Is TfL ready for London 2012?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/doug88888/4573622851/

User Experience

London 2012 Visitors

Metrics

You asked me to address three main concerns: •The general user experience of the website •Whether visitors to London during the Olympic Games can find where they need to go •Usability metrics for future development of the website

Usability Test

Image-Meaning Association Test

To address these concerns, I implemented two studies: •A standard usability test •Image-meaning association test to analyse the pictograms used on the website

Participants
I involved 5 participants: •Varying computing skills •Varying knowledge of London and the city’s public transport network

5

Olympic Games Journey

Cycle Hire
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joffley/5242992941/

Upgrades & Delays

I asked them to work their way through 3 main scenarios: •Olympic Games Journey to help address your concerns with London 2012 visitors •Cycle Hire to address the general user experience and the potential increase in cycle usage •Testing information concerning delays across the network

Metrics
I will be recording a number of metrics.

• Percentage of participants able to successfully
complete a task

• Frequency of critical errors • Number of unique critical errors • Frequency of terms given by participants at
the end of each scenario

Including the percentage of participants who were able to successfully complete an individual task versus those who were unable to do so, the frequency of critical errors, the number of unique critical errors and the frequency of positive and negative terms given by participants at the end of each scenario to describe how they felt the scenario went, based on the Microsoft Desirability Toolkit.

Microsoft Desirability Toolkit
Positive Easy to use Valuable Fun Time-saving Simple Empowering Exciting Trustworthy Reliable Efficient

Usability Test
Negative Stressful Complex Hard to use Time-consuming Sophisticated Frustrating Intimidating Busy Inconsistent Not valuable

•Here are the words I selected from the Microsoft

Desirability toolkit •Each participant will be shown these words on slips of paper at the end of each scenario •Asked to select 5 that describe the finished scenario

Image-Meaning Association Test

•During the usability test, I had one participant who

expressed confusion over pictograms used on the TfL website •I decided to implement an image-meaning association test to see if potential visitors understood the pictograms

What does this image mean?

•Image-meaning association test asks each

participant, for each pictogram, ‘what does this image mean?’

12
transportation network

Participants

•12 individuals •Online survey •Users who weren’t familiar with London’s public

• Percentage of participants who were able to
successfully associate all images with the correct meaning

• Percentage of participants who were able to

successfully associate an individual image with the correct meaning

We would record two important metrics: •Percentage of participants who were able to successfully associate all images versus those who were unable to do so •Percentage of participants who were able to successfully associate an individual image versus those who were unable to do so

Results

Results

Usability Test

Successful Completion
•If we combine all tasks and all participants •There was a successful completion rate of 60% in

60%

the usability test •While this may sound respectable, users struggled with the most important tasks

Results

Usability Test

“Find out how long the journey to the Aquatics Centre will take, along with information about the return journey following the completion of the event. What is the cheapest fare for these two journeys for a single individual excluding Oyster Card options”

•First task asked participants to find a route to the
Aquatics Centre, at the Olympic Park.

•But 3 out of 5 participants selected the incorrect
destination •They didn’t realise the error •If this was for the real, then they’d be lost somewhere in London!

•The location database simply didn’t understand the

new London 2012 venues, nor the established venues that had new names such as ...

•... the o2 Arena •Will be known as the North Greenwich Arena due to
sponsorship reasons during the Games.

Results

Usability Test

Mistaking an advert as content

•1 participant mistook an advert as relevant content •When searching for a ticket price, actually stated the
value of a ticket shown in the advert as the answer •This was incorrect, as the advert was not relevant at all, but resulted in the participant having the wrong price!

Metrics

Usability Test

Unique critical errors
1st scenario of London 2012 visitors Were 4 unique critical errors: •Incorrect destination •System’s refusal to accept the starting location •Participant mistaking an advert as part of the content •Inability to find relevant information about pricing

4

Results

Usability Test

“As a regular London commuter, you are concerned that the Olympic Games will cause significant delays across the public transportation network.You are therefore keen to explore other modes of transport including the new Cycle Hire option”

•2nd scenario asked participants to find out

information about the Cycle Hire scheme in London

Results

Usability Test

•Participants attempted to calculate the price of

using the service •1 participant miscalculated the price as they had to work everything out in their head •Not only did they have to deal with the Access fee and usage charge, they also had to understand ...

