiencing shortages,
which happens on occasion,” says Petry.
“However, the category trend has increased
only slightly and most distillers were pre-
pared, including Woodford Reserve. We
will continue to do as we always have, pro-
mote the brand on its merits and seek ways
to connect with consumers.”
…AND WHETTED APPETITES
Guzman notes that Jim Beam has always
been marketed to men 21-29 years old.
However, other brands in the portfolio are
being groomed for crossover into to other
groups and demographics.
“Red Stag was made for a customer that
may not be a traditional whiskey consumer,
and the flavor profile appeals to a broader
audience,” she explains. “With Basil
Hayden, we have done quite a bit of market-
ing for it in the Gay community in Chicago
and Seattle, promoting it as a bourbon that
is highly mixable with champagne (“The
Basil Bubbly”) or an apple cider drink. We
have also partnered with Out magazine to
help legitimize our marketing strategy with
those consumers. Asian American and
Asian markets, meanwhile, like our higher
proof products and higher aging.”
Guzman notes that their major brand-
ing platforms and our relationships with dis-
tributors, and on and off premise clientele
will continue its growth trajectory in 2010.
Jim Beam will be back on television starting
this holiday season, in light of a successful
campaign on ESPN during the 2009 NBA
Finals. The key advertising campaign cen-
ters around “Guys Never Change,” playing
upon the selling point that as guys (our con-
sumers) never change, neither does Jim
Beam. Tag lines include, “Columbus did not
ask for directions.” and images of guys play-
ing air guitar and doing other guy things,
conveying that the brand has been with
consumers throughout their adult lives and
will always be there…and some things are
not supposed to be messed with.
WHY SMALL IS THE NEXT BIG THING
Though Jim Beam is undeniably a giant,
Guzman draws attention to the small batch
products in its portfolio, thereby acknowl-
edging the increasingly huge demand for
small batch products. “When it comes to an
artisanal focus, you just need to look at our
small batch bourbon collection (including
Basil Hayden, Knob Creek, Baker’s and
Booker’s) which come off the still at a high-
er proof, age longer, and are aged in special
places in our rack house,” she says.
Although Maker’s Mark is a major
national brand, Deephouse insists they oper-
ate with an independent spirit. “We hand-
select the grain and make only 90 barrel
batches at a time,” he says. “We are the only
whisky house in the States that rotates our
barrels, which is a time consuming and
expensive process, but guarantees quality
will be consistent in every bottle. Every bar-
rel is checked at least five times during the
maturation process so when can see when it
is the right time to move the barrel to anoth-
er part of the barrel house or ready to bottle.
Every bottle is hand labeled and hand cut on
a Victorian press, and the font is based on
Mr. Samuels’ writing. We use the original
distillery, which is one of the oldest operat-
ing bourbon distillery in the U.S.”
On the opposite side of the spectrum,
Preiss’ Fox is a believer that smaller is defi-
nitely better. “We don’t have to make up
some big romantic story behind the bourbon
that many (corporate brands) do because the
product speaks for itself,” he states. “The
original Hirsch has its own built-in history,
while the Hirsch Select products have their
own story as they are made from corn
whiskey, which is what our American forefa-
thers drank. We are the only company out
there offering this kind of corn whiskey,
because we found good companies that
could source this interesting offering. We
are also the first company to go outside the
mainstream image of Bourbon to offer
unique products that in effect are the story.
46 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
We also have an advantage over big com-
panies in that those big companies do not
have the time to market something that is
limited to 500 or 1000 cases.”
From the Woodford Reserve stand-
point, Bourbon’s versatility and the
breadth of marketing activity by specific
brands allows it to appeal to a diverse pop-
ulation. “Some brands promote heavily to
young adults while others seek an older
demographic,” observes Petry.
“Some tout their smooth, light flavor
to attract the uninitiated and others pur-
sue minorities through specific lifestyle
programs. This isn’t really new, though
brands are evolving their strategies in
these more trying times. We’re not mar-
keting to a specific demographic group.
Instead, we’re trying to connect with con-
sumers who most appreciate our story of
authenticity, quality and fullness of flavor.
And while our message doesn’t change
our plan will. We’re looking at exciting
new ways to connect with consumers and
bartenders in the on-premise, still a criti-
cal place to build a brand’s awareness and
of course trial.”
Petry advises retailers and restaura-
teurs to keep eyes peeled for more activity
around the brand’s mixability through cre-
ative and classic cocktails, unique partner
programs and special offerings like
Woodford Reserve’s Master’s Collection
(comprised of one-time bottlings of
unique, special-production whiskeys).
Woodford Reserve also remains the offi-
cial bourbon of the Kentucky Derby, with
new twists to the collectible Kentucky
Derby bottle and the $1,000 Mint Julep
program arriving in 2010.
Small producers, in some cases, are
actively looking to expand the category.
According to Ralph Erenzo, of
Tuthilltown Spirits Farm Distillery in
Gardiner, NY, increased popularity of
small batch products has generated a
movement among producers to bring the
sub category of “New American Whiskey”
into the fold.
