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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 • Vol XIII, Edition 98
WATER PROPOSAL
STATE PAGE 5
UKRAINE RIOTS
CRIPPLE CAPITOL
WORLD PAGE 7
CALIFORNIA OFFICIALS UNVEIL $24.7 BILLION PLAN
By Hope Yen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Fully 20 percent of
U.S. adults become rich for parts of their
lives, wielding extensive influence over
America’s economy and politics, according
to new survey data.
These “new rich,” made up largely of older
professionals, working married couples and
more educated singles, are becoming politi-
cally influential, and economists say their
capacity to spend is key to the U.S. eco-
nomic recovery. But their rise is also a sign
of the nation’s continuing economic polar-
ization.
They extend well beyond the wealthiest 1
percent, a traditional group of super-rich
millionaires and billionaires with long-
held family assets. The new rich have
household income of $250,000 or more at
some point during their working lives, put-
ting them — if sometimes temporarily — in
the top 2 percent of earners.
The new survey data on the affluent are
being published in an upcoming book, and
an analysis by The AP-NORC Center for
Public Affairs Research provided additional
information on the views of the group.
In a country where poverty is at a record
high, today’s new rich are notable for their
sense of economic fragility. They rely on
income from their work to maintain their
social position and pay for things such as
private tutoring for their children. That
makes them much more fiscally conserva-
tive than other Americans, polling sug-
gests, and less likely to support public pro-
grams, such as food stamps or early public
education, to help the disadvantaged.
Last week, President Barack Obama
‘New rich’ on the rise in U.S.
Survey data shows1 in 5 Americans reach affluence; wielding political and economic influence
REUTERS
Above:Scott Asperheim runs his snowblower to clear the sidewalk around his
home from several feet of snow after a snowstorm in Duluth, Minn. Left: A
tanker truck throws icy road spray on Interstate 66 in Manassas,Va.Snow and
bitter cold snarled traffic and prompted another 1,650 U.S.flight cancellations
on Monday, and tens of thousands of people were still without power after
January-like weather barged in a month early. The storm covered parts of
North Texas in ice over the weekend and then moved East. Below-zero
temperatures crowned the top of the U.S. from Idaho to Minnesota, where
many roads still had an inch-thick plate of ice,polished smooth by traffic and
impervious to ice-melting chemicals, making intersections an adventure.
Many travelers wished they were home,and people in homes without power
wished they were somewhere else. More than 22,000 Dallas-area homes and
businesses were still without power on Monday.
STORM SNARLS TRAVEL
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Michaels Arts and Crafts will be allowed to relocate from
its Delaware Street location to the former Borders bookstore
on El Camino Real, as the San Mateo City Council voted
unanimously with certain conditions to uphold its appeal of
a previous Planning Commission denial last night.
Michaels and 1998 Books Holdings LLC, approached the
council with adjustments to its proposal that would include
23,818 square feet of retail space, a 1,450-square-foot café
and 864 square feet of art studios and classrooms.
“I think it’s exciting. We’ve been so honored to serve the
community for so many years and see the children who come
to the store grow up to the adults we serve today,” said Judy
Quye, vice president of Michaels’ stores in California.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At age 25, Reuben Holober will be
sworn into Millbrae City Council
tonight.
The young new councilman was
elected alongside appointed incumbent
Anne Oliva to fill the two open seats.
Oliva was appointed to the council in
June after the death of Nadia Holober,
former councilwoman and Reuben
Holober’s mother. Mayor Gina Papan
is termed out. Reuben Holober is also
son of Richard Holober, a longtime
member of the San Mateo County
Community College District Board of
Trustees.
“He has a lot to look forward to,”
said Papan. “The city of Millbrae has a
brilliant future ahead.”
Reuben Holober, who received a
degree in political science and commu-
nication at the University of
Washington, said it’s certainly differ-
ent to be younger on a council.
“I’m ready for the task and spent time
on the campaign trail getting to know
the issues of the city well,” he said.
“Everyone was very receptive to me.
Being a little younger gives me a dif-
ferent perspective than some of other
councilmembers. It is difficult for peo-
ple my age trying to make it in the
Young councilman to take seat tonight
Reuben Holober is son of late councilwoman and school board trustee
Reuben
Holober See HOLOBER, Page 8
See MICHAELS, Page 8
See NEW RICH, Page 20
Michaels Arts and Crafts,left, will be allowed to relocate from
its Delaware Street location to the former Borders bookstore
on El Camino Real in San Mateo.
SERRA QB HAS A
MONSTER GAME
SPORTS PAGE 11
San Mateo will
keep craft store
City Council approves Michaels’
move to El Camino Real location
S.F. police looking
for alleged puppy thief
SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco
police say they are on the lookout for a
man who allegedly pepper-sprayed two
homeless people before stealing their
6-week-old puppy near Buena Vista
Park.
Officer Gordon Shyy says the victims
were asleep in a van parked on Buena
Vista Avenue West at about 6 a.m.
Friday when someone began loudly
knocking on the door.
The man told the victims that he was
a police officer, Shyy says, but when
they opened the door and asked to see
his credentials, he pepper-sprayed them
and grabbed the puppy.
The San Francisco Chronicle reports
that the victims, a woman and a man,
were temporarily blinded and didn’t see
where the man fled.
Police are also looking for the dog,
which is an American pit bull and
Rhodesian Ridgeback mix.
California man gets
five years in ‘sextortion’ case
LOS ANGELES — A 27-year-old
Southern California man who admitted
hacking into hundreds of social media
and email accounts to get women to
pose naked for him has been sentenced
to five years in federal prison.
City News Service reports Karen
“Gary” Kazaryan of Glendale was imme-
diately taken into custody after his sen-
tencing Monday.
In July, Kazaryan pleaded guilty to
one count each of identity theft and
unauthorized access of a protected com-
puter.
Prosecutors say Kazaryan illegally
accessed the accounts and found nude
photos and personal passwords that
women had stored online. He then
posed as a friend, persuading them to
strip while he watched via Skype, cap-
tured images of them, or both.
Once the women learned of the ploy,
he often threatened to post their private
photos if they refused to comply.
Human skull found
at Sonoma County park
WINDSOR — Sonoma County
Sheriff’s officials are scouring the site
where human remains were discovered
over the weekend.
Assistant Sheriff Lorenzo Duenas said
deputies were back at Shiloh Regional
Park in Windsor on Monday morning, a
day after a man walking with his two
children reported finding a skull and a
tennis shoe in a creek bed there.
Deputies confirmed it was human.
They also spotted other skeletal
remains under leaves in the area.
Dog found in Arizona
reunited with California family
PRESCOTT, Ariz. — A California
family has its dog back, a year and a half
after it went missing while the family
was camping in western Arizona.
The Daily Courier reports that the
family of James and Dana O’Brien of
San Juan Capistrano was reunited with
Meko, a 4-year-old Brussels Griffon,
Meko had wandered off from the fami-
ly’s tent at a campground in Parker on
the Fourth of July weekend in 2012,
apparently taken by a man who also was
in the campground.
The dog was found last month along a
highway in the Prescott area, about 100
miles from Parker. The Yavapai County
Humane Society determined his fami-
ly’s identity through an implanted
microchip.
The reunion was particularly pleasing
for 7-year-old Mady O’Brien, who was
diagnosed with a brain tumor in May.
Legal battle over
Nazi-seized masterpiece revived
SAN FRANCISCO — A federal
appeals court has resurrected a Jewish
family’s long legal battle to regain
ownership of a $20 million masterpiece
seized in Nazi Germany during World
War II.
In a ruling Monday, the 9th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated a
California law allowing lawsuits over
art ownership disputes dating back as
far as 100 years. The decision reversed a
lower court ruling that invalidated the
law.
At issue is an impressionistic paint-
ing by Lilly Cassirer exchanged in
1939 for about $360 and a visa to flee
Nazi Germany.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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TV chef Bobby
Flay is 49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1520
Martin Luther publicly burned the
papal edict demanding that he recant,
or face excommunication.
“To have news value is
to have a tin can tied to one’s tail.”
— T.E. Lawrence (1888-1935)
Former Illinois
Gov. Rod
Blagojevich is 57.
Actress Raven
Symone is 28.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Rescue members try to lift a commuter train after it collided at Bintaro district in Jakarta, Indonesia.
Tuesday: Sunny. Patchy frost in the
morning. Highs in the lower 50s.
Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the upper 30s. Northeast winds 5 to 10
mph.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
50s. Northeast winds around 5 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows around 40. North
winds around 5 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 40s.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 40s.
Saturday through Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the
upper 50s. Lows in the lower 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1787, Thomas H. Gallaudet, a pioneer of educating the
deaf, was born in Philadelphia.
I n 1817, Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the
Union.
I n 1861, the Confederacy admitted Kentucky as it recog-
nized a pro-Southern shadow state government that was act-
ing without the authority of the pro-Union government in
Frankfort.
I n 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt became the first
American to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, for helping
mediate an end to the Russo-Japanese War.
I n 1931, Jane Addams became the first American woman to
be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize; the co-recipient was
Nicholas Murray Butler.
I n 1948, the U.N. General Assembly adopted its Universal
Declaration on Human Rights.
I n 1950, Ralph J. Bunche was awarded the Nobel Peace
Prize, the first black American to receive the award.
I n 1962, “Lawrence of Arabia,” David Lean’s epic film star-
ring Peter O’Toole as British military officer T.E. Lawrence,
had its royal gala premiere in London, with Queen Elizabeth
II and her husband, Prince Philip, in attendance.
I n 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. received his Nobel Peace
Prize.
I n 1967, singer Otis Redding, 26, and six others were
killed when their plane crashed into Wisconsin’s Lake
Monona.
I n 1972, baseball’s American League adopted the designat-
ed hitter rule on an experimental basis for three years.
I n 1987, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail S. Gorbachev concluded three days of summit talks
in Washington.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
AHEAD FLOOR TAVERN SHRILL
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When they split the cost of the taxi ride,
everyone paid his — “FARE” SHARE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PMHOC
TINYU
CHILTG
LEFRAT
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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p
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in
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a
v
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s
Print your answer here:
Soap opera creator Agnes Nixon is 86. Former Agriculture
Secretary Clayton Yeutter is 83. Actor Tommy Kirk is 72.
Actress Fionnula Flanagan is 72. Pop singer Chad Stuart
(Chad and Jeremy) is 72. Actress-singer Gloria Loring is 67.
Pop-funk musician Walter “Clyde” Orange (The Commodores)
is 67. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ralph Tavares is 65.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Jessica Cleaves (Friends of
Distinction) is 65. Country singer Johnny Rodriguez is 62.
Actress Susan Dey is 61. Jazz musician Paul Hardcastle is 56.
Actor-director Kenneth Branagh is 53. Actress Nia Peeples is
52. Rock singer-musician J Mascis is 48.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No.9,in frist place; Eureka,No.7,in second place;
annd Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:48.94.
4 1 2
11 29 44 63 64 3
Mega number
Dec. 6 Mega Millions
13 20 32 45 48 17
Powerball
Dec. 7 Powerball
8 9 13 21 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 2 2 4
Daily Four
4 8 4
Daily three evening
3 17 23 37 47 22
Mega number
Dec. 7 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Wish
List!
E V E RY T HI NG
MARKE D
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We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It
WESTERN
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Make your Holiday
SAN MATEO
Hit-and-run. A tan and green Honda was
seen hitting a vehicle on the 3900 block of
Branson Drive before 7:19 a.m. Sunday,
Dec. 1.
Theft. Awoman reported that she has con-
cealed stolen items on the 1700 block of
South Delaware Street before 3:19 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 30.
Found propert y. A bike was found unse-
cured at Railroad Avenue and Claremont
Street before 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30.
Burglary. Apurse was stolen from a Black
Lexus on the 1900 block of J. Hart Clinton
Drive before 1:16 p.m Saturday, Nov. 30.
Burglary. Astereo was stolen from a vehi-
cle on the 1600 block of Wellesley Avenue
before 7:33 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 21.
MILLBRAE
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
100 block of El Camino Real before 7:35
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4.
Robbery. Aphone and cash were taken on
the 300 block of Aviador Avenue before 1:05
a.m. Saturday, Nov. 30.
Burglary. Avehicle was burglarized on the
first block of El Camino Real before 5:30
p.m. Friday, Nov. 22.
Shopl i f t i ng. A man was arrested for
shoplifting on the first block of Murchison
Drive before 6:24 a.m. Friday, Nov. 22.
Police reports
It’s just na-cho day
A vehicle was egged and nachos were
smeared on it on the 200 block of
Florida Avenue in San Bruno before
10:01 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 1.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Schools across the county yesterday
kicked off Computer Science Education
Week with programs encouraging students
to code.
Roosevelt Elementary School in
Burlingame is participating by having stu-
dents in grades kindergarten through fifth-
grade work on lessons and activities based
around the skill of computer coding.
Principal Matthew Pavao said the week
works as an introduction to programming
and is also fun for the students. Lessons are
on a program called Scratch and another
called Light-bot.
“It’s going to be a major part of the world
and where jobs are,” he said. “It helps them
work on their critical thinking skills too.”
The week was conceived by the
Computing in the Core coalition and
Code.org, a nonprofit foundation dedicated
to expanding and improving computer sci-
ence education for all students in kinder-
garten to 12th-grade. Both are producing
the week nationwide for the first time this
year. It is held this week in recognition of
the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral
Grace Murray Hopper, who was born Dec. 9,
1906. It has the support of businessman and
philanthropist Bill Gates, Facebook’s Mark
Zuckerberg and former President Bill
Clinton.
Back at Roosevelt, third-grade teacher
Christy Novack is currently teaching her
students using iPads through Light-bot,
online puzzle and skill games that teach
about programming.
“We want to encourage kids to start think-
ing and understanding how coding works,”
she said. “Jobs in tech are going to become
more important.”
In fact, according to a report by the
Georgetown University Center on Education
and the Workforce four of the five fastest-
growing occupations in 2020 will require
high levels of postsecondary education in
fields such as health care and technical occu-
pations; science, technology, engineering
and math; education and community servic-
es.
These Peninsula schools, along with
schools in 45 other states, are grappling
with new Common Core curriculum. These
new standards shift to more project-based
learning, with more of an emphasis on stu-
dents using technology in classrooms. The
tests associated with these changes, Smarter
Balance testing, align with these new stan-
dards, and go into effect during the 2014-15
school year.
Meanwhile, Burlingame High School is
hosting its own events this week, including
a speech from 2013 TED Talks keynote
speaker Keller Rinaudo, founder and CEO of
Romotive, at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the high
school’s auditorium, 1 Mangini Way.
Additionally, the San Bruno Education
Foundation, San Bruno Park Elementary
School District and other groups will
host an hour of code event noon.-2 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15 for those age 5 and up at
Parkside Middle School, 1801 Niles
Road in San Bruno. It’s $5 with a lunch
included and aims to demystify program-
ming through tutorials.
As part of the week, State Superintendent
Tom Torlakson participated yesterday in a
school assembly at Westborough Middle
School in the South San Francisco Unified
School District to kick off the district’s
events. Torlakson presented a $10,000
check to the school from
DonorsChoose.org. The prize is intended to
go toward technology allowing students to
expand their education in computer science.
Students in the district will each have an
hour of coding lessons this week.
“Hopefully it’s going to get the kids
interested in computer science,” said
Principal Ed Colucci. “And learning to
problem solve and getting them to apply
some of their lessons as we do the Common
Core. Kids are really excited about it.”
Founding partners of the week include
Google, Microsoft and the National Science
Teachers Association, while major promo-
tional partners include Apple, Bing,
Dropbox and LinkedIn.
In addition to the schools’ events this
week, the education startup Codecademy
released an iPhone app called Codecademy:
Hour of Code, which helps iPhone owners
learn the basics of coding in under one hour
through a set of quick demonstrations and
exercises designed to be completed in short
bursts throughout the day. Codeacademy’s
website teaches people to code in languages
including JavaScript, HTML/CSS, Python
and Ruby.
For more information visit csedweek.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Coding takes center stage at Peninsula schools
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Students in Tim Weaver’s third and fourth split
grade class at Roosevelt Elementary School
in Burlingame learn coding through the
Scratch program from parent Sophie Chiang.
4
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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CITY GOVERNMENT
• A San Mateo neighborhood
meeting regarding the redevelop-
ment of the Hillsdale Inn will be
held Thursday at Ci ty Hall.
The developer Barry Swenson
Builder is proposing to turn the
477 E. Hillsdale Blvd. site into 180
residential condominiums made up
of three- and four-story buildings as well as a 330-space
parking garage.
The meeting is 7:30 p.m. at City Hall in conference
room C, 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
The San Mateo Pl anni ng Commi ssi on will be
holding a study session to accept public comment regard-
ing the development Tuesday, Jan. 28.
• The Redwood Ci ty Pl anni ng Commi ssi on will
hold a hearing to certify the environmental impact report
and consider a use permit for the Cambridge Academy
project for up to 180 students and 20 employees. The
academy will be a transitional kindergarten through
eighth-grade private school at the Redwood Baptist
Churc h at 2323 and 232 Euclid Ave. The predominant
neighborhood concerns raised at earlier meetings are
existing traffic and safety worries and noise.
At the same meeting, the commission will consider
amending the planned community permit for the One
Marina project. The Pl anni ng Commi ssi on previ-
ously approved a total of 231 units but after building the
first two 14-unit auto court buildings, the three-story
townhome units were found to be less likely to sell. In
June, the commission agreed to let the remaining build-
ings be changed into 16-unit structures with stacked flats
instead. The new permit reflecting the changes will
increase the overall number of units to 249.
The Planning Commission meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec.