Results

Usability Test

Membership Key cost Non-return charge Late Return charge Multiple Keys cost Damage charge
•... a variety of other additions and charges on the
same web page

Results

Usability Test

Confusion over website

•3 participants actually mistook general information
about bike insurance as information concerning the Cycle Hire •The website mixes Cycle Hire information and general cycling information within the same hub •Leads to incorrect insurance information

Results

Usability Test

•When trying to find the nearest docking station •All participants felt overwhelmed by what was

presented to them •This amount of information was simply too much for them

Metrics

Usability Test

Unique critical errors
For the Cycle Hire scenario There were 3 unique critical errors: •Miscalculation •Confusing general biking information with Cycle Hire information •Getting lost within the TfL website

3

Results

Usability Test

“This weekend you are travelling around London to see some friends. As a regular commuter in London, you know that the Tube is often affected by maintenance work during the weekends.”

•Last scenario asked participants to find which

stations would be a!ected by maintenance work. •Took each participant some time to discover the information •But all 5 individuals successfully completed the task

negative

92% 60%
negative

Olympic Games Journey

Cycle Hire
http://www.flickr.com/photos/joffley/5242992941/

75%
negative

Upgrades & Delays

•When we discussed the metrics in the methodology
section of this presentation •Each participant was asked to select a few words to describe each scenario •The majority of words used for each scenario were negative

Results

Usability Test

•The participants’ experience simply wasn’t good •1 participant was getting visibly frustrated as the
test progressed •I had to end some tasks early as they were becoming very uncomfortable

Results

Image-Meaning Association

•Image-meaning association test •Wanted to establish if people understood the
pictograms used on the TfL website

Metrics

Image-Meaning Association
Successful Failure

12

10

8

6

4

2

0 Bus Coach Cycle DLR Rail River Tram Tube

•Can see that most of the pictograms were correctly
understood by our 12 participants

Results

Image-Meaning Association

• Coach • Bus yellow • Bus • No buses • No answer

•Coach pictogram stuck out •Only 3 out of the 12 participants successfully

understood the pictogram •With participants suggesting words such as ‘Bus Yellow’ or even ‘No Buses’

•So what is the issue?...

Results

Image-Meaning Association

•Pictogram is used on the TfL website to describe
coaches and buses! •Only di!erence is that it is displayed in red for buses and orange for coaches

Recommendations

•Here are some of the key recommendations that I
believe should be implemented to rectify these issues.

Number 1

Recommendations

Ensure all Olympic Games venues are added to the Journey Planner database

•The TfL website must have the correct names for all
Olympic Games venues •For venues such as the o2 Arena - which will be known as the North Greenwich Arena - the website should recognise both venue names

Number 2

Recommendations

All adverts should be clearly identified as advertisements and placed away from the main content area

•Users should never mistake an advert as relevant
content •Adverts should be clearly identified

Number 3

Recommendations

Clearly and distinctly separate the Barclays Cycle Hire information from the general cycle section

•Should be no confusion between the Cycle Hire

scheme and general cycle section •The Cycle Hire scheme should be treated in a similar way to other modes of public transport rather than private transport

Number 4

Recommendations

Do not overwhelm users

•Don’t overwhelm users with information; it can be
very confusing!

Number 5

Recommendations

Use different pictograms for the Bus and Coach mode of transport

•Use di!erent pictograms for Buses and Coaches to
not confuse visitors

Number 5

Recommendations

•In fact, TfL’s guidelines provide another pictogram
for buses •But it is currently restricted to print use only •I recommend that you should consider using this pictogram for buses

•I have described the methodology I used to assess

the TfL website •Shared some key results and recommendations on improving the website

Thank you

http://www.flickr.com/photos/doug88888/4573622851/

Thank you. Any questions?

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