“The future of American Whiskey is
no longer in the hands of the big alcohol
producers,” says Erenzo. “It is shifting to
the small independent producers of spe-
cialty spirits. Together with the nation’s
micro distillers, we are carving out a new
niche, one that was sealed up when
Prohibition took effect. Since the early
part of the 20th century there has been no
small distilling industry. But that Phoenix
is rising.”
A TOAST TO A HIGHWAYMAN
Though bourbon and other American
brown spirits brands are bringing together
the old (historic brands) and the new (the
influence of Mixologists and the artisanal
trend) together to generate interest
among both traditional and non-tradi-
tional bourbon buyers, there are some
unique brands betting on a tactic that a
name can not only say it all, but sell it all.
This is certainly the case with Old
KNOB CREEK BOURBON EGGNOG
6 large egg yolks
¾ cup sugar
2 ½ cups milk
½ cup Knob Creek Bourbon
1 teaspoon vanilla
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
Beat egg yolks and sugar in medium
saucepan. Slowly beat in 2 cups of the milk.
Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently,
until thermometer registers 150°F or mixture
coats the back of the metal spoon. Remove
from heat. Strain into pitcher. Stir in remaining
milk, Knob Creek Bourbon, vanilla and nutmeg.
Cover and chill at least 8 hours or overnight.
Sprinkle with additional nutmeg.
Makes 6-8 servings.
LANCASTER ON HUDSON
2 oz Baby Bourbon
2 drops, LUCID absinthe
1 Teaspoon Bauman's unsweetened spice and
Sassafras Apple Butter
¾ oz Pure NY State Grade A Maple Syrup
1 oz, Fresh lemon juice.
Shake/Strain/Rocks. Garnish: Fresh apple slice
dusted lightly with fennel pollen, if available.
SUZETTE
1 1/2 oz. Hudson Four Grain bourbon
1/2 oz. Sortilège maple liqueur
1/4 oz. Combier orange liqueur
1 dash Bitter Truth orange bitters
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Orange Peel.
BUCK SHOT
Shake equal parts Red Stag and Jagermeister
ice cold into a shot glass
DOE NUT
2.5 oz. Red Stag
¼ oz. Almond Liqueur
¼ oz. Vanilla Rum or Liqueur
Shake/Strain/Up.
DOE NUT
½ part (rī)1 Whiskey
½ part lemon juice
Shake/Strain/Rocks.
(RI)
1
RISING SUN
½ part (rī)1 Whiskey
½ part lemon juice
Shake/Strain/Rocks.
(RI)
1
CLOVE & OAK
1½ parts (rī)1 Whiskey
½ part Allspice Dram
½ part freshly squeezed lemon juice
1½ parts cloudy apple cider
½ part simple syrup
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Apples slices.
Whisky River, also known as Willie Nelson
Bourbon. While the bottle bears the hallmarks
of this American music icon, what’s inside is as
reflective of its namesake as well. While parent
company Heaven Hill produces other bourbons
and brown spirits that benefit from the influ-
ence of mixology or play well with foodies, this
brand stands alone. In other words, just as
Willie Nelson enjoys his bourbon, slightly
smoky and served over ice, the product bearing
his name is made to be appreciated on its own.
“This product was put together by
Willie himself, a long-time Bourbon enthu-
siast,” notes Patrick Kenny, the brand’s
spokesperson, at Drinks Americas. “(What
makes this brand) artisanal is that Willie
Nelson himself was involved, and worked
with the distiller to have it made exactly the
way he likes bourbon.
According to Kenny, Drinks Americas
bought the distribution rights and a portion of
ownership in this brand from Willie and his
business partner three and a half years ago.
Since then, and continuing into 2010, he says
his company will continue to market Old
Whisky River in tandem with Willie Nelson’s
image, promoting it at his concerts and use the
affinity people have with Willie’s iconic status
to market the brand. He also notes that the
brand has enjoyed visibility at regional
Barbeque cook-off events in the Southeast and
Southwest that “followthe NASCAR/country
music track.” However, just as Nelson’s music
had enjoyed crossover appeal to other audi-
ence, the bourbon bearing his name is attract-
ing fans from all walks of life.
“Willie will be autographing guitars for
prizes for BBQ festivals, and it should be
noted sponsorship positions with these
events in turn has had very good results with
on-premise and retailers within those
regions,” says Kenny. “That said, it is impor-
tant to note we’ve done extremely well in
urban markets. One of our strongest sales
areas is in Brooklyn, NY. This can be credit-
ed in part to the fact that our reps in that area
were confident that this product would sell
well there. Old Whisky River has become a
brand that’s fashionable among consumers
beyond the traditional bourbon buying
group.”
One thing that
Kenny has in common
with the other brand
representatives is that
he too has observed
that the scope of the
market and number of
people willing to try
bourbon is expanding.
While he says that Old
Whisky River, a six-
year old bourbon sold
at a fair price point
($19-23/bottle), suc-
ceeds in exceeding cus-
tomers’ expectations,
bourbons and brown
spirits across the
board--at all price
points and from the
small artisanal produc-
ers to the most recog-
nizable names--have
endeavored to do the
same by tapping into
Americana and strik-
ing a collective nerve
in the process. I
48 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
BEVERAGE INDUSTRY NEWS
BIN ONLINE
www.binonline.net
Go online and discover a
wealth of resources
at your fingertips.