10 at City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The alleged Norteño gangmember
accused of starting a shoving match
that ended with the fatal shooting of a
man mistaken for a rival because of his
blue jacket avoided a murder trial by
pleading no contest to felony mayhem.
Mario Cazarez Jr., 20, also admitted
acting on behalf of a gang in return for
no sentencing promises. However,
prosecutors plan to recommend a 14-
year term when Cazarez is sentenced
Feb. 7.
Cazarez’s resolution is quite different
than that of Michael Elijah Rodriguez,
21, who actually shot Julio Pantoja
Cuevas several times and is looking at
life in prison without parole after being
convicted last month of first-degree
murder. Co-defendant Jaime Rodriguez,
22, pleaded no contest in early October
to first-degree murder
and a special gang
enhancement in
return for a flat 26-
year term when sen-
tenced in January.
On Nov. , 28,
2010, Cuevas was
allegedly visiting
three female friends
at a Madison Avenue
apartment complex
in Redwood City wearing a navy blue
jacket. Cazarez and both Rodriguezes,
no relation, allegedly approached
Cuevas and challenged him about what
gang he claimed. After a shoving match
led by Cazarez, Michael Rodriguez
allegedly pulled a gun and shot him sev-
eral times. Cuevas ran down an alley
where he fell and died and the suspects
fled in the opposite direction.
Cazarez and Michael Rodriguez were
arrested the day after the shooting.
Jaime Rodriguez remained at large until
June 2011 when he was arrested in
Santa Fe, N.M., for a domestic dispute
in a casino.
On Nov. 25, a jury deliberated less
than three hours before convicting
Michael Rodriguez. On top of the life
term, he also faces another 25 years to
life for the use of a firearm. He will be
sentenced Jan. 13.
All the men remain in custody with-
out bail.
Another defendant, Gerardo Aboytes,
21, also accepted a plea deal and
received 17 years in prison for may-
hem, perjury and assault with a deadly
weapon. Aboytes was not physically at
the scene when Cuevas was shot but
called his alleged accomplices to alert
them to the presence of possible gang
rivals, according to prosecutors. He
was tied to the case after testifying
before the grand jury and later indicted.
Ex-San Diego mayor
sentenced for harassment
SAN DIEGO — When he was mayor
of San Diego, Bob Filner waited to be
alone with women to kiss, grope and
manhandle them without any witness-
es, according to a probation officer’s
report released after he was sentenced
Monday to home confinement.
Filner, 71, apologized and told the
judge he would try to earn the trust of
those he betrayed and recover his
integrity — a sharp contrast to his
defiant resignation speech nearly four
months ago in which he said he was
the victim of “a lynch mob.”
His attorney Jerry Coughlan said
Filner dropped mood-altering medica-
tions when he became mayor. That,
combined with the stress of leading
the nation’s eighth-largest city, sub-
stantially contributed to Filner’s
behavior, Coughlan wrote to the
judge.
Murder case resolved with mayhem plea deal
Mario
Cazarez Jr.
Around the state
5
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Two 22-year-old men convicted of rob-
bing a 79-year-old woman living in a
Redwood City pastor’s house earlier this
year were sentenced to four years and seven
years in prison, respectively, for home
invasion robbery.
Jovanni Aguilar Martinez received a
four-year term with credit of 348 days
while Luis Martinez Trujillo received a
seven-year stint with credit of 324 days.
Both men pleaded no contest on different
August days to one count of home inva-
sion robbery and admitted using a gun and
committing a crime against an elderly vic-
tim. The negotiated plea deal spared them
trial on other charges like kidnapping.
The incident happened Feb. 7 just before
noon when police responded to the 900
block of 10th Avenue on the report of a
robbery in progress. The victim told
authorities a female she recognized from
the church came to her residence on Feb. 7
and left after a brief interaction. Shortly
later, two hooded men
armed with a semi-auto-
matic pistol arrived and
pointed the weapon at
her head. A man later
identified as Martinez
gathered up property in a
pillow case and, after
approximately an hour
of pointing the weapon
at the woman, moved
her 25 feet to a separate
bedroom and closed the door. The woman
called her daughter who contacted police
and Martinez was caught trying to leave.
Officers also identified the other two who
were later tracked to Mexicali, Mexico,
and arrested.
The girl was never charged in the case.
Trujillo has been in custody in lieu of
$35,000 bail and Martinez held on
$100,000 bail.
They both also return to court Jan. 10 for
a restitution hearing.
Court to consider
California’s DNA collection law
SAN FRANCISCO — The constitutionali-
ty of California’s controversial law mandat-
ing the collection of DNA samples from all
arrestees whether they’re charged with a
crime or not was at issue Monday at a spe-
cially convened hearing of 11 federal
appeals court judges.
California Attorney General Kamala
Harris and the Obama administration are urg-
ing the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to
reject the American Civil Liberties Union
legal challenge to the law, arguing the col-
lection of DNAsamples during the booking
process is a simple cheek swab and a power-
ful law enforcement tool used to solve thou-
sands of “cold cases.”
Guilty verdict in
California city corruption trial
LOS ANGELES — Aformer official in the
Los Angeles suburb of Bell was convicted of
corruption Monday in a case that drove the
city to the brink of bankruptcy.
Jurors found former Assistant City
Manager Angela Spaccia guilty of 11
charges, including conspiracy, misappro-
priating public funds, falsification of
government records and conflict of inter-
est.
Spaccia was acquitted of hiding a public
document involving the police chief’s con-
tract.
Home invaders imprisoned
Jovanni
Martinez
By Jason Dearen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — California water offi-
cials on Monday released a draft of a $24.7
billion plan to restore the Sacramento-San
Joaquin Delta, in part by building two 30-
mile underground tunnels to ensure stable
water delivery to millions of Californians.
The joint federal and state Bay Delta
Conservation Plan, or BDCP, and environ-
mental impact analysis comes after seven
years of study, and includes plans for build-
ing the tunnels and completing significant
habitat restoration work to improve the
delivery of mountain snowmelt to Central
Valley farms and cities throughout the state.
At the heart of the 50-year plan unveiled
last summer by Gov. Jerry Brown are the
twin tunnels with a 9,000-cubic-feet-per-
second capacity that would replace the
delta’s current pumping system that endan-
gers fish and other wildlife.
Currently, the State Water Project and
Central Valley Project pump water from the
delta to 25 million people and three million
acres of farmland.
But that supply has been interrupted in
recent years, as salmon and smelt numbers
declined in delta rivers, and federal regulators
limited the amount of water that could be
pumped from the delta.
Water officials believe creating an alterna-
tive delivery method from the pumps — and
restoring more than 100,000 acres of new
habitat above ground — will help the fish
rebound and keep the water flowing to cus-
tomers.
The plan also outlines how officials would
conduct research and implement monitoring
during and after construction of the tunnels
to study the project’s effect on dozens of
plant and animal species.
State water officials also say the ambitious
project would generate billions of dollars in
jobs, especially in construction, in the delta
region.
The release kicks off 120 days of public
comment on the plan and environmental
analysis.
“By meeting the state’s dual goals ... of
ecosystem restoration and water supply reli-
ability, we will stabilize and secure against
catastrophe the water deliveries that sustain
our homes, jobs, and farms, and do so in a
way that not only protects but enhances the
environment,” said John Laird, California’s
natural resources secretary.
Funding for the roughly $16 billion tunnel
part of the project will come from the water
agencies that would benefit most from it,
according to the state Department of Water
Resources. Those same agencies would pay
for maintenance and operation of the tunnel.
Amixture of federal and state money would
cover the remainder, including the possibil-
ity of general obligation bonds.
But critics of the plan say it would actually
harm fish and agriculture by siphoning off
more water from the estuary.
Dozens of conservation groups including
the Sierra Club have been steadfast in their
opposition, saying the project would ship
more water from the delta south and create
more environmental problems.
Conservationists say modern develop-
ments in water conservation and recycling
can be used to reduce demand from southern
California, and would be far more environ-
mentally friendly than the tunnel project.
“We need a better plan for restoring the
delta environment and making sure
Californians all over the state get the water
they need,” Kathryn Phillips, director of
Sierra Club California, said in a statement.
Jay Lund, director of University of
California, Davis’ Center for Watershed
Sciences, said the goal of the project is not
to increase the amount of water being sent to
thirsty cities and Central Valley farms, but to
make the conveyance less environmentally
damaging. Lund is one of the scientists
reviewing the government’s plan.
“This is really not about taking additional
water from other water users ... it’s just shift-
ing the place of diversion,” Lund said. “You
can never have no impact when doing (some-
thing like this), but you’re changing the
impacts and transforming them for some-
thing that’s less bad for the native fish.”
And some other environmental groups are
supporting the effort, saying major changes
are needed to help restore the badly damaged
delta ecosystem.
The groups, including the Natural
Resources Defense Council and Nature
Conservancy, stopped short of giving for-
mal approval of the draft plan, saying they
are reviewing the some 34,000 pages to see
if previous concerns they raised were
addressed.
State officials unveil
$24.7B water proposal
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
Around the state
6
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Diane Stassen Morris
Diane Stassen Morris, resident of Belmont, died on Dec.
5, 2013, after a long illness. Diane is predeceased by her
husband Lewis Frances Morris. Diane
was born Oct. 26, 1933, in Antwerp,
Belgium. Diane spent most of her child-
hood in Belgium, coming to the United
States with her mother after World War II.
Diane enjoyed telling stories of life as a
child in Belgium during the war. After
coming to this country, Diane and her
mother eventually settled in San
Francisco. Diane graduated from Notre
Dame des Victoires School and then attended Commerce
High School, graduating in 1951. She went on to attend San
Francisco State University. After her graduation, Diane
began teaching foreign languages in the San Francisco
School District, first at Balboa High School and later at
Washington High School. She also received at master’s of
fine arts degree in French from the University of Hawaii in
1976.
Amemorial service is planned for 1 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13
at Crippen & Flynn Carlmont Chapel in Belmont. Diane
was an avid cat lover, and donations in her memory to the
Peninsula Humane Society, or a favorite charity of your
choice, would be welcome. Sign the guestbook at www.crip-
penflynn.com.
Teen injured
in drive-by shooting
A15-year-old girl was shot during a
drive-by shooting in Menlo Park
Sunday night, according to the Menlo
Park Police Department.
Police were called to the 1300 block
of Madera Avenue around 7:36 p.m.
after multiple gunshots were heard.
While inside her home, the girl was
shot and suffered injuries to her hand,
according to police. Shots were also
directed at two vehicles. Police believe
at least two suspects were involved and
fled in a four-door light sedan while
heading westbound on Madera Avenue
toward Ivy Drive.
Anyone with information regarding
the incident should contact the Menlo
Park Police Department at (650) 330-
6300 or the anonymous tip line at
(650) 330-6395.
House under renovation
destroyed in morning blaze
A house undergoing renovation in
East Palo Alto was destroyed in a fire
Monday morning, a Menlo Park Fire
Protection District inspector said.
The two-alarm fire was reported
around 6:15 a.m. in the 600 block of
Bell Street, at the corner of Capitol
Avenue, senior fire inspector Jon
Johnston said.
The single-story home was being
remodeled and was vacant when the fire
broke out. A neighbor walking a dog
on the block noticed flames and called
for help, Johnston said.
When firefighters arrived, the home
was engulfed in flames, Johnston said.
Fire crews knocked down the fire
around 7 a.m.
The fire spread to a detached garage,
and there was minor damage to a neigh-
boring home, he said.
The cause of the blaze remains under
investigation.
T
he American Cancer
Soci ety Cl ub and the
Students i n Acti on Cl ub
are hosting the Smi l es f or Jorge
campaign from Dec. 4 to Dec. 16.
The campaign benefits Jorge
Munoz, a former Burl i ngame
Hi gh School student who has been
battling leukemia. The school is
asking students and community
members to bring in Safeway,
Target and gas gift cards to help his
family out and give them a holiday
season to remember. Donations can
be dropped off in the front office of
Burlingame High School at 1
Mangini Way in Burlingame.
Contact Sue Gl i ck at 558-2873 for
more information.
***
Transitional kindergarten applica-
tions for the 2014-15 school year
will be available online or at the
South San Franci sco Uni fi ed
School Di st ri ct beginning Jan. 6,
2014. Applications must be com-
pleted and submitted to the district
office in person prior to registra-
tion. Parents/guardians will be given
a registration packet to bring to one
of two registration days on Feb. 8
and March 8, 2014, at the district
office, 398 B St. between 9 a.m.-
noon.
Kindergarten registration for the
2014-15 school year will start Feb.
1,2014, and end May 30, 2014.
Schools are open for registration
from 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. and 1
p.m.-3 p.m. weekdays. All registra-
tions after May 30, 2014, will be
placed on a space available basis.
***
The South San Franci sco
Uni f i ed School Di st ri ct will
host a kindergarten information
night 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Jan. 28,
2014, at the South San Franci sco
Muni ci pal Bui l di ng, 33 Arroyo
Drive. Child care will be available.
If you have questions call
Educati onal Servi ces at 877-
8721.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
Local briefs
NATION/WORLD 7
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Jim Heintz and Yuras Karmanau
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEV, Ukraine — Heavily armed riot
troops broke into the offices of a top
Ukrainian opposition party in Kiev
and seized its servers Monday, the
party said, as anti-government
protests crippled the capital for yet
another day.
Elsewhere police dismantled or
blocked off several small protest tent
camps that near key national govern-
ment buildings in the city.
Tensions also rose as a double cor-
don of helmeted, shield-holding police
deployed in the street near Kiev’s city
administration building, which
demonstrators had occupied and turned
into a makeshift command post and
dormitory.
The moves came a day after hundreds
of thousands of demonstrators
crammed into Kiev, the biggest in
three weeks of protests that started
when Ukraine’s president backed away
from signing a long -awaited pact to
deepen ties with the 28-nation
European Union.
Protesters are angered not only by
the thwarting of their desire to become
closer to the West and spin out of
Russia’s orbit, but also by police vio-
lence against the demonstrators. Club-
swinging police have twice broken up
protest rallies.
Ostap Semerak, a member of the
Fatherland Parry, told the Associated
Press that troops broke into the
party’s offices on Monday evening,
some climbing in through its win-
dows.
“They are storming us. The images
are insane,” he said by telephone.
The troops left after confiscating
some computer equipment, he said. An
Associated Press reporter later saw
broken glass and smashed computers
in the offices.
Party member Marina Soroka also
said the troops surrounded and block-
aded several opposition-minded
Ukrainian media outlets, making their
and other media websites inaccessible.
The party is headed by imprisoned
former Prime Minister Yulia
Tymoshenko, a longstanding foe of
President Viktor Yanukovych, and is
the largest opposition grouping in the
parliament. Critics say Tymoshenko’s
conviction on abuse of office charges
was a case of political revenge.
In a surprise move, Yanukovych
announced he would sit down with
three former Ukrainian presidents on
Tuesday to discuss a way out of the cri-
sis that has paralyzed the country.
Armed riot troops storm
Ukraine opposition offices
By Raphael Satter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — American and British
intelligence operations have been
spying on gamers across the world,
media outlets reported, saying that the
world’s most powerful espionage
agencies sent undercover agents into
virtual universes to monitor activity
in online fantasy games such as
“World of Warcraft.”
Stories carried Monday by The New
York Times, the Guardian, and
ProPublica said U.S. and U.K. spies
have spent years trawling online
games for terrorists or informants. The
stories, based on documents leaked by
former National Security Agency con-
tractor Edward Snowden, offer an
unusual take on America’s world-span-
ning surveillance campaign, suggest-
ing that even the fantasy worlds popu-
lar with children, teens, and escapists
of all ages aren’t beyond the attention
of the NSAand its British counterpart,
GCHQ.
Virtual universes like “World of
Warcraft” can be massively popular,
drawing in millions of players who
log months’ worth of real-world time
competing with other players for
online glory, virtual treasure, and mag-
ical loot. At its height, “World of
Warcraft” boasted some 12 million
paying subscribers, more than the
population of Greece. Other virtual
worlds, like Linden Labs’ “Second
Life” or the various games hosted by
Microsoft’s Xbox — home to the pop-
ular science fiction-themed shoot-em-
up “Halo” — host millions more.
Spy agencies have long worried that
such games serve as a good cover for
terrorists or other evildoers who could
use in-game messaging systems to
swap information. In one of the docu-
ments cited Monday by media outlets,
the NSA warned that the games could
give intelligence targets a place to
“hide in plain sight.”
Report: NSA spying on virtual worlds, online games
Congress renews undetectable gun ban for decade
WASHINGTON — Narrowly beating a midnight deadline,
Congress voted Monday to renew an expiring ban on plas-
tic firearms that can evade airport detection machines. But
Republicans blocked an effort to toughen the restrictions —
the latest defeat for gun-control forces in the year since the
grade school massacre in Newtown, Conn.
By voice vote, the Senate gave final congressional
approval to a 10-year extension of the prohibition against
guns that can slip past metal detectors and X-ray machines.
The House voted last week for an identical decade-long
renewal of the ban, and the measure now goes to President
Barack Obama for his signature.
Obama, traveling to Africa for ceremonies honoring the
late South African president Nelson Mandela, was expected
to sign the bill before midnight using an auto pen, a White
House official said. The device has been used for the signa-
tures of traveling presidents since the administration of
president George W. Bush.
GOP senators rejected an effort by Sen. Chuck Schumer,
D-N.Y., to strengthen the ban by requiring that such
weapons contain undetachable metal parts. Some plastic
guns meet the letter of the current law with a metal piece that
can be removed, making them a threat to be slipped past
security screeners at schools, airports and elsewhere.
World leaders to speak
at massive Mandela memorial
JOHANNESBURG — An eclectic mix of world leaders
including President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul
Castro will eulogize Nelson Mandela before a crowd of near-
ly 100,000 mourners at a massive memorial service Tuesday
in the World Cup soccer stadium where the anti-apartheid
champion made his last public appearance.