• CURRENT ISSUE
• NEW PRODUCTS
• WILFRED WONG’S MONTHLY
WINE SELECTIONS
• BIN PRODUCT OF THE WEEK
• BEVSOLUTIONS
• ONLINE GUIDE TO NATIONAL
BEVERAGE COMPANIES
SUPPLIERS/IMPORTERS/
MARKETERS/WHOLESALERS
• CLASSIFIEDS
• INDUSTRY JOB POSTINGS
• SPECIAL AD RATES AVAILABLE
ONLINE
www.binonline.net
CATEGORY FOCUS
Pleasing Patrons and Bartenders
since 1780
(732) 542-0312 www.lairdandcompany.com
Please drink responsibly.
Laird’s 7 1/2 Yr. Old Apple Brandy - 40% ABL
Laird’s Applejack - 40% ABL
Laird’s 12 Yr. Old Apple Brandy - 44% ABL
Laird’s Apple Brandy 100 - 50% ABL
At Tales of the Cocktail, uniting the old
with the new was the thematic element
that tied the festival together. Educational
seminars were themed along the lines of,
“Not Your Grand-Pappy’s Drink
Anymore” and “American Whiskey
Legends,” making it clear the appeal of
American brown spirits are becoming
more inclusive, universal and upscale.
Many of the tasting rooms—including
Laird’s Apple Jack—followed suit with
cocktails that quite frankly, could give
“Sex and the City” cosmos a run for their
money in terms of substance and style.
“Laird’s Apple Jack is the oldest
native distilled brown spirit in America,
and you cannot get more authentic than
something like Apple Jack,” asserts Lisa
Laird Dunne, who spearheads the compa-
ny’s marketing. “This ties in to the move-
ment toward the classic cocktail and their
search for authentic ingredients. Though
we do not do much marketing (in terms of
signage or point of purchase displays), we
put much of our resources into our brand
ambassadors—mixologists around the
U.S. that have supported our products.
They not only have a passion for Apple
Jack itself but also a respect for its history
and the fact that it has survived many ups
and downs over the years since 1780,
including Prohibition and fluctuations in
the economy.”
Though Laird’s Apple Jack has been a
staple for spirits connoisseurs and seasoned
bartenders since its founding, Lisa Laird
Dunne notes that back in 1999, the
emerging classic cocktail trend prompted
the still family-owned company to visit
their back catalogue for pre-Prohibition
inspiration. The result was The Laird’s
Bonded, an artisanal higher end variation
of the spirit made in small batches that
represents classic, straight apple brandy,
and later, Laird’s 12 Year-Old spirit, dis-
tilled from hand-picked ingredients, hand-
bottled and hand-labeled.
“The mixology craze can be seen as a
move back toward the roots of bartend-
ing,” observes Laird Dunne. “It has been
phenomenal for both Laird’s Apple Jack
and Laird’s Bonded products because
today’s bartenders are looking for authen-
tic, historic ingredients that were first used
in the creation of classic cocktails. Because
consumers are going to our accounts and
tasting these wonderful cocktails with
fresh ingredients, they are realizing there
are many more ways to enjoy brown spirits
than just on the rocks or with a splash of
water. They add great depth and character
to a cocktail.”
As Lisa Laird-Dunne sees it, it is best
not to target their product towards any
particular group or segment because there
is already such a wide range of consumers
and mixologists who seek our and appreci-
ate Apple Jack.
“We are supporting our brand ambas-
sadors and by doing events such as Tales of
the Cocktail, we are trying to gear our
events and recipes towards consumers and
mixologists interested in this kind of
brown spirit,” says Laird-Dunne.
Although Laird’s Apple Jack has been in
the California market for many years, she
credits noted mixologist such as H. in San
Francisco and Eric Alperin of The Varnish
in L.A. for drumming up greater demand.
She also notes the company’s successful
Lightening Strikes Tour will be announc-
ing dates on the West Coast in 2010.
“We are working with Chad Solomon
and Christy Pope with a touring program
that is interactive in nature, covering the
history of classic cocktails and Laird’s
involvement and showing attendees how
versatile Lairds is in a variety of cocktails
from the classics to some of their own new
creations,” she details. “Attendees then
have the opportunity to get behind the bar
and create their own Laird’s inventions.” I
HOW DO YOU LIKE
THEM APPLES?
JACK ROSE
2 oz. Laird’s Applejack
3/4 oz. Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
1/2 oz. Pomegranate Grenadine
Shake/Strain/Up. Garnish: Apple Slice
SCOBEYVILLE
2 oz. Laird’s Applejack
3/4 oz. Bianco Vermouth
1/4 oz. Luxardo Maraschino
1/4 oz. Campari
Stir/Strain/Up. Garnish: None
LADY LAIRD
2 oz. Laird’s Applejack
1/2 oz. Cointreau
1/2 oz. Simple Syrup
3/4 oz. Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
1 Egg White (or)
3/4 oz. Pasteurized Egg White
4 Sage Leaves
Muddle/Shake/Strain/Up.
Garnish: Sage Leaf Float
LIGHTNING BOLT
2 oz. Laird’s 100° Apple Brandy
1/4 oz. Simple Syrup
1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Peychaud Bitters
1/4 oz. Absinthe (rinse glass and discard
excess)
Stir/Strain/Rocks. Garnish: Lemon Peel
JUMPIN' JACK
1 1/2 oz. Laird’s Applejack
1 oz. Chilled Espresso
1/2 oz. Cinnamon Syrup
Stir/Strain/Up. Garnish: Heavy Cream Float
JOHNNY APPLE SLING
2 oz. Laird’s Applejack
1/2 oz. Velvet Falernum
1/2 oz. Simple Syrup
3/4 oz. Freshly Squeezed
Lemon Juice
1 Dash Angostura Bitters
Top with Club Soda
Shake/Strain/Rocks.
Garnish: Apple Slice
Jumpin’ Jack Flash!
Laird’s Apple Jack may be a centuries’ old piece of
Americana, but it is inspiring fresh cocktail trends among
existing fans, mixologists and young consumers.
50 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
F
rom the 1960s forward, all the recre-
ational drinker, home hostess or high
volume bartender wanted something
pretty good really fast. There were plenty of
Bloody Mary, Mai Tai and Margarita mixes
lining supermarket and liquor store shelves
produced to address the growing demand for
fun in a bottle.
In the 21st century, however, profes-
sionals and savvy consumers are demanding
a lot more from instant gratification. Enter
the new generation of Ready-to-Drink
cocktails, or RTDs. Purista, a line developed
by mixologists, raises the bar on the old
“just add liquor” mixer format to meet more
particular expectations. Shot-Pak taps into
a fun mix of package design and high profile
appearances at celebrity parties (such as a
pre-BET Awards gifting suite). Charbay
Winery & Distillery draws upon its Napa
foodie cache to lure its audience to its new
just-add-ice-and impress Green Tea and
Pomegranate cocktails.
Southern Comfort, meanwhile, has just
launched Southern Comfort Sweet Tea
Cocktail and Southern Comfort Hurricane
Cocktail ($19.99), which capitalize on
SoCo’s consumer name recognition and
long-standing reputation among bartenders.
When combined with a favorite spirit, these
RTDs endeavor to bring one’s favorite bar or
restaurant into the living room or back yard.
In-house master mixologist Tim Laird was
even involved, grooming SoCo’s latest addi-
tions for stardom and speed without com-
promising on quality.
“This is a fantastic opportunity for the
Southern Comfort brand,” notes Jay
Finnigan, U.S. Brand Management Director
for Southern Comfort. “Younger consumers
around 25 are familiar with (Southern
Comfort) as a shot, perhaps served with
lime. However, the average consumer or
household is not quite sure how to use
Southern Comfort beyond the shot. For off-
premise, these products represent a break-
through in overcoming that limitation for
individuals as well as larger on-premise
accounts. It shows them Southern Comfort
can be used in whisky cocktails (as in the
Southern Comfort Sweet Tea), it can used
in rum cocktails (like the Southern
Comfort Hurricane). Our objective is to get
consumers to think of Southern Comfort in
a whole new context.”
According to Finnegan, Southern
Comfort’s recipe for RTD success is an
ounce of the current economy, two ounces
of the home entertaining/cocooning trend
and a dash to reconcile the popularity of
upscale cocktail creations with the needs of
high volume accounts.
“Palates are more fine-tuned and con-
sumers are sending the message they want to
keep it real when it comes to cocktails,” says
Finnegan. “They’ve become so familiar
with the farm-to-table and fresh fruit-mud-
dle bar approach that anything that tastes
artificial will simply not do. Though the
same people that frequented trendy bars are
now doing their entertaining at home, their
paradigm has shifted. It’s not enough to
serve a lot of drinks fast. Those drinks have
to be comparable to what they’ve gone out
for in the past.”
On premise, while the Southern
Comfort shot with lime introduces many
people to the brand, Finnegan says that the
new RTD’s deliver the added capability of
getting Southern Comfort back into the
hands of bartenders, and inspiring them to
replace other spirits like rum with Southern
Comfort when reinventing old recipes such
as a Manhattan, Mojito or Old Fashioned.
As a result, not only do these cocktails
become trendy again, but it becomes part of
the process of updating cocktails on a regu-
lar basis.
“It is important to note that while our
Southern Comfort Sweet Tea Cocktail and
Southern Comfort Hurricane Cocktail are
becoming hits on the home front, there are
plenty of great opportunities for on-premise
success, especially in places that do high vol-
ume, or times of year such as the Holidays
where quality of the drinks is just as impor-
tant as being sure there are enough drinks to
go around,” affirms Finnegan. “High volume
bars such as those on Bourbon Street in New
Orleans, as well as San Diego, Los Angeles
and other cities around the U.S. are ideal for
special parties or promotions, especially as
they guarantee bartenders will make a per-
fect drink every time.” I
SOCO…
So Good
Southern Comfort leads a new pack of
Ready-to-Drink cocktails that go beyond
instant gratification to reach new levels of
style and sophistication.
BRAND PROFILE
“Our objective is to get
consumers to think of
Southern Comfort in a
whole new context.”