“What a fantastic gift God gave to us in this Mandela, who
quickly became an icon, a global icon of forgiveness, of
generosity of spirit,” Archbishop Desmond Tutu told a gath-
ering Monday at the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory.
“He really was like a magician with a magic wand, turning
us into this glorious, multi-colored, rainbow people.”
Nearly 100 world leaders and tens of thousands of South
Africans of all races and backgrounds were expected to pay
their respects to the man who bridged this nation’s black-
white divide at the FNB stadium in Soweto — a locale heavy
in symbolism as the black township that was at the center
of the violent struggle against apartheid.
IAEA will inspect Libya’s yellowcake stockpiles
UNITED NATIONS — An inspection team from the U.N.’s
nuclear agency will visit Libya to assess the thousands of
barrels of yellowcake uranium that reportedly are being
stored in a former military facility amid a “precarious” secu-
rity situation in the country.
The International Atomic Energy Agency team will arrive
in the North African country this month to “verify existing
stockpiles and conditions of storage,” the U.N. secretary-
general’s special representative to Libya told the Security
Council on Monday.
Tarek Mitri said U.N. authorities have received informa-
tion “indicating that 6,400 barrels are stored” under the
control of an army battalion in a facility near Sabha, in the
country’s unstable desert south, where militants and traf-
fickers have roamed since the ouster of dictator Moammar
Gadhafi in 2011.
News briefs
REUTERS
Riot police gather near a barricade set up by supporters of EU integration in Kiev,
Ukraine.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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economy. ”
As a worker at Natera, a San Carlos
biotech company that does genetic testing,
he hopes to be able to bring more high-
tech businesses to Millbrae. Business
development is very important for creating
jobs and raising revenue, he said.
“There are very few tech businesses
here,” he said. “We’re pretty well located on
the Peninsula; we have BARTand Caltrain.”
What does his father think of his new
position?
“He seems very proud of me,” Reuben
Holober said. “He was extremely encourag-
ing the whole campaign.”
Reuben Holober, a resident of Millbrae
for 22 years, adds that he won’t be replac-
ing his mother when he joins the council.
“I’m not walking into her shoes,” he
said. “She gave a lot to the city and it’s an
honor to follow her. At the same time, I’m
ready to carve my own identity here in
Millbrae.”
Additionally, Reuben Holober is con-
cerned about the city’s fire suppression
assessment tax, which is set to expire June
30, 2014. Millbrae voters originally
passed the $144 annual fee for fire services
on single-family homes in 2004 as one
solution to address the city’s budget crisis,
which began in 2001. It was extended in
2009 and the tax brings in about $1.2 mil-
lion per year to the general fund, according
to a staff report.
“That is very important to be able to fund
the fire department,” he said. “The key in
the near term is the merger with Burlingame
and Hillsborough in the Central County
Fire Department.”
He said there’s definitely a lot of chal-
lenges coming up in the city, but he has a
pretty good idea of what he’s getting into.
Continued from page 1
HOLOBER
This was the second appeals process
Michaels has gone through this year to
relocate to the old Borders site at 2925 S.
El Camino Real from its current location
at 1750 S. Delaware St. near Kmart and
the Hayward Park train station. That area
is slated to be transformed in the next
decade into a mixed-used transit-orient-
ed-development called Station Park
Green. Michaels’ lease is up in 2014. Its
application to move was denied by the
Zoning Administrator in April. That deci-
sion was appealed to the Planning
Commission, which rejected its proposal
in September.
The move has become controversial as
the site was rezoned in 2007 as transit-ori-
ented development to align with the city’s
Rail Corridor Plan. At the time, Borders
was allowed to remain with a non- con-
forming use permit. However, between
Nov. 22, 2011, and June 4, 2012, the site
was not maintained as a retail space and
lost its exception.
Councilmembers agreed it’s critical to
find a balance between maintaining the
city’s intentions of the TOD while sup-
porting transitions that property owners
may face when they lose a tenant.
“I have no doubt that we’re a city that’s
in transition, we’ve got zoning changes
... and we’re struggling in that transition
with some of the non-conforming uses,”
said Mayor Robert Ross.
The TOD was adopted to encourage and
provide guidance for transit-oriented
development within a half-mile radius of
the Hillsdale Caltrain station. Multi-fami-
ly residential facilities and high-density
office space are rightfully zoned under the
TOD and certain convenience-oriented
retail, such as cafes and stores that sell
small items, are also allowed. Another
guideline to qualify under the TOD would
be a mixed-use development.
More than 6,000 Michaels customers
signed cards in support of it remaining in
San Mateo and there is a lot of community
backing, said Linda Bernhardt, senior
advisor to DLA Piper LLP, which repre-
sents the property owners and supported
the store’s relocation to El Camino Real.
The new proposal qualifies as mixed-use
because there will be a separate lease for
the cafe that isn’t accessible through
Michaels, and because it has carved out
space for studio and art class space that
would be accessible to the community,
Bernhardt said.
“It broadly fits within the guidelines for
the TOD. I would have preferred a little
more square footage to be dedicated to
other uses ... but I’m satisfied with where
we are with it,” said Councilman Jack
Matthews.
Matthews spent years working on the
city’s Rail Corridor Plan and although he’s
supported having a Michaels in San Mateo
since it first came to the city, he wants to
ensure the city doesn’t stray too far.
“We’re still in the early phases of mak-
ing [the Rail Corridor Plan] happen, and I
think that’s where the future of our city
lies ... so we don’t want to open the door
to broader interpretations of the specific
plans and lose the essence of what we
mean to do,” Matthews said.
Rich Hedges served on the Citizens
Advisory Committee during the formation
of the Rail Corridor Plan and is concerned
about what effect the council’s interpreta-
tion of Michaels’ proposal last night
could have on other pending cases like the
7-Eleven lawsuit.
“Once you set a precedent that changes
the intent of the corridor plan then you’re
going to end up not having transit-orient-
ed development that really works,” Hedges
said.
Councilmembers all expressed their ded-
ication to the Rail Corridor Plan with
hopes to reduce traffic and mitigate the
city’s carbon footprint. As the city is still
in the process of defining and navigating
the practical aspects of the TOD, it’s
important to keep the community, the city
and local merchants engaged, Ross said.
The council did not give Michaels a
straight go-ahead last night, but instead
directed city staff to work with DLAP t o
draft specifications to bring back at the
Jan. 6 council meeting.
Continued from page 1
MICHAELS
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The comparisons are
perhaps inevitable. President Barack
Obama and former South African leader
Nelson Mandela each served as their
nation’s first black president, living sym-
bols of struggles to overcome deep-seated
racial tensions. Each was awarded the Nobel
Peace Prize.
But as Obama prepares to honor Mandela
at a memorial service Tuesday in South
Africa, people close to the U.S. president
say he is well-aware that his rapid rise
through America’s political ranks pales in
comparison to Mandela’s 27 years in prison
fighting against a repressive government
that brutally enforced laws that enshrined
racial discrimination.
Rather than view himself as a counterpart
to Mandela, Obama has said he sees himself
as one of the countless millions who drew
inspiration from Mandela’s life.
As student, Obama drew inspiration from Mandela
OPINION 9
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Lawmakers should
be subject to laws
Editor,
Keith De Filippis’ letter, “Sen. Harry
Reid exempts his staff members from
Obamacare,” (in the Dec. 5 edition of the
Daily Journal) raises a very important and
pertinent question when he asks, “Why ...
are there different rules for different
groups of people?”
Concisely put, Democratic Sen. Reid
has exerted his power to exempt his staff
members from Obamacare because he
could get away with it. Of course, he
shouldn’t do that, as lawmakers in this
country should be subject to the laws and
not be placed above the law.
Unfortunately, Sen. Reid is not alone in
acting as if he was a part of a royal class.
When our public servants like Sen. Reid
behave in an unethical way or are dishon-
est, they dishonor their office and our
democracy. As a recourse, the people can
exercise their soverign power and dis-
charge them at election time. What a
beautiful thing!
Ethan Jones
San Bruno
Obama has
brought nation together
Editor,
Scott Abramson, (in the Dec. 9 edition
of the Daily Journal) lauded Nelson
Mandela for using his eloquence to heal a
nation and bring together his people
while chiding President Obama for doing
the opposite. One can only wonder in
what world Mr. Abramson lives. The facts
of President Obama’s record: cessation of
the Iraq war, an auto industry rescued,
equal pay law for women, bin Laden ter-
minated, improved civil rights for LGBT
people, an economy reversed with the
Dow at historic levels, and a long overdue
health care act whereby millions now
have meaningful insurance for the first
time while the rate of increase in premi-
ums are the lowest in many years. Oh,
coincidentally, President Obama was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
Based on these accomplishments, there
is ample evidence of an ongoing healing
and bringing people together. Think what
could be done if Congress would provide
something besides disloyal opposition.
So, unless Mr. Abramson has facts to
the contrary, one can only reach the con-
clusion his assessment is nothing more
than a cheap shot and not deserving con-
sideration.
Rel Kempf
San Mateo
John McDowell
Editor,
It was great to read John McDowell’s
column “Sacramento’s rosy scenario”
over the weekend (Dec. 7-8 issue of the
Daily Journal). Seldom do we read a col-
umn in that position in the Daily Journal
that doesn’t parrot a position of what
McDowell identify’s as the Democratic
“two-thirds supermajority in both legisla-
tive houses” or other supercilious, pro-
gressive perspective. It’s refreshing to
read a citizen articulate our position, “liv-
ing in the worst run state in America”;
thanks to the “D’s” in Sacramento. More
John McDowell, please!
Dennis Shanahan
San Mateo
Dirty health care confusion
Editor,
Jack Hickey’s bizarre take (“Profit
should not be a dirty word” in the Nov. 29
issue of the Daily Journal) on Patrick
Field’s thoughts on private health insur-
ance (“Private health insurance is
wrong”in the Nov. 25 issue of the Daily
Journal), has to be a deliberate and calcu-
lated attempt at discrediting the writer and
derailing a most necessary debate.
While Mr. Field quite clearly argues that
a social service like health care ought not
be profit-oriented, Mr. Hickey twists that
concept around to make it look like an
attack on private enterprises like Safeway
and Lucky’s. That’s a dishonest attempt at
confusing the issue, albeit quite common
nonsense from that side.
I, as well as all progressive industrial-
ized nations, agree with Mr. Field that
health care is so important for the overall
welfare of a society, that it must cover
everybody and be funded by government,
with no insurance industry involved.
Instead, the U.S. private health insurance
just adds to the overall cost of health
care, while providing less, for fewer peo-
ple, with executive bonuses as reward for
the “success” of restricted care. What hap-
pened to the “promote the general wel-
fare” part of the preamble of the U.S.
Constitution? In addition to almost 50
million Americans without health insur-
ance, many more have inadequate or limit-
ed coverage due to the iron grip profit-
based insurance programs have forged on
health care.
The “private philanthropy” that Mr.
Hickey swears by, obviously doesn’t do
the job. Patrick Field understands that.
Jack Hickey appears to be programmed
not to.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
The wrong prescription
Editor,
Jack Hickey responds to my letter about
private health insurance by saying pri-
vate health insurance is a win-win situa-
tion and is similar to shopping at grocery
stores (letter to the editor, “Profit should
not be a dirty word,” in the Nov. 29 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal). He also says
that the free market and private philan-
thropy is the best way to help people. He
then states that government is a neces-
sary evil and it should be guided by the
constitution.
Let’s start with the first one: Private
health insurance has maximum coverage
limits. When the limit is reached, people
have to pay themselves or go home and
die. That is not a win-win situation. Next,
health care has nothing in common with
buying groceries. Food is natural and
comes from the earth. Health care has to
do with medical science and is based on
man’s knowledge of illness and disease.
Next, it was the failure of the free mar-
ket that caused the Great Depression and
led to the creation of the government’s
largest entitlement program, the Social
Security Administration. Also, at the
same time, private philanthropy didn’t
help. Finally, asserting that the govern-
ment is evil and should be guided by the
Constitution, which was written more
than 200 years ago, is the same as saying
that people should be guided by the Holy
Bible that was written more than 2,000
years ago.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Obama’s speech and Pope Francis
Editor,
It looks like it’s still about “class.”
President Obama’s recent speech lays out
his plan for the rest of his administra-
tion. This plan is to resuscitate our bro-
ken economic system to enable more
funds to get into the hands of the working
class. Not too different from the message
of the new Pope Francis, which if given
by Mr. Obama, would have triggered an
avalanche of screams of “Marxist Coup”
by our synthetic patriots in the
Republican Party and in the media. What
fun that would have been.
Simple off-the-shelf remedies have been
around since the Roosevelt years for our
wayward and uncontrolled system of
wealth redistribution toward the top 1
percent. The masters of greed never sleep,
so this is a battle that goes on as long as
humans do. While most all the animal
kingdom has to just await their fate, we
can actually speed up our demise or delay
it by our actions and inactions.
Both Mr. Mandela and the Rev. King
had these same ideas for correcting our
greed but they both ended up on terror
watch lists. Who said being human was
easy?
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
Got the hots
for Sriracha
H
ot damn! Could Sriracha get any
more popular? When it comes to
the ubiquitous hot sauce, I’m as
much a fan as the next girl. When it comes
to kicking up bland sushi or lackluster noo-
dles, just grab the plastic
bottle often touted as sim-
ply the “rooster sauce” by
the linguistically chal-
lenged. Asqueeze here, a
dollop there. Sriracha has
come into its own as not
only a fairly well-known
condiment, but preferred.
Think of it as hot sauce’s
more exotic cousin, from
its double-consonant spelling to its debat-
able beginnings. Sri Lanka? Si Racha?
Thailand? Or is it a completely American
condiment given a cooler Asian name to
boost sales among foodies?
I first learned of Sriracha from a date at a
Palo Alto noodle restaurant. Try this, the
boy cajoled. He made up some nonsense
about what it was before finally conceding
he was clueless but it was good. He was right
on both counts which is probably why he
only survived a few more outings while
fondness for the sauce endures.
Fast-forward through the years and
Sriracha is this generation’s aioli and pump-
kin spice all rolled into one. The sauce is
about as common — some might argue over-
used — as other recent trends seemingly used
as a last-ditch effort to dazzle a dish: bacon,
garlic, pork belly, truffle oil, quinoa.
You really know a product has jumped the
gourmet shark when the Subway chain intro-
duces its version of Sriracha-doused sand-
wiches.
Now, fans don’t even have to eat to join
the Sriracha frenzy. There’s Sriracha cook-
books. Sriracha popcorn. Chocolate, high
heels (to savor on the foot, not the tongue).
There’s lip balm tubes for sale (Like making
out with tasty napalm!” is the tagline).
Sriracha vodka, which might arguably work
in a Bloody Mary. And, in the spirit of
Christmas, the piece de resistance: Sriracha
candy canes.
That’s right. Those fun folks at J&D Foods
are marketing Sriracha flavored candy canes.
The company is also selling Power Bacon
deodorant (verbatim from the press release:
“Designed specifically for people with active
lifestyles,” although it doesn’t quite explain
why these active people will need “all day
meat-scented protection.” Put that on the
office white elephant gift list.
In a less shudder-inducing yet still odd
sales pitch, the same company sells the
candy canes as a way to play a trick on chil-
dren. Seriously. From condiment to comedy.
The desire for all things Sriracha has
reached such a fevered pitch that the factory
of Huy Fong Foods in Southern California
can hardly keep up. The factor has been
churning out so much sauce, neighbors of
the facility went to court to stop the irritat-
ing fumes reportedly tainting the surround-
ing air and making it hard to breath.
According to the company, if forced to stop
production, there will be 200,000 less bot-
tles per day of the product. Seriously? A
Sriracha shortage?
Remember what happened when Twinkies
and Leggos were threatened with rations —
prices skyrocketed, eBay became a black
market and even those with barely a taste for
them reacted as though the culinary sky was
falling.
The situation is already heating up.
Asmall package of the sauce is on sale on
eBay for $10,000 which perhaps is a good
price for what the seller calls “the last packet
of Sriracha ever made.” And it’s not alone as
other bottles of the sauce are listed at $20 to
$50. I guess you can’t put a price on love but
you can put a price on love for a hot sauce.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think
of this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
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facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,025.53 +5.33 10-Yr Bond 2.857 -0.026
Nasdaq 4,068.75 +6.23 Oil (per barrel) 97.23
S&P 500 1,808.37 +3.28 Gold 1,239.70
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Sysco Corp., up $3.31 to $37.62
The food distributor acquired US Foods for about $3.5 billion in cash and
stock, pushing annual sales to about $65 billion.
McDonald’s Corp., down $1.08 to $95.72
Sales barely budged last month as stiff competition for the burger chain
resulted in flat traffic at U.S. restaurants.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., down 77 cents to $34.10
The teen retailer reworked its contract with CEO Michael Jeffries, tying
compensation more closely with company performance.
QEP Resources Inc., down 47 cents to $30.96
The energy company will spend $950 million to buy oil and gas assets
located in two West Texas counties as it diversifies.
Nasdaq
American Airlines Group, up 65 cents to $24.60
The carrier finally emerged from bankruptcy protection and combined
with US Airways to create the world’s biggest airline.
Edwards Lifesciences, down $3.56 to $62.73
Markets were put off by expectations for sales of the company’s flagship
Sapien heart valves, which face new competition.
Given Imaging Ltd., up $6.41 to $30.06
Covidien will spend about $860 million to buy the maker of products
used for diagnosing and monitoring the digestive system.