– Jay Finnigan,
U.S. Brand Management Director
O
ne of the world’s most iconic liquor
brands, and the number one blend-
ed Scotch whisky, Johnnie Walker
Black Label, traces its roots back to an inven-
tive grocer in Kilamarnock, Scotland, nearly
200 years ago. Today, the famous whisky is
sold in over 120 countries, alongside its fam-
ily of blends from the House of Walker. And
what has sustained the brand’s popularity
through the years? Quality.
“The art of blending is the hallmark of
the Johnnie Walker brand. The signature
blending style used today is the same as it was
in the 1900s when Walker was a family-run
business,” notes Dan Kleinman, marketing
director of Scotch whisky for Diageo. “The
slanted label and the iconic ‘Striding Man’
logo have been emblazoned on the Black La-
bel bottles since its inception.”
Ambitious Beginnings
In 1820, John Walker, a 15-year-old farm
boy, took over a grocery store in Kilamar-
nock, where he experimented with whisky,
applying the same skills he learned blending
teas. In 1857, his son Alexander took over
the store and devoted his energies to creating
a new blend. ‘Old Highland’ was the precur-
sor to Johnnie Walker Black Label, flaunting
the slanted label and square bottle synony-
mous with today’s version.
In 1909 Johnnie Walker, the global brand,
was born. Two of John’s grandsons, George and
Alexander, took the business to a new level by
purchasing Cardhu Distillery – still the home
and visitors center of Johnnie Walker today.
It is the quality blend Alexander Walker
perfected that Kleinman believes underscores
the excellence and widespread popularity of
Johnnie Walker Black Label. “Each individ-
ual bottle of Johnnie Walker Black Label is
the result of decades of planning. Every sip
is the product of the rich heritage and skill of
the Johnnie Walker Master Blenders, as they
select from up to 40 whiskies from over 700
casks. Johnnie Walker Black Label has stood
the test of time and remains the cornerstone
of the Walker portfolio,” he explains.
The Iconic Bottle
George Walker traveled the globe establish-
ing international distribution networks that
helped propel the collection of Walker whis-
kies into a pioneering brand across the world.
In addition to the distinctive slanted label and
square bottle shape, the next step in making
the Johnnie Walker brand easily rec-
ognizable was a collaboration with
cartoonist Tom Browne, which
resulted in the creation of one of
the world’s first advertising icons: the famous
‘Striding Man’. Over the century, the look of
the bottle, despite a few tweaks, has essential-
ly stayed the same, maintaining its powerful
brand identity among consumers.
Ongoing Buzz
In tandem with the release of the limited
edition bottle, Diageo has unrolled a new
campaign entitled 100 Years of Progress,
which will include a high-impact visual the-
atre program, POS materials and a robust na-
tional public relations campaign.
“The compelling story of 100 years of
Johnnie Walker Black Label will be activat-
ed on every platform and consumer touch-
point, including advertising, public relations,
www.johnniewalker.com and in-store dis-
plays,” Kleinman explains. “In addition to
the Limited Edition Collector’s Pack, high-
impact video displays and a variety of other
visual elements have been created for various
store formats. Consumers are being invited to
join in the anniversary celebration at home
with a mail-in offering of beautiful etched an-
niversary ‘Striding Man’ glassware. Even our
extensive nationwide mentorship program of
on- and off-premise events will receive a spe-
cial Black Label 100
th
anniversary twist.”
As they begin to dive into another cen-
tury, Johnnie Walker Black Label is confi-
dent about the future and maintaining the
level of quality they have been recognized
for over the past century. As Kleinman says,
“The 100 Years of Progress campaign will set
the stage for 100 more.” Q
BRAND PROFILE
Keep on
Walking
Johnnie Walker Black Label
Celebrates 100 Years of Innovation
and Sets the Stage for 100 More
By Alia Akkam
1909
1920
1930
1950
1970
To honor the occasion,
Diageo will be releasing a
new Johnnie Walker Black
Label Centenary Limited
Edition Collector’s Pack.
The sleek black bottle is
embellished with gold and a
timeline of the brand’s key
milestone dates on the back.
2009
52 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
Please Drink Responsibly.
JOHNNIE WALKER BLACK LABEL Blended Scotch Whisky. 40% Alc/Vol. ©2009 Imported by Diageo, Norwalk, CT.
C E L E B RAT I N G
100
YEARS OF
1909-2009
CELEBRATI NG 100 YEARS AS THE
STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE I N WHI SKY
The World’s #1 12 Year Old Scotch
Engine of the Most Valuable Spirits Trademark in the World
Named 2009 Top 10 Brand Riser* in 2009 MVI Annual Retail Brand Report
Awarded Gold in 2009 SF World Spirits Competition
**Brand risers are measured by year on year % brand value growth among 17 categories
Owner Flicka McGurrin took over Pier 23 Café and has indeed turned
it into a San Francisco “Hot Spot”. Patrons have described it as a small
funky roadhouse on the bay that is part ramshackle patio spot, part
dance floor, with a heavy dose of dive bar. It has an incredible diverse
clientele that once included president Bill Clinton.
Pier 23 is open 7 days a week serving lunch and dinner. They also
have a special brunch on the weekends. It features indoor dining as
well as a covered patio section and an outdoor patio on the bay with
a view of Treasure Island. Come early if you want to get a seat on the
patio during the summer months!
The restaurant turns out an amazing array of food; from Eggs
Benedict to the fresh seafood, including peeled and eat prawns in beer
and cajun sauce, plus oysters and dungeness crab cakes; to Nihman
Ranch burgers as well as steaks. Some favorites include the steamed
mussels or clams: an array of great tacos, including steak, fresh grilled
fish, or the Ensenada style prawn taco, that comes with corn salsa,
rice, beans or house slaw. Also, try the SF crab & shrimp sandwich
on thick sourdough with mayo, horseradish and fries.
Pier 23 is also known as the “Hot Spot” in the city because they
feature live music 6 nights a week! Bands run the gamut from, Jazz,
Blues, Ragtime and Boogie-Woogie piano, to Hip Hop Funk and Afro-
Cuban. On Saturday nights they feature Reggae Dj’s, with live Reggae
at the end of each month!
At the bar Pier 23 mixes of choice are Finest Call, which feature a
full line of superior products from the Sweet&Sour, Grenadine,
Coconut, Pomegranate and Prickly Pear syrups, two Bloody Mary
mixes, the Raspberry and Mango and Strawberry Purees; to the premi-
um Cosmopolitan Martini, Sour Apple Martini and Mojito mixes.
As Bartender Brian Williams, says “Our customers appreciate the
fact that we offer the best mixes in the business.”
Pier 23 is located on the Embarcadero in San Francisco.
POUR OF THE MONTH
POUR OF THE MONTH
Kelly Farrell, Hostess with Brian Williams, Bar Manager
PIER 23 CAFÉ
The Hot Spot on The Bay
54 B I N 2 0 0 8 • I S S U E 7
56 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
INDUSTRY VETERAN
ALBERT R. IMPERIAL
PASSES
"A good man," Charles McCabe
wrote some years ago, "is a person who
treats others as if they were good. You
treat a man, or a woman, as if they
were a decent sort, and the battle is
very nearly won." Al Imperial, a good
man, died June 23, 2009, at home,
from complications of a rare blood
disease, surrounded by his loving fam-
ily that was the center of his life. He was 80 years old.
Al’s career in the distilled spirits and wine industry spanned
almost 55 years. Despite the many changes the industry has been
through, and the added pressures that consolidation has brought
along, he loved this business. He especially loved the people he served
and his own personal mission to provide excellent service to his cus-
tomers paid him many dividends for many years.
He began working in the industry in the early 50’s for Rainier Ale.
After a brief stint there, he moved on to work for Hamm’s Brewing.
Al spent several years there before moving over to Max Sobel
Distributing. He worked at Sobel for 5-6 years in the accounting and
administration departments.
Al left Sobel in the late 60’s and went to work for the Fleischmann
Distilling Corp. He began his career there as the region administrator
and was later promoted to Northern California Sales Director for
Fleischmann, a position he held until he left the company.
His love of the business and the people in it was evident. He was
well liked and well respected. He believed that you called on your
accounts regularly – even if they were not buying anything from you.
He showed up every week, regardless of whether or not he got an
order. Eventually, his persistence, as well as his belief in good products
and good service, would win out, and he would make the sale. Al truly
personified the concept that “just showing up” was half the battle –
his personality and skills did the rest.
Al continued to do some work for SWS until June 2006, when he
“officially” retired. But, as you would expect, he continued to stay
abreast of events in the industry. He even continued to check the
retail newspaper ads and talk to old friends about what was going on.
You could say he never really retired.
ADDITIONAL NATIONAL
CATEGORY DIRECTOR TO
THE PREISS IMPORTS TEAM
Preiss Imports brought on Mario
Vitale as National Category Director.
This addition is part of infrastructure
re-strengthening as the company con-
tinues to grow. Mario’s responsibilities
will be with our Latin Portfolio,
including brands like Chinaco
Tequila and Ypiòca Cachaça. This
will increase our effectiveness in the
marketplace by providing more atten-
tion for our valued suppliers and distributors .
Mario comes to us from Kindred Spirits based in Miami, Florida.
His background is extensive having worked at most levels in the
Wine and Spirits Industry. His start was with Gallo Wines in Seattle
and he also worked for major companies such as Paterno Imports,
Shaw Ross Imports, and Odom Corporation. Mario was the US Sales
Director for Riojas Premier Winery Marques De Riscal and worked
overseas in Rome, Italy, being fluent in Italian and also Spanish.
BIN MAGAZINE & THE ASTHMA & ALLERGY
FOUNDATION OF AMERICA TEAMUP
TO SEND KIDS TO CAMP
Beverage Industry News (BIN), in conjunction with the Asthma &
Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), is gearing up for their annu-
al fundraiser to benefit children who suffer from asthma.
BIN needs your support! Donated product is needed to create hol-
iday gift baskets for AAFA’s silent/live auction held on Tuesday,
November 17th, at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica.
BIN has helped to provide a free, week-long camping experience
to boys and girls, ages 8 to 14, who suf-
fer from this chronic disease. Asthma
Camp helps reduce the number of
school absences and emergency room
visits. The children, many from dis-
advantaged homes, enjoy swimming,
hiking, and other fun activities of a
regular camp but, what sets this camp-
ing experience apart is the health pro-
fessional volunteer team which pro-
vides the necessary medical compo-
nent. Studies show that the children
are better able to manage their disease
long after the camp is over!