Hologic Inc., down 17 cents to $22.12
Former Stryker CEO Stephen MacMillan will take the top job and the
medical device maker also named two new board members.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market
notched another record close Monday
after a big acquisition in the food
industry. Hope for a longer-term budg-
et deal in Washington also helped.
Food distributor Sysco rose the
most in the Standard & Poor’s 500
index after the company announced an
agreement to buy rival US Foods in an
$8.2 billion deal. Sysco’s stock
jumped $3.31, or 9.7 percent, to
$37. 62.
Stocks extended a rally from Friday
that was driven by a report of solid
U.S. job gains. That boosted investor
confidence that the economy was
growing strongly enough to handle
any pullback in the Federal Reserve’s
economic stimulus.
“We’re just continuing the bullish-
ness that we’ve had,” said Rex Macey,
Chief Investment Officer of
Wilmington Trust Investment
Advisors, a unit of Wilmington Trust
Bank.
The S&P 500 index climbed 3.28
points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,808.37.
That put the index a point above its
previous record close of 1,807.23 set
November 27.
Other indexes also made small
gains. The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose 5.33 points, less than 0.1
percent, to 16,025.53. The Nasdaq
composite increased 6.23 points, or
0.2 percent, to 4,068.75.
Stocks were also supported by
reports that U.S. lawmakers were
moving closer to reaching a longer-
term budget deal, said Bill Stone,
chief investment strategist at PNC
Wealth Management Group.
Dick Durbin, the No. 2 Democrat in
the Senate, said Sunday on ABC that
budget negotiations are making
progress and moving in the right
direction.
The stock market stuttered in
October after political wrangling over
the budget caused a 16-day partial gov-
ernment shutdown that crimped eco-
nomic growth and hurt consumer con-
fidence.
A budget deal “could be viewed as
positive, in the sense that it is putting
to bed one more possible disruption,”
Stone said.
In other corporate news, American
Airlines rose 65 cents, or 2.7 percent,
to $24.60 on the company’s first day
of trading after completing its merger
with US Airways.
There were no major economic
reports for investors to focus on.
The stock market has climbed to
record levels this year as corporations
have kept increasing their earnings
and the Fed has kept up its $85 bil-
lion-a-month bond purchasing pro-
gram. The Fed’s purchases have
pushed up bond prices, lowered inter-
est rates and encouraged investors to
buy stocks.
Fed policymakers will meet next
week, though few analysts are predict-
ing that they will make changes to
their bond-buying program. The meet-
ing runs from Dec. 17 to Dec. 18.
Improvements in the labor market
since September last year, when the
Fed started its most recent round of
stimulus, provided the most powerful
argument for reducing bond purchases,
St. Louis Fed President James Bullard
said on Monday. Bullard, a voting
member of the Fed’s policy commit-
tee, was speaking in St. Louis.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell
to 2.85 percent from 2.86 percent
Friday.
S&P 500 index notches another record
“We’re just continuing
the bullishness that we’ve had.”
— Rex Macey, Chief Investment Officer of
Wilmington Trust Investment Advisors, a unit of Wilmington Trust Bank
REUTERS
A US Airways plane passes American Airlines planes at Ronald
Reagan National Airport.
New American Airlines
emerges as deal closes
By David Koeing
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT WORTH, Texas — American Airlines emerged from
bankruptcy protection and US Airways culminated its long
pursuit of a merger partner as the two completed their deal
Monday to create the world’s biggest airline.
It’s the latest in a series of mergers that will leave four air-
lines controlling more than 80 percent of the U.S. air-trav-
el market. With less competition, the airlines have success-
fully limited the number of seats, boosting prices and
returning to profitability.
American’s old parent, AMR Corp., is gone, replaced by
the new American Airlines Group Inc. CEO Doug Parker
remotely rang the opening bell of the Nasdaq Stock Market,
flanked on stage by executives and labor leaders of both air-
lines and in front of a crowd of cheering employees.
“Our goal here is to go and restore American Airlines to its
position as the greatest airline in the world,” Parker said.
The largest airline as recently as 2008, American struggled
through a decade of huge losses and fell behind United and
Delta in size.
For passengers, the merger won’t mean many immediate
changes. Whether the deal leads to higher ticket prices, the
issue at the heart of legal challenges from the government
and consumer groups, remains to be seen.
Parker said that merger won’t lead to higher airfares
because the new American plans to keep all the service cur-
rently offered by American and US Airways.
“Airline prices are like prices in other businesses — they
track with supply and demand, and we’re not reducing any of
the supply,” he said in an interview with the Associated
Press.
Elite members of the two frequent-flier programs will get
reciprocal benefits in early January, with other changes
being phased in, executives said. The airlines expect to
soon be able to book passengers on each other’s flights,
increasing the destinations available to customers of both.
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — The U.S. government
ended up losing $10.5 billion on the
General Motors bailout, but it says the
alternative would have been far worse.
The Treasury Department sold its
final shares of the Detroit auto giant on
Monday, recovering $39 billion of the
$49.5 billion it spent to save the
dying automaker at the height of the
financial crisis five years ago.
Without the bailout, the country
would have lost more than 1 million
jobs, and the economy could have
slipped from recession into a depres-
sion, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew
said on a conference call with
reporters.
“The economic stakes were high,
and President Obama understood that
inaction was not an option,” Lew said.
“His decision to commit additional
support to GM while requiring them to
fundamentally restructure their busi-
ness was tough but it was right.”
Government sells remaining stake in GM
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A surging stock
market and a steady recovery in home
prices drove Americans’ wealth to a
record last summer.
The nation’s wealth rose 2.6 percent
from July through September to $77.3
trillion, the Federal Reserve said
Monday. Household wealth has been
rising gradually since bottoming at
$57.2 trillion in 2008. Early this year,
America finally regained all the wealth
it had lost to the Great Recession.
Rising personal wealth has been a
pillar of the slow but steady U.S. eco-
nomic recovery and could continue to
boost the economy next year. When
Americans feel richer, they typically
spend more and fuel economic growth.
Household wealth, or net worth,
reflects the value of homes, stocks,
bank accounts and other assets minus
mortgages, credit cards and other
debts.
From July through September, ris-
ing stock prices boosted Americans’
net worth by $917 billion. Higher
home values added $428 billion more.
The Fed’s figures don’t go beyond
September. But stock prices have con-
tinued to rise since last quarter ended,
which means household wealth has,
too. Since Oct. 1, the Standard &
Poor’s 500 stock index has risen near-
ly 8 percent. Home prices in many
areas have continued to rise, though
more slowly than they did earlier in
the year.
The Fed’s report also showed that
Americans are willing to borrow
more. This suggests that many are
growing more confident in their jobs
and in the broader economy.
When adjusted for inflation, net
worth remains about 1 percent below
its pre-recession peak. But the gains
in stock and home prices during the
current October-December quarter will
likely lift inflation-adjusted house-
hold wealth to a record.
Still, the gains haven’t been equally
distributed. The wealthiest 10 percent
of U.S. households own about 80 per-
cent of stocks. And home ownership
has declined since the recession, par-
ticularly among lower-income
Americans.
Monday’s report also showed that
total mortgage debt rose 0.9 percent
from the previous quarter. It was the
first such increase since early 2009.
The rise reflects rising home sales and
fewer mortgage defaults, an encourag-
ing sign.
Americans are also holding more
consumer debt outside of mortgages,
in the form of student loans, auto
loans and credit cards. Consumer debt
rose 6 percent from the previous quar-
ter.
U.S. household wealth reaches high of $77T
<<< Page 12, Bobcats fall
in Curry’s homecoming
Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013
MAKE A WISH: MATT CAIN LOOKS TO RAISE FUNDS AND MAKE WISHES COME TRUE >> PAGE 13
Honor Roll salutes football All-Leaguers
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Yes, the winter season is here
and it’s warming up. But before the
Honor Roll starts into its winter
mode, it must first salute it’s all-
league football players.
The Peninsula Athletic League
and West Catholic Athletic League
announced the cream of their crops
on Monday — with both leagues
on the cusp of CIF Regional
Championship games this week-
end.
Cheif among those standouts is
Serra’s Hamilton Anoa’i. The big-
time wide receiver picked up the
WCAL Co-Player of the Year award
after a remarkable season for the
Padres. In 12 games, Anoa’i racked
up 516 yards and 10 receiving
touchdowns.
Joining Anoa’i at the top of
WCAL’s list as the Junior of the
Year is running back Kava Cassidy.
Cassidy has come on extremely
strong during the Central Coast
Section playoffs. In three games,
he scored eight touchdowns en
route to Serra’s third CCS title and
its first in the Open Division. For
the season, Cassidy rushed for
1,414 yards and 16 touchdowns.
In total, six more Padres made
the WCAL’s First Team including
Kavapele Maka, Daniel Lavulo,
Ryan Rudolph, Matt Fa’aita,
Tyson Terreros and Eric
Westerman.
Over in the PAL, its two best quar-
terbacks represented the league as
its two top players.
Terra Nova quarterback Anthony
Gordon and Menlo quarterback Jack
Heneghan were named the Bay
Division’s Offensive Players of the
Year. Gordon, a junior, led the
Tigers to their fifth consecutive
division title and a No. 1 seed in the
CCS’ Open Division. He tossed 32
touchdowns and only six intercep-
tions on the year. He averaged 309
yards passing a game.
Heneghan finished the 2013 sea-
son dissapointedly looking on
from the sideline after a shoulder
injury. Still, the Dartmouth-bound
QB was spectacular when he was on
the field. For the season, Heneghan
threw for 2,974 yards, 37 touch-
downs and nine interceptions.
Terra Nova, who went 10-1 on the
year, boasts a total of 10 players on
See ROLL, Page 14
S
acred Heart Prep football
fans might want to stay off
the message boards for the
next week if you’re looking for
positive thoughts about your
team’s chances against El Cerrito
in the Northern California
Division III championship game.
Because there doesn’t appear to
be many peo-
ple — check
that, anyone
— who
believes the
Gators can
beat the
Gauchos. In
fact, not
many believe
the Gators
can even
keep it close.
They may
be right on
one count. SHP may not be able to
beat El Cerrito but, having
watched this team all season long,
I give them a shot to at the very
least make the Gauchos sweat a
little bit.
What the Gators may lack in
athletic ability — and by no
means are they unathletic — they
more than make up for with disci-
pline, intelligence and attention
to detail. You’ve heard the phrase:
“putting a player in the best posi-
tion to make a play?” It only
works when the players have the
desire to not only get in the right
position but to want to make the
play.
I’ve looked at El Cerritos’ Tri-
County Rock Division league and,
while there is at least one other
strong team in St. Mary’s, the rest
See LOUNGE, Page 14
Gators not
given too
much hope
49ers defense makes impressive December stand
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — This
December defensive stand by San
Francisco did plenty for the 49ers
and showed a lot to the rest of the
league in the process.
The defending NFC champions
are still right in the playoff mix,
and plan to keep it that way.
After holding Russell Wilson
and the archrival Seahawks in
check Sunday on the way to a
physical 19-17
victory that
kept Seattle
from clinching
the West, San
Francisco (9-4)
can still largely
control its fate
by winning out
this month.
“I think we
showed a championship effort,”
safety Donte Whitner said. “I
think everybody around the coun-
try knows who the 49ers are now.
That was a championship football
game in a playoff atmosphere and
we just made a few more plays than
they made.”
Not that coach Jim Harbaugh is
spending significant time figuring
out all the different playoff scenar-
ios and where his team might wind
up for the divisional round come
January. Next up is a cross-country
road trip this weekend to Tampa
Bay, and the Niners are riding a
three-game winning streak after
back-to-back losses against
Carolina and New Orleans.
Quoting the signature phrase of
late Raiders owner Al Davis,
Harbaugh said: “Al Davis said it as
well as it can ever be said, ‘just
win.’ Those are our intentions.”
Harbaugh pulled out an old
stand-by of his own after Sunday’s
win, too: “Who’s got it better than
us? Nobody!”
The 49ers limited Seattle to 264
total yards
“The defense came to play,” wide
receiver Michael Crabtree said.
“They saved us.”
And San Francisco still has yet
to allow a 100-yard rusher, though
Justin Smith insists “there’s noth-
ing magical about stopping the
run.” Marshawn Lynch looked like
he might be on his way with a fast
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It was the play that change
everything for Serra High
School.
With a 0-0 on the scoreboard
and the second half just under-
way in the biggest game of the
program’s recent history, Padres
quarterback Matt Fa’aita took to
the field to try and get the Serra
offense jump-started. Up until
that point, Archbishop Mitty
proved it had done its defensive
homework. After losing to the
Padres in the last game of the
West Catholic Athletic League
regular season and relinquishing
half of the WCAL title to the
Padres via a 31-7 loss, the
Monarchs studied up and held the
vaunted Serra Spread to just 89
first-half yards during the
rematch in the Central Coast
Section Open Division champi-
onship game.
Only 22 of those had come
because of Fa’aita’s arm.
Things changed dramatically
for Fa’aita and the Padres come
the second half. In posting a
221-yard passing day for Serra,
Fa’aita led the Padres to their
third CCS title and first ever trip
See 49ERS, Page 13
Serra quarterback on historic ride
See AOTW, Page 14
Donte Whitner
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. —
Joe Torre, Tony La Russa and
Bobby Cox spent decades trying
to beat each other, no holds
barred. On this day, however, they
were a mutual admiration society.
And why not? They were going
to the Hall of Fame together.
With a combined eight World
Series titles and more than 7,500
wins, the managerial trio made it
to Cooperstown in results
announced Monday. Each was
unanimously selected when the 16
voters on the expansion era com-
mittee met a day earlier.
“They’re not the easiest guys to
manage against, that’s for sure.
But it was fun. It was always a bat-
tle,” Cox said Monday at the win-
ter meetings. “And I consider them
enemies on the field, but friends
off the field.”
All three exceeded the magic
benchmark of 2,000 wins — only
Connie Mack and John McGraw
have won more.
“Managing against them, you
certainly learned things,” said
Torre, now an executive vice pres-
ident for Major League Baseball.
“I am honored to go into the Hall
with these two guys.”
Induction ceremonies will be
held July 27 in Cooperstown, N.Y.
Candidates needed 12 votes for
election. No one else on the 12-
person ballot that included former
players’ union head Marvin Miller
and late New York Yankees owner
George Steinbrenner got more
than six votes.
Torre became the fifth manager
to win four World Series champi-
onships, leading the Yankees to
titles in 1996 and from 1998-00
— beating Cox’s Braves twice.
After making only one trip to the
playoffs in 14 seasons with the
New York Mets, St. Louis and
Atlanta, Torre guided the Yankees
to the postseason in all 12 of his
years in New York with a cool,
patient demeanor. His popularity
rankled Steinbrenner.
“George Steinbrenner changed
my life giving me that opportuni-
ty at the end of ‘95,” said Torre,
the seventh Yankees manager to
be elected to the Hall. “He just
wanted to win. He felt he owed it to
the city. Maybe, the fact I was a
New Yorker, it really struck a nerve
with me.”
Torre finished his career by lead-
ing the Los Angeles Dodgers to
two NL West titles in three sea-
sons, retiring after 2010 with a
record of 2,326-1,997. He’s the
only manager to have more than
2,000 hits as a player — he was
the 1971 NL MVP — and 2,000
wins in the dugout.
“Joe taught a lot of us about how
to win the right way and lose the
right way,” La Russa said.
By Steve Reed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Kemba Walker scored 27 of his 31
points in the second half, and the Charlotte Bobcats ruined
Stephen Curry’s homecoming with a wire-to-wire 115-111
victory over the Golden State Warriors on Monday night.
Curry overcame a slow start to finish with a season-high
43 points, 32 of them coming in the second half.
Curry, a Charlotte native who burst on
the national scene while playing at near-
by Davidson College, scored 19 points
in the fourth quarter, including a 27-foot-
er with a hand in his face to cut the
Bobcats’ lead to 111-109 with 11 seconds
left.
But the Warriors (12-10) couldn’t con-
tain Walker, and the point guard hit four
free throws in the final 11 seconds to seal
the victory.
Gerald Henderson had 24 points and Josh McRoberts had
11 points and 10 rebounds for the Bobcats (10-11), who won
their second straight game.
While Curry was putting on a show, Walker did his best to
match him in a duel of high-octane point guards.
Walker scored 15 points in the fourth quarter and finished
10 of 18 from the field and 9 of 11 from the foul line. He also
had five assists.
Curry was 3 of 11 in the first half, but got hot late in the
third quarter and finished 14 of 32 from the field against a
Bobcats team that hadn’t allowed 100 points in 13 straight
games. He was only 5 of 16 from 3-point range, but did some
damage at the free throw line where he was 10 of 12.
Curry also had nine assists.
The Bobcats led 53-41 at the half behind 14 points from
Henderson, who was 7 of 10 from the field, scoring most of
his points in the low post. The Warriors struggled from the
field early, shooting 1 of 12 from 3-point range.
Curry, who led Davidson to the brink of the Final Four as
a sophomore, came in with a career average of 25.3 points
against his hometown team while shooting 62 percent from
3-point land.
The Warriors never led, but tied the game at 88-all on a pair
of free throws by Curry.
But Ramon Sessions scored on a pair of drives and Ben
Gordon knocked down a 3-pointer to quickly push the lead
back to seven with 6:50 left in the game.
Walker hit a 3-pointer and a fall away in
the lane to help stretch the lead to 11.
Warriors coach Mark Jackson said
before the game that Curry’s play has
been “spectacular” this season.
“He’s been playing at a whole different
level,” Jackson said. “He’s playing and
acting like he’s the best player on the
floor night-in-and-night-out, carrying us
down the stretch, making plays, choos-
ing when to take over offensively and he knows when to
facilitate.”
“You see his scoring and you fall in love with his jump
shot. He’s a guy that’s among the league leaders in assists
also. He’s playing at a different level. He’s getting to the
level of the baddest man on the planet. It’s really fun to see.
It takes everyone else to another level.”
Torre, La Russa, Cox elected to baseball Hall
Walker spoils Curry’s
homecoming lifts
Bobcats the Warriors
Stephen Curry
Mark Jackson
REUTERS
Three legendary managers —Tony La Russa, Joe Torre and Bobby Cox
will be inducted into the Hall of Fame.
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
start Sunday, but the Seattle star
wound up with 72 yards on 20
carries — just 22 yards after half-
time.
“That’s quite an accomplish-
ment,” Harbaugh said of his
defense’s streak. “It certainly
was in this game.”
Harbaugh simplified his defen-
sive unit’s effort to “just running
and hitting, hitting and run-
ning. ”
It helps to have such talented
players at every position.
Wi t h Just i n Smi t h, Aldon
Smith and Ahmad Brooks
swarming at every chance,
NaVorro Bowman and Patrick
Wi l l i s del i veri ng puni shi ng
hits and Glenn Dorsey defiantly
manning the middle, this
defense is in sync up front.
“That team was (11-1). When
you knock off a team that had
previously lost one game, you
can look over and see (frustra-
tion),” Aldon Smith said. “We
came out there and were making
plays. We clicked. When we’re all
on the same page, we’re a hard
team to stop. We got after it
today. ”
The 49ers were mad, too. Mad
that they had been outscored 71-
16 in two previous losses against
the Seahawks, both in Seattle,
including a 29-3 rout in Week 2.
Pressure came right at Wi l son
from the start. He threw for 199
yards on 15-of-25 passing but
threw an interception and pro-
duced just an 81.9 passer rating.
“They fly around and they make
plays,” said Wilson, who was
also sacked twice. “They have a
lot of great players and their
front seven is incredibly strong
just like ours.”
Every player on the 49ers real-
izes that each week is being treat-
ed as a win-or-go-home playoff-
type game.
“From here on out, all of them
are,” Dorsey said. “All of them.”
Notes: Harbaugh credited
everyone for executing the key
blocks on Frank Gore’s late 51-
yard gain that helped set up Phil
Dawson’s game-winning 22-yard
field goal. ... Seats from
Candlestick Park, in partnership
between the 49ers and the San
Francisco Recreation and Parks
Department, went on sale in pairs
for $749 via Ticketmaster.
Proceeds benefit San Francisco
Recreation and Parks Department
youth programs. The Niners have
one remaining game at The
‘Stick, Dec. 23 against Atlanta.
The team has played in the iconic
venue since 1971.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
USATODAY SPORTS
Patrick Willis and NaVarro Bowman have the 49ers’ defense playing well.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain wants to
do his part to help the
next Batkid make good
on a dream.
The Giants pitcher and
wife, Chelsea, pledged a
$50,000 matching grant
and challenged to Make-
A-Wish Foundation
Greater Bay Area
Executive Director
Patricia Wilson. If
Wilson can complete her goal of raising
$50,000 by Wednesday night, the Cains
will match it.
The couple was inspired — along with a
captivated country — by 5-year-old Miles
Scott’s whirlwind day last month as his
favorite superhero solving crime in San
Francisco. The boy has undergone
leukemia treatment.
Make-A-Wish says Wilson pledged to
plunge into San Francisco Bay this past
Saturday if supporters raised $7,500, the
typical cost of a wish. She jumped into the
icy water, and had raised more than
$20,000 as of Monday afternoon.
Giants’ Matt Cain offers $50,000
Make-A-Wish matching pledge
Matt Cain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAO PAULO — As video of Brazilian fans
kicking, beating and using metal bars to
pummel supporters of a rival team spread
across the globe, officials moved quickly to
assure people considering coming to the
2014 World Cup that they won’t see that
type of violence at the global tournament.
Aday after four people were hospitalized
following clashes in a key match in the final
round of the Brazilian league, World Cup
organizers said Monday that fan safety will
not be a problem during soccer’s showcase
event.
“We can assure that the safety of this
event will be guaranteed,” said Andrei
Augusto Passos Rodrigues, one of the
Brazilian government’s officials in charge
of security during major events. “The lam-
entable scenes such as the ones that hap-
pened yesterday will not be repeated.”
But violence around Brazilian football is
growing, including about 30 deaths this
year. In July, a referee in a village match
fatally stabbed a player after an argument.
The referee was then stoned and decapitated
by the crowd.
In the Brazilian league this year, police
and fans clashed in and outside stadiums at
least once a month.
Brazil tries to ease fears
of World Cup violence
to the CIF Regional Championship. In that
third quarter, Fa’aita led a couple of master-
ful drives and took away any momentum
Mitty had — especially after a 74-yard
touchdown run gave the Monarchs a 7-9
lead.
But before all the celebration, all the pic-
tures, and all the jumping into the stands
took place, there was a play — the one that
turned everything around for Fa’aita and the
Padres.
On No. 18’s first pass from scrimmage to
start the third quarter, the southpaw dropped
back and threw a pass in the direction of
Demetri McCoy. A Mitty defender jumped
the route and looked destined for an inter-
ception and six points. But somehow, the
ball got through his hands and into
McCoy’s for 18 yards.
“That was the turning point of the game,”
said Serra head coach Patrick Walsh. “There
was an opportunity for them to make a pick
there but I guess ... God is a Padre. It just
didn’t work out for them. Sometimes things
like that give you a little bit of confidence
and it gave Matt a bunch of confidence. He
basically had the opportunity to start
believing in himself, believing in his
receivers and guys were making plays.
Nobody panicked.”
The bit of divine intervention fueld
Fa’aita, who found a groove during the rest
of that third quarter that carried the Padres to
the win.
For his efforts, Fa’aita is the Daily
Journal Athlete of the Week.
“With the rain and the ball being wet, I
just had to go step by step, pass after pass,”
Fa’aita said of a surprisingly quiet first half
against Mitty. “But I just started getting
better and better. I just got the ball to the
receivers and the receivers were catching
them.”
Did they ever. While that miracle, non-
interception stalled deep in Mitty territory,
Fa’aita got back to work. His next effort of
the half resulted in a 30-yard touchdown
pass to Hamilton Anoa’i that tied the game
at 7. That TD toss capped of a sensational
80-yard drive that included long comple-
tions to Easop Winston and Kava Cassidy.
“That’s my No. 1 target right there,”
Fa’aita said of Anoa’i and his touchdown.
“And having him on the field made me feel
comfortable. I just knew I had to get the ball
to him because he’d make a play for me. And
that’s what he did.”
The entire Serra offense made plays, actu-
ally. But that third quarter belonged to
Fa’aita. He completed 67 percent of his
passes for 184 yards — half of those went to
Winston, who finished the game with nine
catches for 119 yards.
Fa’aita, who missed a bit of time early in
the year battling injury, will have to be just
as big for Serra if they hope to reach the
state title game. They’ll play Del-Oro
Friday night at San Jose City College start-
ing at 7:30 p.m.
the First Team including co-Defensive
Player of the Year Nick Pierotti. Billy Gray,
their head coach, was named Coach of the
Year.
Sacred Heart Prep’s Ben Burr-Kirven was
named the other Defensive Player of the
Year.
Menlo-Atherton’s Isiah Nash (Utility)
and Ben Sehl (Special Teams) also made the
top of the list. Menlo’s Mark Newton won
half of the Coach of the Year honors.
Over in the Ocean Division, following a
return to glory year for Burlingame, the
Panthers owned the top of the division’s
awards.
Manase Palu (Offense), Keoni Keahi
(Defense), Robby Baumgarten (Special
Teams) and John Philipopoulos (Coach) all
received top honors for the division. Josh
Holman, the explosive receiver from
Woodside, was named Utility Player of the
Year.
In all, the Panthers had 11 players named
to the Ocean First Team.
Finally, in the Lake Division, Hillsdale
was the top dog in the standings and in the
all-league list.
Cole Carrithers was named Offensive
Player of the Year after a season in which he
threw for 2,243 yards and 24 touchdowns.
Carrithers is joined in the awards list by
Giancarlo Boscacci (Offensive Back), David
Galten (Offensive Lineman), Taran Poss
(Linebacker) and head coach Mike Parodi.
Rounding out the Lake’s awards list is
Mills’ Josh Sved (Defensive), Brandon Gip
(Utility), Tevita Taki Taki (Special Teams),
Derek Friske (Receiver), Troy Hunter
(Defensive Lineman) and Jordan Duncan
(Defensive Back).
And right before we get to winter sports,
football shout outs still go out to Burr-
Kirven who was all over the field on both
sides of the ball during the Gators’ 56-21
win over Pacific Grove in the Central Coast
Section Division IV championship game.
Burr-Kirven had a sack and interception
defensively and added a 23-yard touchdown
run on offense. His teammate, Andrew
Segre, played the game of his life in that
win. He had 267 yards and four touchdowns
in the first half alone and finished with 357
yards and six scores total.
To kick off the winter Honor Roll, Anisah
Smith of Carlmont girls’ basketball, started
the season with a bang, averaging 27.3
points per game in four contests last week.
She opened the year with a 33-point effort
against Silver Creek in the first round of the
Fremont-Sunnyvale Firebird tournament
and followed it with a 25-point outburst in a
loss to Saratoga. In the third-place game,
she went for 27 in a win over host Fremont.
She then wrapped up her week with a 24-
point performance in a win over Carmel.
And over on the soccer pitch, Luca Deza
and Jessica Parque are looking to get Notre
Dame-Belmont off on the right foot. Deza
scored seven goals and recorded an assist as
the Tigers opened the season with a 3-0
mark. Deza had hat tricks in wins over
Mercy-Burlingame and El Camino, and
added a goal and an assist in a win over Half
Moon Bay.
Parque, the already-established threat for
the Tigers, scored eight times in those same
three games. She went for four goals against
El Camino and pair each against both
Mercy-Burlingame at Half Moon Bay.
of the league would not scare anyone, espe-
cially a team as good as the Gators.
Everyone says SHP hasn’t faced an
offense like El Cerrito’s, which boasts five
players who have signed Division I letters
of intent, but I’m guessing the Gauchos
haven’t faced many defenses better than the
Gators. They can fly to the ball and inflict
big hits as well as anyone.
That superior talent may eventually wear
down the Gators, but SHP will make sure
Gauchos work for every score they get.
Serra, on the other hand, is getting a lot
more respect about its chances of capturing
the Division I crown when the Padres take
on Del Oro of the Sacramento area. Both
played De La Salle this season, with Del
Oro getting blown out while the Padres fell
just short once again.
The general consensus on this one is that
it will be very close, with the Padres get-
ting the slight edge among the Internet set.
Win or lose, just having a pair of San
Mateo County teams in Nor Cal champi-
onship games is a big feather in the cap for
Peninsula football.
***
Boy, if the basketball and soccer seasons
were actual living, breathing entities, they
would have been like a pair of homebound
dogs who are uncontrollably happy when
their master comes home. Those sports
have busted out of the gate since the calen-
dar turned to December.
I’ve been out of the loop the last two
weeks or so — first on a Thanksgiving
vacation and then spending last week in
my sickbed with the flu — but I couldn’t
help but notice the number of soccer and
basketball results flooding my inbox.
No rest for the weary, however. It seems
the winter sports have caught us a little bit
by surprise, but the fall season has gone
unseasonably long with the Menlo School
volleyball team advancing to the state
championship match and the Serra and
Sacred Heart Prep football teams winning
Central Coast Section titles and advancing
to Nor Cal championship games.
With only a few football games left,
however, look for the Daily Journal to
ramp up its coverage of the winter sports
schedule.
Before you know it, the baseball season
will be upon us.
***
The 49ers’ 19-17 win over Seattle Sunday
further confirms my belief the Seahawks
won’t win the Super Bowl.
If Seattle has home-field advantage
throughout the playoffs, punch their tick-
ets to New York for the Super Bowl in
February. The Seahawks simply do not lose
at home. In fact, they dominate in front of
the “12th Man.” In six home wins this sea-
son, Seattle has won by an average of 17
points.
On the road? Bit of a different story.
Away from Seattle, the Seahawks are 5-2
and have a margin of just plus-5.6 points.
Granted, they’re tough to beat period, but
put the Seahawks in the cold in New York
against Tom Brady and New England? I’m
liking the “Golden Boy’s” chances.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Terra Nova quarterback Anthony Gordon and Menlo QB Jack Heneghan are the Peninsula
Athletic League Bay Division’s co-Offensive Players of the Year.
Continued from page 11
ROLL
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Continued from page 11
AOTW
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALVADOR, Brazil — The World Cup may
be great for planet soccer, but it isn’t so
good for planet Earth.
FIFA says the 2014 tournament, which
will require huge amounts of air travel to
venues across Brazil, will produce the equiv-
alent of 2.72 million metric tons of carbon
dioxide, a greenhouse gas.
That means staging the monthlong tour-
nament will produce as much carbon dioxide
as 560,000 passenger cars do in one year,
according to the greenhouse gas calculator
on the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency’s website.
In an effort to curb pollution, FIFA will
finance such projects as tree planting trees,
which help reduce carbon emissions. FIFA’s
head of corporate social responsibility,
Federico Addiechi, said in an interview that
the ruling body will be spending several
million dollars.
Teams, spectators, officials and others
will have to crisscross the world’s fifth-
largest country, mostly by air, because the
64 World Cup matches are scattered across
12 stadiums.
Fans will produce about 90 percent of
World Cup carbon emissions, Addiechi said.
The rest — about 251,000 tons — is direct-
ly from FIFA’s activities. That includes trav-
el for teams, referees, FIFAofficials, carbon
produced by their hotels, the use of stadiums
and other tournament-related activities.
“We’re going to offset 100 percent of
those emissions,” Addiechi said.
That could be done by financing reforesta-
tion in Brazil, wind farms, hydroelectric
plants or other projects. The projects will
be announced next year. Addiechi said they
will cost FIFAabout $2.5 million, which is
still just a fraction of the billions expected
in World Cup revenue.
AFIFA-commissioned study breaks down
World Cup emissions like this:
—213,706 tons from the Confederations
Cup tournament in June.
—38,048 tons from other preparations,
including last week’s draw, which required
more than 3,000 guests and journalists to
trek to a huge tent erected at a remote beach
resort on Brazil’s Atlantic coast.
Earth’s atmosphere to take beating at World Cup
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 10 12 .455 —
Toronto 7 12 .368 1 1/2
Philadelphia 7 15 .318 3
Brooklyn 6 14 .300 3
New York 5 14 .263 3 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 16 5 .762 —
Atlanta 11 10 .524 5
Charlotte 10 11 .476 6
Washington 9 11 .450 6 1/2
Orlando 6 15 .286 10
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 18 3 .857 —
Detroit 10 11 .476 8
Chicago 8 10 .444 8 1/2
Cleveland 7 13 .350 10 1/2
Milwaukee 4 16 .200 13 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 15 4 .789 —
Houston 15 7 .682 1 1/2
Dallas 13 8 .619 3
Memphis 10 10 .500 5 1/2
New Orleans 9 10 .474 6
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Portland 18 4 .818 —
Oklahoma City 15 4 .789 1 1/2
Denver 13 8 .619 4 1/2
Minnesota 9 11 .450 8
Utah 4 19 .174 14 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 14 8 .636 —
Phoenix 11 9 .550 2
Golden State 12 10 .545 2
L.A. Lakers 10 10 .500 3
Sacramento 5 13 .278 7
Monday’sGames
L.A. Clippers 94, Philadelphia 83
Denver 75,Washington 74
Charlotte 115, Golden State 111
Memphis 94, Orlando 85
Portland 105, Utah 94
Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Tuesday’sGames
Miami at Indiana, 4 p.m.
New York at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
San Antonio at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Boston at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Chicago at New York, 5 p.m.
Utah at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 30 20 8 2 42 84 61
Montreal 31 19 9 3 41 85 65
Detroit 31 15 9 7 37 85 82
Tampa Bay 29 17 10 2 36 80 70
Toronto 31 16 12 3 35 86 87
Ottawa 31 12 14 5 29 91 103
Florida 31 9 17 5 23 70 104
Buffalo 30 6 22 2 14 51 91
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 32 21 10 1 43 98 71
Washington 30 16 12 2 34 92 85
Carolina 30 13 12 5 31 71 84
N.Y. Rangers 31 15 15 1 31 69 80
New Jersey 31 12 13 6 30 69 77
Philadelphia 30 13 14 3 29 68 78
Columbus 30 12 15 3 27 73 82
N.Y. Islanders 30 8 17 5 21 75 104
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 32 21 6 5 47 116 89
St. Louis 28 19 6 3 41 98 66
Minnesota 32 18 9 5 41 77 75
Colorado 28 20 8 0 40 82 65
Dallas 28 14 9 5 33 81 80
Winnipeg 31 14 13 4 32 82 88
Nashville 30 13 14 3 29 67 88
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 32 20 7 5 45 101 84
San Jose 30 19 6 5 43 101 75
Los Angeles 30 19 7 4 42 79 62
Vancouver 32 17 10 5 39 86 81
Phoenix 29 16 8 5 37 94 93
Calgary 29 11 14 4 26 78 98
Edmonton 31 10 18 3 23 84 105
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Monday’sGames
Ottawa 5, Philadelphia 4, SO
Pittsburgh 2, Columbus 1
Carolina at Vancouver, Late
N.Y. Islanders at Anaheim, Late
Tuesday’sGames
Ottawa at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 4 p.m.
New Jersey at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
Nashville at N.Y. Rangers, 4:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Boston at Calgary, 6:30 p.m.