Beverage Industry News will fol-
low up with an editorial feature to
showcase companies that participate.
Furthermore, all participating companies will be included in the pres-
tigious souvenir journal.
All donated merchandise can be shipped or dropped off at the
AAFA office: 5900 Wilshire Blvd. #710, Los Angeles, CA 90036.
AAFA can arrange a pick-up. For more information, please contact
Rosemarie at (800) 624-0044.
INDUSTRY NEWS
58 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
EMPEROR’S BRAND VODKAS ANNOUNCES
NEW CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTION PARTNER
Emperor's Brand Vodkas, which have graced the American spirits
market since May 2007, is a sophisticated line of spirits with varieties
of vodka that speak to aficionados with refined tastes. Based on early
consumer and trade feedback about these varieties--Emperor,
Versailles, Winter Palace and Imperial Exclusive—these vodkas have
earned praise for their aroma, clarity and smoothness.
Even with the reality that vodka is now one of the world's most
popular spirits, and there are hundreds of them on the market, the
Emperor Brand Vodka family is venturing forth in the competitive
market with confidence with their unique taste and sophistication as
the focus. “It took us several years to perfect the technology and
recipes,” notes Emperor Brand President, Zina Mashin. “Our strategy
is to satisfy a diverse spectrum of discerning customers with four supe-
rior quality vodkas. Our approach, meanwhile, is simple and classic,
allowing them to experience difference through tasting. We have
participated in numerous trade shows where experts and industry pro-
fessionals had the opportunity to taste our vodkas. They were truly
amazed that we could deliver vodka at a whole new level.”
Although Emperor's Brand Imperial Exclusive is distilled five
time like many of the top shelf competitors in today’s market, Mark
Markarian CEO of Saharex Inc., points out it is very different from its
rival brands, thanks to a rich array of flavors and aromas. Emperor,
Winter Palace and Versailles, meanwhile, are distilled six times,
which stands above and beyond the industry standard.
“We took pride in creating our vodkas and were flattered by the
results,” affirms Zina Mashin. “We created them especially for con-
sumers who appreciate quality. Our vodkas are made of 100% wheat,
which we feel makes the cleanest tasting spirits. We also only use
spring water from the region of Cognac, France. Our devotion to cre-
ating a life long commitment to our customers remains consummate.”
For further information contact Saharex Importers (818) 507-6910.
XANTÉ DELIVERS UNIMAGINABLE PLEASURE
AT TALES OF THE COCKTAIL
Xanté liqueur, a premium liqueur from Sweden, was launched to
15,000 mixologists and members of the media at this years Tales of the
Cocktail (TOTC)-the internationally acclaimed festival of cocktails,
cuisine and culture held annually in New Orleans, Louisiana. The
event brought together the best and brightest of the cocktail commu-
nity for a five-day celebration of the history and artistry of making
drinks. Award winning mixologists, world renowned bartenders and
top influencers waited in line at the Xanté tasting room at the Hotel
Montelone on July 11th, to taste what all the buzz from the
Unimaginable Pleasure campaign has been about.
Greeted by President and CEO of The Xanté Company, Adéle
Nilsson, master mixologist, Mike Flannery, and the team from
Kindred Spirits, guests of the Xanté Tasting Room were invited to
indulge in their Unimaginable Pleasures. As a part of Xante’s U.S.
launch campaign, revelers of the Xanté tasting room were asked to
choose one of four pleasures. Whether it was a savory breakfast sand-
wich, luxurious bath gel, a tasty cigar or a sinfully sweet Xanté
infused chocolate truffle there was something that satisfied every-
one’s sensory palate.
Xanté liqueur is best enjoyed chilled neat on the rocks or used in
a cocktail like below. Xanté is a premium liqueur with a hint of
French Cognac known for it’s ménage a trois of virgin pears, vanilla
and French limousine oak, launched in New York, Miami and Boston
earlier this year and is currently rolling out in major cities nationwide.
Distributed by Kindred Spirits of North America, Inc., Xanté retails
at approximately $40.00 for a 750 ml bottle. Xante comes from the
company that brings you the world-renowned Cherry Heering brand,
the original “cherry brandy,” a product of Denmark since 1818. Xanté
liqueur has been in Europe for over ten years and holds the title of the
second most popular liqueur in Scandinavia.
INDUSTRY NEWS
L-R: James Leathers, Emperor's Brand L.L.C., Mark Markarian, Saharex Inc.,
Zina Mashin, Emperor's Brand L.L.C
L-R: Mixologist Mike Flannery serving the Lennart cocktail and Xanté liqueur chilled neat at the
Xanté Tasting Room at Tales of the Cocktail, New Orleans.
INTRODUCING
SMIRNOFF
®
PINEAPPLE &SMIRNOFF
®
PEAR FLAVORED VODKAS
AVAILABLE SUMMER 2009
Please Drink Responsibly.
SMIRNOFF Flavored Vodkas. Distilled FromGrain. 35% Alc/Vol. ©2009The Smirnoff Co., Norwalk, CT.