Carolina at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Los Angeles at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 8 5 0 .615 334 301
Dallas 7 6 0 .538 357 348
N.Y. Giants 5 8 0 .385 251 334
Washington 3 10 0 .231 279 407
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196
Carolina 9 3 0 .750 285 157
Tampa Bay 3 9 0 .250 217 285
Atlanta 3 9 0 .250 261 340
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 7 6 0 .538 346 321
Chicago 7 6 0 .538 368 360
Green Bay 6 6 1 .500 316 326
Minnesota 3 9 1 .269 315 395
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179
San Francisco 8 4 0 .667 297 197
Arizona 7 5 0 .583 275 247
St. Louis 5 7 0 .417 279 278
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 9 3 0 .750 322 261
Miami 6 6 0 .500 252 248
N.Y. Jets 5 7 0 .417 189 310
Buffalo 4 8 0 .333 267 307
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 4 0 .667 285 274
Tennessee 5 7 0 .417 264 267
Jacksonville 3 9 0 .250 174 352
Houston 2 10 0 .167 230 323
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 8 4 0 .667 292 216
Baltimore 6 6 0 .500 249 235
Pittsburgh 5 7 0 .417 263 278
Cleveland 4 8 0 .333 231 297
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 10 2 0 .833 464 317
Kansas City 9 3 0 .750 298 214
San Diego 5 7 0 .417 279 277
Oakland 4 8 0 .333 237 300
Thursday’sGames
Detroit 40, Green Bay 10
Dallas 31, Oakland 24
Baltimore 22, Pittsburgh 20
Sunday’sGames
Minnesota 23, Chicago 20, OT
New England 34, Houston 31
Indianapolis 22,Tennessee 14
Jacksonville 32, Cleveland 28
Carolina 27,Tampa Bay 6
Philadelphia 24, Arizona 21
Miami 23, N.Y. Jets 3
San Francisco 23, St. Louis 13
Atlanta 34, Buffalo 31, OT
Cincinnati 17, San Diego 10
Denver 35, Kansas City 28
N.Y. Giants 24,Washington 17
NFL GLANCE
SATURDAYDEC. 21
NewMexicoBowl
At Albuquerque
WashingtonState(6-6) vs.ColoradoState(7-6),1p.m.
(ESPN)
LasVegas Bowl
Fresno State (11-1) vs. Southern Cal (9-4), 2:30 p.m.
(ABC)
Famous IdahoPotatoBowl
At Boise, Idaho
Buffalo(8-4) vs.SanDiegoState(7-5),4:30p.m.(ESPN)
NewOrleans Bowl
Tulane(7-5) vs.Louisiana-Lafayette(8-4),8p.m.(ESPN)
MONDAYDEC. 23
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ohio (7-5) vs. East Carolina (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
TUESDAYDEC. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State (6-6) vs. Boise State (8-4), 7 p.m. (ESPN)
THURSDAYDEC. 26
LittleCaesars PizzaBowl
At Detroit
BowlingGreen(10-3) vs.Pittsburgh(6-6),5p.m.(ESPN)
PoinsettiaBowl
At San Diego
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Utah State (8-5), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
FRIDAYDEC. 27
MilitaryBowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (8-4) vs. Syracuse (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
BYU (8-4) vs.Washington (8-4), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
SATURDAYDEC. 28
PinstripeBowl
At New York
Notre Dame (8-4) vs. Rutgers (6-6), 11 a.m. (ESPN)
BelkBowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati (9-3) vs.NorthCarolina(6-6),2:20p.m.(ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 5:45 p.m. (ESPN)
BuffaloWildWings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN)
MONDAYDEC. 30
ArmedForces Bowl
At Fort Worth,Texas
MiddleTennessee(8-4) vs.Navy(7-4),10:45a.m.(ESPN)
Music CityBowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi (7-5) vs.GeorgiaTech(7-5),2:15p.m.(ESPN)
AlamoBowl
At San Antonio
Oregon (10-2) vs.Texas (8-4), 5:45 p.m. (ESPN)
HolidayBowl
At San Diego
Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9:15 p.m.
(ESPN)
BOWL GAMES GLANCE
TUESDAY
Girls’ basketball
Lincoln-SFat Aragon,6p.m.;Sequoiaat Crystal Springs,
6:30 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep at Valley Christian, 7:30
p.m.
Boy’ basketball
Mid-Peninsula at Crystal Springs, 5 p.m.; Burton-SF at
Capuchino,Carlmont at Richmond,6p.m.; Hillsdaleat
Westmoor, 6:30 p.m.; Menlo School at Salesian-Rich-
mond, 7 p.m.
Boy’ soccer
Mills at Crystal Springs, 2:45 p.m.; Half Moon Bay vs.
Salinas at Homestead tournament, 5 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Boys’ basketball
Gundersonat MenloSchool,TerraNovaat SanMateo,
St. Patrick-St.Vincent at South City, 7 p.m.
Burlingame Lions Club tournament
Half Moon Bay vs. Aragon, 4:45 p.m.
Menlo-Atherton vs. Sacred Heart Prep, 7:45 p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Hillsdale at Balboa, 5:30 p.m.
Terra Nova tournament
Menlo School vs. Moreau Catholic, 6 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
SouthCityat Priory,2:45p.m.;WillowGlenat Serra,Ri-
ordan at El Camino, 3 p.m.; Menlo-Atherton at Los
Altos, 3:30 p.m.
Homestead tournament
Sequoia vs. Pajaro Valley, 5 p.m.
THURSDAY
Boys’ basketball
Mills vs. Monta Vista at Lynbrook tournament, 4:45
p.m.; Burlingame Lion’s Club tournament TBD
Girls’ basketball
Hillsdaleat Castillja,Pescarderoat Crystal Springs,5:30
p.m.; Oceana at Carlmont, 6 p.m.
Terra Nova tournament,TBD
Boys’ soccer
Carlmont at Mitty,3:15p.m.;MenloSchool at PaloAlto,
3:30 p.m.
Homestead tournament
Burlingame vs. Santa Clara at, 3:15 p.m.
Half Moon Bay vs.Watsonville, 5 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Nor Cal DivisionI championshipgame
Del Oro-Loomis (12-2) vs.Serra(12-2),7:30p.m.at City
College of San Jose
Boys’ basketball
SouthCityat ISA-SF,5:30p.m.; BurlingameLion’s Club
tournament TBD
Girls’ basketball
Woodside at Irvington-Fremont, 5 p.m.; Terra Nova
tournament,TBD
Boys’ soccer
SanMateoat El Camino,3p.m.;SouthCityat Lynbrook,
3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
Nor Cal DivisionIII championshipgame
Sacred Heart Prep (12-2) vs.El Cerrito (12-2),7:30 p.m.
at De Anza High School-Richmond
Boys’ basketball
Terra Nova at Hillsdale,3:30 p.m; Aragon at Serra, 7:30
p.m.
Girls’ basketball
Yerba Buena at Carlmont, 2:30 p.m.; Half Moon Bay at
Hillsdale,6:30 p.m.; Mt. Pleasant at Capuchino, 7 p.m.
Boys’ soccer
Serra at Bellarmine, 11 a.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
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Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ralph D. Russo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Jameis Winston
will have plenty of company at
the Heisman Trophy ceremony —
though he’s not expected to have
much competition.
The Florida State quarterback
was among a record-tying six
Heisman finalists revealed
Monday, along with Northern
Illinois’ Jordan Lynch, Texas
A&M’s Johnny Manziel,
Alabama’s AJ McCarron, Auburn’s
Tre Mason and Boston College’s
Andre Williams.
Six finalists invited to New York
for the presentation are the most
since 1994. The winner will be
announced Saturday night.
Winston is the overwhelming
favorite to win the award now that
a sexual assault complaint against
him in Tallahassee, Fla., has been
closed without charges being filed.
He could also become the second
freshman to win the award.
Manziel was the first just last year.
Famous Jameis, like Johnny
Football last season, is a redshirt
freshman.
While Winston was a lock to be
invited, the rest of the field was
muddled. Some contenders had late
stumbles (Manziel and Lynch),
others (Mason and Williams) made
late runs.
Manziel will try to join another
exclusive Heisman club by becom-
ing the second player to win the
award twice. Ohio State’s Archie
Griffin won the award in 1974 and
‘75. The Aggies’ quarterback is
third in the nation in total offense
with 368 yards per game.
Lynch led No. 24 Northern
Illinois (12-1) to within a victory
of a BCS bid and has set the major
college record for yards rushing
for a quarterback this season with
1,815. He also tweeted that he was
a finalist about five minutes before
the official announcement was
made on ESPN by 1996 winner
Danny Wuerffel.
“NYC here I come!! Thanks to
the coaches teammates and media
relation couldn’t of did it wt out
them!” the record-setting senior
posted.
McCarron completed 67 percent
of his passes for 2,676 yards and
26 touchdowns for the fourth-
ranked Crimson Tide (11-1).
“This will be my first trip to New
York City, and I can’t put into
words how much it means to me,”
McCarron said in a statement
released by the school. “I am truly
privileged to have the opportunity
to represent our team at the
Heisman ceremony. None of this
would be possible without my
coaches and teammates.”
Mason helped No. 2 Auburn
reach the BCS title game, running
for 304 yards and four TDs in the
SEC championship game. He is
ninth in the country in rushing
(124 ypg).
“When I heard the news, I was in
disbelief,” Mason said in a state-
ment. “For me to be invited to the
Heisman ceremony, I am honored
and blessed. I couldn’t have done it
without my teammates; this is an
honor for all of them also.”
Williams is the nation’s leading
rusher at 175 yards per game and
the 16th player in FBS to run for
2,000 yards in a season.
Winston’s arrival as Florida
State’s starting quarterback was
being touted as a major event in
the spring and he has surpassed
the hype. The Alabama native is
on pace to break the NCAA record
for passer efficiency rating
(190.1) and has already set records
for yards passing (3,820) and TD
passes (38) for a freshman.
Winston’s only issues have
come off the field. About a month
ago, a year-old sexual assault com-
plaint against him made by a
female Florida State student was
given by police to the state attor-
ney’s office for a full investiga-
tion.
Awoman claimed Winston raped
her. Winston’s lawyer said the sex
was consensual. Winston contin-
ued to play, and play well, during
the investigation. Last week, the
state attorney announced there
would be no charges filed in the
case, and two days later Winston
threw for three touchdown passes
and ran for a score as No. 1 Florida
State won the Atlantic Coast
Conference championship game
45-7 against Duke and wrapped up
a spot in the BCS title game.
In the latest straw poll released
Monday by HeismanPundit.com,
which has correctly predicted the
last seven winners, Wi nst on
received seven of the 10 first-place
votes and 26 points to easily out-
distance Lynch (eight points and
two first-place votes).
All six finalists are expected to
attend the ceremony, which would
match ‘94 for the most in Heisman
history. That season Colorado
tailback Rashaan Salaam won the
Heisman, and Penn State’s Ki-Jana
Carter and Kerry Collins, along
with Alcorn State’s Steve McNair,
Alabama’s Jay Barker and Miami’s
Warren Sapp were finalists.
In 1989, eight players were
invited to the ceremony, but only
four attended. Among the missing
was Houston’s Andre Ware, who
won the award but was preparing
for a game.
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Stumbling to the
finish of a losing season has
become an all-too-familiar feeling
around the Oakland Raiders.
With 11 straight years without a
winning record or playoff berth
and an NFL-worst 120 losses since
the start of the 2003 season, the
Raiders have had to search for any
small positives they can find.
Despite coming off a 37-27 loss
to a struggling New York Jets team
held to six points the two previous
weeks, the Raiders (4-9) see signs
of progress in being competitive
most weeks and being done in by a
few small mistakes rather than
being completely overmatched
like they were a year ago.
“You have to appreciate where
you came from, where we were last
year and this year,” receiver Rod
Streater said. “Our record might not
be different, but as a team we’re
right there. We just have to get that
one thing to help us get that win at
the end.”
That has eluded the Raiders so far
as they have lost six games they
held leads in or were tied in the sec-
ond half.
That was not the case against
the Jets as Oakland fell into a 20-
3 first-half hole after Matt
McGloin threw an interception
deep in his own territory and
Marquette King had a punt blocked
for a touch-
down.
The Raiders
played better in
the second half,
scoring 17
points on their
first three
drives, but were
unable to come
up with key
stops and lost their third straight
game.
They have three shots left to sur-
pass last season’s win total, starting
Sunday at home against Kansas City
(10-3) followed by a visit to San
Diego (6-7) and the season finale at
home against Denver (11-2).
“I think we’re a lot closer, ”
coach Dennis Allen said.
“Obviously the record doesn’t say
so. We all recognize that at the end
of the day this is a production busi-
ness. We understand that you are
what your record says you are. But
I also know there’s a lot of areas
where this football team has
improved.”
Whether the improvement is
enough to bring Allen back for a
third season may not be determined
until after the final three games.
Allen said he and general manager
Reggie McKenzie remain in lock-
step in their vision for the fran-
chise and said he is worried about
beating Kansas City on Sunday,
not his own status.
Allen has lost more games in his
first two seasons than any coach in
Raiders history.
The only coach the team has
brought back after losing records
in the first two seasons was Tom
Cable, who went 9-19 his first two
years after replacing the fired Lane
Kiffin after four games in 2008.
Cable went 8-8 in his final sea-
son in Oakland before being fired
after the 2010 season.
Hue Jackson then went 8-8 in his
only season as Raiders coach
before McKenzie brought in Allen
to help lead a franchise rebuild.
Allen still has strong support in
the locker room, where the players
have bought into his approach
even if they haven’t always been
able to turn that into wins.
Heisman: Winston, Manziel, Lynch among 6 finalists
USATODAY SPORTS
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston is the favorite to win the
Heisman Trophy, an award presented annually to the NCAA’s best player.
Raiders see progress despite another losing season
Dennis Allen
17
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Harmless lung cancer? Aprovocative study
found that nearly 1 in 5 lung tumors detected on CT scans
are probably so slow-growing that they would never cause
problems.
The analysis suggests the world’s No. 1 cause of cancer
deaths isn’t as lethal as doctors once thought.
In the study, these were not false-positives — suspicious
results that turn out upon further testing not to be cancer.
These were indeed cancerous tumors, but ones that caused no
symptoms and were unlikely ever to become deadly, the
researchers said.
Still, the results are not likely to change how doctors
treat lung cancer.
For one thing, the disease is usually diagnosed after
symptoms develop, when tumors show up on an ordinary
chest X-ray and are potentially life-threatening.
Also, doctors don’t know yet how to determine which
symptomless tumors found on CT scans might become dan-
gerous, so they automatically treat the cancer aggressively.
The findings underscore the need to identify biological
markers that would help doctors determine which tumors are
harmless and which ones require treatment, said Dr. Edward
Patz, Jr., lead author and a radiologist at Duke University
Medical Center. He is among researchers working to do just
that.
Patz said patients who seek lung cancer screening should
be told about the study results.
“People have to understand that we’re going to find some
cancers which if we’d never looked, we never would have
had to treat,” he said. Among patients and even many doc-
tors, “it’s not something that is commonly known with
lung cancer. ”
A leader of an influential government-appointed health
panel agreed.
“Putting the word ‘harmless’ next to cancer is such a for-
eign concept to people,” said Dr. Michael LeFevre, co-
chairman of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
The panel recently issued a draft proposal recommending
annual CT scans for high-risk current and former heavy
smokers — echoing advice from the American Cancer
Society. A final recommendation is pending, but LeFevre
said the panel had already assumed that screening might
lead to overdiagnosis.
“The more we bring public awareness of this, then the
more informed decisions might be when people decide to
screen or not,” LeFevre said. He called the study “a very
important contribution,” but said doctors will face a chal-
lenge in trying to explain the results to patients.
In testimonials, patients often say lung cancer screening
via CT scans cured them, but the study suggests that in
many cases, “we cured them of a disease we didn’t need to
find in the first place,” LeFevre said.
The study was published Monday in the journal JAMA
Internal Medicine.
More than 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with lung
cancer each year, and more than half of them die.
Worldwide, there are about 1.5 million lung cancer deaths
annually.
The new study is an analysis of data from the National
Lung Cancer Screening Trial — National Cancer Institute
research involving 53,452 people at high risk for lung can-
cer who were followed for about six years.
Half of them got three annual low-dose CT scans — a type
of X-ray that is much more sensitive than the ordinary vari-
ety — and half got three annual conventional chest X-rays.
During six years of follow-up, 1,089 lung cancers were
diagnosed in CT scan patients, versus 969 in those who got
chest X-rays.
That would suggest CT scans are finding many early cases
of lung cancer that may never advance to the point where
they could be spotted on an ordinary chest X-ray.
An earlier report on the study found that 320 patients
would need to get CT screening to prevent one lung cancer
death.
The new analysis suggests that for every 10 lives saved
by CT lung cancer screening, almost 14 people will have
been diagnosed with a lung cancer that would never have
caused any harm, said Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, the cancer soci-
ety’s deputy chief medical officer.
He said that is a higher rate of overdiagnosis than he
would have predicted, but that the study shows how much
understanding of cancer has evolved. Decades ago, “every
cancer was a bad cancer,” he said.
Now it’s known that certain cancers, including many
prostate cancers, grow so slowly that they never need treat-
ment.
Study says many lung cancer tumors prove harmless
“People have to understand
that we’re going to find some cancers
which if we’d never looked,we never would
have had to treat. ... it’s not something
that is commonly known with lung cancer.”
— Dr. Edward Patz, Jr., lead author
and a radiologist at Duke University Medical Center
HEALTH 19
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For months, the talk
was all about computer code. About
response times. About glitches and bugs.
People who didn’t know a URL from an
http were blithely expounding on software
snags and web design, thanks to the clunky
launch of healthcare.gov, the insurance
marketplace for the government’s big
health care overhaul.
With the website improving and tech
chatter settling down, the conversation
about the Affordable Care Act, or
“Obamacare,” is turning in other directions.
It’s about trust. It’s about big govern-
ment. It’s about politics. And, oh yeah, it’s
about your health care, too.
WOULD YOU BUY A
USED CAR FROM THIS MAN?
Or an agenda? The debate over President
Barack Obama’s health care law has gradual-
ly morphed into a broader discussion about
whether he is to be trust-
ed. It’s a critical question
for Obama, who could
always rely on strong rat-
ings on his leadership
and personal qualities,
even if people did not
agree with his policies.
It turned out that the
confidence he exuded
prior to the disastrous
launch of the health care exchanges was
misplaced. Then came revelations that,
despite Obama’s assurances that people
could keep their plans if they liked them,
millions of Americans faced insurance
policy cancellations. Now Republicans
are highlighting questions about
whether people will be able to keep their
doctors.
Obama has tried to head off the cancella-
tions by giving insurance companies more
flexibility. But Republicans have been only
too happy to pound him for broken promis-
es, and to insist that he knew all along what
would happen.
The debate has taken a toll on the presi-
dent’s credibility. A Quinnipiac University
survey of registered voters last month found
the share of Americans who thought Obama
was honest and trustworthy had fallen 10
percentage points over the fall, to just 44
percent.
The health care launch “turned out to have
moral dimensions as well as policy dimen-
sions,” says Robert Blendon, a Harvard
professor of health policy and political
analysis. Obama “really has to restore con-
fidence in himself. He’s got an agenda for
the rest of his term here.”
And Republicans will be sure to ask at
every turn why Americans should take the
president at his word on immigration
reform or budget policy or any other big
issue if he led them astray on health care.
THE BIG G
The struggle over Obama’s health care law
has reinvigorated a debate that’s been going
on for centuries and never seems to get set-
tled: the core question of what government
should or shouldn’t do for people, and how
it should spend their money.
For years now, Republicans have dis-
played remarkable message discipline in
zinging the Obama White House for creat-
ing a “government-centered health care
delivery system,” arguing that the matter
would be better left largely to private
forces. The failed website sign-up launch
generated a whole new round of head shak-
ing about government overreach.
Rep. Darrell Issa, the California
Republican who misses no opportunity to
investigate perceived shortcomings in the
overhaul, devoted a hearing last week to the
“limitations of Big Government” when it
comes to health care.
“By its very design, the federal govern-
ment may never be efficient or effective or
innovative enough to carry out big initia-
tives like Obamacare, nor should it be,” he
says.
It’s the antithesis of Obama’s yes-we-can
philosophy that government should step in
to ensure all Americans have the opportuni-
ty to thrive and succeed.
Health care debate has trust, politics themes
Barack Obama
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California’s health
insurance exchange has a backlog of
25,000 paper applications that must be
processed by Dec. 23 for the applicants to
get health insurance starting in the new
year.
Roy Kennedy, a spokesman for Covered
California, said Monday that all of the
applications are from insurance agents who
were unable to access the online portal in
the first few days after the exchange opened
on Oct. 1. He says the agency has added staff
to help.
Still, the California Association of Health
Underwriters says those workers are only
entering basic information, and insurance
agents are being asked to check the site sev-
eral times a day for clients whose applica-
tions need to be entered.
Covered California has backlog of 25K requests
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, DEC. 10
Affordable Care Act information
session for businesses. 10 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Comerica Bank, 1031 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Suite G. Foster City.
Presentation by Lanea Riley, Benefit
Experts Insurance Agency and Rich
Gettings, Paychex. Please RSVP at
www.benefitexperts.eventbrite.com
.
Holiday PJ Party. 5:30 p.m.
Serramonte Center. Open to all chil-
dren 12 and younger. For more infor-
mation contact shelbi@spinpr.com.
Architecture Lecture Series. 8 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. The lecture series
will feature leading pioneers in
architecture who have had a signifi-
cant impact on design and built
environment. For more information
call 522-7818.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 11
RSVP Deadline for San Mateo
County Newcomers Club Event:
Luncheon on Dec. 17. Noon.
Wedgewood Banquet Room, Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Bring
unwrapped toys. By Wednesday,
Dec. 11, $25 check must be sent to
Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline Drive,
San Mateo, CA, 94404. Janet can be
reached at 286-0688. For more infor-
mation call 477-2562.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Christmas Tours. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., South San Francisco.
For more information call 875-6988.
Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Join us for Xbox or Wii
gaming with Just Dance, Dance
Central, Kinect Sports, Super Smash
Bros and more. Ages 12 to 19. For
more information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Kids Club Holiday Pajama Party.
5:30 p.m. Serramonte Center, 3
Serramonte Center, Daly City.
Children are invited to join the
Serramonte Center Kids Club and
participate in this festive, holiday
pajama party including music,
games, crafts, dancing and more.
The Daniel Castro Band Hosts the
Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. The Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more informa-
tion go to rwcbluesjam.com.
THURSDAY, DEC. 12
Teen Study Night. 5:15 p.m. to 9
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. The library
will be open after hours for students
with private rooms, textbooks, white
boards and computers available for
use. Light snacks and refreshments
will be provided. For high school stu-
dents. Student ID required. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Third Annual Founder’s Event. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. B Street Station, 236 S.
B St., San Mateo. Celebrate this year’s
‘Support the Kid’ children and raise
funds. For more information contact
mario@supportthekid.org.
Holiday family music program,
‘Sherry and Hen House.’ 6:30 p.m.
to 7:45 p.m. Library Fireplace Room,
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Free. Refreshments will be
provided. For more information call
697-7607.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical.’
7:30 p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Notre Dame de Namur
University presents this perform-
ance for the 28th year. Free. For more
information go to www.christmas-
carolthegift.org.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
FRIDAY, DEC. 13
Hillsdale High School Chamber
Choir performance. 7:30 a.m. to
8:30 a.m. Wedgewood Banquet
Center at Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Course Drive,
Burlingame. $15. Includes breakfast.
For more information call 515-5891.
Annual Lego Holiday
Extravaganza. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Museum of American Heritage, 351
Homer Ave., Palo Alto. The Museum
of American Heritage (MOAH), The
Bay Area Lego User Group (BayLUG)
and Bay Area LegoTrain Club
(BayLTC) are co-hosting the 2013/14
LEGO Holiday display at MOAH.
Enjoy a variety of Lego creations
made by members of the club, fea-
turing train layouts, Bay Area land-
marks, castles, miniature cities, sculp-
tures and more. Admission is $2.
Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Hansel and Gretel. 9 a.m., 11 a.m.
and 7 p.m. Saratoga Civic Center,
13777 Fruitvale Ave., Saratoga. $10.
For more information go to
http://www.brownpapertickets.com
/event/381850.
The 29th Annual Juried Show.
Noon to 5 p.m. Runs Friday through
Monday until Jan. 10. For more infor-
mation call 726-6335.
Broadway Cheer. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Broadway Avenue, Burlingame.
Annual Broadway Cheer sponsored
by the Central County Fire
Department. Have your picture
taken with Santa and listen to carol-
ers.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical.’
7:30 p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Notre Dame de Namur
University presents this perform-
ance for the 28th year. Free. For more
information go to www.christmas-
carolthegift.org.
Foster City Monthly Social Dance.
7:30 p.m. Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd, Foster City.
$12. For more information call 571-
0836.
‘November’ by David Mamet. 8
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A hilarious-
ly biting commentary on the state of
the union, a politically incorrect
president in the death throes of his
failing re-election campaign and
some Thanksgiving turkey pardons
for sale. Contains adult language.
Tickets range from $15 to $30 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs Nov. 22
through Dec. 15. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2
p.m.
SATURDAY, DEC. 14
Harley Motorcycle Riders Escort
Santa to San Mateo Medical
Center. 10:30 a.m. Main Lobby of the
hospital, corner of 39th Avenue and
Edison Street, San Mateo. For more
information call 573-3935.
Annual Lego Holiday Extravaganza.
11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Museum of
American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave.,
Palo Alto. The Museum of American
Heritage, The Bay Area Lego User
Group (BayLUG) and Bay Area Lego
Train Club (BayLTC) are co-hosting
the Lego Holiday display at MOAH.
Enjoy a variety of Lego creations
made by members of the club, fea-
turing train layouts, Bay Area land-
marks, castles, miniature cities, sculp-
tures and more. Admission is $2.
Exhibit runs through Jan. 19 on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
Harley Farms Christmas Faire. 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Harley Farms, 205
North St., Pescadero. Shop hand-
made gifts and food, experience live
music and sample award-winning
goat cheese. Admission is free.
Continues Sunday. For more infor-
mation go to www.harleyfarms.com.
Christmas Tours. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Plymire-Schwarz House Museum,
519 Grand Ave., South San Francisco.
For more information call 875-6988.
Gingerbread House Making
Contest. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Menlo Park
Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo Park.
Free. Registration is required. For
more information email
atajar@plsinfo.org.
‘A Christmas Carol: The Musical.’ 2
p.m. 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Notre Dame de Namur University
presents this performance for the
28th year. Free. For more information
go to
www.christmascarolthegift.org.
PWC presents ‘Illuminate This
Night.’ 2:30 p.m. St. Mark’s Episcopal
Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto.
PWC will sing holiday music from
around the world. Premium tickets
are $35, general tickets are $30 and
students 18 and under are $10. To
get more information or purchase
tickets go to www.pwchorus.org or
call 327-3095.
Holiday Family Concert at San
Mateo Public Library to Feature
Musae, Women’s Vocal Ensemble.
3 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 522-7802.
Jeanne Barrett — Nature and Bay
Area Photo Exhibit Reception. 4
p.m. Reach and Teach, 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Meet the artist and
see some of her beautiful nature and
Bay Area photography. Family-
friendly. Free. For more information
call 759-3784.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
asserted that growing inequality is
“the defining challenge of our time,”
signaling that it will be a major
theme for Democrats in next year’s
elections.
“In this country, you don’t get any-
where without working hard,” said
James Lott, 28, a pharmacist in
Renton, Wash., who adds to his six-
figure salary by day-trading stocks.
The son of Nigerian immigrants, Lott
says he was able to get ahead by earn-
ing an advanced pharmacy degree. He
makes nearly $200,000 a year.
After growing up on food stamps,
Lott now splurges occasionally on
nicer restaurants, Hugo Boss shoes
and extended vacations to New
Orleans, Atlanta and parts of Latin
America. He believes government
should play a role in helping the dis-
advantaged. But he says the poor
should be encouraged to support
themselves, explaining that his sin-
gle mother rose out of hardship by
starting a day-care business in their
home.
The new research suggests that
affluent Americans are more numerous
than government data depict, encom-
passing 21 percent of working-age
adults for at least a year by the time
they turn 60. That proportion has
more than doubled since 1979.
Even outside periods of unusual
wealth, members of this group gener-
ally hover in the $100,000-plus
income range, keeping them in the
top 20 percent of earners.
At the same time, an increasing
polarization of low-wage work and
high-skill jobs has left middle-
income careers depleted.
“For many in this group, the
American dream is not dead. They
have reached affluence for parts of
their lives and see it as very attain-
able, even if the dream has become
more elusive for everyone else,” says
Mark Rank, a professor at
Washington University in St. Louis,
who calculated numbers on the afflu-
ent for a forthcoming book, “Chasing
the American Dream,” to be published
by the Oxford University Press.
As the fastest-growing group based
on take-home pay, the new rich tend
to enjoy better schools, employment
and gated communities, making it
easier to pass on their privilege to
their children.
Because their rising status comes at
a time when upward mobility in the
U.S. ranks lowest among wealthy
industrialized counties, the spending
attitudes of the new rich have implica-
tions for politics and policy. It’s now
become even harder for people at the
bottom to move up.
The group is more liberal than
lower-income groups on issues such
as abortion and gay marriage, accord-
ing to an analysis of General Social
Survey data by the AP-NORC Center
for Public Affairs Research. But when
it comes to money, their views aren’t
so open. They’re wary of any govern-
ment role in closing the income gap.
In Gallup polling in October, 60
percent of people making $90,000 or
more said average Americans already
had “plenty of opportunity” to get
ahead. Among those making less than
$48,000, the share was 48 percent
***
Sometimes referred to by marketers
as the “mass affluent,” the new rich
make up roughly 25 million U.S.
households and account for nearly 40
percent of total U.S. consumer spend-
i ng.
While paychecks shrank for most
Americans after the 2007-2009 reces-
sion, theirs held steady or edged high-
er. In 2012, the top 20 percent of U.S.
households took home a record 51
percent of the nation’s income. The
median income of this group is more
than $150,000.
Once concentrated in the old-money
enclaves of the Northeast, the new
rich are now spread across the U.S.,
mostly in bigger cities and their sub-
urbs. They include Washington, D.C.;
Boston, Los Angeles, New York, San
Francisco and Seattle. By race, whites
are three times more likely to reach
affluence than nonwhites.
Paul F. Nunes, managing director at
Accenture’s Institute for High
Performance and Research, calls this
group “the new power brokers of con-
sumption.” Because they spend just
60 percent of their before-tax income,
often setting the rest aside for retire-
ment or investing, he says their
capacity to spend more will be impor-
tant to a U.S. economic recovery.
In Miami, developers are betting
on a growing luxury market, build-
i ng hi gher-end malls featuring
Cartier, Armani and Louis Vuitton
and hoping to expand on South
Florida’s Bal Harbour, a favored
hideaway of the rich.
“It’s not that I don’t have money.
It’s more like I don’t have time,” said
Deborah Sponder, 57, walking her
dog Ava recently along Miami’s blos-
soming Design District. She was
headed to one of her two art galleries
— this one between the Emilio Pucci
and Cartier stores and close to the
Louis Vuitton and Hermes storefronts.
But Sponder says she doesn’t con-
sider her income of $250,000 as
upper class, noting that she is paying
college tuition for her three children.
“Between rent, schooling and every-
thing — it comes in and goes out.”
The new rich’s influence will only
grow as middle-class families below
them struggle. The Federal Reserve
said Monday that the nation’s wealth
rose 2.6 percent from July through
September to $77.3 trillion, a record
high, boosted in part by a surgi ng
stock market. But the gains haven’t
been equally distributed; the wealthi-
est 10 percent of U.S. households
own about 80 percent of stocks.
***
Both Democrats and Republicans
are awakening to the political reali-
ties presented by this new demo-
graphic bubble.
Traditionally Republican, the group
makes up more than 1 in 4 voters and
is now more politically divided, bet-
ter educated and less white and male
than in the past, according to
Election Day exit polls dating to the
1970s.
Sixty-nine percent of upper-income
voters backed Republican Ronald
Reagan and his supply-side econom-
ics of tax cuts in 1984. By 2008,
Democrat Barack Obama had split
their vote evenly, 49-49.
In 2012, Obama lost the group,
with 54 percent backing Republican
Mitt Romney.
“For the Democrats’ part, tradition-
al economic populism is poorly suit-
ed for affluent professionals,” says
Alan Abramowitz, an Emory
University professor who specializes
in political polarization.
The new rich includes Robert Kane,
39, of Colorado Springs, Colo.
A former stockbroker who once
owned three houses and voted stead-
fastly Republican, Kane says he was
humbled after the 2008 financial
meltdown, which he says exposed
Wall Street’s excesses. Now a senior
vice president for a private equity firm
specializing in the marijuana busi-
ness, Kane says he’s concerned about
upward mobility for the poor and calls
wealthy politicians such as Romney
“out of touch.”
But Kane, now a registered inde-
pendent, draws the line when it comes
to higher taxes. “A dollar is best in
your hand rather than the govern-
ment’s,” he says.
Continued from page 1
NEWRICH
COMICS/GAMES
12-10-13
MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 “Ben-Hur” studio
4 Canine warning
7 Part of CPA
11 Lennon’s wife
12 Crawling with
14 Imperfection
15 Dakota region
17 Hindu royalty
18 Gym clothes
19 Evening star
21 Dessert cart item
22 Orange root
23 Gourmet appetizers
26 Tendons
29 Fall birthstone
30 Wrist bone
31 Sweetie-pie
33 Calif. clock setting
34 Air pollution
35 Stringed instrument
36 Make like Houdini
38 Situated
39 Kimono sash
40 Airline to Stockholm
41 Londoner’s wit
44 Most sensible
48 Indigo dye
49 Typical examples
51 Conceal
52 Cooked enough
53 Thurman of “Gattaca”
54 Grasping
55 Single no more
56 British title
DOWN
1 Rowdy crowds
2 What mice do
3 Fashion
4 Without charge
5 Washer cycle
6 Country addr.
7 Ski lodge type (hyph.)
8 Large family
9 Sugar source
10 Tease
13 Glimpsing
16 Jacket feature
20 Pre-Tina Turner
23 Burst
24 Vaulted recess
25 Makes lacework
26 Wild plum
27 Motives
28 Piqued
30 Called balls
32 Jarrett of NASCAR
34 The “elephant boy”
35 Lariat
37 Got less hot
38 Prepared a hook
40 Razorbacks
41 Big laugh (hyph.)
42 Academic inst.
43 Skirt length
45 Down under birds
46 Highway cruiser
47 Industrial giant
50 Loud noise
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2013
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — It’s a good
day to engage in activities that will improve your
surroundings and make you more comfortable at
home or work. Do your own research and make
decisions based on what you discover.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Move along at
your own speed. Refrain from letting anyone push
you into something that you have reservations
about. The less you leave unfinished, the better you
will feel about your future.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Issues involving
honesty or integrity are likely to arise. Speak
up and set anyone straight who may not fully
understand what you want or think. A judicious
compromise will help you avoid trouble.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Offer favors and
address issues concerning contracts, loans or
settlements. Getting together with someone from your
past will pay off. A change is heading your way.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Unpredictable behavior
can work for and against you. Stick to your usual means
and methods at work, but use the element of surprise
when socializing or taking part in physical activities.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Offer your skills to
someone you want to impress. Expanding your interests
and knowledge will also encourage new friendships or a
reconnection with someone from your past.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Empty promises are
likely. Take precautions and get what you want in
writing. Don’t be afraid to make an unexpected change
in your plans if it will help you achieve your aims.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Readdress a situation
that is constantly changing. Let go of the past to give
yourself the freedom to take advantage of a situation
that could improve your life.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Try new things, meet new
people and enjoy being a participant today. Don’t
let anyone dictate what you can and cannot do.
Jealousy could be behind a problem you have with
a colleague or family member.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Be proactive when
dealing with health or financial concerns. Changes
going on at home may not be to your liking at first,
but be patient. Self-improvement projects will
bring good results.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — If you face unexpected
situations with grace, dignity and sound common
sense, you will come out ahead. Don’t jump to
conclusions about a situation or make assumptions
about someone. Take one step at a time.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Do whatever it takes to
finish what you start. Dedication will count for much
when it comes to making an impression. Travel or
revisiting old friends or places will be eventful.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
ARE YOU CREATIVE, like to bake? Do
you enjoy working with the public? We
want you to come & talk to us! Looking
for FT/PT to work hard & have fun. We
will train you. Call Linda @ 235-0222 for
info/application.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CLUB SPORTS
COORDINATOR
$3000-$4400 monthly
BA/BS Recreation,
Sports Management
2 years related experience in recrea-
tion, intramural,
college club sports program
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:
http://www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/
CUSTOMER CONTACT -
OUTSIDE POSITION
FULL TIME/PART TIME
$15.62 per hour start
to $35 per hour
with bonuses
Full training and expenses
Mr. Connors (650)372-2810
110 Employment
DISH WASHER &PREP COOK
To apply, please call:512-653-1836
696 Laurel St, San Carlos,
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED -
\San Mateo. Cleaning, washing, prepare
for meal (no cooking), take care of whole
house. $20 per hour, 2-3 hours per day,
5pm-7pm. Send resume by mail: Attn:
Connie, 3130-3132 Diablo Ave, Hayward
CA 94545.
INSPECTOR / HOME -
DO YOU HAVE
A LADDER?
DRAW A DIAGRAM?
USE A TAPE MEASURE?
CAMERA?
Full training, to do inspections
for our 28 year old company.
Good pay. And expenses.
Mr. Inez, (650)372-2813
LANDSCAPING -
Part-time Landscapers needed. Three to
five days a week. Peninsula and Half
Moon Bay. Must have own transportation
Contact Ian @ 415-385-8861 or email
ian@flowerpowergardens.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
IN ACCORDANCE with the provi-
sions of commercial code 7209,
with these being unpaid storage
charges, notice is hereby given
that the household and personal
effects and/or business effects of:
Kathleen Murphy, Shirley Howard-
Johnson. Barbara Woods, and Lori
Stone, will be sold at Auction on
December 30, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
at AMS Relocation Inc., 1873 Roll-
ins Road, Burlingame, CA 94010.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258187
The following person is doing business
as: BiX Software US, 951 Mariners Is-
land Blvd , Ste 300, SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: CFOdecision, LLC 1712 Pio-
neer Ave, Ste 100, Cheyenne, WY
82001. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/06/2013.
/s/Dr. Nigel Alastair Geary, Pres./
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/20/13, 11/27/13, 12/04/13, 12/11/13).
23 Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
SOUTH BAYSIDE WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY
SAN MATEO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
NOTICE INVITING SEALED PROPOSALS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed proposals or bids will be publicly opened, examined and
announced on Friday, December 20, 2013 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM. by the Facility Opera-
tions Manager of the South Bayside Waste Management Authority, 610 Elm Street, Suite 202,
San Carlos, California, for THE SHOREWAY ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER – TRANSFER STA-
TION FLOOR RESURFACING.
All Contractors and Subcontractors shall be properly licensed by the Contractors State License
Board and possess the necessary license classifications for the work they perform under this
project.
Bidders and their subcontractors must possess a current City of San Carlos business license fol-
lowing the award of the Contract.
Bids may be delivered or mailed to the South Bayside Waste Management Authority’s office at
the above address.
Bid submittal shall include a complete description of the materials to be furnished, and methods
of installation, in sufficient detail to allow for evaluation for conformity with the requirements of the
Technical Provisions.
The principal items of work are the resurfacing of the concrete floor within the transfer station, us-
ing concrete and application methods described in the Technical Provisions to provide wear re-
sistance.
Work will be done and progressive payments made in cash in accordance with and as more par-
ticularly described in the plans and specifications therefore and Standard Specifications of the
City of San Carlos approved by the SBWMA Chair and on file in the office of the South Bayside
Waste Management Authority.
Bids must be accompanied by a Proposal guarantee amounting to ten percent of the bid as de-
scribed in the specifications. Said guarantee shall be forfeited to the Authority in case the bidder
depositing the same does not, within thirty (30) days after written notice that the contract has
been awarded to him (1) enter into a contract with the Authority and (2) furnish Performance and
Payment Bonds as described in the specifications.
The Authority reserves the privilege of rejecting any and all proposals or to waive any irregulari-
ties or informalities in any proposals or in the bidding.
No bidder may withdraw his proposal for a period of forty-five days after the date set for opening
of proposals.
Time of completion for this work is Thirty (60) Calendar Days.
The Authority has determined the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in
which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of work needed to execute the contract
to be as published by the State of California. Department of Industrial Relations, Division of La-
bor Statistics and Research, a copy of which is on file in the office of the City Engineer of the City
of San Carlos.
It shall be mandatory upon the Contractor to whom the contract is awarded and upon any sub-
contractor under him to pay not less than the said specified rates to all workmen employed by
them in the execution of the contract.
Plans and specifications, forms of proposals, bonds and contracts may be inspected or obtained
in person at the office of the South Bayside Waste Management Authority or by email request to
Hilary Gans at hgans@rethinkwaste.org. Company Name, contact name, full address and phone
number must accompany request.
For the South Bayside Waste Management Authority:
/s/ Cyndi Urman
Secretary to the Board of Directors of the SBWMA
Dated: December 6, 2013
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 525155
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME AND GENDER
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr Taione
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr
Taione filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name and Gender as
follows:
Present name: Fred Ahokava Afemui Jr
Taione
Propsed Name: Kathryn Christine Annal-
ette Taione
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 8,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/21/2013
(Published, 12/03/13, 12/10/2013,
12/17/2013, 12/24/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258646
The following person is doing business
as: Complete Carpet & Upholstery
Cleaners, 751 Laurel Street # 538, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: David M. Mercu-
rio, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN.
/s/ David Mercurio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13).
203 Public Notices
ÅCASE# CIV 525414
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
RåEDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Diana Kardash and Eugene Kardash
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Diana Kardash and Eugene
Kardash filed a petition with this court for
a decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Uladzislau Kardash
Proposed Name: Vladislav Kardash
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 16,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/25/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/22/2013
(Published, 11/26/13, 12/03/2013,
12/10/2013, 12/17/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258548
The following person is doing business
as: The Best Care, 324 Capalpa Street
#114, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Loren-
za Ramos, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Lorenza V. Ramos/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258346
The following person is doing business
as: Fat Coda Studios, 126 Marbly Ave,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Joseph
Rayhbuck, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/Joseph Rayhbuck/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258522
The following person is doing business
as: K & K Beauty Salon, 108 W. 25th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:Yunlan
Hu, 2381 Sunny Vista Dr., San Jose, CA
95128. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN N/A.
/s/ Yunlan Hu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/19/13, 11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258538
The following person is doing business
as: Coaching for Couples, Relationship
Renaissance, 141 Wellesley Cresent
#205,Redwood City, CA 94962 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Doug-
las Rosestone and Olivia Rosestone,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by Co-Partners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Douglas Rosestone/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/26/13, 12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258713
The following person is doing business
as: Grand Partners, 800 El Camino Real,
Suite 180, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040
is hereby registered by the following
owner: California Partners, Inc., same
address. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN.
/s/Walter Gil /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/13, 12/13/13, 12/20/13, 12/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258503
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Chang & Chen Associates, 386
Convention Way, Redwood City, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Nam Chen Chang 214 La
Esprial ORINDA, CA 94563, 2) Fwei Mei
Chang 214 La Esprial, ORINDA, CA
94563, 3) Yung-Lin Chen, 35815 Mar-
shall Hutts Rd., Rio Hondo, TX 78583, 4)
Li-Chun Tai Chen, 35815 Marshall Huts
Rd., Rio Hondo, TX 78583, 5) Alan Ten-
lien Chen, 2240 Britannia Dr., San Ra-
mon, CA 94582, 6) Janemei Hsu Chan,
2240 Britannia Dr., San Ramon. CA
94582, 7) Tsung-Chi Lai, No. 42, Lane
225 Ming-Chu West Road, Taipei, Tai-
wan, TW 10374, 8) Lien-Chu Chen Lai,
No. 42, Lane 225 Ming-Chu West Road,
Taipei, Taiwan, TW 10374, 9) Kuo_Uan
Chen, No. 128, Da-Chu Street, Taipei,
Taiwan, TW 70055 10) Chuang-Yuh
Hwang, No. 128, Da-Chu Street, Taipei,
Taiwan, TW 70055. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN 06/01/2001.
/s/ Nam Chen Chang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258640
The following person is doing business
as: Julie Amber Publications, 120 W. 3rd
Ave., Apt. 107 SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Witold S. Kolankowski, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN .
/s/ Witold S. Kolankowski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/03/13, 12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258708
The following person is doing business
as: Yessir!, 1542 Jasmine Street, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Yessir!, LLC,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 06/20/2013.
/s/ Masahiro Miyata /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/10/13, 12/17/13, 12/24/13, 12/31/13).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: BC515508
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): Eugene Anthony Rah, an
Individual; and Does 1Through 10 inclu-
sive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo
esta demandando el demandante):
Garment Line, Inc.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
203 Public Notices
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
Los Angeles
111 North Hill St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
S. Young Lim, Esq., (SBN 126679)
Park & Lim
3530 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 1300
LOS ANGELES, CA 90010
(213)386-5595
Date: (Fecha) Jul. 17, 2013
John A. Clanke, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
December 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
210 Lost & Found
294 Baby Stuff
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 SOLD
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! (650)430-6556
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
(650)430-6556
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL REFRIGERATOR great for of-
fice or studio apartment . Good condition
$40.00 (650)504-6058
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 (650)591-3313
298 Collectibles
101 MINT Postage Stamps from Eu-
rope, Africa, Latin America. Pre 1941,
All different . $6.00, (650)787-8600
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 RARE Volumes of Lewis & Clark Expe-
dition publish 1903 Excellent condition,
$60 Both, OBO, SOLD
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
24
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., SOLD
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
MAHJONG SET 166 tiles in case good
condition $35.00 call 650-570-602
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA EXCAVATOR, two arms move,
articulated,only $22 (650)595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BOX FULL TOYS Original Pkg., 40’s -
50’s, $90 for all (650)365-3987
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 SOLD
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 SOLD
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
NIKON FG SLR body w 3 Vivitar zoom
lenses 28-70mm. 28-219 & 85-205, Ex-
cell Xond $ 99 (650)654-9252
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SAMSUNG, FLAT screenTV, 32” like
new! With Memorex DVD player, $185
(650)274-4337
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(SOLD
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 TWIN Mattresses - Like New - $35
each , OBO (650)515-2605
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINNING ROOM table with chairs excel-
lent condition like new. $99.00 (650)504-
6058
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50 SOLD
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $200 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $85
RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable
coast $600.00 sacrifice $80.00
(650)504-6058
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 SOLD
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 SOLD
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TOWER BOOK Shelf, white 72” tall x 13”
wide, $20 (650)591-3313
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
TWINE BED including frame good con-
dition $45.00 (650)504-6058
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANNING POTS, two 21 quart with lids,
$5 each. (650)322-2814
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GAS STOVE - Roper, Oven w 4 Burners,
good condition $95 (650)515-2605
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MONOPOLY GAME - rules, plastic real
estate, metal counters, all cards and pa-
per money $10 (650)574-3229
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, SOLD!
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CEMENT/ CONCRETE hand mixing box
Like New, metal $25 (650)368-0748
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
NEW 18VOLT Drill/Driver w/ light,
warranty, only $29.99 (650)595-3933
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
16 BOOKS on Histoy if WWII Excllent
condition $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BALANCING SANTA, Mint condition,
Santa rocks back/forth, 20 in high, sturdy
metal, snowman, chimney, $12.00
(650)578-9208
BLACK LEATHER Organizer, Unop-
ened, Any Year, Cell Holder, Wallet, Cal-
ender., In Box $12 (650)578-9208
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRIC IMPACT wrench sockets
case warranty $39.95 (650)595-3933
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FRONT LOADER, bucket & arm move,
articulated $12.50 (650)595-3933
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO-10"x10",
cooler includes 2 icepaks, 1 cooler pack
$20 (650)574-3229
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX BATH TOWELS(3) 26"x49",
watermelon color $15 (650)574-3229
MARTEX HAND TOWEL(5) 15"x28", wa-
termelon color $10 (650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN
black/gold/white floral on aqua $10
(650)574-3229
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
ACOUSTIC GUITAR no brand $65
(650)348-6428
FENDER BASSMAN 25 watt Bass am-
plifier. $50. 650-367-8146
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
K MANDOLIN - A Style, 1940’2 with
Case, $50 firm SOLD!
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
SOLD!
NEAPOLITAN MANDOLIN With case
sounds good $75 (650)348-6428
311 Musical Instruments
OLD USED Tube Amplifer, working con-
dition $25 SOLD!
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 SOLD!
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $10
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB LOUNGE exercise machine cost
$100. sell for $25. Call 650-570-6023
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
25 Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Says “I do” to
5 Harvest bundle
10 Bone below the
knee
14 Big name in skin
care
15 Sculpture
subjects
16 Jay with a column
in Popular
Mechanics
17 Smokes
19 Speak wildly
20 Dated song
21 Computer repair
pros
23 Fizzle out
24 2013 Literature
Nobelist Munro
26 Words sighed
after a defeat
28 Ice cream maker
Joseph
30 Cultural funding
gp.
31 Let loose, as pigs
32 Large group
34 Two-time Oscar-
winning director
Lee
35 Turkish general
38 Pop star
39 Fortuneteller’s
deck
41 Corp. moneymen
42 Sidewalk eatery
43 Suffix for a school
of thought
44 Chopper blades
46 Classic role for
Nimoy
48 Highchair
protection
49 Be a fink
50 “Zip it!”
52 “Aida,” for one
54 Sewn edge
55 Catches in a
sting
58 Until now
61 Poor box deposit
63 “Tell me about it”
65 Kennel pest
66 “You’ve Got Mail”
co-screenwriter
Ephron
67 Complete failure
68 Civil suit cause
69 Philosophy test
component
70 Shade trees
DOWN
1 Home of the
Texas Sports Hall
of Fame
2 Villainous
3 Sultry stretch
4 Slow mollusk
5 Fr. holy woman
6 Drink with dim
sum
7 Art Deco artist
8 “Be there in __”
9 Vacation with
worms?
10 Nikon product, for
short
11 Destined for one’s
comeuppance ...
or what the last
words of 3-, 9-
and 25-Down are
doing?
12 Navel type
13 Well-known
18 Queen, in
Quebec
22 Additive sold at
Pep Boys
25 Slogan on a
Boston
basketball fan’s
shirt
27 Flinch, say
28 Long heroic poem
29 Pop, to baby
31 One, for Juan
33 Got some
shuteye
34 Pitcher’s asset
36 Jewish wedding
dance
37 Lead-in for prof.
or D.A.
40 Show curiosity
45 More than
heavyset
47 Not at home
48 __ and
Herzegovina
50 Golf club part
51 Greeting word
53 John who married
Pocahontas
56 Top pilots
57 Buds
59 Molecule part
60 Crunch count
62 Used a chair
64 Boxing’s Sugar
__ Leonard
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
12/10/13
12/10/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
LOOKING TO PURCHASE A TOTAL
GYM Price Negotible. Please call
(650)283-6997
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
SMALL TRAMPOLINE $5.00 call 650-
570-6023
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. SOLD
318 Sports Equipment
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $45., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
GAS ENGINE String Trimmer - Homelite
- 25cc engine. Excellent Cond.$70
(650)654-9252
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
2 WALKABOUT ROLLATORS 4
Wheeled Rollators, hand brakes, seats
back rest, folds for storage, transport.
$50 each SOLD!
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
ELECTRIC HOSPITAL Bed, variable
pressure mattress $900, (650)348-0718
INVERSION TABLE relieves pressure
on back. Cost $100.00 sell for $25.
(650)570-6023
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
PATIENT LIFT with heavy duty sling,
$450 (650)348-0718
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
studios and 1 bedrooms, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)592-1271
REDWOOD CITY 1 bedroom apartment
$1350. month, $1000 deposit, close to
Downtown RWC, Absolutely no animals.
Call (650)361-1200
SAN MATEO Complete remodeled 2
bdrm 1 bath. Includes parking spot.. Wa-
ter and garbage paid. . $2500/month +
dep. 6503025523
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,900 OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2,400 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
GMV ‘03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 (415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services • General
Errands • Event Help
$65 Holiday Special,
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
GUTTERS AND ROOF
REPAIR
• New Installation seamless,
• Cleaning and Screening,
• Commercial and Residential
Power Washing
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
27 Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
28
Tuesday • Dec. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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