Please Drink Responsibly.
SMIRNOFF Flavored Vodkas. Distilled FromGrain. 35% Alc/Vol. ©2009The Smirnoff Co., Norwalk, CT.
WAKE UP YOUR ORANGE JUICE
REMIX YOUR GINGER ALE
60 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
INDUSTRY NEWS
THE DALMORE’S NEWAWARD
WINNING PACKAGING
The Dalmore, one of the most highly award-
ed single malt scotch ranges is poised to it
place at the bar and on the shelf in both on
and off premise accounts in California. This
legendary range of daring single malts, creat-
ed passion, pride and exacting standards
under the watchful eye of
Master Blender Richard Paterson is pure gold
in the bottle. The core marques in the range
are The 12 Year Old, The 15 Year Old, The
Dalmore Gran Reserva and King Alexander
III. Each expression captures the pillars The
Dalmore is renowned for: Dynamic
Distillation, Sublime Maturation and
Harmonious Fusion. New award winning
Packaging for the entire line reflects the true
premium position of the brand and the qual-
ity in every drop.
ZAYA RUMREBUTTAL TO
NEWYORK TIMES SHAKEN
& STIRRED COLUMN
The NYT SHAKEN & STIRRED column
ran a piece about Gosling’s rum and their
battle to preserve its trademarked name for
the classic Dark ‘n’ Stormy cocktail.
According to the July 2nd article, the
cocktail must contain the following:
• 2 oz Gosling's Black Seal rum
• 4 oz ginger beer
• a lime wedge
Gosling's says that they will pursue those
advertising a drink using that name with a
recipe that contains any other ingredient.
The use of such a tactic can generate an
aura for Gosling’s that may be interpreted as
a stance of “anti-mixology.” In obvious rebut-
tal to this position, the makers of Zaya Rum
recently released the following statement;
Zaya Rum fully supports Mixology as an art-
form. By imposing a trademark or patent on
a cocktail recipe one is suggesting to under-
mine a Mixologists’ artistic freedom. We
applaud bartenders who put their personal
thumbprint on a libation as an integral part
of the artform; it’s what creates a recipe in
the first place.
For the time being your local watering
hole can advertise the trademarked recipe
and customers can expect what they order,
will be just that. Yet to simplify a Mixologist’s
inventiveness could be detrimental, as both
consumers and alcohol brands depend upon a
Bartender’s creativity, as both an admirable
and necessary quality to possess.
This summer, Zaya Gran Reserva Rum
eagerly launches a nationwide promotion as
a rum that showcases its unprecedented mix-
ability factor to "elevate everything."
Celebrated as the world's finest sipping rum,
Zaya now aims to illustrate the spirit's versa-
tility. Zaya Rum suggested retail price is
$34.99. For more info, please visit
www.infiniumspirits.com.
62 B I N 2 0 0 9 • I S S U E 7
It is a sizzling 101 degrees outside, and four thirsty guests are ready
to order drinks. You suggest margaritas. Ted orders a beer. Carol is
pregnant and doesn't want alcohol. Bob says, “No thanks, I'm driv-
ing,” and Alice says she's quitting drinking. You're wishing you had
a better selection of non-alcoholic drinks to offer them.
You're not alone. One casual dining chain offers 67 alcoholic
drinks (including 23 wines), and only seven non-alcoholic drinks.
Maybe it's time to expand your non-alcoholic beverage offer-
ings. Here are three good reasons to do so:
1. Differentiate yourself from the competition. Spotlight some
tantalizing non-alcoholic drinks right along with alcoholic
drinks and price them competitively. The casual dining chain I
mentioned charges $3.50 to $11.00 for alcoholic drinks and
$2.49 to $2.99 for non-alcoholic iced tea, lemonades and pome-
granate drinks. They could increase profits by developing some-
thing more tempting and pricing them higher.
2. Satisfy the needs of guests who don't drink alcoholic bever-
ages. This includes designated drivers, athletes, expectant
moms, recovering alcoholics and others. According to one
study, 47.6% of surveyed Californians age 18 and older didn't
drink alcoholic beverages at all in the past month.
3. It's good policy. When guests drink too much or too fast, a
non-alcoholic beverage is a great way to slow consumption and
prevent intoxication, and a responsible business practice the
Alcoholic Beverage Control and the Courts might consider in
your favor if you are ever accused of a liquor law violation, or
sued.
With a little imagination, non-alcoholic drinks can enhance
your guests' overall experience, increase ticket averages and boost
tips. And if you involve your crew in developing the drinks, pricing
and promotion, you'll increase morale, too. Now, that's really hot.
Lauren C. Tyson is a retired District Administrator with the
California Alcoholic Beverage Control, a liquor liability consultant
and expert witness. For more information, please visit
www.theliquorlicenseadvisor.com or call (951) 226-7845. I
Disclaimer: It is not the intent of this article to offer legal advice.
INDUSTRY INSIGHT
BY LAUREN C. TYSON, LIQUOR LIABILITY CONSULTANT
WWW.THELIQUORLICENSEADVISOR.COM
3 GOOD REASONS TO REASSESS YOUR BEVERAGE PROGRAM

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful