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Vol. 157 • No. 12 • December 2013

Top Plants: Five Exemplary
Renewable Plants
BUYERS’ GUIDE 2014
Integrating Renewables in
China
Using SCR Catalysts for
Mercury Co-benefits
PV Modules Cast a Shadow
over CSP
Achieving Zero Liquid Discharge
When a public utility client needed upgrades to the
FGD effluent system at a coal plant, Tisha Scroggin
and Don Schilling took a long, hard look at how it could
be done. Applying recent experience, the pair helped
the utility install a zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system
in less than 20 months. With a final cost of approximately
$45 million per 100 gpm treated, the ZLD
system eliminated a discharge point and
was completed on a schedule that defied
industry norms. In the long run, the
installation gave the utility cost and
regulatory certainty by removing future
needs for additional equipment.
WHERE WATER
and
POWER MEET
CUSTOMI ZED WATER SOLUTI ONS THAT FI T YOUR POWER PLANT
As a nationwide technical leader in ZLD system development,
Don has 40 years of experience consulting with utilities on the
water requirements for coal and other power plants. Tisha has led
the installation of ZLD systems for clients facing regulatory challenges to their
power plant water systems. They are two of our experienced professionals
who can help you identify the water alternative that fits:
Zero liquid discharge
Customized wastewater treatment and water management
Constructed wetlands
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E n g i n e e r i n g , A r c h i t e c t u r e , C o n s t r u c t i o n , E n v i r o n m e n t a l a n d C o n s u l t i n g S o l u t i o n s
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Professional, Technical &
Integrated Maintenance
Solutions for the Power Industry
Nuclear Fossil Renewables
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800.225.0385
Turbine Services
Valve Services
Instrumentation & Control
Specialty Welding
Radiation Protection
Engineering
Project Management
On the cover
Portugal has embraced renewable energy sources, principally wind and hydropower, be-
cause the country has no indigenous gas or oil resources. The national energy plan re-
quires construction of 10 new hydropower plants by 2020, which includes the recently
commissioned 259-MW Alqueva II, which doubled the pumped storage hydropower ca-
pacity of the facility. Courtesy: Alstom
COVER STORY: RENEWABLE TOP PLANTS
24 Alqueva II Pumped Storage Hydropower Plant, Alqueva, Portugal
It’s often been said that the key to greater integration of variable renewable genera-
tion on any major grid is energy storage. This fast-response renewable plant both
provides baseload power and stores backup power for the large amount of wind
power located in the south of Portugal.
26 Macarthur Wind Farm, Victoria, Australia
Developing the largest wind farm in the Southern Hemisphere was logistically com-
plex, in part because it involved transporting the largest wind turbines ever erected
in Australia. The project also was the first to purchase the Vestas V112-3.0 MW wind
turbines.
30 Mesquite Solar 1, Maricopa County, Arizona
Power from this 150-MW photovoltaic plant is helping California meet its ambitious
renewable generation goals. It stands out not only for its size but also its use of
leading-edge components designed for the extremes of its desert setting.
32 Polaniec Green Unit, Polaniec, Poland
Across Europe, momentum is shifting from fossil fuels to renewables, and Poland
is no exception. That’s where you’ll find the world’s largest biomass-fired circulating
fluidized bed boiler, with a combination of renewable fuel, efficient design, and emis-
sions controls to deliver impressive results.
34 Shams 1, Madinat Zayed, United Arab Emirates
You might think a desert is an ideal location for solar power, but Masdar had to ad-
dress several challenges before bringing online the world’s largest concentrating
solar power plant (at the time it was commissioned). The lessons learned should
help future projects in the Middle East and elsewhere.
SPECIAL REPORT: RENEWABLES IN CHINA
36 A Plan for Optimizing Technologies to Support Variable Renewable Generation
in China
Between 2011 and 2015, China plans to install 75 GW of wind and solar capacity. Safely
and effectively integrating that enormous amount of variable generation into the grid
will require careful analysis and strategic deployment of appropriate technologies.
Established 1882 • Vol. 157 • No. 12 December 2013
24 26 34
2014
BUYERS’ GUIDE
2014
63
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|
December 2013 2
FEATURES
RENEWABLES
42 Photovoltaics Overshadow Concentrated Solar Power
Both concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic power are near “grid parity,”
yet CSP is far behind in total installed capacity. We look at what it would take for CSP
to maximize its technology advantages.
EMISSIONS
46 Optimized SCR Catalysts Maximize Mercury Removal Co-Benefits
A newly commercialized technology can help your plant develop a catalyst management
plan that delivers the required levels of mercury oxidation through existing equipment,
which can result in substantial cost savings over installing new equipment.
WORKFORCE TRAINING
50 Power Plant Training Simulators Explained
Faced with the dual challenges of less-experienced staff and leaner staffs, many
plants are considering the use of simulators. Before you choose between a motor-
cycle and a stretch limo, learn what various types of simulators can offer.
OFFSHORE WIND
52 A Wind Energy Plan That Fits America’s Resources
To date, offshore wind generation in the U.S. is somewhere on the horizon. One
technology developer makes the case that floating vertical axis wind turbines are
best suited for the job.
NUCLEAR
56 When It Comes to Nuclear Plants, Is Small Beautiful?
Though small modular reactors have their detractors, on balance, they appear to have
multiple advantages over the familiar large-scale plants—at least for U.S. developers.
EVENTS
59 Coal in Favor as Malaysia Increases Its Installed Capacity
Did you miss the Asian Sub-Bituminous Coal Users’ Group meeting? Here’s a run-
down of the main themes.
DEPARTMENTS
SPEAKING OF POWER
6 The When, Where, and Why of Energy Patents
GLOBAL MONITOR
8 Germany Raises Renewables Levy by 20%
8 Headway for Congo’s Long-Delayed 40-GW Inga Hydro Project
10 THE BIG PICTURE: Capturing Carbon
12 IEA: Wind Power Could Supply 18% of World’s Power by 2050
13 India Withdraws Tender for Chhattisgarh UMPP
14 Spain Inaugurates 2-GW Pumped Storage Facility
16 POWER Digest
FOCUS ON O&M
18 Preventing Failure of Elastomeric Expansion Joints in FGD Systems
LEGAL & REGULATORY
22 Federal-State Cooperation Is Needed in Transmission Project Development
By James K. Mitchell, Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
62 NEW PRODUCTS
COMMENTARY
128 Defining the Future: Time to Get Real
By Christoph Frei, secretary general, World Energy Council
Connect with POWER
If you like POWER magazine, follow us
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news and comments.

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December 2013 4
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Use true volumetrics to take stock of your
inventory costs. Contact Magnetrol
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the Money
Follow

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December 2013 6
SPEAKING OF POWER
The When, Where, and
Why of Energy Patents
N
ew research conducted by Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology
and Santa Fe Institute researchers
finds that the number of energy patents
is increasing faster than patents overall.
However, the trend lines are strikingly dif-
ferent for different energy technologies.
The results, published as “Determinants
of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy
Technologies,” included several surprises.
The researchers examined datasets includ-
ing more than 73,000 energy-related pat-
ents issued in more than 100 countries
between 1970 and 2009 and found that
the number of energy patents rose dramat-
ically over those four decades, especially
for solar and wind. In contrast, patents in-
volving fossil fuels increased only slightly
during the period studied, while filings in
nuclear technology were flat.
Money Plus Markets
The researchers found investment in alter-
native energy technologies surged during
the 1970s energy crises but was followed
by decades of little R&D investment when
oil prices fell. “The observed correlation
between total (public and private) R&D
and patenting in the US over the period of
1970–2003 suggested that this slowdown
in innovation was the direct result of dis-
investment in research,” they write.
However, more recently, something
changed. The researchers note that “The
empirical evidence points to a pronounced
increase in patenting in energy technolo-
gies over the last decade . . . despite tra-
ditional investment—private and public
R&D—not rising commensurately.” Clearly,
money isn’t the only driver of innovation.
Markets also play a role.
The team said the trends over time and
across technologies can only “be accounted
for by the combined effects of public invest-
ments in R&D and a fast rate of growth in
markets for these technologies.” So it should
come as no surprise that “Renewable energy
technologies—especially solar and wind—
are growing most rapidly while patenting
in nuclear fission has remained low despite
sustained high levels of public investment.”
So why not leave innovation up to mar-
kets alone? As the researchers found, ear-
ly-stage markets for new technology are
typically very small, so public R&D invest-
ments are needed to spur new approaches.
As markets develop, market growth, some-
times driven by public policy, attracts
investment. “Public R&D investments in
innovation and those driven by market ex-
pansion have effects that are multiplica-
tive, with each providing a base multiplier
for the other. Any public R&D investment
is highly leveraged by market driven in-
vestments as technologies develop to-
wards stage B, as is presently occurring
with several energy technologies such as
solar and wind.”
Fossil Sector Falling Behind
Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)
for power plants is one of those early-
stage markets. Although CCS has been
used commercially, its success to date (for
enhanced oil recovery) is highly location-
dependent. CCS for power plants is effec-
tively a new market.
As the researchers note, “It is important
to emphasize that the growth of markets
for low-carbon energy technologies, which
improve on an aspect of performance (car-
bon emissions) not commonly captured by
market price . . . has depended strongly
on public policy. We also note that poli-
cies are likely needed to fund research and
incentivize market growth further until
these technologies become cost-compet-
itive and can take off on their own.”
Without innovation for CCS, the outlook
for fossil-fueled generation is bleak, and
not just in the U.S. In late October, the
U.S. Treasury Department declared the na-
tion would no longer support multilateral
development bank funding for new over-
seas coal projects—unless they employ
CCS. Meanwhile, a report issued earlier in
October by the Global CCS Institute found
that progress toward large-scale CCS has
stalled, particularly for projects involving
power generation (see p. 10).
Even a major lobbying group, the World
Coal Association, has called for the devel-
opment of CCS to enable the future use of
coal. So why has CCS R&D been so slow?
The Global CCS Institute blames weak
policy support: “Without sufficient policy
incentives to attract private funding, it is
difficult to create the economic or market
conditions required for broad-based CCS
demonstration (and deployment).”
U.S. Is Not No. 1
Why should you care what patents are filed
and where? Because, as the study authors
note, “Patents provide an unparalleled
measure of the location and intensity of in-
novative activity.” And when it comes to
energy-related patents, the U.S. is not in
the lead. Japan issued the most patents
for all energy technologies other than coal,
hydroelectric, biofuels, and natural gas over
the study period. China is now issuing the
most coal patents, surpassing both the U.S.
and Europe, and China is running a close
second to Japan for total wind patents.
However, those rankings don’t tell the
whole story. The researchers point out that
they approached their quantitative analy-
sis at a global level because “It is common
for a technology to be, for example, devel-
oped by a US firm, patented and manu-
factured in China, and sold and installed
in Europe.” Nevertheless, patent location
is an indication of where that intellectual
property is likely to be used, and the big-
gest market for new generation of all sorts
is clearly not in North America.
Remember, the researchers looked at
patent filings, not commercial technolo-
gies. But patents are often a leading in-
dicator of market growth or revitalization.
Without them, industries reinforce the
status quo and can eventually die. At the
very least, this study should show both
industry and government leaders what it
takes for any country hoping to capture
market share for tomorrow’s energy tech-
nologies. As the researchers noted, a dol-
lar invested today in R&D is likely to have
ripple effects far into the future. ■
—Gail Reitenbach, PhD is editor of
POWER. Follow her on Twitter @GailReit
and the editorial team @POWERmagazine.
© 2013 Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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December 2013 8
Germany Raises
Renewables Levy by 20%
Germany’s levy to promote renewables un-
der the 2008 Renewable Energy Act (EEG)
will climb to €0.624/kWh in 2014—a 20%
increase that represents nearly a fifth of
residential electricity bills. The measure an-
nounced by the country’s four transmission
system operators (TSOs), who independent-
ly determine the EEG surcharge, is already
under considerable political debate.
As RWE’s Sebastian Ackermann explains
it, because power produced by wind tur-
bines and photovoltaics is “much more
expensive” than power from conventional
power stations, “operators of these facili-
ties receive a subsidy for the energy they
feed into the grid, which is significantly
higher than market prices on the energy
exchange.” Rules for these subsidies are
outlined in the EEG Act, but that law also
outlines how much of the additional cost
incurred in generating renewable energy
is passed on to consumers. The EEG levy
is included in the electricity prices that
power companies charge their customers.
“These companies act as collection agen-
cies and pass on the money to the grid
operators,” explains Ackermann. “The grid
operators then use this money in its en-
tirety to pay for the energy from the [re-
newable power] producers.”
The latest increase in the EEG levy com-
pares to €0.131/kWh in 2009 and €0.528/
kWh in 2013. Next year, it will amount to
about €23.6 billion ($32 billion). Many
argue that it has successfully spurred the
increase of renewables in Germany (Figure
1), which is in the process of phasing out
nuclear power and has ambitions to pro-
duce 80% of its power from renewables
in 2050 compared to the current 23%. In
2011 alone, for example, the number of
renewable facilities connected to the grid
soared by 24%, while renewable energy
increased 16%. In October, the country’s
TSOs said forecasts showed another sig-
nificant increase of renewable generation
in the upcoming year, increasing from the
current 135 TWh to 150 TWh.
But the levy also means the average
German household currently pays €180
($242) per year to subsidize renewable
energy. Meanwhile, no upper limit on Ger-
many’s subsidies for renewables has been
set. Another sticking point is that the EEG
levy is nearly 25% higher for residential
and business consumers than for industri-
al users, though as Ackermann points out,
“The key reason for [these exceptions] is
the fear that energy-intensive companies
in Germany will move away, and take jobs
with them.”
However, Germany’s BDI industry fed-
eration, which represents about 100,000
companies, including Siemens AG, said
in a statement in October that re-elected
Chancellor Angela Merkel’s third-term gov-
ernment must “radically reform” the EEG
to tamp down industry costs, which are
straining energy-intensive sectors like
steelmakers. A recent BDI study predicts
electricity prices for big industrial cus-
tomers in Germany may grow on the back
of the EEG levy and increasing grid costs
from €90/MWh in 2012 to around €98/
kWh to €110/kWh in 2020. That compares
to a projected increase of just €48/MWh
to €54/MWh over the same period in the
U.S., when cheap shale gas is factored in.
The government has said it will amend
the EEG law once Merkel’s Christian Demo-
cratic bloc reaches an agreement with
another party to form a new coalition fol-
lowing the September elections. Members of
Germany’s Green Party, which championed
the nuclear phaseout and have rallied for re-
newables, say adding new wind turbines and
solar panels only account for 10% of the EEG
levy’s increase. They instead point to a fail-
ing power market and industry aid that has
been misappropriated by the government on
non-privileged electricity customers.
Headway for Congo’s
Long-Delayed 40-GW Inga
Hydro Project
Plans to build the $12 billion Inga 3
hydropower project may be finally com-
ing to fruition after a new energy treaty
signed by South Africa and Democratic
Republic of Congo (DRC) promised to give
the long-stalled project a credible power
purchaser.
The DRC has been seeking a develop-
ment group for the 4.8-GW project pro-
posed on the Congo River—the third
largest river in the world by volume of wa-
ter discharged—and bidders have appar-
ently been forthcoming. So far bid groups
for the projects include China Three Gorges
Corp. and Sinohydro Corp; a consortium of
South Korean companies POSCO and Dae-
woo Corp. and Canada’s SNC-Lavalin Group;
1. New coal. Germany’s increasing output of renewables, incentivized by a levy that will
jump 20% next year, has prompted an electricity glut that has caused wholesale power prices
to plummet 60% since their 2008 peak. This December, three coal plants are expected to come
online, built by GDF Suez, Trianel, and Steag. RWE is building two new hard coal–fired units
(shown here) with a total capacity of 1,600 MW at its existing Hamm power plant site in West-
phalia. Courtesy: RWE
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 9
and Spain’s Actividades de Construccion y
Servicios SA and Eurofinsa Group. But the
DRC is still open to other investors and
has said it could make its decision in June
or July next year.
That means construction of Inga 3,
which would be the first of eight mas-
sive units comprising the ambitious
40-GW Grand Inga project, may begin
in October 2015 and be completed by
2020. That $80 billion project would re-
quire 66 square miles around the Congo
River to be flooded to create what could
become the largest source of hydropower
in the world.
Two existing dams—Inga 1 and Inga 2
(Figure 2)—have already been operating
on the Congo River for more than three
decades, but they are dilapidated and
underperform at around 50% of capacity.
Internationally backed efforts to refurbish
those plants are underway, but even these
more modest projects have been plagued
by years of delay. By June 2013, three out
of six turbines in Inga I had been reha-
bilitated and one had been replaced. The
other two turbines were scheduled for
completion by the end of 2013. Five of
Inga 2’s eight turbines were working, and
the other three are scheduled to be refur-
bished by the end of 2015.
While feasibility studies for the Inga 3
project have been carried out (financed
by the African Development Bank), no
power purchasers emerged until the DRC’s
October treaty with South Africa, which
guarantees 2,500 MW from the project
for South Africa’s power-strapped state-
owned utility Eskom. Under the treaty,
the DRC will build nearly 1,841 kilometers
(km) of transmission lines to its border
with Zambia, and South Africa will install
1,540 km of lines from Zambia through
Zimbabwe. The DRC has meanwhile said it
will provide 1,300 MW from Inga 3 to the
country’s lucrative but energy-short cop-
per mining industries in Katanga prov-
ince. The remainder is expected to power
the DRC. Of the country’s population of
70 million, only 9% have electricity.
Observers still express reservations
about the project’s completion, however,
owing to the DRC’s political volatility. The
country is emerging from a long period of
conflict and mismanagement, though in
2011—for the first time in more than four
decades—it was able to organize back-to-
back multiparty presidential and parlia-
mentary elections.
Then there are cost concerns: Esti-
mates to refurbish the Inga 1 and Inga
2 projects alone were recently expanded
from $226.7 million to $460.2 million.
Meanwhile, the World Bank is reviewing
an aid request from the DRC’s Ministry
of Energy for $73 million of the Inga 3’s
$12 billion total project cost. It optimis-
tically says in affiliated documents that
the hydropower potential of the 40-GW
Inga project would make it the largest
and “most cost-effective” hydroelectric
2. Getting the ball rolling. The Democratic Republic of Congo is pushing on with a proj-
ect to build the 4.8-GW Inga 3 hydropower project on the Congo River. This image shows a 2004
view of the 351-MW Inga 1 dam, with the feeding canal for 1,424-MW Inga 2 in the foreground.
Source: Alaindg/Commons
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|
December 2013 10
THE BIG PICTURE: Capturing Carbon
Projects Canceled or
on Hold
Of 64 large-scale integrated projects to capture and store more than 25 million tonnes per year of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) that
are already active or planned worldwide, only 29 are dedicated to the power sector. Carbon capture and storage (CCS)
projects are operational in the gas processing and high-purity industries, but not in the power generation sector. The pace
of CCS development remains well below the level for CCS to make a substantial contribution to climate change mitigation,
says the Global CCS Institute. Its cause: not technical uncertainties but insufficient policy support “exacerbated by poor
public understanding of the technology.” Notes: “Molecules” are scaled to reflect size of CO
2
capture capacity; PC = post-com-
bustion capture; IGCC = integrated gasification combined cycle. Source: Global CCS Institute —Copy and artwork by Sonal
Patel, associate editor
Hydrogen Power (UAE):
Economics
Taylorville Energy Center (U.S.):
Economics
Since January 2012, the
number of active CCS
projects worldwide dropped
from 75 to 64 as projects,
mostly for power genera-
tion, were scrapped or
suspended.
Tenaska Trailblazer
Energy Center (U.S.):
Economics
Mongstad (Norway):
Economics, policy
Swan Hills Synfuels (Canada):
Economics
H
Maritsa (Bulgaria):
Economics
er (
mics mic
Cash Creek (U.S.):
Economics
PurGen One (U.S.):
Economics
Eemshaven (Netherlands): Policy
Pegasus Rotterdam (Netherlands): Policy
3. Define Stage
1. Identify Stage
2. Evaluate Stage
4. Construct Stage
l
el
Bełchatów (Poland):
Economics
FutureGen 2.0,
(U.S., 2017) Oxyfuel
Hydrogen Energy California
(U.S., 2018), IGCC
NRG Energy Parish
(U.S., 2016), PC
OXYCFB 300 Compostilla
(Spain, 2018), Oxyfuel
Porto Tolle
(Spain, 2020), PC
Sinopec Shengli Oil Field
(China, 2015), PC
Rotterdam Opslag en Afvang
(Netherlands, 2017), PC
Texas Clean Energy
(U.S., 2017), IGCC
Don Valley
(UK, 2018), IGCC
Datang Daqing CCS
(China, 2018), Oxyfuel
Dongguan Taiyangzhou
(China, 2019), IGCC
Industrikraft Möre AS
(Norway, 2018),PC
Korea-CCS 2
(S. Korea, 2019), N/A
Lianyungang
(China, 2019), IGCC
Shanxi International Energy
(China, 2018), Oxyfuel
Bow City Power
(Canada, 2019), PC
C.GEN North Killingholme
(UK, 2015) IGCC
Captain Clean Energy
(UK, 2018), IGCC Emirates Aluminium
(UAE, 2018), PC
Getica CCS
(Romania, 2016), PC
Huaneng GreenGen
(China, 2016), IGCC
Korea-CCS 1
(S. Korea, 2017), PC
Peterhead Gas
(UK, 2017), PC
Surat Basin
(Australia, 2022), PC
Quintana South Heart
(U.S., 2017), IGCC
Teesside Low Carbon
(UK, 2018), IGCC
White Rose CCS
(UK, 2016), Oxyfuel
Boundary Dam, (Saskatchewan,
Canada, 2014), PC
Kemper County (Miss., U.S.,
2014), IGCC
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|
December 2013 12
site in the world. And though it notes that “heavy engagement”
in the electricity sector through two regional energy projects
yielded “limited results,” significant progress has been made in
recent months on the institutional front, including strengthen-
ing governance within the DRC’s National Electricity Co.
IEA: Wind Power Could Supply 18% of
World’s Power by 2050
Up to 18% of the world’s electricity could be generated with wind
energy by 2050, but the massive jump from 2.6% today would
require the nearly 300 GW of current wind capacity worldwide to
increase eight- to tenfold and cost nearly $150 billion a year, the
International Energy Agency (IEA) said in an updated assessment
of the world’s wind power.
The Paris-based autonomous energy agency now sees a much
larger penetration of wind power than the 12% by 2050 share
forecast in its previous 2009 edition of the “Technology Road-
map: Wind Energy.” Forecasts put China as the world’s future wind
power leader, overtaking European members of the Organisation
for Economic Co-operation and Development by about 2020 or
2025, with the U.S. ranked third.
But IEA Executive Director Maria van der Hoeven cautioned
that much more remains to be done before that increased share
of wind is achieved, so that a global energy-related carbon
dioxide target of 50% below current levels can be reached by
2050. “There is a continuing need for improved technology,”
she said. “Increasing levels of low-cost wind still require pre-
dictable, supportive regulatory environments, and appropriate
market designs. The challenges of integrating higher levels of
variable wind power into the grid must be tackled. And for
offshore wind—still at the early stages of the deployment jour-
ney—much remains to be done to develop appropriate large-
scale systems and to reduce costs.”
Since 2008, the report notes, wind power deployment has
more than doubled on the back of technological develop-
ments that have boosted energy yields and reduced operation
and maintenance costs. Today, wind power provides 30% of
Denmark’s total generation, 20% of Portugal’s, and 18% of
Spain’s. The report finds that wind power has only received 2%
of the world’s public energy research and development fund-
ing. Yet, costs have fallen: Land-based wind power generation
costs range from $60/MWh to $130/MWh at most sites, and
it can be competitive “where wind resources and financing
conditions are favorable,” the IEA says, but “it still requires
support in most countries.”
Trends in the world’s wind sector noted by the agency
include the large-scale deployment of offshore wind farms
(though the IEA points out this is limited mostly to Europe),
an increasing number of turbines being installed in cold cli-
mates, and a rise in repowering old wind turbines with more
modern and productive equipment. Repowering in particular is
slated to grow tremendously over the next five years, increas-
ing power generation at repowered sites from 1.5 TWh to 8.2
TWh by 2020.
Wind market shares have also seen dramatic changes over
the last five years, though most wind turbine manufacturers
are concentrated in six countries: the U.S., Denmark, Ger-
many, Spain, India, and China. China’s six largest wind com-
panies alone have exceeded the majority 20% market share
in recent years.
Technologically, a general trend in turbine design has been
to increase the height of the tower and the length of the
blades. “This decrease in the specific power, or ratio of capacity
over swept area, has pushed up capacity factors considerably
for the same wind speeds,” says the IEA. The average rated
capacity of land-based wind turbines has also increased from
1.6 MW in 2008 to 1.8 MW in 2012, while for offshore turbines,
it has grown to 4 MW in 2012, versus 3 MW in 2008 (Figure 3).
Otherwise, the sector is also seeing more development of rotors
designed for lower wind speeds. Focus is also being placed on
grid compatibility, acoustic emissions, visual appearance, and
suitability for site conditions.
3. Growing giants. According to the International Energy Agen-
cy, the size of wind turbines has continued to increase. The average
rated capacity of new grid-connected onshore turbines in 2012 was
1.8 MW, compared to 1.6 MW in 2008, though the largest commercial
wind turbine available today is 7.5 MW, with a rotor diameter of 127
meters. Offshore turbine sizes have grown from 3 MW to 4 MW in
2012. However, turbines with a rated capacity ranging from 1.5 MW to
2.5 MW still make up the largest market segment. Source: EWEA
17 m
75 kW
30 m
300 kW
50 m
750 kW
70 m
1,500 kW
80 m
1,800 kW
100 m
3,000 kW
126 m
7,500 kW
Rotor Diameter (m)
Rating (kW)
1980 –
1990
1990 –
1995
1995 –
2000
2000 –
2005
2005 –
2010
2010 2011
H
u
b

h
e
i
g
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t

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|
POWER www.powermag.com 13
India Withdraws Tender for
Chhattisgarh UMPP
The Power Finance Corp. (PFC), India’s
nodal agency that conducts bidding for
16 proposed Ultra-Mega Power Plants
(UMPPs)—coal projects of a 4,000-MW
scale to make power available at a mini-
mum cost—in October withdrew a key
tender inviting preliminary bids for the
Surguja project in the country’s central
state of Chhattisgarh.
Though no official information about
the withdrawal was made, Indian media
reported the process for invitation of
initial bids has suffered repeated de-
lays because coal blocks for the project
are located in dense forest area, which
the Ministry of Environment and Forest
have warned may cause environmental
damage if mined. The PFC in October,
however, issued requests for qualifica-
tion for Odisha and Tamil Nadu UMPPs,
projects that could be awarded in Febru-
ary 2014.
India in 2005 proposed 16 UMPPs in
various states, including Andhra Pradesh,
Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Jharkhand, Karna-
taka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Od-
isha, and Tamil Nadu. Only four projects
have so far been awarded. The first of
those projects, Tata Power’s Mundra UMPP
(a POWER 2013 Top Plant) fully went live
in March 2013, but its developer has been
hemorrhaging financially after new rules
rendered coal contracts between Tata
Power and Indonesian producers invalid.
The change forced the company to pro-
cure imported coal at an unprecedented
cost that increased 150% to 200% from
the start of the bid process.
Power sector investors have since ex-
pressed emphatic concerns about fuel
risks in coal-short India. To keep inves-
tors interested in the build, own, and
operate projects that the government
says are integral to reducing the na-
tion’s power demand-supply chasm (Fig-
ure 4), India’s power ministry in October
announced it had relaxed bidding norms
by halving capital cost requirements to
qualify for setting up UMPPs from 10%
of the overall project cost to 5%. It also
said it would consider costs incurred by
companies on projects that span seven
years, rather than five years, as previous
bids required.
Coal supply was assured for the Odisha
UMPP, the government said, and land and
water clearances had already been secured for
both the Odisha and Tamil Nadu projects.
4. Super thermal. India plans to tackle
chronic power shortages by boosting coal-
fired generation by 17,000 MW over the next
year. That will involve plants like NTPC’s 3-GW
Rihand Super Thermal Power Project in Uttar
Pradesh, whose sixth 500-MW unit was com-
missioned in October. The plant will power
northern and western states, including Delhi,
Punjab, and Haryana. Courtesy: NTPC
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|
December 2013 14
Spain Inaugurates 2-GW Pumped Storage
Facility
Europe’s largest pumped-storage power plant was inaugu-
rated this October in the Júcar River basin in Spain’s eastern
province of Valencia as Spanish utility Iberdrola commis-
sioned the final seven-year-long, 1.7-GW phase of the La
Muela project.
The La Muela pumped storage project has since 1989 stored
energy by pumping water from the Júcar River to an artificial
upper reservoir at a height of 500 meters (Figure 5). The €1.2
billion ($1.6 billion) Cortes-La Muela expansion begun in 2006
doubled the capacity of the existing facility, though as Jose
Navarro Torrijos, a senior industrial engineer at Iberdrola noted,
the ambitious project was not without difficulties in design and
construction. The project entailed installation of four Alstom-
supplied generator motors of 240 MVA/600 rpm, and a 840-m
long penstock at a 45-degree angle to improve performance—
all which proved to be an experience akin to “completing a
Master’s in hands-on knowledge of hydraulic technologies,” Tor-
rijos said.
Capable of generating about 5,000 GWh per year, the proj-
ect will prove essential for Spain, whose renewable power
production share jumped from 13% in 2007 to 27% in 2012.
The country has faced several challenges integrating the large
amount of renewables into real-time dispatch of its power
generation to meet power demand, and plans foresee the share
of renewables to reach 38% in the future. A recent government
report of renewable energy plans calls for the installation to
increase from the current 5,350 MW of pumped-storage capac-
ity to 6,300 MW by 2015 and 8,800 MW by 2020. A number
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5. Pumping up capacity. Spanish utility Iberdrola this October
commissioned the final phase of a project that doubles the capacity
of the La Muela pumped storage facility in Spain’s eastern province
of Valencia. The 2-GW facility uses the Júcar River basin as a lower
reservoir and features a 840-meter-long penstock that was installed at
a 45-degree angle to improve performance. Courtesy: Iberdrola
Looking for Timely Industry News?
Our weekly POWERnews eletter sends a
short selection of the week’s top stories
to your inbox every Thursday. You’ll also
find the news stories as they are posted
throughout the week on our homepage,
www.powermag.com. While you’re there,
sign up to get POWERnews. Here are just a
few stories that ran in early November:
DOE to Fund 18 Research Projects to •
Drive Down Cost of Carbon Capture
V.C. Summer Unit 3 Nuclear Island •
Basemat Completed
With Coal on the Way Out, Ontario •
Turns to Renewables
Whitfield Goes on Offensive Versus EPA •
Senate Bills Kick Up New Efforts to •
Establish Federal Renewable Mandate
C
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P
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|
December 2013 16
of projects are already in the pipeline,
including Endesa’s Moralets II project, a
400-MW expansion of the existing Mo-
ralets pumped storage project on the
Noguera Ribagorzana River in northeast-
ern Spain that is expected to come on-
line in 2014. Iberdrola is spearheading
another 728-MW project in northwestern
Spain using the existing San Estaban re-
servior as the lower reservoir.
Some observers point out, however,
that the outlook for Spain’s renewables
remains murky after a 2010 policy turn-
around that sought to freeze unsustain-
able annual growth of the feed-in-tariff
deficits, which had built up to a stag-
gering $35 billion. In September, Spain’s
government admitted that despite power
price increases and ongoing reforms, tar-
iff deficits this year alone had soared to
about $4 billion.
POWER Digest
First Kundankulam Unit Synchronized
to Grid. The state-owned Nuclear Power
Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) on
Oct. 22 synchronized to the grid the first
of two units at the Kundankulam Nuclear
Power Project. Startup of the project in the
southern state of Tamil Nadu—twin VVER
reactors built by Russia’s Atomstroyex-
port—has been delayed by anti-nuclear
protests since it attained criticality in
July. The Kundankulam project is the
first pressurized water reactor belonging
to the light water reactor category in In-
dia, which has cultivated an indigenous
nuclear power sector for decades. At 1,000
MW, it is also the largest “single” power
generation project in the country.
Belarus Licenses Construction of
New Reactor. The Belarus Department
of Nuclear and Radiation Safety on
Sept. 13 issued a license for the con-
struction of the first of two Russian-
built reactors at the Ostrovets site in
the Grodno region. The Eastern Europe-
an country in October 2011 awarded a
main construction contract to Russia’s
Atomstroyexport, and later finalized
a $10 billion turnkey contract to Rus-
sian state nuclear enterprise Rosatom
for the supply of the two 1,200-MWe
AES-2006 reactors. The newly issued li-
cense means that full construction of
the project can begin. Completion of
the first reactor is expected in 2018,
with commissioning set for the second
unit in 2020.
Three CSP Units Opened. Aben-
goa SA in October opened its 280-MW
Solana parabolic trough plant near Gila
Bend, Ariz., as well as Solaben 1 and
Solaben 6, two 50-MW parabolic trough
plants in Extremadura, Spain. The So-
lana project is the first in the U.S. to
feature a thermal energy storage system
that can produce 6 hours of power even
if the sun is unavailable. Total invest-
ment of the plant is about $2 billion,
of which $1.45 billion was received as
a federal loan guarantee. The Solaben
units are part of a larger 200-MW Ex-
tremadura Solar Complex, one of the
largest in Europe.
Vietnam Nixes Major Hydro Proj-
ects on Environmental Concerns.
Vietnam’s government on Oct. 26 re-
vealed that it had approved the removal
of six potential large and 418 small
hydropower projects from the country’s
hydropower development master plan
because they were likely to cause nega-
tive environmental and social impacts.
It also suspended work on another 136
projects.
The decision means that the South-
east Asian country that is struggling to
meet surging power demand, and which
last year produced 44% of the nation’s
power with hydro, now has 815 hydro-
power projects in its national plan, in-
cluding 268 that are already operational
and 205 that are under construction.
Among major projects rejected are the
135-MW Dong Nai 6 and the 106 MW
Dong Nai 6A hydropower projects, which
were to be built on the Dong Nai River
where three other projects, the 180-MW
Dong Nai 3, the 340-MW Dong Nai 4,
and the 154-MW Dong Nai 5, are under
development.
GDF Suez Shutters 1.9-GW Gas
Plant for Demand Reasons. GDF Suez
on Oct. 18 said it would decommis-
sion and demolish the 1.9-GW Teesside
Power Station in the UK after review-
ing the nation’s future power market
and determining that the 1993-opened
combined cycle gas turbine plant was
unable to compete with newer, more
efficient technology. The French util-
ity group mothballed the power plant
earlier this year after running it at a
fraction of its capacity since 2009. GDF
Suez had already closed or mothballed
12 GW of gas-fired capacity across Eu-
rope. An estimated 51 GW of gas-fired
power has been shuttered across Europe
due to competition from renewables and
cheap coal imports.
Coal Plant 1-GW Expansion
Planned in Indonesia. The Japan
Bank for International Cooperation
and the Export-Import Bank of Korea
have agreed to extend loans to finance
a 1-GW coal-fired power plant expansion
at an existing 660-MW plant in Cirebon,
in Indonesia’s West Java province. The
plant is owned by Cirebon Electric
Power, which comprises several compa-
nies, including Marubeni Corp., Korea
Midland Power, Samtan, and Indika
Energy. The expansion is estimated to
cost $1.5 billion to $2 billion. ■
—Sonal Patel is a POWER associate edi-
tor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine).
What Blogger Ken Maize Did on His Fall
Vacation
A three-week cruise down the west coast of South
America provided rich material for one of Kennedy
Maize’s most interesting posts. Here’s a taste: “Wind
power has always struck me as one of those ‘horses-for-
courses’ technologies, well-suited for some situations
and not so much for others. It doesn’t really fit well for
much of the U.S., in my judgment. But wind makes a
lot of sense for Chile, for reasons related to geography,
geology, and meteorology.”
Read about Chile’s generation options (plus a few colorful
travelogue details) in “Chile’s High-Flying Wind Plan” in
the POWERBlog: powermag.com/blog/chiles-high-flying-
wind-plan/
Follow the maze to the end.
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December 2013 18
Preventing Failure of
Elastomeric Expansion
Joints in FGD Systems
Fossil-fuel-based power generation plants
with wet scrubbing systems use slurries
of sorbents to remove sulfur dioxide from
their emissions. These highly abrasive
slurries accelerate wear on the expansion
joints in plants’ piping systems, resulting
in failures and unplanned outages. These
failures and outages can be prevented and
the service life of the joints maximized by
taking into account key factors, such as
tube selection, arch design, and the use
of flow liners and controllers.
Sulfur dioxide is removed from power
plants’ flue gas using wet or dry desulfu-
rization systems. Wet systems, which use
alkaline chemical reagents including lime-
stone, lime, ammonia, and sodium, pose
the greatest potential for abrasive wear in
non-metallic joints. These reagents con-
vert sulfur dioxide into a liquid or solid
waste by-product, from which gypsum can
be extracted through oxidation.
Expansion joints (Figure 1) are flex-
ible connectors used to reduce vibra-
tion, dampen sound, and accommodate
movement in industrial piping systems
for pressurized fluids. These systems are
subject to movement from pressure or
vacuum, temperature gradients, equip-
ment vibration, their own weight, and
structural settlement. To compensate for
this movement, expansion joints are typi-
cally installed at the suction or discharge
side of pumps, and at directional changes
and long runs of piping.
Types of Expansion Joints
There are two primary types of expansion
joints—metal and non-metallic or elas-
tomeric. Metal expansion joints are con-
structed in a bellows configuration from
thin-gauge material designed to absorb
mechanical and thermal movement. Elas-
tomeric expansion joints, by contrast, are
fabricated from natural or synthetic rubber
and fabric. Consisting of an inner elasto-
meric tube fused to a metal-reinforced fab-
ric body and an elastomeric cover, these
types of expansion joints accommodate
greater pipe movement and provide more
abrasion resistance than metal joints.
A typical flue gas desulfurization
(FGD) system using a limestone reagent
operates in two stages—one for the re-
moval of fly ash and the other for the re-
moval of sulfur dioxide. Flue gas passes
through the fly ash removal phase and
then enters the sulfur dioxide removal
stage. Wet systems use expansion joints
in a number of locations, notably ab-
sorber bleed and slurry recycle pumps,
where they compensate for movement
and dampen vibration.
The majority of expansion joints in FGD
systems are elastomeric because of the
abrasive nature of the application. The
three basic components in this type of
joint are the tube, body, and cover (Fig-
ure 2). Consisting primarily of an elas-
tomeric material, the tube protects the
internal structure of the joint from the
media passing through it. Selection of the
tube material should be based on chemical
compatibility, temperature, and abrasive-
ness of the application.
Serving as the “backbone” of an elas-
tomeric joint, the body consists of combi-
nations of fabric and reinforcing metallic
rings. As with the tube, the body materials
must be able to withstand the temperature
and internal pressure of the system during
operation. The cover is similar to the tube,
but it protects the body from the external
rather than internal environment. As such,
it must be compatible with the surround-
ing environment, including chemicals and
temperature, as well as its location in the
system and the presence of nearby compo-
nents that can leak onto it.
Flow Liners
Flow liners are used in expansion joints to
combat the effects of abrasion. Abrasive
flows are frequently accompanied by sub-
stantial flow rates that can wreak havoc
on piping systems, including expansion
joints. Here they can wear away the elas-
tomeric tube material, exposing the body
to the potentially harmful media. Flow lin-
ers protect the surface of the tube by di-
recting the fluid media away from it, while
allowing the joint to move freely within
its capabilities.
It is important to understand the re-
lationship between the direction of flow
and the orientation of the flow liner, as it
can potentially harm the piping system.
In most FGD systems, the recycle pump
discharges vertically for recycling the
material further up the tower wall. This
gravity-opposing flow can recirculate and
build up behind the liner, rendering the
joint ineffective.
As noted, the primary criteria used
when selecting the proper type of ex-
pansion joint for a specific application
include size, operating temperature,
pressure, and media. However, consider-
ation also should be given to flow rate,
location in the system, and the use of
control units. Significant flow rates ac-
celerate abrasive wear; using filled-arch
joints reduce turbulence, improve flow
with minimal disruptions, and reduce the
potential for particle buildup.
Expansion joints also can be found on
the suction side of recycle pumps (Figure
3), where they are used in two configura-
tions. The first is a straight joint attached
to a reducing spool attached to a pump,
where a flow liner can be used in conjunc-
tion with a filled arch to protect it from
abrasive media. The second is a tapered
joint to replace the reducing spool. This
configuration prohibits the use of a flow
liner and requires tube material that can
1. Expansive benefits. Expansion
joints reduce vibration, dampen sound, and
accommodate movement in piping systems.
Courtesy: Garlock Sealing Technologies
2. Main parts. This cutaway shows the
tube (yellow), cover (gray), and body (black)
of an elastomeric expansion joint. Courtesy:
Garlock Sealing Technologies
Founded in 1988, PIC has been a leader in the
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CIRCLE 13 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 20
withstand significant wear.
It should be noted that custom drill
patterns and lateral offset from pipe
misalignment can also contribute to
premature failure of suction-side expan-
sion joints.
Unlike recycle pumps, absorber bleed
pumps generally have smaller I.D.s but
higher flow velocities and greater levels
of abrasive particulates. Again, vertically
oriented flows can eliminate the protec-
tion afforded by flow liners.
Troubleshooting
Proper pipe support is critical to the per-
formance of absorber bleed pumps, as
movements during operation can magnify
the effects of abrasion-induced fatigue
on the expansion joints. Therefore, mea-
surements should be made prior to initial
installation of an expansion joint and pe-
riodically during operation to detect any
potential offsets (Figure 4).
Unlike metal expansion joints, elasto-
meric joints exhibit visible signs of wear
and fatigue that can alert observant us-
ers to potential failures. The indications
include exterior cracking, blistering, de-
formation and delamination, exposure of
metal or fabric reinforcement, ply separa-
tion of the cover, rubber deterioration, and
leakage. Signs of impending failure can be
seen in cracking at the base and soften-
ing of the joint, arch inversion, splitting
of the outer diameter of the flange, and
leakage at the flanges.
The failure modes can be attributed to a
variety of root causes, such as overextension
of the joint, chemical attack, excessive pres-
sure or vacuum, elevated temperatures, and
insufficient bolt load on the joint. Proper se-
lection of expansion joints and appropriate
preventative maintenance programs that in-
clude proactive troubleshooting and failure
analysis can result in significant savings by
reducing unplanned breakdowns and maxi-
mizing the life of non-metallic expansion
joints in FGD applications. ■
—Sherwin Damdar (sherwin.damdar@
garlock.com) is associate product manager
and Stephen Cramb (stephen.cramb@
garlock.com) is applications and product
engineer for expansion joints, Garlock
Sealing Technologies.
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CIRCLE 14 ON READER SERVICE CARD
3. In use. Expansion joints are used on
both the discharge and suction sides of re-
cycle pumps. Courtesy: Garlock Sealing Tech-
nologies
4. Measure twice, install once.
Measurements before and after installation
can detect potentially troublesome offsets.
Courtesy: Garlock Sealing Technologies
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CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 22
Federal-State Cooperation
Is Needed in Transmission
Project Development
James K. Mitchell
B
eginning with its landmark Order No. 888 in 1996, the
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has aggres-
sively pursued policies designed to foster planning and
construction of new transmission facilities, in order to support
expansion of competitive wholesale electricity markets. However,
as FERC has acknowledged, “there is longstanding state authority
over certain matters that are relevant to transmission planning
and expansion, such as matters relevant to siting, permitting
and construction.” FERC can best achieve its goal of enhancing
competition through construction of new facilities if plans for
construction of such facilities are developed with due regard for
applicable state requirements.
Transmission Planning and FERC Order No. 1000
Each transmission provider is required to include in its Open Ac-
cess Transmission Tariff (OATT) provisions for engaging in a co-
ordinated, open, and transparent transmission planning process
with affected stakeholders. FERC Order No. 1000, which was is-
sued in July 2011, also obligates each transmission provider to
participate with its neighbors in coordinated regional transmis-
sion planning. This process is intended to evaluate “transmission
solutions that might meet the needs of the transmission planning
region more efficiently or cost-effectively than solutions identi-
fied by individual public utility transmission providers in their
local transmission planning process.”
FERC policy assumes that the regional transmission planning
process will be enhanced if new, non-utility affiliated transmis-
sion developers are encouraged to submit proposals for meet-
ing regional transmission needs. There is little incentive for such
developers to incur the costs of participation unless they can
reasonably expect that they will be designated to construct the
facilities should their proposal be adopted. Order No. 1000 there-
fore required each transmission provider to remove from its OATT
any provision giving the incumbent transmission provider a right-
of-first-refusal to construct transmission facilities in a regional
transmission plan, subject to certain limitations.
FERC has recently interpreted this provision to require dele-
tion of references in OATTs to the need for compliance with state
laws. For example, FERC ordered PJM Interconnection to remove
language giving the incumbent transmission owner a preference
to build a transmission project in any instance “required by state
law, regulation or administrative order with regard to [transmis-
sion] enhancements or expansions … located within that state.”
In FERC’s view, this provision contravened the ban in Order No.
1000 on rights-of-first-refusal. In another case, FERC ruled that
the transmission provider could not condition its acceptance of
a proposed transmission project in a regional transmission plan
on approval of the project by all of the relevant state regulatory
authorities by a specified date.
State Laws Cannot Be Ignored
State laws may establish minimum qualifications that must
be met by transmission line developers before they may build
transmission facilities within a state. FERC Commissioner Tony
Clark has therefore questioned the wisdom of rulings that may
cause state laws to be ignored. He has said that the failure of
a transmission provider to consider state laws when selecting a
project for inclusion in the regional transmission plan “would
require transmission providers to select a project … when it is
unclear whether [that project] will be able to secure the neces-
sary governmental approvals within the desired development
schedule,” or where the project “may have no legal possibility
of ever being built.”
FERC’s rulings have alienated the National Association of Reg-
ulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). NARUC has interpreted
FERC’s decisions as preempting state law over transmission sit-
ing and integrated resource planning, as well as reducing the
role of states in the transmission planning process from that
of a regulator with decision-making responsibilities to that of
mere stakeholders providing input. The NARUC Board of Directors
recently adopted a resolution concluding that “Order No. 1000,
as implemented, inappropriately infringes on State authority re-
served by Congress over integrated resource plans, generation
and transmission decisions, assurance of resource adequacy and
reliability, and authorization and construction of new facilities.”
State Concurrence with Transmission Plans Is Preferred
Regardless of whether an OATT explicitly provides for consid-
eration of applicable state laws governing transmission siting
and construction during the transmission planning process, such
state laws cannot be simply ignored. Logically, if state laws or
regulations may cause certain entities to be disqualified from
building new transmission facilities, it would be more efficient
for transmission providers to consider such laws when developing
a regional transmission expansion plan.
The likely consequence of a failure to do so may be delay
or rejection of desirable transmission projects. FERC’s ability to
achieve its goals will be enhanced if it allows transmission pro-
viders to consider state policies when evaluating proposals for
inclusion in a regional transmission plan and selecting transmis-
sion developers to construct each transmission project. ■
—James K. Mitchell (jamesmitchell@dwt.com) is a partner in
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP’s energy practice group in the firm’s
Washington, D.C., office.
CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 24
TOP PLANTS
Alqueva II Pumped Storage
Hydropower Plant,
Alqueva, Portugal
Owner/operator: Energias de Portugal
S
unny Portugal enjoys a climate much
like that of Southern California and
likewise has considerable wind re-
sources. Unlike California, Portugal has
virtually no indigenous fossil fuel resources
(some coal, but no gas or oil), which has
pressed the country to rapidly develop its
wealth of renewable resources.
Portugal’s success in converting an econo-
my largely based on imported fossil fuels for
electricity production to one based on renew-
able energy resources has been remarkable. In
2006, for example, fossil-fueled plants pro-
duced two-thirds of the country’s electricity
consumption (~38% using imported oil and
natural gas). Today, more than half its energy
comes from wind, solar, and hydropower, hav-
ing constructed the world’s largest solar farm,
Europe’s largest wind farm and an extensive
network of hydroelectric facilities.
In the Beginning
Portugal’s push for renewables began in 2000
when the government purchased all the utility-
owned transmission lines and formed a pub-
lically owned and traded company to operate
the system. The purpose of this very contro-
versial move was to encourage capital invest-
ment in upgrades and investment in smart grid
technologies, a precursor to integrating renew-
ables onto the grid. The plan also included a
national system of electric car charging sta-
tions. Since the acquisition, over $600 million
has been invested in grid upgrades.
Unfortunately, the country’s economic
malaise, punctuated by an International Mon-
etary Fund and European Union bailout in
May 2011 that required drastic public spend-
ing cuts, has undercut the rate of renewable
expansion in Portugal. The reduction in ener-
gy consumption (averaging –6% per year for
the past three years but down only 0.4% in
the first quarter of 2013) during the economic
downturn, combined with favorable weather
conditions for hydroelectric power, resulted
in Portugal’s renewable energy plants sup-
plying 70% of total consumption in the first
quarter of 2013, according the Portuguese
grid operator. For a few hours in late 2011,
the country’s entire electricity demand was
provided by renewable electricity.
The Alqueva hydropower plant is part of the
government’s program of exploiting the coun-
try’s sizable renewable hydropower potential.
By 2020, the government plans to construct 10
new dams with hydropower plants under the
National Programme of Dams with High Hy-
dropower Potential. Portugal’s official goal is to
produce 60% of its annual electricity demand by
2020 with renewable energy. The hydropower
capacity portion of the goal is 7,000 MW.
Courtesy: Alstom
European Union carbon emission limitations and a lack of indigenous fossil fuel
resources pushed Portugal in 2000 to embrace renewable energy. Today, Portugal
supplies over 50% of its annual electricity demand from renewable resources, an
increase of over 25% in the past five years alone. Leading Portugal’s renewable
energy transformation is Alqueva II, a new pumped storage hydropower plant that
supplies baseload electricity and backstops the large amount of variable wind gen-
eration in the south.
Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
TOP PLANTS
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 25
Portugal’s hydroelectric generating capac-
ity increased 300% over 2012 because several
important hydropower plants recently entered
service. One major contributor to Portugal’s
significant increase in hydroelectric electric-
ity production was the recent inauguration of
the Alqueva II pumped storage plant.
Construction of the Alqueva Dam, located
on the Guadiana River in southern Portugal,
was completed in 2002, and the reservoir
reached capacity in 2012. The Alqueva Dam
constitutes one of the largest dams and ar-
tificial lakes (250 km
²
) in Western Europe.
In addition to hydropower, the entire in-
frastructure provides agricultural irrigation
water and the regional water supply, includ-
ing a strategic water reserve during periods
of extended drought. The entire hydropower
plant is expected to produce up to 10 billion
kWh per year, enough power to supply the
surrounding towns of Evora, Beja, Portel,
Moura, and Vidigueira.
The 518-MW hydroelectric power station
was constructed in two phases. Phase I (259
MW) was commissioned in 2004. In 2008, to
meet the need for network regulation because
of the booming growth of wind power in
southern Portugal, Energia de Portugal (EDP)
decided to double the hydropower capability
of the Alqueva infrastructure. The Portuguese
Minister of Environment, Agriculture and
Sea, Assunção Cristas, commissioned 259-
MW Alqueva Phase II pumped-storage hy-
dropower plant in January 2013 (Figure 1).
Pumped storage plants use reversible
pump/turbines and motor/generators that
can be used in two modes: either to gener-
ate electricity by transferring water from an
upper reservoir to a lower one, or by storing
energy by pumping water back into the up-
per reservoir, where it is stored and reused
during peak electricity production hours.
Pumped storage can recover about 80% of
energy consumed in the overall energy cy-
cle. Pumped storage plants also have very
fast response to system load changes, which
is necessary when balancing system loads
dominated by unpredictable wind energy, as
is the case in southern Portugal.
“Alqueva II project was launched by EDP
to develop power production through the ef-
fective use of Portugal’s natural resources. The
successful completion of the Alqueva II hydro
power plant has proven once again Alstom’s
capacity to execute state-of-the-art pumped
storage power plants, and demonstrate our
strong relationship with EDP,” stated Angelo
Ramalho, president Alstom Portugal.
Project Features
In 2008, EDP signed a contract with Alstom
and its consortium partners EFACEC En-
genharia S.A. and SMM for the construction
of Phase II at a contract price of approxi-
mately €95 million (roughly $130 million).
Alstom delivered and installed two new
130-MW reversible pump/turbine-motor/
generator units and other hydro-mechan-
ical equipment for Phase II. In addition,
Alstom delivered ring gates, governing
systems, excitation systems, and a static
frequency converter and was responsible for
the transportation, supervision of erection,
and commissioning of the new units. Royal
Haskoning performed construction manage-
ment for the project. The entire plant is fore-
casted to run for approximately 2,100 hours
in turbine mode and approximately 1,900
hours in pumping mode every year.
Phase II doubled the output of the Phase
I project, but the new addition was not iden-
tical to the first. Operating experience from
Phase I plus advances in low-head design
and performance for increased turbine ef-
ficiency, nearly maintenance-free bearing
technology, and improved ring gate tech-
nology that reduces onsite construction
were integrated into the design of the new
addition.
Hydraulic Design Improved. The
Alqueva II hydraulic design improvements
were facilitated by advances in computer
modeling and computational fluid dynam-
ics technology, as well as the latest pump
turbine design processes. The new design
of the turbine produced an average 0.6%
increase in plant efficiency. Furthermore,
for Alqueva II, the new hydraulic design
adjusted the turbine performance curve to
maximize output in the expected range of
operation, especially at full load.
New Thrust Bearings. Reliability of the
bearing technology used in a hydropower
plant is crucial to the machine’s overall
reliability. The Alqueva pumped storage
plant has been equipped with Alstom’s
latest thrust bearing technology, which al-
lows equal load distribution on each pad,
regardless of frame deformation, shaft line
deflection, or misalignment in all operating
conditions. Alstom’s hydrodynamic thrust
bearings use a self-regulating mechanism
to carry the bearing pads. This approach
resulted in a shorter installation time plus
increased safety during operation and en-
hanced performance monitoring.
Improved Ring Gates. Pump/turbines
are usually protected by spherical or but-
terfly valves whose dimensions are often
too large for low-head pump turbines such
as at Alqueva. Ring gates are critical safety
equipment for hydropower plants because
they can shut off the flow of water to the
turbine. Alstom’s ring gates reduce the
construction work required for installation
while retaining the safety and operational
advantages of inlet valves. The ring gates
used for Alqueva II have a diameter of 8.27
m and are 15 cm thick, which makes them
among the largest ring gates ever deployed
in Western Europe. ■
—Dr. Robert Peltier, PE is POWER’s
consulting editor.
1. Renewable revolution. Portugal has made significant progress in transforming its
economy from reliance on fossil fuels to renewable energy, particularly wind and hydropower.
The Alqueva Phase II project added a second block of 259 MW pumped storage capability to
southern Portugal. The Alqueva Dam is one of the largest dams and artificial lakes in Western
Europe. Its pumped storage capability is particularly important given the large amount of wind
power present in the south. Courtesy: Alstom
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 26
TOP PLANTS
Macarthur Wind Farm,
Victoria, Australia
Owner/operator: AGL Energy/Malakoff Corporation Berhad
T
hough endowed with some of the world’s
largest coal resources, Australia—whose
southern coasts experience strong west-
erly winds called the “Roaring Forties”—also
has wind power as a natural choice. For cen-
turies, these powerful, largely unhampered
west-to-east air currents, which are caused
by a combination of air being displaced from
the Equator towards the South Pole and the
Earth’s rotation, helped speed ships sailing
from Europe to Australasia. Today, they fur-
nish hundreds of sites in South Australia with
wind speeds averaging 8 or even 9 meters
per second (m/s) at 50 meters (m) above the
ground—giving the nation wind power re-
sources that excel by world standards.
Yet the country’s wind power sector is
just getting started. At the end of 2012,
wind turbines with a total nameplate capac-
ity of 2,548 MW supplied more than 7,700
GWh, or 3.4%, of Australia’s overall elec-
tricity demand. Wind’s outlook is healthy:
The current renewable energy target (RET)
set by the Australian government requires
20%—or more than 45,000 GWh—of
the country’s total power generated to be
sourced from renewables by 2020, and at
least 19 GW of new wind projects are in
the pipeline.
Industry analysts forecast the growth of wind
power will be sustained despite the conserva-
tive Liberal Party’s sweep to power in the Sept.
7 election, which ended a six-year term led by
the largely wind-supportive Labor government.
Newly elected Prime Minister Tony Abbott has
pledged to repeal the year-old national carbon
tax of A$23 per metric ton of carbon dioxide
equivalent emissions that was expected to last
until July 2015, after which the country was to
transition to an emissions trading scheme. But
he has also pledged to shutter the publicly fund-
ed A$10 billion Clean Energy Finance Corp.
(CEFC), and press on with a biennial review
of the RET policy, begun in January 2010 and
next due for review in 2014.
Thinking Big
In this context, full completion last January
of the 420-MW Macarthur Wind Farm in
the southeastern state of Victoria, Australia’s
most noteworthy wind installation to date,
marked a tremendous milestone for the coun-
try’s fledgling sector.
More than 350 people were directly em-
ployed during the 30-month construction
of this A$1 billion project’s 140 wind tur-
bines near Hamilton, about 245 kilometers
(km) west of Melbourne—making it the larg-
est investment in Australian renewable energy
since the 1974-completed Snowy Mountains
Scheme, a hydroelectric project widely con-
sidered an engineering wonder.
Development of the Macarthur Wind Farm
was initiated in 2007 by AGL Energy Ltd.
(AGL) and its former 50:50 joint venture part-
ner Meridian Energy, which is based in New
Zealand. The project is now owned by AGL and
Malakoff Corporation Berhad. Though primar-
ily built by a consortium comprising Australian
infrastructure and mining firm Leighton Con-
tractors and Danish wind turbine maker Vestas,
a number of local suppliers also participated.
Keppel Prince Engineering, from Portland, Vic-
toria, for example, manufactured 80 of the 140
wind towers. The remaining 60 towers were
supplied by Adelaide-based RPG Australia.
But the project also necessitated an array of
other local resources, including materials from
nearby quarries and trucking companies, which
supplied crushed rock and other materials for the
85 kilometers of internal roads and other materi-
Fully commissioned in January 2013, the 420-MW Macarthur Wind Farm is the larg-
est wind farm in the Southern Hemisphere. But sourcing and erecting 140 wind
turbines for this massive project was logistically challenging and required a rethink
on several levels.
Sonal Patel
Courtesy: Vestas
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CIRCLE 17 ON READER SERVICE CARD
TOP PLANTS
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 28
als for the significant public road upgrades that
were undertaken by project developers to ease
transportation of a plethora of parts—including
blades, nacelles, and hubs—imported to the
Port of Portland from Denmark.
Siting and Procuring Permits
The Macarthur Wind Farm’s 140 turbines
are spread out across 5,500 hectares on three
near-flat farms owned by separate landown-
ers—a site chosen specifically because it has
“a productive wind regime” and average wind
speeds of about 7.6 m/s, says AGL. Those
are speeds that the U.S. National Renewable
Energy Laboratory would rank as class 5 or
higher, with class 3 or greater designated as
suitable for most utility-scale wind turbine
applications. AGL estimates the project’s ca-
pacity factor—the amount of power produced
per year divided by the amount of power that
would be produced if the wind turbines oper-
ated at full capacity all the time—is 35%.
However, the site also offers proximity to
a 500-kV transmission line for connection to
the state grid, and it has good road access to
the Port of Portland, from which most of its
imported heavy equipment was trucked in,
and where many of the wind turbine tower
sections were manufactured. Developers then
procured all necessary permits, including a
state planning permit that set strict noise lim-
its. Enforced by the Victoria State government,
the permit requires noise monitoring to be car-
ried out at specific neighboring buildings and
that the noise level from an operating wind
farm at any relevant nominated wind speed
cannot exceed the background noise before
the wind farm was built by more than 5 deci-
bels (dBA), or a level of 40 dBA, whichever
is greater. AGL has undertaken over 40,000
hours of noise monitoring, and according to
the company, noise loggers installed between
February and March 2013 for an objective as-
sessment confirm the wind farm remains com-
pliant with these strict limits.
Newly Launched Technology
Yet another remarkable consideration that qual-
ifies this project as a POWER Top Plant is that
the Macarthur Wind Farm uses the world’s first
purchased Vestas V112-3.0 MW wind turbine
model (Figure 1). The deal between the wind
turbine manufacturer and project developers
for 140 of the newly launched turbines was ce-
mented in August 2010, and it comprises a full
engineering, procurement, and construction
contract; a 10-year service agreement; and a
VestasOnline Business supervisory control and
data acquisition solution.
For AGL, the choice to use Vestas’ new
V112-3.0 MW was based on economics. It al-
lowed the company to increase the wind farm’s
capacity while reducing the number of towers
from 174 to 140, said AGL CEO and Manag-
ing Director Michael Fraser. “This reduces
the environmental footprint of the project and
achieves substantial operating cost savings in
excess of [A]$30 million over the [25-year]
life of the wind farm.” Former co-developer
Meridian Energy revealed that it did “extensive
due diligence” through site visits and technical
meetings to ensure the V112-3.0 MW platform
was “the right solution for the project.”
Clearing Hurdles
Finally, though it was “logistically complex,”
Vestas and Leighton Contractors delivered
the wind farm three months ahead of sched-
ule (see table).
As Vestas Construction Supervisor Gary
Barret recalled, “We would jump over one
hurdle and were confronted with another the
day after.” For one, the V112-3.0 MW turbine
is the biggest wind turbine ever to be installed
in Australia, and that brought about its own
challenges—and eventually even changed
the rules on inland oversized transport.
“Transporting the longest blades and the
heaviest nacelles required input from various
government and local authorities, with pub-
lic safety always at the forefront,” explained
Leighton Contractors Logistics Manager
Brendan Rowe. “No less than four separate
stakeholders were involved with every one
of the 1,120 oversized loads delivered to the
Macarthur Wind Farm site.”
Then, the project’s progress was almost
thwarted by flooding that inundated the region
during 2010–2011 because it significantly im-
pacted the ability to build roads, hardstands, and
foundations. “The excessive rainfall led to the re-
design of the road and hardstand construction, as
well as extensive dewatering of all excavations
until the end of the 2011 winter,” said David
Mawhinney, a project manager with Leighton
Contractors. “The wet weather also held up the
installation of the meteorological masts at the be-
ginning of the project. These are installed to col-
lect three months of wind data before the wind
turbines are erected. Consequently, we took the
unusual step of hiring a helicopter to pour the
masts’ concrete foundations.”
More to Come
For AGL, one of Australia’s largest private
owners and operators of renewable energy
assets, the now-completed Macarthur project
serves as a “base” on which to build a sustain-
able energy future. But while Meridian funded
its debt portion of the Macarthur investment
with an award-winning project finance agree-
ment, the company this June sold its interest
in the farm to Malakoff Corporation Berhad, a
Malaysian power generator and retailer.
According to Meridian Chief Executive
Mark Binns, the company’s investment was
intended to be held over the full-project term,
but a “low interest rate environment and the
opportunity to invest in further wind farms in
Australia provided a compelling reason to look
at a sale and the reinvestment of funds in future
renewable generation options in Australia.” ■
—Sonal Patel is a POWER associate edi-
tor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine).
1. The first buy. The V112-3.0 MW wind turbines installed at the Macarthur Wind Farm
were Danish wind turbine maker Vestas’ first sale of that turbine model (though not the first
installed in the world). About 1,120 heavy lifts were required to join the tower sections, nacelles,
hubs, and blades of the farm’s 140 turbines, each of which has a hub height of 85 meters (m)
above ground and a rotor diameter of 112 m. The wind farm, in a region with average wind
speeds of 7.6 m/s, has a capacity factor of 35%. Courtesy: AGL Energy
Date Milestone
August 2010 Contract signed
Mid-November 2010 Site established
August 2011 Erection of first tower started
October 2011 First turbines arrive
September 2012 First turbine commissioned
October 2012 140th tower erected
January 2013 140th turbine commissioned
April 2013 Wind farm officially opens
Table 1. Macarthur Wind Farm proj-
ect schedule. Source: Leighton Contractors
CIRCLE 18 ON READER SERVICE CARD
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 30
TOP PLANTS
Mesquite Solar 1, Maricopa
County, Arizona
Owners/operators: Sempra U.S. Gas & Power and Consolidated Edison Development
C
alifornia has been pursuing renewable
generation since enactment of its Re-
newable Portfolio Standard (RPS) in
2002, which had the goal of increasing re-
newable generation to 20% of the state’s elec-
tricity mix by 2017. That goal was codified in
2006. In the meantime, the 2003 Integrated
Energy Policy Report (IEPR) recommended
accelerating the schedule to 20% by 2010, a
plan that utilities were ill prepared to meet,
principally because of transmission limita-
tions. The following year, the 2004 IEPR
again recommended an update to the plan,
advancing the goal to 33% by 2020. Then-
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed
Executive Order S-14-08 in Nov. 2008 re-
quiring retail sellers of electricity to comply
with the new RPS standard. The RPS was
codified when Governor Edmund G. Brown,
Jr. signed SBX1-2 in April 2011. The RPS
standard applies to all publicly owned utili-
ties, investor-owned utilities (IOUs), elec-
tricity service providers, and community
choice aggregators.
There has been marked progress toward
the RPS goal during the past few years. As
of December 2012, California’s three large
IOUs reported that they serve 19.6% of their
2012 retail sales with RPS-eligible renewable
energy, slightly less than the compliance goal
of no less than 20%. Sempra Energy’s wholly
owned subsidiary San Diego Gas & Electric,
at 20.31%, was the only California IOU to
meet the 2011–2013 renewable energy goal.
Another 2,800 MW of renewable energy
is scheduled to enter service in California
during 2013, and more than 644 MW came
online in the first quarter of this year. At 150
MW, the largest of those new projects was
Sempra U.S. Gas & Power’s Mesquite Solar
1. Power from Mesquite Solar 1 is being sold
to California’s Pacific Gas & Electric under a
20-year-contract.
Solar Industry Leader
Sempra Energy, a Fortune 500 energy ser-
vices holding company, is the parent of proj-
ect developer Sempra U.S. Gas & Power (a
consolidation of Sempra Energy’s U.S. op-
erations outside of its California utilities,
completed in January 2012) and the regulat-
ed public utility San Diego Gas & Electric.
Sempra U.S. Gas & Power has a very strong
history among developers of utility-scale PV
projects, going back to the completion of the
company’s first solar energy project—the
10-MW El Dorado Solar PV plant in Boul-
der City, Nev. That plant was named a 2009
Top Plant winner for its well-designed inte-
gration with the adjacent El Dorado Energy
gas-fired combined cycle plant. I wrote at
the time, “El Dorado is Sempra Energy’s
first solar power generation project but will
likely not be its last.”
Indeed, POWER also named Sempra
U.S. Gas & Power’s Copper Mountain So-
lar 1, adjacent to the El Dorado facility,
a 2011 Top Plant. That plant entered ser-
vice in December 2010. At the time of the
award, the 48-MW plant was recognized as
“the largest photovoltaic plant in the U.S.”
Since then, the smaller plant has been in-
Courtesy: Sempra U.S. Gas & Power
Sempra U.S. Gas & Power’s jointly owned Mesquite Solar 1 project added 150 MW
of photovoltaic-generated electricity to the grid in January 2013, making it one of
the largest PV projects of its type in the country. Sempra U.S. Gas & Power’s long-
term plan is to expand the facility to 700 MW.
Dr. Robert Peltier, PE
TOP PLANTS
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 31
corporated into the larger one, now referred
to as the 58-MW Copper Mountain Solar
1. Today, the company is constructing two
additional phases of the project, Copper
Mountain Solar 2 and Copper Mountain
Solar 3, with 308 MW currently under
construction. Both projects are slated for
completion in 2015.
Sempra U.S. Gas & Power hits the POW-
ER award trifecta in 2013 with its jointly
owned Mesquite Solar 1 project. The 150-
MW facility was constructed on 920 acres
of a 4,000-acre site in Maricopa County,
Ariz., an hour and a half drive west of
Phoenix. Construction of the plant began
in June 2011. The first three blocks of so-
lar panels totaling 42 MW entered service
in late Dec 2011 with the remainder of the
150-MW first phase connecting to the grid
in late 2012. At that time, Mesquite Solar
1 became one of the largest PV projects
in the U.S., although that record was later
eclipsed by another installation. The plant
is expected to operate with an ~27% annual
capacity factor producing ~350 GWh per
year. A video describing the development
and construction of the project is available
at www.semprausgp.com/energy-solutions/
solar-mesquite-solar.html.
However, as you read above, bragging
rights are short-lived, because there always
seems to be a bigger PV project in the works.
Mesquite Solar will surely reacquire those
bragging rights, because early development to
expand the facility to a massive 700-MW PV
installation is ongoing. The PV facility is also
adjacent to Sempra U.S. Gas & Power’s joint-
ly owned 1,250-MW Mesquite Power Gen-
erating Station, a 4 x 2 gas-fired combined
cycle plant that was, as you may have guessed
by now, a POWER Top Plant in 2004.
The completion of Mesquite Solar 1 moves
Sempra U.S. Gas & Power closer to its goal
of investing in 1,850 MW of renewables to
its power generation portfolio by 2017. Since
announcing progressively increasing targets
starting in early 2011, the company along
with its strategic development partners has
installed, started construction on, or secured
long-term utility contracts for more than 800
MW of additional solar and wind capacity.
“We are pleased to continue the momen-
tum of our solar program with the comple-
tion of Mesquite Solar 1 and will now focus
on the development of the remaining 4,000-
acre complex,” said Jeffrey W. Martin, presi-
dent and chief executive officer of Sempra
U.S. Gas & Power. “This accomplishment
puts us solidly on track to own and operate
more than 1,000 megawatts of renewable en-
ergy capacity by the end of this year [2013].
We are excited about the future.”
Massive in Scale
The scale of Mesquite Solar 1 is, to say the
least, large. The 830,000 panels cover acreage
equivalent to 680 football fields (Figure 1).
Mesquite Solar 1 uses Suntech Power
Holdings Co. multi-crystalline solar pan-
els with Pluto cell technology that converts
sunlight into electricity at 20.3% efficiency.
Suntech, headquartered in China and the
world’s largest producer of PV panels, pro-
vided 830,000 polycrystalline solar modules
for the project. In fact, Mesquite Solar 1 is
located only about 30 miles from Suntech’s
former Goodyear, Ariz. manufacturing facil-
ity, which supplied a portion of the panels for
the plant.
Engineering, design, and construction
were handled by Zachry Holdings Inc., a fa-
miliar name in fossil-fueled power plant con-
struction. Zachry has diversified its project
portfolio to include renewable projects, such
as Mesquite Solar 1.
Inverters and transformers are normally
used to convert the direct current produced
by the PV panels into alternating current suit-
able for the grid. However, Mesquite Solar
1 is one of the first utility-scale PV sites to
use Advanced Energy’s AE 500NX inverter.
The inverter is modular in design and uses a
closed air-to-liquid cooling, a desirable fea-
ture for a plant located in the desert. Each
inverter handles up to 500 kW and does not
require an enclosure for cooling. Better still,
the advanced bipolar design does not require
a built-in transformer, yet makes the con-
version to 420 VAC at weighted efficiency
of 97.5% with a reliability >99%. The Ad-
vanced Energy inverters include reactive
power and power factor control features and
low-voltage ride-through capability.
Each Solaron inverter can handle up to
10 input feeds. Four Solaron inverters are
combined into an ~2 MW skid, which also
include a single 2-MW transformer, break-
ers, and a DCS cabinet. Multiple skids are
combined at the main facility transformer
where the voltage is increased to match
the grid voltage at the nearby Hassayampa
switchyard, a major energy hub for the
Southwest. Almost one million linear feet
of underground cable were used to inter-
connect the panels and inverters.
The panels are installed on Schletter’s
ground mount fixed-tilt system. Approxi-
mately 85,000 steel piers support the ground-
mount PV system, each embedded four feet
into the ground. The posts are galvanized
steel and the panel frames are aluminum.
Emerson supplied its Ovation distributed
control system to manage the plants con-
trol and monitoring functions. Fiber optic
cables interconnect the control room with
the switchgear and inverter skids.
Arizona may be the hub of solar electric-
ity development in the U.S. because of its
ample sunshine, but the California RPS and
other subsidies also play an important role
in developing these massive solar projects.
In September 2011, the Federal Financing
Bank provided a $337 million loan for the
development of the first phase of the $600
million Mesquite Solar 1 project. The U.S.
Department of Energy provided the loan
guarantee. ■
—Dr. Robert Peltier, PE is a consulting
editor for POWER.
1. Carpet the desert. Mesquite Solar 1 is a 150 MW solar power plant located about 70
miles west of Phoenix, Ariz. The facility’s 830,000 solar panels cover about 920 acres or 1.4
square miles. Courtesy: Sempra U.S. Gas & Power
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 32
TOP PLANTS
Polaniec Green Unit, Polaniec,
Poland
Owner/operator: GDF SUEZ Energy Poland
H
istorically, Poland has relied heav-
ily on coal for electricity generation.
International Energy Agency statis-
tics show that coal generation accounted for
86.5% of total electric power production in
2011. The Polaniec facility has been an im-
portant contributor to that total over the years.
The plant, built in the late 1970s, began with
eight 200-MW coal-fired units. Through an
upgrade process, all the units were increased
to 225 MW by 1995, giving the facility a total
capacity of 1.8 GW.
Like many other European Union mem-
bers, the Polish government has committed
to changing its energy strategy. The country
identified several areas of focus, including
improving efficiency, enhancing security,
introducing nuclear, developing competi-
tive markets, reducing environmental im-
pact, and increasing the use of renewable
energy sources.
On Nov. 10, 2009, Poland’s Council of
Ministers adopted a new energy policy con-
sistent with those goals. One of the objectives
of the policy was to increase the use of re-
newable energy sources in the country’s final
energy consumption to at least 15% by 2020
with further increases in the following years.
The Polaniec Green Unit provides a reliable
and consistent electricity supply, which sup-
ports that policy.
Bit by Bit a Shift to Biomass
Grzegorz Gorski, CEO of GDF SUEZ En-
ergy Poland has commented that “10 years
ago the idea was born, to do something bet-
ter for the environment and change the fuel
mix.” The plant began to slowly add bio-
mass to the blend, increasing the amount
almost every year. “It was a logical step to
make a fully dedicated unit,” he added in a
YouTube video.
So in 2007, the owners worked with
Tractebel Engineering to develop a feasi-
bility study. Recommendations were made
regarding the process and selection of cut-
ting, drying, and milling technologies. Sug-
gestions were based on safety aspects and
the capability to meet required particle size
distribution.
With this information in hand, the compa-
ny pressed forward, having Tractebel prepare
an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).
The EIA looked at the possible replacement
of one of Polaniec’s coal-fired boilers, Unit
8, with a new biomass-fired circulating flu-
idized bed (CFB) boiler. In April 2010, a
contract was signed with Foster Wheeler to
design and construct the new unit.
Biomass Boiler Design
The Foster Wheeler design allows a variety
of biomasses to be burned efficiently and still
meet tight environmental regulations. Foster
Wheeler’s Advanced Bio CFB (ABC) tech-
nology enables a mix of 80% wood and 20%
agricultural by-products to be used for fuel in
the Polaniec Green Unit.
Foster Wheeler considers its ABC tech-
nology to be state of the art for biomass
combustion. The ABC concept is the result
of continuous research and experience from
more than 400 commercial CFB references.
Foster Wheeler’s responsibility for the proj-
ect included designing and supplying the
Courtesy: GDF SUEZ
When Gérard Mestrallet, chairman and CEO of GDF SUEZ, set a target of doubling
the company’s renewable energy capacity from 2007 to 2013, it seemed very ambi-
tious. Projects like the Polaniec Green Unit have helped the company reach its goal
with room to spare.
Aaron Larson
TOP PLANTS
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 33
steam generator, auxiliary equipment, and
biomass yard, as well as carrying out civil
works, erection, and commissioning of the
boiler island.
Polish regulations require a minimum of
20% agro biomass, which includes a vari-
ety of materials, such as straw, sunflower
pellets, dried fruit (marc), and palm ker-
nel shells. A major concern in the design
process was the high-alkali content of this
agricultural biomass. Pilot testing was con-
ducted to determine if the advanced agro
CFB concept would perform adequately
under these conditions. The design passed
with flying colors.
The Polaniec boiler has solids separators
built from steam-cooled panels integrated
with the combustion chamber, which avoided
heavy refractory linings in the separator. The
final superheating and reheating stages are
located in special enclosures at the bottom of
the furnace, adjacent to the main combustion
chamber (Figure 1). Because they are located
outside the main combustion area, they are
protected from the fouling and corrosive en-
vironment of the boiler’s hot flue gas, thus
resulting in higher steam temperatures. The
design also provides good load-following ca-
pabilities and turndown ratios.
The ABC technology uses moderate flu-
idizing velocity in the furnace and features
a full-step grid design in order to transfer
heavy unfluidized particles effectively into
the bottom ash removal system.
“The unit is indeed unique, as it is one of
the largest in its sector,” said GDF SUEZ
Chairman and CEO Gérard Mestrallet.
“It’s a very original, ultra-modern unit. It
features fluidized bed combustion, which
is really at the cutting edge of combustion
technology.”
Other Major Contracts
The plant utilizes the Ovation distributed
control system, supplied by Emerson Process
Management. The system can handle 6,000
I/O points and includes the AMS Suite pre-
dictive maintenance software.
A complete chipping line, which includ-
ed a drum chipper and corresponding han-
dling equipment, was supplied to the plant
by BRUKS Klöckner GmbH together with
Polimex Mostostal Warszawa.
Alstom was awarded a contract to retrofit
the existing steam turbine to optimally match
the new biomass configuration. In mid-2012,
Alstom parlayed that work into a contract
worth approximately €65 million ($89.6 mil-
lion) for modernization of Units 2 through 7.
Alstom also has an option to retrofit Unit 1,
but the decision on whether to move forward
with that upgrade is not expected until 2014.
The upgraded steam turbines will increase
efficiency and allow for capacity ratings of
over 240 MW per unit, which will also sig-
nificantly reduce CO
2
emissions from the
rest of the facility.
Emissions Control
While GDF SUEZ is the largest independent
power producer in the world, with over 117
GW of installed capacity and 7.2 GW more
under construction, the company has devel-
oped a management approach designed to
limit its environmental impact. It has em-
braced a strategy that targets 20% of electric
generation capacity from renewables and
has also optimized the energy efficiency of
its production facilities in an effort to fight
climate change.
The Polaniec Green Unit is a flagship
plant that demonstrates the company’s
commitment to this strategy. The boiler uti-
lizes a low and uniform temperature profile
in the furnace and staged combustion to
help control emissions. Additionally, it is
equipped with an ammonia injection sys-
tem and catalyst—selective noncatalytic
reduction plus selective catalytic reduc-
tion—for controlling the nitrogen oxide
emissions. An electrostatic precipitator is
used for controlling particulate emissions.
With these measures, the Green Unit can
adequately meet the required emission lim-
its noted in Table 1.
Replacing the original coal-fired boiler
in Unit 8 with the Green Unit enabled the
project to meet its goal of saving almost 1.2
million tons of CO
2
annually. As the world’s
largest biomass-fired CFB boiler, the Pola-
niec Green Unit is a well-qualified POWER
Top Plant.
The unit began commercial operation on
Nov. 15, 2012, six weeks ahead of schedule.
“It’s a beautiful showcase,” said Jean-Fran-
çois Cirelli, vice chairman of GDF SUEZ,
“All the ingredients are there for it to be a
success.” ■
—Aaron Larson is a POWER associate
editor (@AaronL_Power,
@POWERmagazine).
1. Side view of Polaniec boiler. Source: Foster Wheeler
Description Value
Flue gas exit temperature 148C (298.4F)
Boiler efficiency 91.0%
NO
x
<150 mg/Nm
3
SO
2
<150 mg/Nm
3
CO <50 mg/Nm
3
Particulate matter (dry) <20 mg/Nm
3
Table 1. Design performance data are for O
2
6% in dry gases, emissions guarantees 50%
boiler maximum continuous rating, 24-hour average. Source: Foster Wheeler
1
2
3
4
5
1 - Step grid
2 - Final SH and RH
3 - Conservative flue gas velocity and
effective temperature control
4 - Steam cooled solid separator and
return leg
5 - Optimal convective heat transfer
surfaces and correct flue gas temperature
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 34
TOP PLANTS
Shams 1, Madinat Zayed, United
Arab Emirates
Owner/operator: Shams Power Co.
T
he small nation of the United Arab
Emirates (UAE), despite having the
world’s seventh-largest proven reserves
of both oil and gas, has been working hard
to diversify its economy over the past two
decades. Though hydrocarbons still account
for the large majority of its economic activity
and more than 80% of government revenue, it
has managed to significantly reduce the share
of hydrocarbons in its total export figures.
But the rapid growth of its financial and in-
ternational trade sectors over the past decade
has meant equally rapid growth in electricity
demand, which has stretched the UAE’s grid
to its limits. According to International En-
ergy Agency estimates, the UAE’s electric-
ity consumption in 2011 was 83.79 TWh, a
more than 50% increase since 2001. Installed
capacity, almost entirely natural gas–fired
thermal plants, was 23.25 GW in 2009, ac-
cording to the Energy Information Agency.
Despite its ample gas reserves, the UAE is
also working to diversify its generation port-
folio, having contracted with Korea Electric
Power Corp. to construct four nuclear reac-
tors, two of which are now under construc-
tion, with the first scheduled to come online
in 2017 and the others expected to be com-
pleted by 2020.
The country is also looking to boost re-
newable generation. To this end, Abu Dhabi,
the largest emirate, formed the Masdar initia-
tive in 2006, with a focus on development of
renewable and sustainable energy technolo-
gies. Masdar is a subsidiary of Abu Dhabi’s
state-owned Mubadala Development Co.
Masdar’s flagship project is Masdar City,
which aims to be the world’s first low-carbon
municipality. Located just outside the capi-
tal, it currently houses the Masdar Institute,
a joint effort with the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology. A number of other high-tech-
nology and renewable energy businesses and
organizations are planning to set up shop in
Masdar City, among them, the International
Renewable Energy Agency, Siemens Middle
East, and GE. Masdar has invested in a va-
riety of renewable energy projects, most no-
tably a 20% share in the 630-MW London
Array in the UK, currently the world’s largest
offshore wind farm.
Still, the overall goal of Masdar is to di-
versify the emirite’s energy sector. In the late
2000s, it began planning for a major solar
power plant in the UAE to be called Shams—
“Sun” in Arabic.
No Simple Task
While a desert location might seem like the
ideal spot for a concentrating solar power
(CSP) plant, in fact, making one work in such
an area carried with it a number of significant
challenges that the designers had to overcome
in planning the project. The original design
for Shams 1 was proposed in 2007, and Mas-
dar tendered the project for bids in 2008.
Because the coastal areas of the UAE are
at a premium in terms of occupancy and land
values, and because such areas have lower
insolation, the project needed to be located in
the southern region of the country. These ar-
eas, however, are characterized by loose and
Courtesy: Masdar
The Arabian Peninsula might seem like the ideal location for a concentrating solar
power plant, but developers of the 100-MW Shams 1 CSP project in the UAE—the
world’s largest at its inauguration in March—found that things were nowhere near
that simple.
Thomas Overton
TOP PLANTS
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 35
sandy soil, high winds, and high dust levels,
as well as large rolling sand dunes.
Early research for Shams revealed that, be-
cause of the dust in the atmosphere, the site had
surprisingly low direct normal irradiance (DNI)
levels of under 2,000 kWh/m
2
/yr. This is quite
a bit less than that received by CSP projects in
Spain and the U.S., where DNI levels can reach
2,700 kWh/m
2
/yr. Initial estimates of DNI for
the site—based on satellite data—had been sub-
stantially higher, which meant that adjustments
needed to be made in the design. This discovery
led Masdar to withdraw the tender and go back
to the drawing board.
The designers also realized that the high
dust levels meant more frequent cleaning of
the mirrors would be necessary, and overall re-
flectance of the mirrors would be lower. Stud-
ies had to be conducted to determine the level
of soiling the mirrors would experience.
Two approaches were developed to com-
bat the problem of higher mirror soiling.
First, a seven-meter-high windbreak was built
around the entire site to reduce the amount
of ground-level sand and dust blown onto
the mirrors. After extensive research, proj-
ect planners settled on a design composed of
both concrete and semi-porous fencing mate-
rial. In addition to reducing windblown dust,
the windbreak reduces the wind load on the
mirrors and limits the movement of the sand
dunes around the site.
Second, additional automatic mirror-
cleaning trucks were added to the operations
and maintenance plan in order to increase the
frequency of cleaning. This allowed the en-
tire site to be cleaned in a three-day cycle.
But the additional cleaning implicated an-
other challenge of the location: An extreme
shortage of water. Though water used for
cleaning the mirrors is collected and recycled
to the extent possible, the project team had to
consider a number of approaches for meeting
the site’s water needs, not just for cleaning
but also for cooling the steam cycle. Coastal
areas of the UAE rely largely on desalinated
water, but the high cost of it, combined with
the 60-km distance from ocean, made piping
or shipping water to the site far too expen-
sive. The use of gray water for plant cooling
was studied but found to be unworkable.
All of this meant that an air-cooled con-
denser (ACC) would be necessary (Figure
1). However, while this would greatly reduce
water requirements, it would also reduce the
plant’s efficiency, as ACCs do not function
as well in very hot climates such as the one
at this site, where summer temperatures can
exceed 120F.
These challenges meant that several chang-
es would be needed to the design of the plant if
it was to be able to meet its specified output.
First, additional solar collectors were
added to the original design. Next, a high-ef-
ficiency steam turbine was custom-designed
by MAN to allow operation at high turbine
efficiencies at the higher vacuum pressures
that would exist at high operating loads.
Finally, the use of natural gas firing was
changed. In typical CSP plants, natural gas
is often burned to smooth out intermittency
during cloudy periods. At Shams, however,
low levels of gas are burned continuously to
increase steam temperature from the 380F
maximum from the solar collectors to 540F.
This higher temperature increases the overall
efficiency of the plant. In normal operation,
natural gas contributes about 18% of the total
heat input but about 45% of the net electricity
output. Abundant, inexpensive natural gas in
the region makes the approach economic.
Abengoa Solar and Total were selected in
2010 to develop Shams 1 on a 25-year build,
own, operate basis. Masdar owns 60% of the
Shams Solar Power joint venture, with the
other two holding 20% each. Construction
began in June 2010, and the $600 million
project was completed in late 2012.
The 2.5 km
2
plant comprises 768 parabol-
ic trough collectors that heat synthetic oil that
is used to produce steam in a Foster Wheeler
solar steam generator for the 125-MW MAN
turbine. The air-cooled condensers were sup-
plied by GEA. Overall, the design changes
actually make Shams 1 about 3% to 8% more
efficient than a typical CSP plant, despite the
challenges of the site.
An Important Regional Symbol
One key goal of the Shams project is unrelat-
ed to renewable energy. Like other countries
in the Gulf region, the UAE relies heav-
ily on foreign labor: Estimates are that less
than 1% of the private workforce is Emirati.
While the majority of the construction force
was not local, efforts were made to foster lo-
cal skills and local employment. More than
60 local companies were involved in the
construction, many of which were formed
specifically for the project. A number of
Emiratis also worked with Abengoa’s CSP
projects in Spain to gain the necessary skills
to work at Shams. Currently, 30% of the
plant workforce is Emirati, and plans are to
increase this to 40% over the next two years.
Local students will be trained at the plant
until they are ready to join the staff.
The importance of Shams to the UAE can
be judged from the sentiments of Sheikh
Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, president of the
UAE and ruler of Abu Dhabi, who officially
inaugurated the plant in March. “Shams 1 is
a strategic investment in our country’s eco-
nomic, social and environmental prosperity,”
he said. “The domestic production of renew-
able energy extends the life of our country’s
valuable hydrocarbon resources and supports
the growth of a promising new industry.”
At the time of its inauguration, Shams
1 was the largest CSP plant in the world,
though it has since been eclipsed by proj-
ects in the U.S. At the dedication ceremony,
Masdar CEO Dr. Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber
said, “We are now producing close to 10%
of the world’s installed CSP capacity and
almost 68% of the GCC [Gulf Cooperation
Council] region’s renewable energy capacity.
The UAE has become the first country in the
Middle East and OPEC to produce both hy-
drocarbons and renewable energy.”
For taking the lead in renewable energy
in a fossil-fuel dominated region despite nu-
merous challenges, Shams 1 is a deserving
POWER Top Plant. ■
—Thomas W. Overton, JD is POWER’s gas
technology editor (@thomas_overton, @
POWERmagazine).
1. Hot air. With water at a premium at the desert site, Shams 1 employs an air-cooled con-
denser to condense the steam from the turbine. Courtesy: Masdar
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2013 36
RENEWABLES IN CHINA
A Plan for Optimizing Technologies
to Support Variable Renewable
Generation in China
Between 2011 and 2015, China plans to add eight major wind generating bases
with a total capacity of 65 GW and two solar photovoltaic installations ex-
ceeding 10 GW. With all that variable generation planned, the nation must
determine how to integrate it into the grid while ensuring grid stability.
Researchers from North China Electric Power University propose a plan
that takes into consideration the best options on a regional basis.
Zeng Ming, Li Shulei, and Xue Song
R
ecently, the variable generation (VG)
industry has been strongly promoted
in China to advance sustainable energy
development, especially for wind power and
solar photovoltaic (PV) power, which have
entered rapid development periods. For ex-
ample, wind power installed capacity in China
doubled every year for four consecutive years
beginning in 2006, while large-scale solar PV
power plants have been integrated with the
grid since 2010. But more is to come.
According to the country’s renewable
energy development plan, the eight biggest
wind power developments will gradually be
constructed during the 12th Five-Year Plan
period (2011–2015) in Hebei, west Inner
Mongolia, east Inner Mongolia, Jilin, Shan-
dong, Jiangsu, Jiuquan, and Hami. The in-
stalled capacity of each base may exceed
10 GW, and the total capacity will reach 65
GW. Additionally, two massive PV power
bases will be constructed from 2020 to 2030
in Jiuquan and Qaidam basin, each with an
installed capacity exceeding 10 GW. Those
wind and PV developments are mainly lo-
cated in Northeast China, North China, and
Northwest China, where wind and solar re-
sources are abundant. The Chinese govern-
ment has issued a series of regulations, such
as the Renewable Energy Law, to guarantee
renewable power integration.
In China, regions abundant in wind and so-
lar energy are usually remote areas far from
load centers and the main grid. Therefore, a
current major initiative to solve integration
and demand problems is constructing more
large-scale transmission lines to enable VG
power consumption over a wider area so as to
make use of the large-scale and concentrated
wind power and solar power bases (Figure 1).
Variable energy sources such as wind and
solar have characteristics of randomness,
intermittency, and low capacity coefficient.
Additionally, local load consumption abil-
ity is limited, which challenges the local
and region power systems’ safe and stable
operation. These problems become more
significant as installed wind power capac-
ity increases.
The first problem concerns power system
security. Eighty wind turbine tripping acci-
dents occurred in 2010, and 193 wind turbine
tripping accidents occurred by August 2011.
The second problem is that wind power is
difficult to integrate into networks. The in-
stalled capacity of wind power accounted for
3.06%, while power production from wind
only accounted for 1.18% of total generation,
and this number still hadn’t exceed 2% by the
end of 2011.
Construction of large-scale transmission
lines could help distribute variable energy
over a wider range for more-distant use. Now
the primary problem is to determine the
optimal supporting technology investment
program to back up VG and solve the safe-
ty problems posed by VG integration. The
determination of peak-shaving power sup-
ply type and scale, as well as demand-side
management and cross-regional transmission
management are involved. Hence, a techno-
economic evaluation of VG resource inte-
gration supporting technology investment
program is needed.
1. Solar siting. The 320-MW Longyangxia solar photovoltaic power plant is located in Qing-
hai Province in Northwest China and is owned by China Power Investment Corp. Courtesy: Ding
Haisheng, China Power News Network
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 37
RENEWABLES IN CHINA
3. Distribution of the eight planned large wind power bases. Courtesy:
Zeng Ming, Xue Song, Ma Mingjuan, Zhu Xiaoli. “New energy bases and sustainable develop-
ment in China: A review.” Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2013, 17:169–185
Base in
Xinjiang,
Hami
Base in
Gansu,
Jiuquan
Base in Mengxi
Base in
Mengdong
Base in
Jinlin
Base in
Hebei
Base in
Shandong
Base in
Jiangsu
>200W/m
2
(High)
150-200W/m
2
100-150W/m
2
50-100W/m
2
<50W/m
2
(Low)
2. Wind density map of China. Courtesy: Zeng Ming, Xue Song, Ma Mingjuan, Zhu
Xiaoli. “New energy bases and sustainable development in China: A review.” Renewable &
Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2013, 17:169–185
The Technical Roadmap
The approach that we propose has several
steps. First, the project would collect relevant
available information concerning distribution,
installed capacity, and integration of variable
power. Then it would analyze the difficulties
and challenges with VG integration from a
technical level. Next, we propose possible
supporting technology investment programs
and make techno-economic evaluations of
them. Finally, we would sort the various pro-
grams according to assessment results, make
final optimized decisions, and make recom-
mendations for relevant state policies.
The project collects data by referring to
information disclosed by the departments in
charge, such as the Bureau of Statistic in Chi-
na and China Electricity Council. Data need-
ed here mainly concern wind power, solar
power, and hydropower distribution; variable
power installed capacity and on-grid energy;
VG integration in each region; and the rel-
evant supporting technology parameters.
Analysis of VG Integration
Challenges
As a research basis for determining appropri-
ate supporting technologies for VG integration,
we first analyze difficulties and challenges
posed by integrating VG into networks from a
technical level. After collecting data—includ-
ing grid operation data, peak and valley dif-
ferences and peaking power units data before
wind power was integrated into networks—
we can analyze the impacts of wind power on
system operation from the following angles.
Wind Power’s Impacts on Grid Voltage
Level. First we plan to study the geographi-
cal and temporal distribution characteristics
of VG and energy demand, so as to make
clear the impacts on grid voltage of large-
scale variable power integration. Existing
data show that the wind energy resource and
energy demand are distributed in a reverse
direction. That means that large volumes of
wind power would need to be transmitted
long distances to load centers for consump-
tion, which may cause great voltage dips, fol-
lowed by local grid instability and reduced
stability margin. In turn, grid voltage stabil-
ity limitations also restrict the maximum in-
stalled capacity and output of wind farms.
Wind’s Impacts on Grid Short-Circuit
Current. Wind power units with common
asynchronous generators or doubly fed in-
duction generators are widely used in Chi-
nese wind farms, which affects short-circuit
current in a different way from traditional
synchronous generators when there is a
short-circuit fault on the grid. In this phase,
we would analyze the influence of the inte-
gration of common asynchronous generators
www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2013 38
RENEWABLES IN CHINA
and doubly fed induction generators on grid
short-circuit current through field research.
Wind’s Impacts on Grid Power Quali-
ty. Wind speed fluctuation is quite obvious in
Northwest China, especially on the Tibetan
Plateau. We would take the Northwest Grid
as the example to analyze the output power
fluctuation of integrated wind power units re-
sulting from the random fluctuation of wind
speed as well as the turbulence, wake effect,
and tower shadow effect during wind power
units’ operation. Power quality problems
such as voltage fluctuation and flicker would
also be analyzed.
Wind’s Impacts on Grid Stability. To
study this issue, we would take the Northwest
Grid, which has high wind power capacity as
an example, studying the impacts that wind
power integration has on original power flow
distribution, line transmission power, and sys-
tem inertia. When analyzing the influence of
wind power integration on grid transient sta-
bility and frequency stability, we will discuss
its effects on main grid voltage stability.
Wind’s Impacts on Equivalent Peak
and Valley Difference. When studying wind
power integration, we could consider wind
farm output as negative load. Therefore, we
could get the equivalent diurnal load curve
through associating the diurnal variation
curves of wind farm output and load, so as
to observe the peak-valley variation. In this
analysis, we take typical days in Baicheng in
Jilin Province, which belongs to the North-
east Grid, and in Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai,
and Ningxia, which belong to Northwest
Grid as examples to analyze net load (load
minus wind power production) peak and val-
ley difference changes, impacts on peaking
power and frequency modulation, and grid
operation cost changes.
Wind’s Impacts on Regional Power
Grid Peak Shaving. Existing local units are
mainly used in China for peak shaving. Rel-
evant standards regarding interregional load
trading and settlement are absent in China so
far. In this analysis, we first would analyze
hydropower, large-scale gas-fired generation,
fast-response coal-fired units, and pumped
storage plant installed capacity and the roles
they each play in peak shaving.
At the same time, considering that wind
power is mainly concentrated in North China
(which suggests peak-shaving resources such
as cogeneration units should also meet us-
ers’ heating demand in winter), we will take
northeast areas as examples, analyzing im-
pacts on regional power grid peak shaving
while integrating large-scale wind power into
networks on winter nights.
Wind’s Impacts on the Entire Grid
Network. Wind power integration in China
now is of large scale, long distance, and
high voltage. With the development of even
more wind farms, wind power accounts for
an increasingly larger percentage of installed
capacity, and its influence on the grid is ex-
panding from partial regions. Consequently,
we plan to conduct a statistical analysis of
wind power installed capacity integrated into
distribution and transmission networks. Then
we would assess impacts on overall grid se-
curity and stable operation while wind power
is integrated into the grid through transmis-
sion networks.
Requirements for Demand-Side Man-
agement and Interregional Transmis-
sion. Considering the energy distribution
characteristics and the development of large-
scale variable energy resources in China, it’s
urgent to improve interregional resource al-
location optimization ability and to enhance
demand-side management (DSM) to achieve
interregional transmission. In this phase, we
will focus on analyzing the impacts on wind
power consumption and energy utilization
efficiency enabled by DSM enhancement
and interregional transmission. We will also
study the necessity of DSM and interregional
transmission for VG integration.
Techno-economic Evaluation
of Technologies to Support VG
Integration
During the 12th Five-Year period, the eight
biggest wind power bases will gradually be
constructed in Hebei, west Inner Mongolia,
east Inner Mongolia, Jilin, Shandong, Ji-
angsu, Jiuquan, and Hami. The installed ca-
pacity of each base may exceed 10 GW, and
total capacity could reach 65 GW. Bases in
Jiangsu and Shandong will mainly focus on
offshore wind power development. The dis-
tribution of wind resources in China is shown
in Figure 2; distribution of the eight largest
wind power bases is shown in Figure 3.
After analysis of the difficulties and chal-
lenges posed by grid-integrated variable
generation and initial investigation of the dis-
tribution of wind resources and load, we could
address those challenges by developing four
typical planning programs: Northeast China
(high wind power, low load), Northwest
China (high wind power, lower load), North
China (high wind power, high load), and East
China (high wind power, higher load).
Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, and east In-
ner Mongolia are included in Northeast Chi-
na, which is abundant in hydropower with
low local load. Xinjiang, Gansu, and west
Inner Mongolia are included in Northwest
China, which is rich in coal, with low load
level as well. North China contains Hebei,
arkline
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RENEWABLES IN CHINA
Shandong, and Jiangsu and possesses a cer-
tain amount of pumped storage resource with
high local load. Zhejiang and Shanghai are in
East China, rich in pumped storage resource
with rather high local load.
Based on both national and international
research sources, we determined that tech-
nologies supporting VG integration in China
mainly consist of hydropower, large-scale
gas-fired generation, 600-MW coal-fired
units (now coal-fired units under 300 MW ca-
pacity are shut down to meet the requirement
of energy conservation and emission reduc-
tion, which makes 600-MW coal-fired units
the main peak-shaving resource), pumped
storage plants, battery energy storage tech-
nologies (including electric vehicles), dis-
tributed generation technologies, DSM, and
interregional transmission technology.
It is important to note that already-in-
stalled capacity of technologies supporting
VG integration and wind power capacity is
not considered here; we only consider newly
added future capacity.
A flow chart of the techno-economic eval-
uation of technologies supporting VG inte-
gration in China is shown in Figure 4.
Brief discussions of specific consider-
ations for each region follow. For each re-
gion, the techno-economic evaluation of the
proposed technologies involves five steps:
We begin by analyzing the exploitable 1.
wind power capacity in the region and
determine the capacity of the backup
technology needed per MW of grid-
integrated wind power. We also look at
construction and maintenance costs for
the technologies used to support VG
integration.
Based on the wind power develop- 2.
ment plan, we assume that newly
added wind power capacity increases
at a fixed growth rate, and we evalu-
ate a number of investment programs
based on the technology options for
each region.
We calculate the initial investment 3.
cost of the selected programs, the rate
of return, and payback period under
existing tariff and settlement systems
through techno-economic evaluation
theory and methods. Additionally, we
will make sensitivity analysis of those
Northeast China
Hydropower, large-scale gas-fired
generation, 600-MW coal-fired unit, and
pumped storage capacity plus a combination
of investment programs for these
technologies
Hydropower, large-scale gas-fired
generation, and 600-MW coal-fired unit
capacity plus a combination of investment
programs for these technologies
Large-scale gas-fired generation, 600-MW
coal-fired unit, pumped storage, and battery
energy storage capacity (including electric
vehicles) plus a combination of investment
programs for these technologies
Hydropower, large-scale gas-fired
generation, pumped storage, battery energy
storage (including electric vehicles), and
combined cooling, heat, and power capacity
as well as demand-side management and
a combination of investment programs for
these technologies
Northwest China
North China
East China
Interregional transmission (from Northwest China to
East China)
Analyze the exploitable wind power capacity
and the fixed growth rate
Select the alternative programs
Make techno-economic evaluations of the
programs
Assess the impacts on the power system of the
programs and their social benefits
Sort the programs
Program optimization
Calculate the
investment
cost, rate
of return,
and payback
period for
each program
and conduct
a sensitivity
analysis
4. The plan at a glance. This flow chart shows the proposed stages of a techno-economic evaluation of technologies that could be used to
support the integration of large-scale variable renewable energy (predominantly wind power) in China. Source: Zeng Ming, Li Shulei, Xue Song
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 40
RENEWABLES IN CHINA
investment programs.
We will evaluate the impacts on system 4.
operation, equivalent peak and valley
difference, and peak shaving by those
investment programs. Social benefits
also need to be evaluated, especially the
energy conservation and carbon emis-
sions benefit.
We will make a comprehensive evalu- 5.
ation of the total investment cost, in-
ternal rate of return, payback period
for investment, and social benefits.
Considering that there is a national
sustainable development plan for en-
ergy utilization and that tax incentive
measures may be issued, we will only
consider the relevant investment pro-
grams in this phase.
Northeast China. Considering resource
distribution characteristics, uneven load
distribution, and the low load in Northeast
China, we select four VG integration sup-
porting technologies for techno-economic
POWER DISTRIBUTION ENCLOSURES CLIMATE CONTROL
Thousands of enclosures
Hundreds of options
Designed and delivered in 10 days
5. Transfer of power plan. This map of the regions with the greatest wind power potential shows recommended substation and trans-
mission line placement for optimizing the transfer of variable power to higher-demand regions. Source: Bo Zeng, Ming Zeng, Xue Song, Min
Cheng, et al. “Overall review of wind power development in Inner Mongolia: Status quo, barriers and solutions,” Renewable & Sustainable Energy
Reviews, 2013, 29: 614-624
Gansu Province
Alashan League
Ningxia Hui
Autonomous Region
Shaanxi Province
To South China
(East China)
Ordos City
Bayannaoer League
Central of Wulanchabu
League wind power
collection station
Baotou
City
Shanxi
Province
To south of
Heibei Province
Beijing
To north China
(East China)
To
Wanquan
To
Guyuan
Hebei
Province
To Chengde
Hahhot
City
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Xilingol League
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Thermal power plant
Wind Farm
500 kV substation for power collection
Existing 500 kV substation and
transmission line
New 500 kV substation and transmission
line
±800 kV DC substation and transmission
line
±600 kV DC substation and transmission
line
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POWER www.powermag.com 41
RENEWABLES IN CHINA
SOFTWARE & SERVICES IT INFRASTRUCTURE
www.rittal.us
evaluation: hydropower, large-scale gas-fired
generators, 600-MW coal-fired units, and
pumped storage.
Northwest China. Considering resource
distribution characteristics, the area’s rich-
ness in coal and water resources, uneven load
distribution, and lower load, we select these
three VG integration supporting technologies
for techno-economic evaluation: hydropow-
er, large-scale gas-fired generators, and 600-
MW coal-fired units.
North China. Considering resource dis-
tribution characteristics with the absence of
a large coal power and hydropower base,
even load distribution, and high load level,
we select these five VG integration sup-
porting technologies for techno-economic
evaluation: large-scale gas-fired generators,
600-MW coal-fired units, pumped storage,
and battery energy storage technologies (in-
cluding electric vehicles).
East China. Considering resource dis-
tribution characteristics with rich water
resources, even load distribution with high
load level, and the region’s high dependence
on cross-province transmission, we select
these six VG integration supporting tech-
nologies for techno-economic evaluation:
hydropower, large-scale gas-fired genera-
tors, pumped storage plants, battery energy
storage technologies (including electric ve-
hicles), and CCHP (combined cooling, heat-
ing, and power).
Evaluation of Interregional Trans-
mission Technology Programs
In China, regions that are abundant in wind
and solar energy usually have low load lev-
els (for example, the Northwest Grid). That
combination contributes to limited ability
for local energy consumption, wind power
abandonment, and low energy utilization
efficiency. A smart grid with an ultra-high-
voltage grid as its backbone network is being
built in China to achieve VG integration via
large-scale interregional transmission over
long distances with high efficiency to en-
able remote consumption—typically, in East
China (Figure 5).
In considering this challenge, we will
propose an interregional transmission plan
considering relevant issues to improve VG
consumption levels and increase energy
utilization efficiency. We will also take the
ultra-high-voltage transmission line from
Northwest China to East China as an exam-
ple to evaluate possible economic and envi-
ronmental benefits.
From Evaluation to Implementation
After comprehensively assessing the results
of the techno-economic and social benefit
evaluations of the various technology options
for supporting VG integration in each region,
and accounting for renewable energy policies
and their trends, we will select and propose
the preferred investment plan for VG integra-
tion supporting technologies in each region.
As investors are usually encouraged by eco-
nomic interests, we should make investment
decisions according to each program’s techno-
economic evaluation results. For programs eco-
nomically viable and with good social benefits,
the government should support market-oriented
investments, while the government’s main duty
is to conduct market regulation.
As to programs not economically viable
but with good social benefits, the gov-
ernment should introduce incentive mea-
sures—such as tariff compensation, direct
subsidies, or preferential loans—to support
investments. Programs economically vi-
able but with poor social benefits could be
treated as options. Programs not economi-
cally viable and with bad social benefits
should be abandoned.
Goals and Impacts
If this project is successfully implemented as
outlined here, the project is expected to have
three main benefits.
First, it could provide a decision-making
basis for the Chinese government that could
help it determine the appropriate combina-
tion of technologies for supporting VG in-
tegration and their capacity when a certain
amount of wind power is put into produc-
tion. That could contribute to maximizing the
amount of grid-integrated VG.
Second, it could provide an investment de-
cision-making basis for players in the market
and help improve investment efficiency.
Third, mature experience concerning
large-scale and concentrating VG exploita-
tion and long-distance transmission is absent
at present. If this project is successfully im-
plemented, the research results can provide a
reference for other countries. ■
—Zeng Ming, Li Shulei, and Xue Song
(xuesongbjhd@163.com) are all with North
China Electric Power University, Beijing.
The work described in this article was
supported by National Science Foundation
of China (NSFC) (71271082), The National
Soft Science Research Program (2012GX-
S4B064), and The Energy
Foundation (G-1006-12630).
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 42
RENEWABLES
Photovoltaics Overshadow
Concentrated Solar Power
Though much newer, solar photovoltaic technology has gained a much larger market
share than concentrated solar power, even though the latter promises thermal
storage and the potential to be almost fully dispatchable.
Sonal Patel
A
s solar technologies, both solar pho-
tovoltaic (PV) and concentrated so-
lar power (CSP) are often discussed
collectively, along with solar thermal and
solar fuels. But the difference between the
two power generating technologies that
have evolved independently for decades is
significant: CSP harnesses irradiative solar
energy, which is easily transformed into
heat through absorption by gases, liquids,
or solid materials and is then converted to
mechanical energy and finally electrical en-
ergy, while PV uses solar radiation, which
is essentially a flux of elementary particles
that promote photoreactions and generate a
flow of electrons.
Technology-agnostic solar industry ob-
servers note that both technologies are today
approaching “grid parity” as solar utilities
around the world develop them with “rela-
tive” success. But solar PV has vastly over-
taken CSP’s market share, and will prevail for
a long time. At the end of 2012, the world’s
PV installations totaled 32 GW—compared
to a cumulative 2.9 GW of CSP capacity, the
bulk concentrated in Spain (68%) and the
U.S. (28%).
Of the 1,176 MW of utility-scale solar ca-
pacity in the U.S. at the beginning of 2012,
about 43% came from concentrated thermal
technology while 57% came from PV—but
PV accounts for 72% of solar projects under
construction. And while 2012 was a banner
year for the world’s CSP sector, marking the
most installations—more than 1 GW—over
a 12-month period in the technology’s 135-
year history, experts forecast that growth
spurt will be short-lived, overshadowed pri-
marily by plunging prices of PV panels and
a variety of hurdles that are stalling the still
relatively small sector.
At least 7.3 GW of new CSP capacity is
in various stages of preconstruction develop-
ment in the U.S., the Middle East and North
Africa, and in China, India, and Australia.
Saudi Arabia, notably, will lead a longer-
term charge with its ambitions to generate 75
to 110 TWh by 2032, which could require the
installation of 25 GW of capacity in Saudi
Arabia alone. Yet, PV’s growth is slated to
soar to a staggering 41 GW by 2014—an ex-
pansion that will be undertaken by “all major
world regions,” according to market research
firm IHS.
A Cost Disparity
The paramount reason for this market share
disparity is cost. According to the Interna-
tional Energy Agency, CSP received a mi-
nuscule 7% share of public research and
development (R&D) funding from the Or-
ganisation for Economic Cooperation and
Development countries for renewables in
2010, compared to 36% for solar PV and
28% for wind. This is why, some experts
say, innovation in the CSP field has been
limited and patent rates declined signifi-
1. In a new light. Spain led the world with 1.95 GW of installed concentrated solar power
(CSP) capacity at the end of 2012 and generated 5,138 GWh from 42 plants: 37 parabolic trough,
three tower, and two Fresnel plants. Spanish companies are also putting up a number of the
CSP plants worldwide, like Abengoa SA’s $2 billion Solana parabolic trough plant, which came
online near Gila Bend, Ariz., this October. That 280-MW plant built with a $1.45 billion U.S. fed-
eral loan guarantee uses a thermal storage system to produce power for six hours at full power.
Courtesy: Abengoa SA
December 2013
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POWER www.powermag.com 43
RENEWABLES
cantly between 1977 and 2000.
Moreover, CSP is a capital-intensive
technology whose initial investment is
dominated by solar field equipment and
labor. Accounting for 84% of electric-
ity generation costs of CSP, initial invest-
ment requirements range from $2,500 to
$10,200/kW, depending on capacity factor
and storage size. In contrast, solar PV’s
initial investment costs range from $3,500
to $6,000/kW. The remaining 16% for CSP
typically consists of fixed operation and
maintenance costs, which average $70/
kW per year, while variable maintenance is
limited to about $3/MWh.
Cost concerns are also possibly the most
plausible reason why investment in CSP is
substantially lower than for PV: In 2011, the
sector garnered just $18 billion worldwide,
while PV got $125 billion.
A Vulnerable Sector
As with most dawning technologies, the
economic crisis hit CSP particularly hard as
governments reconfigured subsidies and im-
posed austerity measures, forcing develop-
ers to rethink projects or convert to PV. For
Spain, the only European Union member
to have developed a CSP production sec-
tor, and a country that spurred the world’s
concentrated solar technology revival in the
second half of the 2000s, CSP’s future has
all but been eclipsed by both a moratorium
on financial aid imposed by the Spanish
government earlier this year and the gov-
ernment’s intention to retroactively redefine
plant remuneration terms.
At the end of 2012, though Spain com-
missioned 17 new plants to bring its to-
tal CSP capacity up to 1.95 GW—and all
within the last five years—the future of at
least six new plants hangs in the balance as
Spanish CSP developers have been forced
to turn to other countries to develop their
technology (Figure 1) and bring down pro-
duction costs on their own. Protermosolar,
the country’s CSP industry association,
bemoans the government’s measures that
it says came before the nation’s CSP sec-
tor could become as competitive as other
generation sectors.
More Stringent Requirements
Added to cost concerns are a number of
The Evolution of CSP
Since the world’s very first concentrating solar thermal systems
were developed in 1878 by French inventors Augstin Mouchot and
Abel Pifre, the fundamental quest for solar thermal energy devel-
opers of a great variety of designs and applications has been to
increase working temperatures. Today, four different technology
approaches focus the sun’s energy onto mirrors to create steam to
drive a turbine that generates power:
■ Trough systems, which use large, U-shaped (parabolic) reflec-
tors that heat oil-filled pipes running along their center, or
focal point, as high as 750F. The parabolic trough is today the
most mature of CSP technologies and forms the bulk of current
commercial plants (Figure 2).
■ Power tower systems, also called central receivers, which use
many large flat heliostats to track the sun and focus its rays
onto a tower-mounted receiver. The receiver heats a fluid, such
as molten salt, to temperatures of up to 1,050F to make steam
or store energy for days before being converted into electricity.
■ Dish/engine systems, which use mirrored dishes nearly 10 times
larger than a backyard satellite to focus sunlight onto a re-
ceiver that is integrated into a high-efficiency “external” com-
bustion engine outfitted with thin tubes containing hydrogen
or helium gas.
■ Linear-Fresnel reflectors, which approximate the parabolic shape
of trough systems but use long rows of flat, or slightly curved,
mirrors to reflect the sun’s rays onto a downward-facing linear,
fixed receiver.
Mouchot’s and Pifre’s inventions were based on dishes, though
the parabolic trough was invented soon after, in 1884, by Amer-
ican engineer John Ericsson. In 1897, another American engi-
neer, Frank Shuman, demonstrated a solar engine that worked by
reflecting solar energy onto collector boxes filled with ether—
which has a lower boiling point than water—and later, an im-
proved system using mirrors to reflect solar energy onto boxes
filled with water. He also developed a 560-W low-pressure steam
turbine and, in 1912, set up the world’s first solar power thermal
power station in Meadi, Egypt, using parabolic troughs to power a
60- to 70-horsepower engine that pumped 6,000 gallons of water
per minute from the Nile River to nearby cotton fields.
In contrast, PV’s evolution has been much more recent. The
first photovoltaic technology capable of providing sufficient
power to electrical equipment—a primitive version with an ef-
ficiency of only 4% that cost $300/W to produce—was invented
in 1954 by the Bell Telephone Laboratories. Solar PV got its
boost with the space age, after the U.S. launched its first satel-
lites into space. Finally, in 1970, a solar cell was developed that
tamped down the price of energy from $100/W to $20/W—a
breakthrough that made it realistic to use solar applications for
residential use.
Operational Under construction Planned
71.4%
Trough
15.9%
28.6%
26.9%
25.8%
2.7%
0.04%
Tower Linear Fresnel Dish
17.6%
7.4%
0.8%
0.3%
1.8%
0.6%
2. CSP projects by type. Parabolic trough plants account
for the majority of operational capacity due to cost advantages, but
solar tower systems are also increasing, accounting for 52% of
planned projects. The first large-scale linear-Fresnel plant is already
in operation in Spain (Puerto Errado 2), but dish systems are still at
an early stage of development. Source: IEA Solar Paces database,
March 2013
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 44
RENEWABLES
obstacles. According to the U.S. National
Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL),
generation-weighted averages for total land
area requirements range from 3.2 acres/
GWh per year for CSP towers to 5.3 acres/
GWh per year for Stirling dish CSP systems;
large (>20 MW) PV systems require between
2.8 and 3.4 acres/GWh. But not only must
CSP plants be installed at larger scales to be
cost-effective, they also need higher levels of
irradiance—which means siting is limited in
the U.S. to the Sunbelt—and access to water.
That also means they can take years to permit
and connect to the grid.
In fact, CSP needs a tremendous amount
of water for cooling processes—up to
3,780 liters/MWh for Fresnel installations
and 2,835 liters/MWh for solar towers,
compared to just 19 liters/MWh for PV—
and this in turn has environmental implica-
tions in arid and semi-arid areas. However,
at least four large plants with dry cooling
technology—which promises to reduce
water consumption by more than 90% (but
increase generation costs by 5%)—have
come online this year alone: three Integrat-
ed Solar Combined Cycle (ISCC) plants in
Hassi R’mel, Algeria; Kuramayat in Egypt;
and Ain Beni Mathar in Morocco; plus
the 100-MW Shams 1 in the United Arab
Emirates—a POWER Top Plant (see story
on p. 34).
Significantly, PV has a number of stand-
alone smaller applications, attributable to
its low maintenance requirements and low
costs. One reason for PV’s extensive mar-
ket growth has been its suitability for resi-
dential power supply, points out pro-solar
community resource group, the Principal
Solar Institute. “In fact, photovoltaics have
found a place meeting a broad spectrum of
energy needs. While large-scale photovol-
taic projects are competing with traditional
utilities to meet consumer demand at one
end of the spectrum, smaller residential
projects are working to replace them at the
other end,” it says.
The Promise of Thermal Storage
Perhaps CSP’s saving grace could be its
most formidable advantage over PV, which
is its ability to store thermal energy for
up to 16 hours. Innovations are expected
in all four CSP technologies (see sidebar)
and throughout the system value chain as
research and development is focused on
improving dispatchability. According to
Romeu Gaspar, founder of energy consult-
ing firm X&Y Partners, “Dispatchability
will be increasingly important when and
where renewable energies achieve high pen-
etration rates, so two things can happen:
CSP becomes a commercially viable solu-
tion before a commercial PV storage system
is developed, carving its own market seg-
ment; or the PV industry quickly solves the
storage issue and becomes the solar technol-
ogy of choice.”
Other experts point out that CSP is also
better suited to hybridization with com-
plementary solar and fossil fuel primary
energy sources. And it can be applied to
a number of niche industrial processes to
desalinate water, improve water electroly-
sis for hydrogen production, generate heat
for combined heat and power applica-
tions, and support enhanced oil recovery
operations.
That means CSP isn’t going to disappear
from the market altogether, the Principal
Solar Institute says. The future of CSP will
depend on its stronghold at the utility scale,
“where no amount of PV cost-reduction is
expected to overcome its inherent technology
advantages.” ■
—Sonal Patel is a POWER associate edi-
tor (@sonalcpatel, @POWERmagazine).
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|
December 2013 46
EMISSIONS
Optimized SCR Catalysts Maximize
Mercury Removal Co-Benefits
New air emission rules limit the amount of mercury (Hg) air emissions from coal-fired
power plants. Many plant owners may find leveraging the Hg removal co-ben-
efits available from SCR Hg oxidation and FGD Hg collection a more attractive
option than constructing new equipment or using other expensive mitigation
technologies.
Chris Bertole, PhD and Scot Pritchard
T
he new Mercury and Air Toxics Stan-
dards (MATS) have given coal-fired
power plant owners a short time to
bring their plants into compliance with rules
that require significantly less mercury (Hg)
in stack gases emitted into the atmosphere.
MATS applies to U.S. plants, but the move
to reduce power plant mercury emissions has
gone global. In January 2013, after four years
of negotiations, 140 nations signed the first
legally binding agreement to control mercury
emissions from power plants (and many oth-
er sources and products). The official signing
of the Minamata Convention (named after a
city in Japan that experienced environmental
damage caused by industrial mercury dis-
charges into local rivers) is scheduled for Oc-
tober of this year. New rules are expected to
go into force over the next three to five years,
with full effect by 2020.
Flue gas from coal-fired power plants may
contain Hg in three different species or forms.
First, the Hg may be in particulate form (Hg
P
),
which is typically removed with the ash and
unburned carbon in an electrostatic precipita-
tor or fabric filter. Second, the Hg may be in
oxidized form (Hg
2+
), which is water-soluble
and can be removed by a wet flue gas desulfu-
rization system (FGD). The Hg may also ap-
pear in its elemental form (Hg
0
), which is not
water-soluble and usually passes unchanged
straight through most air quality management
systems and into the atmosphere.
The potential synergy from combining SCR
and FGD technologies for mercury removal
has been known for some time. Data collected
during the Environmental Protection Agency’s
(EPA’s) Information Collection Request cam-
paigns in 1998, 2005, and updated in 2009,
showed that mercury capture in bituminous-
fired units with cold-side electrostatic pre-
cipitators increased from about 36% to 75%
when a wet FGD was also in service. The data
also showed that the amount of Hg removal
increased to >95% with the SCR in-service
compared to when it was in bypass. More
recent studies have produced similar results
(see “Determining AQCS Mercury Removal
Co-Benefits,” in POWER’s July 2010 issue
and “An SCR Can Provide Mercury Removal
Co-Benefits,” October 2011).
You Have Options
The two most familiar options to reduce mer-
cury emissions are a high capital cost retro-
fit with equipment specifically designed for
mercury removal (such as TOXECON) or
using an expensive combustion gas additive,
such as activated carbon injection (ACI),
that will adsorb the mercury for capture in a
downstream filtration system. The effective-
ness of both approaches is highly dependent
on the type of fuel consumed by the plant.
A third option, the use of existing equip-
ment, or “co-benefit option,” can be the most
cost effective: leverage air quality control
equipment already in place at most coal-fired
plants to produce the necessary Hg reduction
without an extended plant outage required
for an equipment retrofit. This two-step ap-
proach occurs by first oxidizing the Hg
0

present in the stack gas as it passes through
the SCR and then removing the Hg
2+
in the
FGD. In many cases, the catalyst used in
the SCR must be optimized for site-specific
conditions to achieve the desired Hg
0
oxida-
tion rate and therefore the overall mercury
removal efficiency. In addition, recent ad-
vancements in FGD technology and additives
help to prevent re-emission of the captured
oxidized mercury. Another option is to utilize
supplemental mercury capture using sorbents
such as ACI in combination with the exist-
ing equipment. This option can be used to
increase mercury removal efficiency where
specific plant equipment and/or conditions
do not allow optimization of the SCR/FGD
co-benefit.
Cormetech recently commercialized its
Oxidized Mercury Emissions Technology
(COMET) that can be used to characterize
reactor performance for a set of plant-spe-
cific features and fuels, determine the cor-
rect catalyst formulation so that NO
x
removal
rates remain unchanged, and provide a spe-
cific catalyst management plan to obtain the
required levels of mercury oxidation through
the SCR. The potential mercury removal co-
benefits and cost savings can be substantial.
SCR Hg Oxidation Co-Benefit
The SCR of NO
x
using NH
3
as the reductant
for V
2
O
5
- (WO
3
or MO
3
)/TiO
2
catalysts is the
current best available control technology for
NO
x
emissions from coal-fired utility boil-
ers. SCR has demonstrated NO
x
removal ef-
ficiencies of 90% or more. The primary NO
x

reduction reaction proceeds according to the
stoichiometry described by the following two
equations (note that NO
x
levels in the flue
gases from coal-fired boilers typically con-
tain >90% NO).
Equation 1: 4NO + 4NH
3
+ O
2
à 4N
2
+
6H
2
O
Equation 2: 2NO + 2NO
2
+ 4NH
3
à 4N
2

+ 6H
2
O
SCR catalysts are also active for the oxi-
dation of Hg
0
by chlorine as HCl and/or by
bromine as HBr, as described by Equation
3 for HCl. The conversion of Hg
0
, which is
water-insoluble, to HgCl
2
or HgBr
2
(water-
soluble oxidized mercury Hg
2+
) allows for
capture of mercury in a downstream flue gas
desulfurization system.
Equation 3: 2Hg
0
+ 4HCl + O
2
à 2HgCl
2

+ 4H
2
O
SCR Does Double Duty
Differences between NO
x
and Hg removal
performance must be considered within and
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 47
EMISSIONS
surrounding the SCR. From an SCR per-
spective, de-NO
x
performance is well de-
fined and controlled within the SCR reactor
by catalyst selection, cross-sectional area,
number of modules, and so on. However,
total Hg removal must carefully consider
the mercury removal performance of equip-
ment downstream of the SCR, such as the
air heater, particulate control device(s), and
the FGD. A number of system-level factors
relative to characterizing and understanding
catalyst performance must also be consid-
ered (Table 1).
Cormetech’s early product development
work to quantify the co-benefits SCR + FGD
mercury removal used a mercury activity test
reactor system in conjunction with a multi-
layer catalyst system to perform multiple
parametric tests. For example, one set of
tests characterized layer position and halogen
content for a given catalyst. Tests were also
conducted on new as well as aged catalysts
taken from operating plants. This critical
data enables accurate prediction of catalyst
Hg oxidation performance for unique appli-
cations. Typical results from those tests show
that NO
x
reduction is a strong function of the
operating temperature of the reactor and the
HCl present in the gas. In addition, the Hg
0

oxidation to Hg
2+
is a strong function of the
halogen content (HBr) and operating tem-
perature (Figure 1).
Catalyst Design and Selection
Traditional catalyst management techniques
provide very accurate predictions of de-NO
x

performance for various fuels and fuel addi-
tives. At the heart of the catalyst management
process for de-NO
x
is a simplified method to
describe catalyst oxidation potential, shown
in Figure 1 and represented by Equation 4.
Equation 4: K de-NO
x
/AV = ln (1– de-
NO
x
efficiency), where K de-NO
x
= cata-
lyst de-NO
x
activity, AV = area velocity, α =
NH
3
:NO
x
molar ratio = 1
The addition of mercury oxidation as a
performance feature of the SCR adds com-
plexity to the management process where
both de-NO
x
and Hg oxidation needs must be
managed simultaneously. Thus it is important
to develop equations and tools to accurately
model mercury oxidation performance as has
been done with de-NO
x
. Again, a simplified
approach to describe catalyst oxidation po-
tential is shown in Figure 1 and represented
by Equation 5.
Equation 5: K HgO
x
/AV = ln (1– Hg
0

oxidation) at α = variable, where K HgO
x
=
catalyst Hg oxidation activity and AV = area
velocity
Although the equations are similar, the
usefulness of the equation for Hg oxidation is
influenced to a greater extent by the ammo-
nia concentration. Therefore, instead of sim-
plifying the assessment to one molar ratio,
multiple molar ratios must be considered to
properly assess the performance capability of
a given catalyst layer in a particular position
within the reactor. Plant-specific conditions
related to fuel parameters, such as halogen
De-NO
x
Mercury
NO
x
inlet
a
NO
x
inlet
Efficiency
a
NH
3
efficiency
Slip
a
NH
3
slip
Temperature Hg oxidation
a
SO
2
conversion
b
Temperature
Fuel->contaminants->K/Ko SO
2
conversion
b
Reactor condition
Fuel->contaminates
->K/Ko
O
2
, H
2
O, SO
2
(lower
impact)
Reactor condition
Halogen (fuel or ad-
ditive)
Layer position (NH
3
)
CO
O
2
, H
2
O, SO
2
(can be
larger impact)
Notes: a. Performance threshold; b. Catalyst
formulation
Table 1. Key factors that influence
SCR de-NO
x
performance and Hg
oxidation performance. Of particular
importance are the concentrations of halo-
gens and reducing agents, such as CO and
NH
3
, present in the stack gas. Halogens,
whether present in the fuel or as an additive,
favorably influence SCR catalyst performance.
The ammonia concentration is a function of
the desired de-NO
x
performance, layer posi-
tion, and chemistry. Source: Cormetech Inc.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
d
e
N
O
x

(
%
)
20 40 60 80 100 120
HCl (ppmvda)
1. MATRS test data. The SCR Hg
0
oxidation rate is a function of halogen content and
temperature (right). The SCR performance of the same catalyst is shown for comparison (left).
The parametric studies used fresh and field-aged catalyst. Source: Cormetech Inc.
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0.0
H
g

o
x
i
d
a
t
i
o
n

(
%
)
0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5
HBr (ppmvda)
400C 340C
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
1
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e

K
H
g
O
x
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Standard COMET
2. COMET catalysts perform. Test results of COMET versus a standard de-NO
x
catalyst
illustrate a significant improvement in Hg
0
oxidation rates. The ability of the catalyst to oxidize
mercury is represented by the K HgO
x
, the catalyst oxidation activity (Equation 5). The data was
taken at 403C; 107 ppm of NO
x
; 3.5% O
2
; 14% H
2
O; 245 ppm SO
2
; and 8 ppm of HCl. Source:
Cormetech Inc.
NH
3
ppm 0 0 0 0 0 21 21 21 21 86
CO ppm 0 100 0 100 0 0 0 100 0 0
HBr ppm 0 0 0.1 0.1 1 0 0.1 0.1 1 0
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 48
EMISSIONS
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
N
H
3

s
l
i
p

(
p
p
m
)
20,000
Operating hours
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000
D
e
-
N
O
x

e
f
f
i
c
i
e
n
c
y

(
%
)
,

S
C
R

o
u
t
l
e
t

o
x
i
d
i
z
e
d

H
g

(
%
)
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
N
H
3

s
l
i
p

(
p
p
m
)
20,000
Operating hours
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000
D
e
-
N
O
x

e
f
f
i
c
i
e
n
c
y

(
%
)
,

S
C
R

o
u
t
l
e
t

o
x
i
d
i
z
e
d

H
g

(
%
)
Target 80% ox. Hg
Action: Inject halogen
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
N
H
3

s
l
i
p

(
p
p
m
)
20,000
Operating hours
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000
D
e
-
N
O
x

e
f
f
i
c
i
e
n
c
y

(
%
)
,

S
C
R

o
u
t
l
e
t

o
x
i
d
i
z
e
d

H
g

(
%
)
Target: 90% ox. Hg
Action: Initially change 2
layers to max. length COMET
and repeat for layer 3
3. Baseline management plan. A baseline performance curve where de-NO
x
and Hg
0

oxidation performance requirements are well synchronized is illustrated at top, with de-NO
x
=
85%, Hg
0
oxidation rate = 70%, and maximum NH
3
slip is 2 ppm. This baseline catalyst man-
agement plan shows that a standard catalyst could be used to meet both target performance
requirements. The center chart illustrates the impact of a rise in the target Hg
0
oxidation from
70% to 80% after 70,000 operating hours. In this situation, the 80% Hg oxidation requires injec-
tion of a halogen. The bottom chart represents the impact of a change in the target Hg
0
oxidation
from the baseline of 70% to 90% after 70,000 operating hours. In this case, a catalyst replace-
ment was required to achieve the Hg oxidation target. Source: Cormetech Inc.
De-NO
x
efficiency SCR outlet oxidized Hg NH
3
slip
CIRCLE 22 ON READER SERVICE CARD
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 49
EMISSIONS
and Hg concentration, also need to be es-
tablished in the same way as the traditional
inputs for de-NO
x
, such as temperature, inlet
NO
x
, O
2
, H
2
O, SO
2
, and SO
3
.
The optimal SCR catalyst design for a giv-
en unit will maximize the rates of the de-NO
x

(Equations 1 and 2) and Hg oxidation (Equa-
tion 3) reactions, while minimizing the rate of
the SO
2
oxidation reaction, SO
2
+ ½O
2
à SO
3
.
Routinely, SCR catalyst is formulated to a
maximum allowed SO
2
oxidation rate to min-
imize the negative effects of high SO
3
caused
by air preheater plugging or opacity concerns
(visible plume), while continuing to meet the
de-NO
x
and NH
3
slip requirements. In other
words, the de-NO
x
reduction is limited by the
expected SO
2
oxidation. COMET is designed
to function within these de-NO
x
operational
constraints without impacting its mercury
reduction function. Other factors impact the
catalyst design, such as Hg
0
oxidation that
occurs across the air preheater, the efficiency
of Hg
P
removal, the Hg
2+
capture efficiency in
the FGD, HCl and HBr concentration in the
flue gas, SCR operating temperatures (partic-
ularly for cycling and load-following units),
and so on. Figure 2 illustrates improvements
that have been made in Hg oxidation perfor-
mance as a function of key input parameters,
specifically NH
3
, CO, and halogen content,
while maintaining constant de-NO
x
and SO
2

conversion rates.
Managing Catalyst Performance
Once SCR de-NO
x
and Hg
0
oxidation tar-
gets are established, catalyst management
options can be explored. Figure 3 presents
a series of catalyst management strategies
over the lifetime of a catalyst. Figure 3, top,
illustrates a typical baseline catalyst man-
agement plan with a de-NO
x
rate of 85%
and an Hg
0
oxidation rate of 70%. If at some
time in the future the desired Hg
0
oxida-
tion rate were increased from 70% to 80%
at 70,000 hours of operation, then the cata-
lyst management plan would be modified
to increase the halogen injection (Figure 3,
middle). If the required removal rate were
to increase from 70% to 90% at 70,000 hour
of operation then a catalyst change would
be required (Figure 3, bottom). Note that
combinations of additives and catalyst de-
sign options would also be considered when
updating the catalyst management plan to
achieve the most cost-effective system or
to add additional operating flexibility to the
unit.
Figure 3 illustrates a single catalyst man-
agement plan responding to a hypothetical
change in the required mercury removal rate
in the future. There are many other combina-
tions available than just those illustrated. The
SCR can be tuned should Hg removal rates
be ratcheted up again in the future or if there
are other operating changes in the plant, such
as a fuel switch.
More aggressive emissions rules are likely
in the future, so the best upgrade path for
many plants is to keep their future options
open and capital costs low. COMET is a
highly flexible, cost-effective compliance
strategy for a unit, plant, or even an entire
fleet of coal-fired facilities. ■
—Chris Bertole, PhD (bertolecj@cormetech.
com) is catalyst development manager and
Scot Pritchard (pritchardsg@cormetech.
com) is senior vice president, sales engi-
neering for Cormetech Inc.
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December 2013 50
WORKFORCE TRAINING
Power Plant Training Simulators
Explained
Faced with the necessity of doing more with less—and less-experienced—staff, the
power business increasingly is turning to simulators for reliable and efficient
real-world training.
Richard W. Vesel
T
raining simulators are worth their
weight in gold to the power industry,
as well as to most process industries in
general. People tend to learn the fastest and
the most thoroughly when hands-on trial and
error is part of their training process. Opera-
tional errors made while engaged in training
simulations are cost-free and provide high-
return lesson events. Conversely, the results
of operator errors made during actual plant
operations can range from inefficient to cata-
strophic. Simulators can reduce the time for
training an operator from years to months,
and achieve it with far better thoroughness
and retention. With a built-in ability to re-
view, vary, and repeat operational scenarios
until they are cemented in the minds of op-
erators and operators-to-be, no power plant
should be without one.
Simulators come in many varieties,
where complexity and efficacy are ex-
changed for cost (Figure 1). Simulators
distinguish between emulation and virtual
simulation. Emulators do not physically
contain the same control system elements
or HMIs that the actual process controls
contain but merely mimic them with soft-
ware. A virtual simulator contains exactly
the same process controls and HMIs that
an operator will encounter in the real pro-
cess control room, and only the physical
processes themselves are simulated by
computer. The better the physical system
process simulation, the more realistic the
virtual simulator becomes, until using it
is almost indistinguishable from the real
plant control room experience.
The complexity and accuracy of this phys-
ical process simulation is characterized by
what is called the “fidelity” of the simulator.
Simulator fidelity is usually described as be-
ing low, medium, or high (Table 1). The best,
most process-realistic simulators are high fi-
delity, and as one might expect, they are also
the most expensive. Cost notwithstanding,
many users choose high-fidelity simulators
to train operators so that the trainees get as
deeply exposed to the plant as possible, with-
out actually touching it.
Simulators as a Critical Training
Tool
What are some of the benefits to having a
training simulator? Obviously, training is
faster and more effective, but this can provide
benefits across all plant operations.
For example, new operators can fill va-
cancies in the existing operator force more
quickly. This helps reduce the impact of
workforce turnovers and attrition. When
new equipment is installed, a simulator is
the fastest method of getting existing op-
erators familiar with new procedures. For
new plants, simulators can give operators
early hands-on “experience,” especially
with turnkey projects. Simulators can also
be used to let operators practice standard
operations. This means faster and more re-
liable startups, shutdowns, and runbacks.
Standardization of operating practices
through the use of simulators means that
operators who are identified as those with
“best practices” can train other staff mem-
bers in their methods.
And of course, simulators are ideal for
safely training operators to respond to abnor-
mal plant conditions. This means improved
operational flexibility and response times to
widely varying dispatch signals, a reduction in
abnormal operating situations, and a reduction
of unplanned outages due to operator errors
and unforeseen equipment trips.
Financial Returns from Simulator
Investments
Low-fidelity simulators are low six-figure in-
vestments, while a medium-fidelity simulator
will be in the mid six figures. A full high-
fidelity simulator will typically be in very
low seven-figure territory. From date of order
to delivery date, the typical simulator project
tends to run about three to six months.
1. Many options. A variety of simulator options are available. The best (and most expen-
sive) can exactly duplicate real plant processes and operations. Courtesy: ABB
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 51
WORKFORCE TRAINING
With even the basic benefits discussed
above, such as faster startups and reduced
outages, simulator projects are amongst the
easiest to justify. If a plant has had any sig-
nificant “operator error” events in its recent
history, eliminating these events can bring
immediate returns.
Best Practices for Incorporating
Simulators
The following are suggested approaches
for getting the most value from a simulator
investment:
Use the simulator to familiarize trainees
with plant systems, functions, and interac-
tions, as well as familiarization with HMIs
and process data views.
Use the simulator as a cross-training
tool for members of the plant engineering,
technical,and maintenance staffs.
Use the simulator as a key element of new
operator training:
■ Unit startup, shutdown, and steady state
operations
■ Normal responses to small or moderate
changes in demand
■ Unit runbacks and turndowns to lowest
stable levels of operation
■ Boiler efficiency and safety management
under normal conditions
■ Scheduling of routine intermittent opera-
tions such as soot-blowing
Use the simulator as the central element
for refresher or “continuing education” train-
ing for existing experienced operators:
■ Shift-to-shift transfer of best setup and
control strategy practices
■ Shift-to-shift transfer of abnormal situa-
tion responses
■ Advanced efficiency improvement topics
■ Retraining due to unit equipment modifi-
cations/additions
Focus on abnormal situational control,
with accident prevention and remediation:
■ Large tube leaks
■ Loss of large pump function
■ Loss of fan function
■ Loss of feedwater heater(s)
■ Loss of burner fuel flow (mill plugging,
etc.)
■ Boiler pressure control malfunction
■ Loss of automatic O
2
control
■ Loss of critical measurements
■ Boiler trip management
■ Fuel variability management
■ Alarm flooding scenarios
Use the simulator with plant technical
staff, or consulting suppliers, to assist with:
■ Review of existing control logic and pro-
cess responses
■ Replays of plant problem scenarios to im-
prove controls and responses
■ New control logic testing and debugging
■ Design and test of one-button startup/shut-
down controls
■ Alarm management studies and corrective
actions
■ Cross-training between specialists of dif-
ferent disciplines
Experiences on the simulator, when com-
bined with actual physical walkdowns, are
the fastest way to introduce a new hire or
transferee to the characteristics of a unit. The
practices outlined above will keep operations
staff at the best readiness to handle abnormal
situations when they occur. This is born out
by the experiences of simulator users not only
in fossil and nuclear power, but in all indus-
tries that must control large, complex equip-
ment, right up to airline pilots and astronauts.
Investments in training simulators continue
to grow, and they continue to provide ever-
greater possibilities to improve plant safety,
reliability, and profitable operation. ■
—Richard W. Vesel is global product
manager for power generation energy
efficiency with ABB Power Generation,
North America.
Low fidelity Medium fidelity High fidelity
Benefits Lowest cost, fastest
delivery time
Moderate cost, moderate deliv-
ery schedule, greater process
simulation detail, unit startup
and shutdown simulations
Best possible process model,
most realistic operator experience
for startup, shutdown, dynamic
operations, runbacks/turndowns,
and plant performance tuning
Limitations Process model is static,
good for basic training
in HMI and controls
navigation.
Process model cannot handle
fast process dynamic responses,
runbacks to low levels, or
operational tuning for best unit
financial performance.
Highest investment cost, longest
project execution time
Table 1. Benefits and limitations of simulators vs. fidelity type. Courtesy:
ABB
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December 2013 52
OFFSHORE WIND
A Wind Energy Plan That Fits
America’s Resources
The U.S. lags far behind Europe in offshore wind power production due in part to
deepwater challenges. Using floating vertical axis wind turbines and energy
storage could be the nation’s best means to resolve technical and investment
issues and launch the fledgling sector.
Drew Devitt
A
merica is blessed with long coastlines
and relatively deep waters. But ironi-
cally, this has been a disadvantage to
the U.S. offshore wind industry. Compared to
more than 1,000 turbines that are already op-
erating in the relatively shallow waters around
the British Isles, and the significant offshore
wind turbine generating capacity in many other
European countries, only one offshore turbine
is operational in the U.S. today. This is in no
small part because shallow U.S. coastal waters
are relatively close to the shoreline, which is
problematic because it means offshore instal-
lations, limited by technical hurdles, must be
closer to people, migratory bird patterns, and
within state jurisdictions.
As for any new industry, it is a good idea
to get a big picture view of the sector’s par-
ticular circumstances and objectives. First,
it is a given that renewable wind generation
should be relatively close to demand, yet not
in someone’s backyard. Several technical
trends are symbiotically conspiring to avoid
“not in my back yard” (NIMBY) issues and
dramatically change the offshore wind model
developed in Europe. These trends include
the development of floating wind turbines
as opposed to seafloor-supported designs,
the use of deep ocean water near U.S. coast-
lines as an effective head for energy storage,
and the use of direct current (DC) deepwater
cables in energy transmission. This article
shows how these technologies could work
together in the context of America’s natural
resources and political landscape.
The Case for Offshore Wind
Turbines
When used for offshore wind power produc-
tion, floating structures have the potential to
reach a much larger and significantly more
energetic wind resource than seafloor-mount-
ed turbines. At the same time, they increase
social acceptance because they allow turbines
to be installed far away from people.
Sandy Butterfield and his colleagues at
the National Renewable Energy Laboratory
(NREL) have published papers confirming
the huge potential advantages of floating wind
turbines, noting in 2010: “The NREL has esti-
mated the offshore wind resource to be greater
than the 1000 GW of the continental United
States. The wind blows faster and more uni-
formly at sea than on land. A faster steadier
wind means less wear on turbine components
and more electricity generated per turbine.
The wind increases rapidly with distance from
the coast, so excellent wind sites exist within
reasonable distances from major urban load
centers reducing the onshore concern of long
distance power transmission.”
To emphasize Butterfield’s point regard-
ing transmission, the best winds within the
continental U.S. are class 3 and 4 winds in
the Great Plains and Mountain States—
but typically 1,500 miles from major load
centers. Comparatively, areas just 30 miles
offshore from major metropolitan hubs see
class 6 winds. This is significant because an
estimated 70% of U.S. electricity demand is
close to its coastlines and the Great Lakes.
It is also important to add that the energy in
wind increases as a cube function of its veloc-
ity, so wind of 6 meters per second (m/s) has
more than double the energy of wind at 4 m/s.
Also, wind velocity near the ocean surface is
higher than on land, as thermal boundary layers
created by the sun heating the land are elimi-
nated farther from shore. About 20 miles out to
sea, wind currents aloft sink and reattach to the
ocean surface, becoming trade winds. This re-
duces the need to elevate the turbine into the air
and improves its capacity factor.
Types of Wind Turbines
Wind turbines can have either a horizontal or
a vertical axis of rotation. Another important
point of differentiation is that wind turbines
employ two basic principles to capture en-
ergy from moving air: aerodynamic turbines
use low-pressure lift (like an airplane wing),
while impulse turbines use drag (like a water
wheel). The differentiating factor is that the
blade tip speed of aerodynamic turbines is a
multiple of the wind speed, but an impulse
turbine will not spin faster than the wind.
Aerodynamic turbines can be more efficient
than impulse turbines (Figure 1).
An anemometer, a device for measuring
wind speed, is an example of an impulse-
type device with a vertical axis of rotation—
though vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs)
may employ aerodynamic or impulse design.
Conventional horizontal axis wind turbines
(HAWTs) used widely at utility scale are
an example of aerodynamic turbines with
Betz max. efficiency 2-blade HAWT
aerodynamic 3-Blade HAWT aerodynamic
2-Blade Darrieus VAWT aerodynamic
2-Blade Dutch HAWT aerodynamic Multi-
blade American HAWT hybrid Multi-blade
Savonius VAWT impulse
60
50
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20
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(
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1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1. Turbine efficiency by type. This
chart describes the efficiency of different types
of utility-scale wind turbines. The chart’s verti-
cal axis represents the turbine’s efficiency as a
percentage of the total energy in the wind. The
horizontal axis represents the relationship be-
tween wind speed and turbine tip speed. Aero-
dynamic turbine types have tip speeds of four
to seven times the wind speed, and impulse
turbines have tip speeds on the order of the
wind speed. Aerodynamic turbines are favored
because they have roughly twice the efficiency
of impulse-type turbines, but impulse turbines
have historically been used whenever cost,
reliability, or capacity factor is more important
than efficiency. Source: Jean Lucmenet
December 2013
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POWER www.powermag.com 53
OFFSHORE WIND
tip speeds today reaching 100 m/s (360 ki-
lometers or 225 miles per hour). The old
four-bladed Dutch wind-powered mills and
water pumps that used cloth-covered, wood-
en-framed blades as well as the iconic Wild
West American multiblade wind turbines are
almost impulse type systems when consid-
ered in the context of today’s modern aero-
dynamic HAWTs.
A lot of engineering and technical develop-
ment has gone into modern HAWTs in order
to drive their efficiencies to 45% at the high
end. The theoretical maximum efficiency is
limited by Betz’s Law to 59%. A wind tur-
bine cannot be 100% efficient, as this would
imply that the air exiting the turbine would
have zero velocity and so would prevent oth-
er air from flowing through the turbine.
Efficiency factors can be misleading,
though, in that they presume a certain wind
speed, which is usually not noted. For in-
stance, a HAWT may have an efficiency of
45% for a wind speed of 14 m/s, but it would
not even spin—meaning it would have zero
efficiency—with a 5 m/s wind. HAWTs are
a logical optimization of the wind turbine
specifications. The energy in wind is a cubed
function of its velocity, so optimizing wind
turbine efficiencies for high wind speed re-
sults in large megawatt ratings. This works
well for the sales team when selling a turbine
based on its megawatt rating.
What should be considered instead are capac-
ity factors. Capacity factors are based on a power
curve for the particular wind turbine as well as
wind speed data from the proposed site where
the turbine will be installed. Capacity factors for
land-based wind turbines are typically claimed
to be 25% to 35%. Comparatively, gas or steam
turbine capacity factors approach 100%.
To maximize the capacity factors for
wind energy, the focus of the offshore wind
industry should change from the megawatt
rating of a turbine to useful load matching,
1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
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2. Time versus wind energy. This chart, showing the distribution of wind speeds with
respect to time, plots two years’ worth of wind speed data from a buoy at the mouth of the
Delaware Bay. Total hours that the wind blew at a particular speed are shown as a bar chart. To
show the energy that is contributed at each of the wind speeds, the power in the wind (a cubed
function of its velocity) is multiplied by the time that the wind blew at that speed. Notice that the
maximum energy was at 11 meters per second but that the wind blew at this speed only 4%
of the time. Half of the total energy for the year occurred on the high-speed side of the energy
peak during 15% of the total hours. Source: American Offshore Energy
CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD
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December 2013 54
OFFSHORE WIND
with more interest given to turbines opti-
mized for higher capacity factors in aver-
age wind speeds. In the current paradigm,
HAWTs have the highest efficiencies in the
higher wind speed ranges, and this results
in high megawatt ratings for the turbines
but low capacity factors, meaning that the
turbine will generate its rated capacity only
a small fraction of the time. This causes
“spiky power,” that is, much of a turbine’s
power is made over a relatively short period
of time (Figure 2). For this reason, wind
turbine electricity must be associated with
storage in order to be considered as a basel-
oad power source.
In comparison, VAWTs in an impulse con-
figuration have a relatively high efficiency in
lower wind speeds because they have higher
blade areas as a percentage of swept area. This
could be thought of as the “barn door method”
of collecting energy from the wind: Although
not as efficient at higher wind speeds, impulse
type VAWTs will make power most of the time
the wind is blowing—making them more suit-
able to power companies and mitigating the
need for time shifting or storing wind energy.
However, utility-scale energy storage would
still be beneficial to any electrical grid if it can
be done cost effectively.
Ocean Energy Storage
Much has been invested in trying to develop
energy storage technologies as a way to more
evenly distribute renewable power across
time. So far, only compressed-air storage and
pumped-hydro storage have the capacity to
practically “time shift” utility-scale energy,
but both require specific geological features
that are generally not found close to major
load enters. If the electrical generation occurs
over deep ocean water, though, energy stor-
age becomes much more convenient.
In another significant advantage for floating
wind turbine technology, the pressure of the
deep ocean waters under the turbines can be
used for utility-scale energy storage. A number
of different engineering approaches to this have
been explored using air or water. Colorado-
based Bright Energy Storage, for instance, has
a plan to pump air into huge bags in deep water,
while Dr. Alexander Slocum, a mechanical en-
gineering professor at the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology, suggests using excess wind
power to pump water from hollow concrete
spheres (made from fly ash) that are ballasted
by their own weight to the seafloor. Doubling
as an anchor for floating wind turbines, a 25-
meter-diameter sphere could store up to 10
MWh of power, depending on depth.
Pairing deepwater wind generation with
energy storage could make wind energy the
most flexible of all energy sources. A 1-MW
wind turbine that is able to produce 10 MWh
over 24 hours could sell all 10 MWh dur-
ing the hottest hour of the next day at peak
prices. Wind farm operators could even begin
bidding in the frequency regulation market,
where the price per kilowatt-hour is five to
10 times the price that can be negotiated in
power purchase agreements. This would both
improve returns for investors and provide an
environmental bonus because turbines that
now provide frequency regulation, being
smaller and more flexible, have fewer pollu-
tion controls. It is good for everyone when
clean flexible power is worth more.
Addressing Transmission
Concerns
But to accomplish frequency regulation from
the deep ocean, transmission capabilities are
obviously required. Several developments
have been made here, too. Trans-Elect Devel-
opment Co. has proposed the Atlantic Wind
Connection (AWC), a 6,000-MW transmis-
sion backbone running from Virginia to
northern New Jersey, some 30 to 50 miles
out in the Atlantic Ocean. That $5 billion
plan has attracted more than $500 million
control You
CAN
dust & spillage.
call 800.544.2947
visit martin-eng.com
email info@martin-eng.com
®

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Start with a good foundation: EVO
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Transfer Point System
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SUCCESS STORY
Overall, the biggest dust control improvement
has been the rebuilding of the coal transfer
points to contain dust.
“We used to have lots of dust and spillage.
But now that all the transfer points have
been rebuilt, it’s a night and day difference.”
said Kirk Estee, P.E. Material Handling
Supervisor, OPPD.
Omaha Public
Power District
Omaha, NE
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POWER www.powermag.com 55
OFFSHORE WIND
in investments from companies including
Google, Good Energies, and Marubeni.
Trans-Elect has received a “Determination of
No Competitive Interest” from the Bureau of
Ocean Energy Management and is proceed-
ing without an associated auction. Plans are
in effect to have the first phase—a $1.8 bil-
lion, 150-mile-long project from Delaware
Bay to Atlantic City—operational by 2016.
Notably, Trans-Elect, which was the na-
tion’s first independent transmission compa-
ny, is betting on high-voltage direct current
(HVDC) cables, which it anticipates will
have cost and technical advantages over al-
ternating current (AC) transmission. Today,
almost all commercially available wind tur-
bines generate asynchronous AC current that
is converted to DC, and then the DC is invert-
ed back to three-phase AC at 60 Hz. However,
a number of capital costs, efficiency losses,
cooling systems, power quality problems,
and maintenance headaches must be borne
with this method. Wind turbines designed to
generate DC current may still need a trans-
former to step up the voltage but would avoid
even having to sync with the rest of the grid,
making them simpler to implement by reduc-
ing the balance of plant—which is especially
important at sea.
Though technically challenging, obtaining
permits for undersea cables may be easier than
for land-based lines. Also, transmission cables
could be brought ashore to existing grid con-
nections at retired power plants, many of which
are located on riverbanks or at coastlines near
major load centers. These could serve as per-
fect locations for injection of high-current fre-
quency regulation and reactive power services
to keep the grid running efficiently.
Floating VAWTs Fit the Bill
Only one offshore turbine is operational in the
U.S., even though the country has the world’s
second-highest onshore wind turbine capacity
(after China). The UK has more than one-half
of the 3 GW total worldwide installed offshore
wind generation, and it has ambitious plans
for even more offshore wind farms. However,
as Bloomberg New Energy Finance notes, be-
cause the UK has a limited supply chain for
offshore wind turbines, about 80% of what the
country spends on wind technology still goes
to foreign contractors or turbine suppliers. Jim
Lanard, president of the U.S. Offshore Wind
Development Coalition, is quick to point out
that if the U.S. is to gain and keep legislative
support for the offshore wind industry, it will
have to generate domestic jobs.
Increased use of floating VAWTs could
do just that. First, the capital-intensive sup-
ply chain needed to manufacture large roller
bearings, gears, forgings, and castings would
not be required. Steel fabrications and fiber-
glass components with relatively low capital
equipment needs are all that would be re-
quired, so a supply chain based on these com-
ponents would scale up much more quickly.
Old shipbuilding sites and cargo transfer ports
could make for good candidates for wind tur-
bine manufacturing sites. The labor skill sets
could also be filled quickly and practically
deployed in many more coastal locations.
Floating VAWTs could also eliminate the
need for purpose-built ships that are required
to assemble seafloor-mounted HAWTs. This
is important because, having never installed a
foundation-based offshore wind turbine, the
U.S. lacks a fleet of the jack-up ships that are
necessary. And, unlike in Europe, the U.S.
cannot hire foreign-flagged ships to work in
U.S. territorial waters because it would vio-
late the Jones Act, a federal statute that regu-
lates maritime commerce in U.S. waters. The
U.S. already has a ready fleet of ships that
are capable of towing floating turbines out to
mooring fields, though.
By eliminating a seafloor foundation, the
cost structure of supply-chain issues and the
costs to assemble and service turbines at sea
can also be dramatically improved. As noted
previously, the further away from NIMBY
issues and state jurisdictions, the better the
wind resource becomes, but the ability to tow
a turbine back to the factory in a single day
mitigates risk, reducing both insurance and
banking costs for projects. Ocean transporta-
tion and sighting combined with low turbine
speed could enable scalability to a huge size.
A Better Choice than HAWTs
However, most “floater” programs in develop-
ment in the U.S. today are designed to employ
HAWTs, which have a lot of developmental
inertia based on current onshore designs, their
supply chains, and government funding pro-
grams. U.S. research consortium DeepCwind,
which is led by the University of Maine’s
Habib Dagher, this year launched the first and
only offshore wind turbine off the coast of
Maine—a concrete-composite floating plat-
form HAWT prototype that is one-eighth the
size of a “VolturnUS” design envisioned for
commercial installation.
One problem is that it is difficult to make
conventional HAWTs float. They are cantile-
vered structures, reaching high off their base
support with large masses and forces acting at
the top. It is a fundamentally unstable struc-
ture in the context of floatation, but HAWTs
are the mainstay of the wind energy industry.
Almost all utility-scale wind turbines employ
three blades connected to a horizontal spindle,
which is mounted on top of a pole. There is no
debate that this design can be the most effi-
cient at capturing energy from wind, but a big
picture, smart grid, objective look should con-
sider all of the issues and constraints involved,
not just the turbine’s maximum efficiency.
Other structures are possible. Lightweight
structures can be achieved by using tension
and compression design principles rather
than the bending of a cantilevered structure.
Examples of such structures would include
bicycle wheels, suspension bridges, and sail-
boat masts (Figure 3).
A 200-foot tall VAWT installed 30 miles
offshore would not be visible or audible from
land, dramatically reducing legal challenges
that can delay and increase costs of wind
projects. Having a high degree of solidity and
a low rotation speed avoids harm to birds and
provides excellent horizontal radar reflec-
tion for maritime visibility with little vertical
reflections. Additionally, the VAWT has no
gearbox or oil reservoir, and all the compo-
nents on the turbine are waterproof and rust-
proof. In the event of an occasional hurricane
or rogue storm, the turbines could be easily
reefed or sunk by remote control, allowing
them to ride out the storm safely beneath the
ocean surface. When the storm has passed
turbines may be again raised via remote con-
trol and recommissioned with little effort.
Floating VAWTs enable a host of advantages
that dramatically improve the return on invest-
ment, the reliability of the energy stream, and
the ability to usefully site the turbine. Because
VAWTs would have a completely different sup-
ply chain than conventional HAWTs, their po-
tential to generate jobs may be increased. And,
if paired with HVDC power transmission and
deep ocean energy storage, floating VAWTs
could give the country’s new offshore sector
fair winds in which to hoist its sails. ■
—Drew Devitt is founder of American Off-
shore Energy and a former president of the
American Society of Precision Engineering.
3. Inspired design. One example of a
floating vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is
a design based on the rigid mainsail used on
America’s Cup boats. The 60-ton VAWT design
adds three more sail plans and a masthead
ring for 1,800 square meters of projected
area. The bearings and generator are located
near sea level for easy on-site service and to
provide a stable low center of gravity. Cour-
tesy: American Offshore Energy
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 56
NUCLEAR
When It Comes to Nuclear Plants,
Is Small Beautiful?
Though small, modular reactors have their detractors, on balance, the “little guys”
appear to have an edge over the heavy-weights in the contest for the next gen-
eration of U.S. nuclear power.
Kennedy Maize
I
n 1973, an obscure economist from Brit-
ain’s National Coal Board, which then
owned and operated all the coal mines in
the country, published a book that posited—
as the title proclaimed—that Small Is Beau-
tiful. It was an antidote to the conventional
wisdom that “bigger is better.” E.F. Schu-
macher’s book became an international best-
seller and an iconic text for the burgeoning
worldwide environmental movement.
Today, the nuclear power industry, which
long embraced the “bigger is better” para-
digm, is moving in Schumacher’s direction.
The industry is looking for alternatives to the
long-held wisdom about the economic ben-
efits that come from scaling up atomic tech-
nology. Now, big money is actively pursuing
smaller reactor designs that bite off consid-
erably less than the machines that came into
service in the 1970s and 1980s. The rubric
for the new nukes is “SMR,” which stands for
“small, modular reactors.”
Let’s examine the terms in more detail.
“Small” means reactors that are less than
a third the size of what are conventional,
utility-scale nuclear plants. Modern, state-of-
the-art nuclear units basically start at 1,000
MW and move upward from there. Today’s
plants are designed to take advantage of what
economists describe as “economies of scale,”
meaning that the efficiencies and incremen-
tal cost savings gained by getting bigger out-
weigh the greater cost of a larger unit.
But is that doctrine always valid? Maybe
not, according the latest economic analyses
that support the concept of SMRs. It may be
the case that the hefty capital costs of new,
big nuclear plants, the long lead times to build
them, and the fact that each plant is unique
and entirely built on site, may overwhelm the
economics of getting bigger. Smaller may be
better for new nuclear power units.
The decision by a utility to build a new
conventional nuclear power plant, which
costs in the range of $7,000/MW per unit,
is a gut-wrenching, often bet-the-company,
strategic move. It’s a long-term wager of
at least $7 billion in capital for 1,000 MW
of baseload, nondispatchable, capacity in
a market where power prices are far more
than ever a matter of short-term supply and
demand.
Bite-Sized
Busting that bet into smaller chunks—say 300
MW at a time—makes some economic sense,
many in the industry now reckon, even if the
overall capital cost per unit of power is greater
than the big unit. That’s one of the doorways
to conceptualizing small modular generating
units. There are other potential benefits.
Modular units imply that they can be
built in multiples, following the growth in
demand as it develops (or doesn’t). The
smaller size of the units also implies that the
nuclear units can be factory-fabricated and
shipped to the reactor site, a revolutionary,
and possibly big cost-saving, difference from
the conventional “stick-built” approach that
characterized the first generation of nuclear
power plants in the U.S.
At a presentation at the Bipartisan Policy
Center in Washington last year, Pete Lyons,
the Department of Energy (DOE) assistant
energy secretary for nuclear energy and a
nonpartisan veteran of the nuclear policy
wars in Washington, outlined the economic
benefits the agency sees that could flow from
smaller, more flexible, factory-built reactors.
Among them, said Lyons, are:
■ Reduced financial risk
■ Flexibility to add units
■ Right size for replacement of old coal
plants
■ Domestic forgings and manufacturing
Lyons also laid out what the energy agen-
cy believes are safety benefits from a new,
smaller, generation of nuclear plants, as his
talk occurred close to the first anniversary of
the catastrophe at Japan’s Fukushima multi-
unit nuclear station. These benefits, Lyons
said, include:
■ Passive decay heat removal by natural cir-
culation
■ Smaller source term inventory
■ Simplified design eliminates/mitigates
several postulated accidents
■ Below-grade reactor siting
For nearly four years, the nuclear indus-
try and the federal government, through the
DOE, have been pushing the concept of the
smaller, modular nuclear reactors. Congress
has given the DOE some $452 million to
dedicate to the development of SMRs. The
agency is moving ahead to commit that
money. It’s important to note that the gov-
ernment money isn’t just free candy. It must
be matched, dollar-for-dollar, by the private-
sector recipient.
Policy Priority
Lyons told a House appropriations subcom-
mittee in March 2013 that the Obama ad-
ministration’s “Nuclear Energy Research
and Development Roadmap” places a “high
priority” on accelerating “the timelines for
the commercialization and deployment of
small modular reactor (SMR) technologies
through the SMR Licensing Technical Sup-
port program. The program will focus on
first-of-a-kind engineering support for design
certification and licensing activities for SMR
designs through cost-shared arrangements
with industry partners (industry contribu-
tions are a minimum of 50% of the cost) to
promote accelerated commercialization of
the nascent technology. If industry chooses to
widely deploy these technologies in the U.S.,
they could help meet the nation’s economic,
energy security and climate change goals.”
After soliciting bids in 2010 for proposals
for cooperative agreements, which the DOE
said at the time likely would result in two
winners in the SMR sweepstakes, the agency
in November 2012 picked only one, the Bab-
cock & Wilcox mPower design, a 180-MW
light water reactor proposal from a company
that has vast experience in nuclear power,
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 57
NUCLEAR
particularly with Navy nuclear propulsion
systems (its experience with large civilian
plants, however, has had some bumps along
the road, including the Three Mile Island
plant in Pennsylvania, the Davis-Besse plant
in Ohio, and the Crystal River plant in Flor-
ida). The plan is for connection to the Ten-
nessee Valley Authority (TVA) power system
around 2022.
B&W’s project involves a muscular team
that also includes the engineering giant Bech-
tel and, providing a site and its own extensive
nuclear experience, the TVA. The TVA wants
to locate two of the 180-MW mPower units
at its Clinch River site, where the agency
and the federal government planned, spent
billions, and never succeeded in building a
fast breeder reactor in the 1970s and 1980s.
Breeders were then going to be the next big
thing in nuclear power technology.
Having disappointed the nuclear industry
by picking only one winner in the first round
of its competition for SMR cost sharing, the
DOE last March announced round two, with
applications due in July, for projects aimed at
a 2025 time frame. These projects included:
■ A consortium led by Westinghouse Elec-
tric Co., a Toshiba subsidiary, working
with utility Ameren Missouri (legally
known as Union Electric), owner and op-
erator of the Callaway nuclear plant.
Their plan calls for development of a 225-
MW version of the AP1000, an advanced
1,000-MW pressurized water reactor that
has Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) design approval. (Any SMR proj-
ect will have to get the NRC’s sign-off on
the safety of the design before it can be
built and operated.)
■ NuScale, a 45-MW, below-ground light-
water reactor developed by a group of
Oregon State University (OSU) scientists
working with the DOE’s Idaho Nuclear
Engineering Laboratory. The company is
based in Corvalis, Ore., home of OSU.
NuScale’s majority owner is engineer-
ing and construction giant Fluor Corp.
The design is a pressurized water reactor
that the developers claim can shut down
in an emergency without need for off-site
power.
■ Holtec International, a New Jersey firm,
which has proposed a 160-MW underground
pressurized water reactor, with backing from
New Jersey utility PSEG, which operates
two nuclear generating plants in the Garden
State, and URS Corp., a major nuclear engi-
neering consulting firm.
■ General Atomics (GA), a San Diego firm
that has a long history of innovative reac-
tor technologies, which has bid a helium-
cooled, graphite-moderated design into
the DOE SMR competition. GA, which de-
signed and marketed the Triga research re-
actor, the most successful nuclear machine
in the world, is proposing a version of its
high-temperature gas reactor for the DOE
program. The GA project proposes a 265-
MW helium-cooled, graphite-moderated
reactor that is surely a challenge to conven-
tional light-water designs.
Industry experts expect the DOE to pick a
second-round winner soon.
Cautionary Notes
But the SMR technology has well-qualified
critics. Edwin Lyman of the Union of Con-
cerned Scientists (UCS), long a technically
sophisticated critic of nuclear power, in Sep-
tember issued a report, “Small Isn’t Always
Beautiful,” arguing that SMR technology is a
dead end. The UCS report says that the safety
claims of SMR advocates are overstated. The
SMR units, says the analysis, “feature small-
er, less robust containment system than cur-
rent reactors.” Undergrounding the units “is a
double-edged sword—it reduces risk in some
situations (such as earthquake) and increases
it in others (such as flooding).”
While each smaller unit may be less dan-
gerous than a larger unit, says the UCS paper,
LinkedIn: Where the POWER Community
Connects
As a follow-up to the October editorial “When Policy and
Construction Timelines Diverge,” we asked members of the
LinkedIn POWER magazine group, “Have you ever been
involved in a project built to meet a particular policy—only
to have the policy change by the time the project went
online?” Here are excerpts from a few responses:
Yes, and it wasted a great deal of effort. The sunk •
costs of everyone involved would have run well into six
figures, without counting all of the engineer costs of the
plant itself (I plan the move of them, not design them).
(Edward)
I suppose most of us old timers had such an •
experience.
. . . Change is almost constant in the marketplace
and the regulatory environment. Given that major
power projects take many years for permitting and
construction; and with economics a moving target, you
almost never start up and serve the load as planned. .
. . This situation is certainly a management challenge.
(John)
Yes I worked on a Waste-to-Energy facility in NJ—the •
new Governor cancelled the facility even though the
foundations had been poured—when politics over-ride
sound engineering and financial considerations the
public suffers. See also Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant
in Long Island cancelled after all permits were obtained.
(Richard)
The POWER magazine LinkedIn group is also a great place to
ask for advice from other members (via the Discussions tab).
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 58
NUCLEAR
this “is misleading, because small reactors
generate less power than large ones, and
therefore more of them are required to meet
the same energy needs. Multiple SMRs may
actually present a higher risk than a single
large reactor, especially if plant owners try to
cut costs by reducing support staff or safety
equipment per reactor.”
Nuclear power plant development started
out small in the U.S., for understandable
reasons. The thrust of U.S. efforts on use
of nuclear energy in the first two decades
after the atomic destruction of Hiroshima
and Nagasaki was on submarine propulsion,
driven by the brilliant and autocratic engi-
neer Admiral Hyman Rickover, who occu-
pied dual positions in the Navy and at, first,
the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and,
later, at the DOE.
The first U.S. commercial power reac-
tor—Shippingport, on the Duquesne Light
system outside of Pittsburgh, Pa.—was a
60-MW unit that was basically a Navy pres-
surized water reactor built on the ground
and tied into the utility grid. It went into
service in December 1957. The AEC reactor
program cautiously followed with a series
of early light-water reactors of fairly low
power: Dresden in Illinois, a boiling-water
reactor at 180 MW (1959); Indian Point 1 in
New York, with 163 MW of capacity from
nuclear and 112 MW from an oil-fired pre-
heater (1962); and Humboldt Bay in Cali-
fornia at 63 MW (1963).
Consolidated Edison, which owned and
operated the Indian Point reactor, in the early
1960s proposed a 1,000-MW plant in Queens,
in the heart of New York City at its existing
Ravenswood oil-fired station. Con Ed’s plans
for the unit soon collapsed under the weight
of local opposition and a skeptical AEC.
The nuclear big iron arrived with the “sec-
ond-generation” reactors of the late 1960s
and early 1970s, beginning with New Jer-
sey’s Oyster Creek, a 636-MW GE boiler that
went into service in 1969, and about which
the economics remain murky today, although
it appears that GE, which built the plant on a
turnkey contract, took a large financial bath.
But the presumed economies of scale soon
propelled reactor vendors and utility buyers
into larger and large units, until 1-GW ma-
chines became the norm.
But there were concerns even during the
nuclear boom of the 1970s that the scale-up
had been a mistake. The second generation of
nuclear designs—the 1,000-MW big boys of
GE, Westinghouse, Combustion Engineering,
and B&W—too often were lousy performers
by many measures. They had poor operating
records, with too many unplanned outages,
poor capacity factors, and multitudes of regu-
latory infractions.
In the 1980s, not long after the March
1979 Three Mile Island meltdown in Penn-
sylvania, a top nonpolitical official at the
NRC suggested that perhaps it was a mis-
take to rapidly scale up reactors beyond
about 300 MW. At the time, those musings
struck the nuclear industry as unexpected
treachery.
Today, on the other hand, the industry
is embracing the idea of smaller units with
greater safety margins, fewer engineered
safety features, often with underground sit-
ing, and with economic benefits from smaller
scale. Will this latest approach to resurrect
the U.S. nuclear industry work? That ques-
tion remains unanswered. ■
—Kennedy Maize is a POWER
contributing editor.
ENJOY 70º
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3rd Annual EUEC Golf Tournament | Feb 2nd, 2014
December 2013
|
POWER www.powermag.com 59
EVENTS
Coal in Favor as Malaysia
Increases Its Installed Capacity
Attendees at the third annual Asian Sub-Bituminous Coal Users’ Group learned de-
tails about Southeast Asia’s first 1-GW supercritical coal-fired power plant and
heard of plans to expand coal’s use further across the region.
By David Wagman
M
alaysia’s largest power provider
considers coal to be an important
fuel for future growth as the South-
east Asian nation of nearly 30 million people
works to diversify its generation portfolio
away from natural gas even as it meets grow-
ing demand for electricity.
Attendees at the third annual Asian Sub-
Bituminous Coal Users’ Group (ASBCUG)
in George Town, Penang, Malaysia (Figure
1) in October saw evidence of that com-
mitment to coal during a visit to the Stesen
Janakuasa Sultan Azlan Shah power plant, a
3 x 700-MW coal-fired power plant equipped
with Alstom turbines that entered service in
2003. The power plant is sited on reclaimed
land next to the Straits of Malacca on the
country’s west coast. Work is underway at
an adjacent location on a 1,000-MW super-
critical coal-fired unit—also using Alstom
technology—that is slated to enter service in
March 2015. Conference attendees also heard
Tenaga Nasional Bhd (TNB) Vice President
of Generation Zainuddin Ibrahim say that
the company will build two more 1,000-MW
coal-fired power plants by 2017.
Zainuddin said Malaysia’s electricity de-
mand is growing at a 2.9% annual rate and
that TNB currently generates 35% to 40%
of its electricity from coal, 50% from natu-
ral gas, and the remainder from renewable
energy, including hydroelectricity. Asia as a
whole obtains around two-thirds of its elec-
tricity from coal-fired power plants, he said.
“Our aim is to give the most cost-efficient
supply of electricity,” Zainuddin told report-
ers on the sidelines of the annual conference,
which is organized by TradeFair Group, pub-
lisher of POWER. He said coal ranks as one
of Malaysia’s most important energy sources
and that more than 80% of the fuel is imported
from Indonesia, South Africa, and Australia.
TNB is the country’s largest utility and
is one of the ASBCUG’s founding utilities.
Other founders include CLP Power Hong
Kong, the Electricity Generating Public Co.
Ltd. (EGCO) of Thailand, Hong Kong Elec-
tric, Taiwan Power, Korea Southeast Power
(KOSEP), and the U.S.-based Powder River
Basin Coal Users’ Group.
Coal Plant Visit
Two motor coaches took ASBCUG attend-
ees to TNB’s 2,100-MW Stesen Janakuasa
Sultan Azlan Shah power plant (Figure 2),
a three-hour drive from the UNESCO World
Heritage city of George Town. The power
plant’s three subcritical units entered service
between April and September 2003 and oper-
ate with main steam and reheat steam tem-
peratures of 540C. The boilers are two-pass,
drum-type boilers with seven elevations of
tangential firing coal burners and four eleva-
tions of distillate oil burners. At 100% load
the station burns 320 tons of coal per hour.
The station’s coal yard can accommodate a
30-day supply of coal.
Since the station entered service, op-
erators have burned 43 different brands of
bituminous and subbituminous coal. That
represents a total burn of around 48.4 million
tons of subbituminous coal and 9.1 million
tons of bituminous coal.
Azizul Othman, operations manager,
said the plant meets World Bank standards
for emissions. It achieves those standards
by using flue gas desulfurization and elec-
trostatic precipitators. Low-NO
X
burners as
well as low-sulfur subbituminous coal also
help achieve emission goals, which are 50
mg/Nm
3
for particulates, 750 mg/Nm
3
for
sulfur dioxide, and 650 mg/Nm
3
for nitrogen
oxide. The plant does no on-site coal blend-
ing. Instead, ships’ holds are unloaded at an
offshore jetty and the coal is conveyed to the
plant’s coal yard. The plant’s boilers then
burn one shipload of coal at a time.
Nearby, work is underway on what is
expected to be Southeast Asia’s first super-
critical coal-fired boiler at the 1,000-MW
Manjung 4 unit. Work on the project began
in March 2011, and the facility is expected
to begin producing electricity for Malaysia’s
national grid in early 2015, said Rosli Mo-
hammad Appandi, who heads TNB’s boiler,
coal, and ash operations. The unit is expected
to be anywhere from 37% to 41% efficient
and achieve a heat rate ranging from 9,200
1. UNESCO World Heritage Site. The third annual Asian Subbituminous Coal Users’
Group met in George Town, Penang, Malaysia. The 2014 conference will take place in Bangkok,
Thailand. Source: David Wagman
www.powermag.com POWER
|
December 2013 60
EVENTS
Btu/kWh to 8,300 Btu/kWh. The 80-meter-
tall two-pass boiler will be equipped with
a pulverizer and dynamic classifier. Fabric
filters will be installed to handle particulate
control instead of electrostatic precipitators.
Appandi said the unit’s personnel are cur-
rently in training using both simulators and
on-site training at an overseas power plant.
As required by the project lender, TNB has
also hired a technical service advisor to assist
with power plant operations for its first two
years of service.
Coordinating with Malaysia’s national
load dispatch center is likely to be complex,
he said, since this will be the first time that 1
GW of capacity will come from a single unit.
Not surprisingly, the unit runs best at basel-
oad, and Appandi said any request to reduce
the plant’s output could negatively impact
its overall efficiency. A second challenge in-
volves preparing contingency plans should
the unit trip offline.
Mercury Strategies
Mercury emissions also were a topic of dis-
cussion during the two-day conference. The
Minamata Convention on Mercury, named
after a Japanese city where industrial emis-
sions of mercury caused a poisoning disease
that affected thousands of people, was signed
by multiple nations in early October. It aims
to prevent health damage and environmental
pollution. The convention was adopted at an
international conference organized by the
United Nations (UN) Environment Program
and drew delegates from 140 nations.
The pact will take effect 90 days after it is
ratified by at least 50 nations and maps out
measures to curb health and environmental
damage caused by mercury. Lesley Sloss,
principal environmental consultant for the
International Energy Agency’s Clean Coal
Center, told ASBCUG attendees that the
UN Environmental Program had named
mercury as the greatest danger globally,
2. Emission standards. Azizul Othman, operations manager at the 2,100-MW coal-
fired Stesen Janakuasa Sultan Azlan Shah power plant in Malaysia, said the plant achieves
World Bank emission standards by using flue gas desulfurization and electrostatic precipitators.
Source: David Wagman
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December 2013
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POWER www.powermag.com 61
EVENTS
and that perhaps 25% of mercury releases
to the environment may come from power
plants. She said Asia is a primary focus for
mercury reductions given the amount of
coal burned for power production across
the region.
She said that although the United States
was among the first to initiate mercury con-
trols, Canada was the first to adopt emission
limits in 2010. Ontario complied in part by
closing all of its coal-fired power plants, she
said. (For more on Ontario’s coal phaseout,
see “Ontario Goes Coal-Free in a Decade” in
the May issue of POWER.)
The U.S. emission standards are par-
ticularly stringent and require mercury
reductions of between 90% and 95%, she
said. The standard was set based on emis-
sions from the top 12 performing coal-fired
plants, and compliance may be achieved
through approaches that include both wet
and dry flue gas desulfurization, dry sor-
bent injection, selective catalytic reduction
(SCR), activated carbon injection, and bag-
house and fabric filters. (See “Optimized
SCR Catalysts Maximize Mercury Removal
Co-Benefits” in this issue.)
Sloss said that many U.S. power gen-
erators have found compliance to require a
“significant investment,” but that compliance
with the Minamata Convention standards
may be a less-expensive undertaking. Rela-
tively simple steps such as fuel switching,
operating adjustments, and coal washing may
be effective mitigation tools. Sloss said that a
5% to 10% blend of bituminous with subbi-
tuminous coal could add sufficient amounts
of chlorine and potassium to enhance mer-
cury’s conversion to an oxidized state, which
may be captured at rates of up to 90%.
Other Regional Coal-Burning
Concerns
Attendees also heard Rod Hatt, president of
Coal Combustion Inc., discuss challenges
operators face due to variations in coal qual-
ity. He said that because coal originates from
fossilized swamps, wide variability in coal
quality should be expected, even from a
single seam in a mine. What’s more, he said
sampling techniques and standards have not
evolved much over the decade. This means
that broad variations in coal quality may exist
but remain unidentified.
As one example, he said that coal volatil-
ity refers to the amount of smoke a particular
coal produces, a gauge first identified in the
mid-1800s by naval commanders and used
as a means to measure how visible their war-
ships might be under full steam. “We’re us-
ing 1880s technology in 2013,” he said.
Doug Hart, firing systems manager at Al-
stom Power, extended the discussion about
coal to note that low-rank coals tend to burn
easier, but they also may spontaneously com-
bust on the coal pile. He said subbituminous
coal produces lower NO
X
and SO
2
emissions,
but at the expense of a lower heat value and
higher moisture content. Hatt said that lower
NO
X
can detune a boiler and increase the
amount of slagging. Combustion efficiency
also may be affected, he said.
Hart pointed to a variety of systems that
may need to be modified or upgraded by a
power plant that burns subbituminous coal.
Those systems include mills, high-velocity
coal piping, burners, the furnace, air heaters,
and induction fans.
The 2014 Asian Sub-bituminous Coal Us-
ers’ Group conference will be held in Bang-
kok, Thailand. Visit www.asiansbcusers.com
for details. ■
—David Wagman is content director
for the ELECTRIC POWER Conference,
which takes place April 1–3, 2014, in New
Orleans. Visit www.electricpowerexpo.
com for details.
For more information, call Wright’s Media
at 877.652.5295 or visit our website at
www.wrightsmedia.com
Leverage branded content from POWER magazine to create a more
powerful and sophisticated statement about your product, service,
or company in your next marketing campaign.
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www.powermag.com POWER
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December 2013 62
NEW PRODUCTS
TO POWER YOUR BUSINESS
Heat Recovery Economizer
Rising energy costs necessitate new ideas and
techniques for heat recovery—such as the Hitec
Economizer from GEA Heat Exchangers. It is designed for
equipping or retrofitting gas turbines and boilers, as well as
a wide range of industrial processes where heat recovery can be
achieved. A special feature of the Hitec Economizer is the corrosion-
and temperature-resistant Polual shield on the finned tubes of the heat
exchangers. These finned tubes can be manufactured from inexpensive, light
metal (aluminum) but can be employed for temperatures up to 200C (392F).
Until now, finned tubes made of considerably more expensive stainless steel
were commonly used for such temperatures. In addition, stainless steel
has lower heat conductivity than does light metal, which reduces operational
efficiency. (www.gea-heatexchangers.com)
Eddy Current Testing Instruments
Nondestructive testing technology company UniWest has announced the launch of the EddyView family of three new
portable eddy current testing instruments. The line of new instruments, Prime, Pro, and Premium, is designed to match
the technical functionality and price of eddy current instruments from the most basic to the most sophisticated. The
product line was developed in response to market demand for a wider selection of application-specific features in
portable eddy current testing instruments. All three of the new instruments are built on the same high-signal to low-
noise technology platform, and these instruments are readily available. (www.uniwest.com)
Bearing Fault Detector Vibration Sensor
IMI Sensors has launched the Bearing Fault Detector PLUS, which is a new sensor
designed to monitor rolling element bearings and provide a sensitive 4–20 mA signal to
plant monitoring and control systems for early alarming of faults. The new model 649A03
contains an accelerometer and transmitter in a single housing with multiple specialized
outputs. When used with a control system, these outputs provide an early warning of
bearing defects such as cracked races, brinelling, looseness, and spalling. Ideal for
applications requiring continuous monitoring, the 649A03 is specifically designed for
sensitivity to high-frequency vibrations in rolling element bearings, which indicate the
early stages of wear and damage. (www.imi-sensors.com)
Inclusion in New Products does not imply endorsement by POWER magazine.
2014
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BUYERS’ GUIDE
2014
2G - CENERGY Power Systems
Technologies, Inc., 151 College
Dr., #15, Orange Park, FL 32065
Phone: 904-579-3217
Fax: 904-406-8727
Email: mturwitt@2g-cenergy.com
www.2g-cenergy.com
360training.com and LKItraining.
com, 13801 N Mopac Blvd., Ste.
100, Austin, TX 78731
Phone: 888-318-3552
Email: kirk.
vandervort@360training.com
www.360training.com/corporate-
solutions/power
3Degrees, 38 Keyes Ave., Ste.
300, San Francisco, CA 94129
Phone: 415-449-0500
Fax: 415-680-1561
Email: info@3degreesinc.com
www.3degreesinc.com
4-STAR Hose & Supply, 10704
Composite Dr., Dallas, TX 75220
Phone: 214-351-6085
Email: info@4starhose.com
www.4starhose.com
A
A.J. Weller Corp., P.O. Box 17566,
Shreveport, LA 71138
Phone: 318-925-1010
Fax: 318-925-8818
Email: robinr@ajweller.com
www.ajweller.com
Aalborg CSP A/S, Hjulmagervej
55, Aalborg, 9000 Denmark
Phone: +45 88 16 88 36
Email: info@aalborgcsp.com
www.AalborgCSP.com
AB Technology Group, 431 State
St., Box 1491, Ogdensburg, NY
13669
Phone: 610-906-3549
Email: info@abthermal.com
www.firesleeveandtape.com
ABB Switzerland Ltd., Excitation
Systems Austrasse, Turgi, 5300
Switzerland
Phone: +41 58 589 24 86
Fax: +41 58 589 23 33
Email: pes@ch.abb.com
www.abb.com/unitrol
ABB Transformer Remanufactur-
ing and Engineering Services,
4350 Semple Ave., St. Louis, MO
63120
Phone: 314-679-4722
Email: donna.m.wiese@us.abb.com
www.abb.com
ABB, Inc., 29801 Euclid Ave.,
Wickliffe, OH 44092-1832
Phone: 440-585-6724
Fax: 440-585-7944
Email: francisco.m.tacoa@
us.abb.com
www.abb.com
ABC - Diesel, Wiedauwkaai 44,
Gent, 9000 Belgium
Phone: 329-267-0033
Fax: 329-267-0067
Email: ph@abcdiesel.be
www.abcdiesel.be
Abengoa, 16401 Swingley Ridge
Rd., Ste. 700, Chesterfield, MO
63017
Phone: 636-519-2300
Fax: 636-539-4021
Email: meranda.ory@abengoa.com
www.abengoa.com
The POWER Buyers’ Guide consists of a Company Directory
(below), a Product Directory (p. 102), and a Service Directory
(p. 117). In the Product and Service Directories, categories also
have subcategories. The Company Directory lists manufacturers’
and service providers’ complete contact information.
HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE
Suppose you want to contact one or more manufacturers of circuit
breaker test equipment. Turn to the Product Directory page that
lists test equipment. There you’ll find subcategories listed, includ-
ing one for circuit breakers (30).
From the companies listed below the test equipment
subcategories, select those with (30) after their names. Then
consult the Company Directory for their contact information.
Listings in boldface type indicate companies that are advertisers
in this issue. Their ads appear on the pages noted.
SEARCH ONLINE, TOO
Visit www.powermag.com and click on the Buyers’ Guide button
to search by company or keyword in the online
POWER Buyers’ Guide.
This print directory includes companies that updated their information in our online Buyers’ Guide within the past year
(through early November). To ensure current information listings at ELECTRIC POWER, visit www.powermag.com and click
on Buyers’ Guide to update your listing by March 2013.
The deadline for updates that will appear in next year’s print Buyers’ Guide will be October 1, 2014. To edit or update a
listing, click on the Buyers’ Guide button on the powermag.com site any time before then.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR VENDORS
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December 2013 64
Abresist Kalenborn Corpora-
tion, 5541 North State Road 13,
Urbana, IN 46990
Phone: 800-348-0717
Fax: 219-774-8188
Email: russ@abresist.com
www.abresist.com
AcousticEye, 12 Greenway Plaza,
Ste. 1100, Houston, TX 77046
Phone: 888-874-4779
Email: info@acousticeye.com
www.acousticeye.com
Acromag, Inc., 30765 S Wixom
Rd., Wixom, MI 48393
Phone: 248-295-0880
Fax: 248-624-9234
Email: sales@acromag.com
www.acromag.com
Active3D, Inc., 2125 Davis Blvd.,
Fort Myers, FL 33905
Phone: 313-608-8822
Fax: 435-608-8825
Email: marc@active3dinc.com
www.active3dinc.com
ADA Carbon Solutions, 1460 W
Canal Ct., Ste. 100, Littleton, CO
80120
Phone: 303-962-1989
Email: devon.santistevan@ada-
cs.com
www.ada-cs.com
ADA Environmental Solutions,
9135 S Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 200,
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129
Phone: 303-734-1727
Fax: 303-734-0330
Email: contactus@adaes.com
www.adaes.com
Advance Products & Systems, P.O.
Box 60399, Lafayette, LA 70596
Phone: 337-233-6116
Fax: 337-232-3860
Email: sales@apsonline.com
www.apsonline.com
Advanced Acoustic Technologies,
LLC, 3022 Shepperd Rd., Monk-
ton, MD 21111
Phone: 410-472-3000
Email: mail@soniccleaning.com
www.soniccleaning.com
Advanced CEM Solutions, 30 Mon-
roe Drive, Pelham, AL 35124
Phone: 800-429-8445
www.advancedcems.com
Advanced Combustion Technol-
ogy, Inc., 8525 Freeland St.,
Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-910-8800
Fax: 713-910-8889
Email: act@act-texas.com
www.act-texas.com
Advanced Detection Systems,
LLC, 1440 East 357th St., East-
lake, OH 44095
Phone: 440-951-6687
Fax: 440-951-6641
Email: jai@spectruminfrared.com
www.spectruminfrared.com
Advanced Filtration Concepts,
7111 Telegraph Rd., Los Angeles,
CA 90640
Phone: 323-832-8316, x12
Fax: 323-832-8318
Email: tmoyer@advfiltration.com
www.ADVfiltration.com
Advanced Flexible Systems, Inc.,
P.O. Box 14156, Charleston, SC
29422-4156
Phone: 843-795-6800
Fax: 843-795-6889
Email: ttaylor@afsjoints.com
www.afsjoints.com
Advanced Industrial Systems,
Inc., P.O. Box 373, 1550 Confed-
eration Line, Sarnia, ON N7T 7J2
Canada
Phone: 877-902-8822
Fax: 519-336-0049
Email: ko@theaisteam.com
www.theaisteam.com
Advanced Inspection Technolo-
gies, Inc., 7777 N Wickham Rd.,
#12-557, Melbourne, FL 32940
Phone: 321-610-8977
Fax: 321-574-3814
Email: paul@aitproducts.com
www.aitproducts.com
Advanced Remediation, LLC,
5361 Young Pine Rd., Orlando,
FL 32829
Phone: 407-234-1788
Fax: 407-380-5188
Email: jmm@agfuels.biz
www.agfuels.biz
Advanced Specialty Gases, 135
Catron Dr., Reno, NV 89512
Phone: 775-356-5500
Fax: 775-356-5571
Email: asg@advancedspecialty-
gases.com
www.advancedspecialtygases.com
Advanta Energy Corp., 2500 Old
Crow Canyon Rd., Ste. 526, San
Ramon, CA 94583
Phone: 925-831-8001
Email: gallen@advantaenergy.com
www.AdvantaEnergy.com
AE&E - Von Roll, Inc., 302
Research Dr,. Ste. 300, Norcross,
GA 30092
Phone: 770-613-9788
Fax: 770-613-9860
Email: info@aee-vonroll.com
www.aee-vonroll.com
AE&E Austria GmbH & Co. KG,
Waagner- Biro-Platz 1, Raaba/
Graz, 8074 Austria
Email: info@aee-austria.at
www.aee-group.com
Aegion, 17988 Edison Avenue,
St. Louis, MO 63005
Phone: 636-530-8000
Fax: 636-519-8010
www.aegion.com
See our ad on p. 48
Aeris Corp., P.O. Box 2026,
Kalamazoo, MI 49003
Phone: 269-207-7360
Fax: 269-375-4479
Email: jdurlach@aeriscorporation.
com
www.aeriscorporation.com
AeroGo, Inc., 1170 Andover Park
West, Tukwila, WA 98188
Phone: 206-575-3344
Fax: 206-575-3505
Email: kiliz.b@aerogo.com
www.aerogo.com
Aerotek Energy Services, 7301
Parkway Dr., Hanover, MD 21076
Phone: 410-694-5483
Email: tmendoza@aerotek.com
www.aerotek.com
Aggreko, 4540 Kendrick Plaza
Drive, Suite 100, Houston, TX
77032
Phone: 877-795-0252
Fax: 281-985-8201
www.us.aggreko.com
AGT Services, Inc., 24 Sam Strat-
ton Rd., Amsterdam, NY 12010
Phone: 518-843-1112
Fax: 518-843-8389
Email: brian@agtservices.com
www.agtservices.com
AIMS, LLC, 1616 S 31st Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-237-0292
Fax: 602-237-0294
Email: chris@azindustrialclean-
ing.com
www.azindustrialcleaning.com
Air Engineering, Inc., 2075 S
170th St., New Berlin, WI 53151
Phone: 800-558-4318
Email: parts@airengineering.com
www.airengineering.com
Air Instruments & Measurements,
LLC, 15404 E Valley Blvd., City of
Industry, CA 91746-3325
Phone: 626-330-4700
Fax: 626-330-4776
Email: aimanalysis@earthlink.net
www.aimanalysis.com
Air Systems Ltd., 139, Velach-
ery Road, Chennai, Tamilnadu,
600015 India
Email: nitin@asplparts.com
www.asplparts.com
Airfloat LLC, 2230 Brush College
Rd., Decatur, IL 62526
Phone: 217-423-6001
Fax: 217-422-1049
Email: tabbott@airfloat.com
www.airfloat.com
Airflow Sciences Corp., 12190
Hubbard St., Livonia, MI 48150
Phone: 734-525-0300
Fax: 734-525-0303
Email: power@airflowsciences.com
www.airflowsciences.com
Airoflex Equipment, 6001 49th
St. S, Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-264-8066
Fax: 651-631-2539
Email: sales@airoflexequipment.com
www.airoflexequipment.com
Airtrol, Inc., 920 S Highway Dr.,
Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-326-4600
Fax: 636-326-4610
Email: cthompson@airtrol.com
www.airtrol.com
Aitech Defense Systems, 19756
Prairie St., Chatsworth, CA 91311
Phone: 888-248-3248
Fax: 818-718-9787
Email: dpatterson@rugged.com
www.rugged.com
Aitken Spence PLC, Aitken
Spence Towers,305, Vauxhall
Street, Colombo 02, Sri Lanka
Phone: +94 11 2 308 308
Fax: +94 11 2 445 406
Email: info@aitkenspence.lk
www.aitkenspence.com
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Albemarle Environmental
Division, 451 Florida St., Baton
Rouge, LA 70801
Phone: 225-388-7402
Email: mercury@albemarle.com
www.albemarle.com/mercury
Albert Products, P.O. Box 1245,
Springfield, IL 62705
Phone: 217-529-9600
Fax: 217-529-8919
Email: buckets@carhoe.com
www.carhoe.com
Alcatel-Lucent, 3, Avenue Octave
Greard, Paris, 75007 France
Phone: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Fax: +33 (0)1 40 76 10 10
Email: kamal.y.ballout@alcatel-
lucent.com
www.alcatel-lucent.com/smart-grid
Alchemy Consultants, Inc., 9144
Highland Ridge Way, Tampa, FL
33647-2277
Phone: 813-994-1654
Fax: 813-994-6095
Email: aci1@tampabay.rr.com
Alcon Solenoid Valves, 369 Frank-
lin St., Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-855-2500
Fax: 716-855-1400
Email: marketing@alconsole-
noids.com
www.alconsolenoids.com
Alden, 30 Shrewsbury St.,
Holden, MA 01520-1843
Phone: 508-829-6000
Fax: 508-829-5939
Email: info@aldenlab.com
www.aldenlab.com
Aleasoft, Viladomat 1, 1º 1ª,
Barcelona, 8015 Spain
Phone: +34 93 289 20 29
Email: info@aleasoft.com
WWW.ALEASOFT.COM
Alfa Laval, Maskinvej 5, Søborg,
DK-2860 Denmark
Phone: +45 39 53 60 00
Fax: +45 39 53 65 56
Email: susanne.rosentoft@
alfalaval.com
www.alfalaval.com
ALGAE-X International (AXI),
5400-1 Division Dr., Fort Myers,
FL 33905
Phone: 239-690-9589
Email: pgeorge@algae-x.net
www.algae-x.net
Alignment Supplies, Inc., 1681
Lance Pointe Rd., Ste. 2, Mau-
mee, OH 43537
Phone: 800-997-4467
Fax: 419-887-5893
Email: pberberian@alignment-
supplies.com
www.alignmentsupplies.com
Alimak Hek, Inc., 1100 Boston
Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06610
Phone: 203-367-7400
Fax: 203-367-9251
Email: info@alimakhek.com
www.alimakhek.com
Allegheny Industrial Sales, Inc.,
105 N Jamestown Rd., Moon
Township, PA 15108
Phone: 412-262-9050
Fax: 412-262-9055
Email: dlb2@allegheny-ind.com
www.allegheny-ind.com
Allegro, 1445 Ross Ave., Ste.
2200, Dallas, TX 75202
Phone: 214-237-8000
Fax: 214-526-7076
Email: info@allegrodev.com
www.allegrodev.com
Allen Gears Ltd., Atlas Works,
Station Road, Pershore, WR10
2BZ United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1386 552211
Email: sales@allengears.com
www.allengears.com
Allen-Sherman-Hoff, 457 Cream-
ery Way, Exton, PA 19341-2508
Phone: 484-875-1600
Fax: 484-875-2080
Email: dpi_marketing@diamond-
power.com
www.a-s-h.com
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc.,
W62 N248 Washington Ave., #
208, Cedarburg, WI 53012
Phone: 262-618-2403
Fax: 262-618-2303
Email: info@alliedindustrialmar-
keting.com
www.alliedindustrialmarketing.com
Allied Power Group, 10131 Mills
Rd., Houston, TX 77070
Phone: 281-444-3535
Fax: 281-444-3529
Email: info@alliedpg.com
www.alliedpg.com
Allied Union, Inc., 4704 Yorkshire
St., Sugar Land, TX 77479
Phone: 281-980-1700
Email: alliedui@gmail.com
www.alliedunion.com
Alloy Bellows and Precision
Welding, 653 Miner Rd., Highland
Hts., OH 44143
Phone: 440-684-3000 X105
Email: d.scanlon@alloybellows.
com
www.alloybellows.com
Alstom, 3 Avenue André Malraux,
Levallois-Perret, 92300 France
Phone: +33 1 4149 20
Fax: +33 1 4149 7925
Email: alexandra.weber@power.
alstom.com
www.alstom.com
Alstom Projects India Ltd., First
Floor, Brahmputra Bldg., Makar-
pura Gidc, Maneja, Vadodara,
390013 India
Phone: 0265-6613367
Fax: 0265-6613080
Email: himanshu.joshi@power.
alstom.com
www.alstom.co.in
Alstom Thermal Services, 2800
Waterford Lake Dr., Midlothian,
VA 23112
Phone: 804-763-2329
Email: tgservices@power.alstom.
com
www.power.alstom.com
Alstom USA, 801 Pennsylvania
Ave., NW, Ste. 855, Washington,
DC 20004
Phone: 202-495-4960
Fax: 202-495-4961
Email: adam.r.pratt@power.
alstom.com
www.alstom.com/us
Altec Capital Services, LLC, 33
Inverness Center Pkwy., Ste. 200,
Birmingham, AL 35242
Phone: 205-408-8077
Fax: 205-408-8113
Email: abby.wiggins@altec.com
www.alteccapital.com
Alturdyne, 660 Steele St., El
Cajon, CA 92020
Phone: 619-440-5531
Fax: 619-442-0481
Email: info@alturdyne.com
www.alturdyne.com
Amarillo Gear Co., P.O. Box 1789,
Amarillo, TX 79105
Phone: 806-622-1273
Fax: 806-622-3258
Email: info@amarillogear.com
www.amarillogear.com
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co.,
10080 Alliance Rd., Cincinnati,
OH 45242
Phone: 513-792-9800
Fax: 513-792-9933
Email: sales@ambassadorco.com
www.ambassadorco.com
Ambitech, 1411 Opus Place, Suite
200, Downers Grove, IL 60515
Phone: 630-963-5800
Fax: 630-963-8099
www.ambitech.com
AMEC, 1979 Lakeside Pkwy,
Tucker, GA 30084
Phone: 770-688-2500
Fax: 770-688-2501
www.amec.com
American Aerospace Controls,
Inc., 570 Smith St., Farmingdale,
NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-5100
Email: greg@a-a-c.com
www.a-a-c.com
American Association of Boiler
Assessors, Inc., P.O. Box 310,
Brooks, KY 40109
Phone: 502-562-0022
Email: cmceachran@aa-ba.org
www.aa-ba.org
American DG Energy, Inc., 45
First Ave., Waltham, MA 02451
Phone: 781-522-6000
Fax: 781-522-6050
Email: info@americandg.com
www.americandg.com
American Efficiency Services, LLC,
15925 North Ave., Woodbine, MD
21797
Phone: 410-489-0613
Fax: 410-489-6937
Email: wscherer@americanef-
ficiency.com
www.americanefficiency.com
American Electrical Testing Co.,
Inc., 480 Neponset St., P.O. Box
267, Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 800-992-3826
Fax: 781-821-0771
Email: hbramson@99aetco.com
www.99aetco.com
American Exchanger Services,
1950 Innovation Way, Hartford,
WI 53027
Phone: 414-529-0067
Fax: 414-433-4839
Email: joe@amexservices.com
www.amexservices.com
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American Fire Technologies, Inc.,
2120 Capital Dr., Wilmington, NC
28405
Phone: 910-799-9191
Fax: 910-799-3382
Email: gregr@americanfiretech.
com
www.americanfiretech.com
American Galvanizers Associa-
tion, 6881 S Holly Cir., Ste. 108,
Centennial, CO 80112
Phone: 720-554-0900
Fax: 720-554-0909
Email: marketing@galvanizeit.org
American Industrial Supply,
351 Smith St., Perth Amboy, NJ
08862
Phone: 732-826-7600
Fax: 732-826-9182
Email: sales@ameind.com
www.ameind.com
American Polywater Corp., P.O.
Box 53, Stillwater, MN 55082
Phone: 651-430-2270
Fax: 651-430-3634
Email: freddy@polywater.com
www.polywater.com
American Pulverizer Co., 1319
Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO
63110
Phone: 314-781-6100
Fax: 314-880-2293
Email: sales@ampulverizer.com
www.ampulverizer.com
American Wind Energy Associa-
tion, 1501 M St. NW, Ste. 1000,
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-383-2500
Fax: 202-383-2505
Email: windmail@awea.org
www.awea.org
AMETEK Land, Inc., 150 Freeport
Rd., Blawnox, PA 15238
Phone: 412-826-4444
Fax: 412-826-4460
Email: irsales@ametek.com
www.ametek-land.com
Ametek Power Instruments, 255
N Union St., Rochester, NY 14605
Phone: 585-263-7700
Fax: 585-262-4777
Email: power.sales@ametek.com
www.ametekpower.com
Ametek, Solidstate Controls,
875 Dearborn Dr., Columbus, OH
43085
Phone: 614-846-7500
Fax: 614-885-3990
Email: nick.yarnell@ameteksci.com
www.solidstatecontrolsinc.com
Amiad Filtration Systems, 2220
Celsius Ave., Oxnard, CA 93103
Phone: 805-988-3323
Fax: 805-988-3313
Email: renee@amiadusa.com
www.amiad.com
Amphenol Industrial Operations,
40-60 Delaware Ave., Sidney, NY
13838
Phone: 800-678-0141
Fax: 607-563-5157
Email: cvansoest@amphenol-aio.
com
www.amphenol-industrial.com
Ampirical Solutions, LLC, 4 Sanc-
tuary Blvd., Ste. 100, Mandeville,
LA 70471
Phone: 985-789-6726
Fax: 985-809-5250
Email: dmitchell@ampirical.com
www.ampirical.com
AMREL/American Reliance, 3445
Fletcher Ave., El Monte, CA 91731
Phone: 626-443-6818
Fax: 626-443-8600
Email: ariinfo@amrel.com
www.amrel.com
Analysts, Inc., P.O. Box 2955,
Torrance, CA 90509-2955
Phone: 310-320-0070
Fax: 310-320-0970
Email: analystsinc@analystsinc.com
www.analystsinc.com
Analytec Corp., 8828 S Kingston
Ave., Tulsa, OK 74137-3000
Email: analytec@worldnet.att.net
www.analytec.com
Andax Industries, LLC, 613 W
Palmer St., Saint Marys, KS 66536
Phone: 800-999-1358
Fax: 888-443-4732
Email: customerservice@andax.com
www.andax.com
Andritz AG - Pumps Division,
Stattegger Strasse 18, Graz,
A-8045 Austria
Phone: 43 316 6902 2509
Fax: 43 316 6902 413
Email: guenter.haiden@andritz.com
www.andritz.com/pumps
ANDRITZ Environmental Solu-
tions, Inc., 9730 Patuxent Woods
Dr., Ste. 100, Columbia, MD
21046
Phone: 410-910-5100
Fax: 410-910-5101
Email: sue.emminizer@andritz.com
www.allied-env.com
Anixter, 4464 Willow Rd., #101,
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Phone: 925-469-8751
Fax: 925-469-8750
Email: matt.scheid@anixter.com
www.anixter.com
Ansaldo Caldaie S.p.A., Largo
Buffoni 3, Gallarate (VA), 21013
Italy
Phone: 0331738111
Fax: 0331738794
Email: sales@ansaldoboiler.it
www.ansaldoboiler.it
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports,
160 Frenchtown Rd., North Kings-
town, RI 02852
Phone: 401-886-3005
Email: bstrouss@anvilintl.com
www.anvilintl.com
Anvil International, 500 W Eldo-
rado St., Decatur, IL 62522
Phone: 217-425-7354
Fax: 217-425-7537
Email: dmcdavitt@muellercom-
pany.com
ap+m, 1811 Corporate Dr., Boyn-
ton Beach, FL 33426
Phone: 561-732-6000
Fax: 561-732-6562
Email: sales@apm4parts.com
www.apm4parts.com
APC by Schneider Electric, 132
Fairgrounds Rd., West Kingston,
RI 02892
Phone: 888-994-8867
Fax: 401-788-2698
Email: gutor.usa@apc.com
www.gutor.com
Apex Instruments, Inc., 204
Technology Park Ln., Fuquay-
Varina, NC 27526
Phone: 919-557-7300
Fax: 919-557-7110
Email: jnichols@apexinst.com
www.apexinst.com
APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energía),
P.O. Box 272, 720 Snyder Creek
Rd., Jefferson, CO 80456
Phone: 970-231-6032
Fax: 970-506-9229
Email: admin@apoyotec.com
www.apoyotec.com
Applied Bolting, 1413 Rocking-
ham Rd., Bellows Falls, VT 05101
Phone: 802-460-3100
Fax: 802-460-3104
Email: info@appliedbolting.com
www.appliedbolting.com
Applied Gas Turbines, a Division
of Mid America Engine, 2500
State Hwy. 160, Warrior, AL
35180
Phone: 205-647-4312
Fax: 205-590-3885
Email: sales@appliedgasturbines.
com
www.appliedgasturbines.com
Aptech Engineering Services,
Inc., P.O. Box 3440, Sunnyvale,
CA 94088-3440
Phone: 408-745-7000
Fax: 408-734-0445
Email: aptech@aptecheng.com
www.aptecheng.com
Aquatech International Corp.,
One Four Coins Dr., Canonsburg,
PA 15317
Phone: 724-746-5300
Fax: 724-746-5359
Email: aic@aquatech.com
www.aquatech.com
Aquatic Sciences, L.P., 40 Centre
Dr., Orchard Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-667-3507
Fax: 716-667-3509
Email: blaurens@aquaticsciences.
com
www.aquaticsciences.com
AquatiPro™, 211 12th St. SW,
Loveland, CO 80537
Phone: 970-593-1342
Fax: 970-461-1485
Email: apsales@aquatipro.com
www.aquatipro.com
Aqua-Vu, 34076 County Rd. 3,
P.O. Box 368, Crosslake, MN
56442
Phone: 218-297-0744
Fax: 218-692-4881
Email: ben@aquavu.com
www.aquavu.com
Arc Machines, Inc., 10500 Orbital
Way, Pacoima, CA 91331
Phone: 818-896-9556
Email: sales@arcmachines.com
www.arcmachines.com
Ares Technology, LLC, 126 Cor-
porate Dr., Ste. E, Simpsonville,
SC 29681
Phone: 864-399-9805
Fax: 864-399-9809
Email: jpalmer@arestechllc.com
AREVA, Inc., 7207 IBM Dr., Char-
lotte, NC 28262
Phone: 434-832-3702
Fax: 434-832-3840
Email: donna.gaddybowen@
areva.com
www.us.areva.com
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Arid Dry by Controlled DH (IMS),
5931 Ford Ct., Brighton, MI
48116
Phone: 810-229-7900
Fax: 810-229-7908
Email: tbradley@cdims.com
www.cdims.com
Aries Electronics, 2609 Bartram
Rd., Bristol, PA 19007
Phone: 215-781-9956
Fax: 215-781-9845
Email: frankf@arieselec.com
www.arieselec.com
Arizona Instrument, LLC, 3375 N
Delaware St., Chandler, AZ 85225
Phone: 602-470-1414
Fax: 480-804-0656
Email: sales@azic.com
www.azic.com
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc., 648
Moeller St., Granby, QC J2G 8N1
Canada
Phone: 450-378-2655
Fax: 450-375-3787
Email: jrsmith@armstronginter-
national.com
www.armstronginternational.com
ASB Industries, Inc., 1031 Lam-
bert St., Barberton, OH 44203
Phone: 330-753-8458
Fax: 330-753-7550
Email: cmkay@asbindustries.com
www.asbindustries.com
Asco Valve, Inc., 50 Hanover Rd.,
Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 973-966-2000
Fax: 973-966-2448
Email: info-valve@asco.com
www.ascovalve.com
ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc., 301
Gordon St., Allentown, PA 18102
Phone: 800-344-4000
Fax: 610-778-8991
Email: info@asgco.com
www.asgco.com
Ashland Water Technologies,
Drew Industrial, One Drew Plaza,
Boonton, NJ 07005
Phone: 973-263-7600
Fax: 973-263-4483
www.drewindustrial.com
ASI Group Ltd., 250 Martindale
Rd., St. Catharines, ON L2R 7R8
Canada
Phone: 905-641-0941
Fax: 905-641-1825
Email: blaurens@asi-group.com
www.asi-group.com
Asia Carbon Energy, 5F, CBD In-
ternational Mansion, No.16 Yong
An Dong Li, Chaoyang District,
Beijing, P R China, Beijing,
100022 China
Phone: 86 10 65637762
Fax: 86 10 6563 7612
Email: cindy.jin@a-carbon.com
www.a-carbon.com
ASME, Two Park Avenue, New
York, NY 10016
Phone: 973-882-1170
www.asme.org
Associated Electric Products,
Inc., P.O. Box 6713, Longmont,
CO 80501
Phone: 800-361-6314
Email: info@assoc-elec-prod.com
www.assoc-elec-prod.com
Aston Evaporative Services, 743
Horizon Ct., Ste. 250, Grand
Junction, CO 81506
Phone: 970-242-7003
Fax: 970-256-7006
Email: kevink@astoncompanies.
com
www.astoncompanies.com
Astro Arc Polysoude, Inc., 24856
Rockfeller Ave., Valencia, CA
91355
Phone: 661-702-0141
Fax: 661-702-0632
Email: sales@astroarc.com
www.astroarc.com
ATCO Emissions Management, 260
Holiday Inn Dr., Unit 1, Cam-
bridge, ON N2P 2V1 Canada
Phone: 519-220-0600
Fax: 519-220-0602
Email: info@atcoem.com
www.atcoem.com
Atlantic Plant Services, 10440
Little Patuxent Pkwy., Ste. 600,
Columbia, MD 21044
Phone: 800-433-0438
Fax: 815-730-3350
Email: kelly.simonsen@atlanticii.
com
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc.
(ABS), 3330 Fiechtner Dr. SW,
Fargo, ND 58104
Phone: 701-235-5226 ext.117
Email: jwyganowska@abs-usa.com
www.abs-usa.com
Atlas Copco Compressors, LLC,
1800 Overview Dr., Rock Hill, SC
29730
Phone: 866-546-3588
Email: paul.humphreys@
us.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.us
Atlas Copco Tools and Assem-
bly Systems, 2998 Dutton Rd.,
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
Phone: 248-373-3000
Email: assembly.tools@
us.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.us
ATM Air Freight, 1924 Rankin Rd.
Ste. 300, Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-821-2002
Fax: 281-443-0938
Email: jeremy@atmairfrt.com
Atomizing Systems, Inc., Bldg.
#1, 1 Hollywood Ave., Hohokus,
NJ 07423
Phone: 201-447-1222
Fax: 201-447-6932
Email: info@coldfog.com
www.coldfog.com
AUMUND Fördertechnik GmbH,
Saalhoffer Strasse 17, Rheinberg,
47495 Germany
Phone: 492843720
Fax: 49284360270
Email: aumund@aumund.de
www.aumund.com
Automated Appointment Re-
minders, 30150 Telegraph Rd.,
Bingham Farms, MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: sales@voiceshot.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/
appointment-reminder.asp
Automation Products, Inc. - DY-
NATROL® Division, 3030 Maxroy
St., Houston, TX 77008-6294
Phone: 713-869-0361
Fax: 713-869-7332
Email: sales@dynatrolusa.com
www.DynatrolUSA.com
Automation Technology, Inc.,
2001 Gateway Pl., Ste. 100, San
Jose, CA 95110
Phone: 408-350-7020
Fax: 408-350-7021
Email: sales@atinet.com
www.atinet.com
Automation Training, Inc., 1067
East Woolley, Carlisle, IN 47838
Phone: 866-573-9849
Email: terri@atifortraining.com
www.atifortraining.com


AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep
GmbH u. Co. KG, Heinestrasse 5,
Herrsching, 82211 Germany
Phone: +49 8152-9392-0
Fax: +49 8152-939291
Email: info@ava-huep.de
www.ava-huep.com
AVO Training Institute, Inc., 4271
Bronze Way, Dallas, TX 75237
Phone: 877-594-3156
Fax: 214-331-7363
Email: avotraining@avotraining.
com
www.avotraining.com
AZZ | N L I, 7410 Pebble Dr., Fort
Worth, TX 76118
Phone: 800-448-4124
Email: gregkeller@azz.com
www.azz.com/nli
B
B & H Engineering, 5773 Rut-
ledge Trail, Liberty Township, OH
45011
Phone: 888-742-9783
Fax: 866-742-9783
Email: tosterhouse@geographic-
markers.com
www.geographicmarkers.com
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd.,
Gemini House, Cambridgeshire
Business Park 1, Bartholomew’s
Walk, Ely, CB7 4EA United
Kingdom
Email: sales@bwmech.co.uk
www.bwmech.co.uk
b3o enviroTek, 695 Nashville
Pike, No. 310, Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-989-1576
Fax: 615-451-5044
Email: budr@locateunderground.
com
www.locateunderground.com
Babcock & Wilcox Co., 20 S
Van Buren Ave., Barberton, OH
44203
Phone: 330-753-4511
Fax: 330-860-1886
Email: info@babcock.com
www.babcock.com
See our ad on p. 7
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Babcock Power Environmental,
Inc., 5 Neponset St., P.O. Box
15040, Worcester, MA 01615-0040
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-854-3800
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Babcock Power, Inc., 6 Kimball Ln.,
Ste. 210, Lynnfield, MA 01940
Phone: 978-646-3300
Fax: 978-646-3301
Email: sales@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Baldor Electric Co., 5711 R.S.
Boreham, Jr St., Ft. Smith, AR
72901
Phone: 479-646-4711
Fax: 479-648-5792
Email: info@baldor.com
www.baldor.com
See our ad on p. 21
Banner Engineering, 9714 Tenth
Ave. North, Minneapolis, MN
55441
Phone: 800-809-7043
Fax: 763-544-3123
Email: sensors@bannerengineer-
ing.com
www.bannerengineering.com
Bannerstone Energy, 7 Buerger
Rd., Mobile, AL 36608
Phone: 251-344-2534
Email: pstabler@bannerstoneen-
ergy.com
www.bannerstoneenergy.com
Barnhart, 26374 Pollard Rd., Ste.
B, Daphne, AL 36526
Phone: 800-587-3249
Fax: 251-654-0547
Email: thughes@barnhartcrane.
com
Barry Persky & Co., Inc., 31
Taunton Ln., Newtown, CT 06470
Phone: 203-270-6700
Fax: 203-270-6702
Email: bpersky@barrypersky.com
www.barrypersky.com
BARTEC GmbH, Max-Eyth-Str.
16, Bad Mergentheim, 97980
Germany
Phone: +49 7931 597-0
Fax: +49 7931 597-119
Email: info@bartec.de
www.bartec.de
Basic Concepts, 1310 Harris
Bridge Rd., Anderson, SC 29621
Phone: 800-285-4203
Fax: 864-224-7063
Email: bci@basicconcepts.com
www.basicconcepts.com
Basic Wire & Cable, 3900 N Rock-
well St, Chicago, IL 60618
Phone: 773-539-1800
Fax: 773-539-3500
Email: basicwire@basicwire.com
www.basicwire.com
Basler Electric, 12570 State
Route 143, Highland, IL 62249
Phone: 618-654-2341
Email: jakehinterser@basler.com
www.basler.com
Bauer Compressors, Inc., 1328
Azalea Garden Rd., Norfolk, VA
23502
Phone: 757-855-6006
Fax: 757-857-1041
Email: sls@bauercomp.com
www.bauercomp.com
BE&K Construction Co., LLC, 2000
International Park Dr., Birming-
ham, AL 35243
Phone: 205-972-6618
Fax: 205-972-6807
Email: bonsackr@bek.com
www.bek.com
Beamex, Inc., 2152 Northwest
Pkwy., Ste. A, Marietta, GA 30067
Phone: 800-888-9892
Fax: 770-951-1928
Email: beamex.inc@beamex.com
www.beamex.com
Beaudrey A.S., 343 West Drake
Rd., Ste. 240, Fort Collins, CO
80526
Phone: 970-204-1573
Email: beaudreyas@beaudreyas.
com
www.beaudreyas.com
Bechtel, 5275 Westview Dr.,
Frederick, MD 21703
Phone: 301-228-8609
Email: powernews@bechtel.com
www.Bechtel.com
R
EL ECT RI C ACT UATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons, Inc.,
11 Terry Dr., Newtown, PA 18940
Phone: 215-968-4600
Fax: 215-860-6383
Email: sales@haroldbeck.com
www.haroldbeck.com
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc., 6190
118th Ave. North, Largo, FL
33773-3724
Phone: 727-544-2326
Fax: 727-546-0121
Email: marketing@beckwithelec-
tric.com
www.beckwithelectric.com
Bedeschi America, Inc., 3275 W
Hillsboro Blvd., Ste. 312, Deer-
field Beach, FL 33442
Phone: 954-602-2175
Email: info@bedeschiamerica.com
www.bedeschiamerica.com
Beetle Plastics, LLC, Ardmore
Industrial Airpark, P.O. Box 1569,
Ardmore, OK 73402
Phone: 580-389-5421
Fax: 580-389-5424
Email: sales@beeltleplastics.com
www.beetleplastics.com
Belgrave Management Ltd., Ste
3, Poseidon Ct Cyclops Wharf,
Docklands, London, E14 3UG
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 020 7193 8707
Fax: +44 020 8593 7690
Email: belgrave@belgraveltd.com
www.belgraveltd.com
Belt Conveyor Guarding, 3478
Penetanguishene Rd., Barrie, ON
L4M 4Y8 Canada
Phone: 866-300-6668
Fax: 705-725-8835
Email: safety@conveyorguard-
ing.com
www.conveyorguarding.com
Belt Tech, P.O Box 620,Washing-
ton, IN 47501
Phone: 877-554-BELT
Email: sales@belttech1.com
www.belttech1.com
Beltran Technologies, Inc., 1133
East 35th St., Brooklyn, NY 11210
Phone: 718-338-3311
Fax: 718-253-9028
Email: beltran@earthlink.net
www.Beltrantechnologies.com
Beltservice de Mexico, Gustavo Baz
305 Colonia La Loma, Tlalnepantla,
Edo. de MX, 54060 Mexico
Phone: 5-5362-0434
Fax: 5-5362-0261
Email: ventasmexico@beltservice.
com
www.beltservicedemexico.com


Belyea Co., Inc., 2200 Northwood
Ave., Easton, PA 18045
Phone: 610-515-8775
Fax: 610-258-1230
Email: jkinney@belyeapower.com
www.belyeapower.com
Belzona Western Ltd., 10732
Maple Bend Dr. S.E., Calgary, AB
T2J 1X5 Canada
Phone: 403-225-0474
Fax: 403-278-8898
Email: belzona1@telus.net
www.belzona.ca


Benetech, 2245 Sequoia Dr., Ste.
300, Aurora, IL 60506
Phone: 630-844-1300
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: smitha@benetechusa.com
www.benetechglobal.com
Benjamin Co., 3575 East Oak
Lake Rd., Port Clinton, OH 43452
Phone: 419-366-0950
Fax: 419-285-2585
Email: ksb@kenben.com
www.kenben.com
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co.,
1711 Orbit Way, Minden, NV
89423-4114
Phone: 775-783-4600
Fax: 775-783-4650
Email: sales@bpb-co.com
www.bentlypressurizedbearing.com
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC,
99 Midway Ln., Oak Ridge, TN
37830
Phone: 865-483-1488
Fax: 865-425-4309
Email: berthold-us@berthold-
tech.com
www.berthold-us.com
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc.,
3201 W Harrison St., Phoenix,
AZ 85009
Phone: 602-323-0436
Fax: 602-265-5431
Email: lbeugelink@beu-math.com
Beumer Kansas City, LLC, 4435
Main St., Ste. 600, Kansas City,
MO 64111
Phone: 816-245-7262
Email: jackie.sessler@beumer.com
www.beumer.com
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BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH
& Co. KG, Oelder Str. 40, Beckum,
59269 Germany
Phone: 0.000809864
Fax: 279.9991901
Email: beumer@beumer.com
www.beumer.com



BHI Energy, 60 Industrial Park
Rd., Plymouth, MA 02360
Phone: 508-591-1149
Fax: 508-591-1397
Email: lauren.buckman@bhien-
ergy.com
www.bhienergy.com
See our ad on p. 1
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC,
208 Long Branch Rd., Ste. 300,
Syracuse, NY 13209
Phone: 315-453-0001
Fax: 315-453-0033
Email: dbianchi@bianchidemo.com
www.bianchidemo.com
Bibb EAC, 3131 Broadway, Kansas
City, MO 64111
Phone: 816-285-5500
Email: bobbibb@bibb-eac.com
www.bibb-eac.com
BICE Engineering and Consulting,
5729 Lebanon Rd., Ste. 144 PMB
353, Frisco, TX 75034-7259
Phone: 214-883-3675
Fax: 972-668-0563
Email: bemay@bice-eeconsulting.
com
www.bice-eeconsulting.com
Bierlein Companies, 2000 Bay
City Rd., Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 800-336-6626
Fax: 989-496-0144
Email: bboyle@bierlein.com
Big Top Manufacturing, 3255
North US 19, Perry, FL 32347
Phone: 850-584-7786
Fax: 850-584-7713
Email: sales@bigtopshelters.com
www.bigtopshelters.com
Bilfinger Berger Power Services
GmbH, Duisburger Str. 375, Ober-
hausen, 46049 Germany
Phone: +49 208 4575 7740
Fax: +49 208 4575 2170
Email: andreas.goebel@bbps.
bilfinger.com
www.bbps.bilfinger.com
Binder Group Pty Ltd., 26 Miles
Rd., Kewdale, 6105 Australia
Phone: + 61 8 9353 2208
Fax: + 61 8 9353 2806
Email: leo.crohan@bindergrp.com
www.bindergrp.com
BinMaster Level Controls, 7201
N 98th St., P.O. Box 29709
(68529), Lincoln, NE 68507
Phone: 402-434-9102
Fax: 402-434-9133
Email: info@binmaster.com
www.binmaster.com
BIOFerm Energy Systems, 617
N Segoe Rd., Ste. 202, P.O. Box
5408, Madison, WI 53705
Phone: 608-467-5523
Fax: 608-233-7085
Email: info@biofermenergy.com
www.biofermenergy.com
Bird Machine Co., 1600 Provi-
dence Hwy., Ste. 45, Walpole, MA
02081-2544
BIS Both Industrial Services BV,
P.O. Box 6007, Da Vlaardingen,
3130 Netherlands
Phone: 31 10 2497046
Fax: 31 10 2497047
Email: jan@bisboth.nl
www.bisboth.nl
Blac, Inc., 195 Spamler Ave.,
Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 630-279-6400
Fax: 630-279-1005
Email: melisa.miller@blacinc.com
Blome International, 1450 Hoff
Industrial Dr., O’Fallon, MO 63366
Phone: 636-379-9119
Fax: 636-379-0388
Email: andy@blome.com
www.blome.com
BMC P. Ltd., B-184 Okhla Indus-
trial Area Phase-1, New Delhi,
110020 India
Phone: +91 11 26812554
Fax: +91 11 26371343
Email: jbihani@bihanigroup.com
www.bihanigroup.com
Boiler Tube Co. of America, 506
Charlotte Hwy., P.O. Box 849,
Lyman, SC 29365
Phone: 864-439-4489
Fax: 864-439-8292
Email: sales@boilertubes.com
www.boilertubes.com
Boldrocchi Srl, Viale Trento e
Trieste, 93, Biassono, 20046 Italy
Phone: 39-039-22021
www.boldrocchi.it
Bonetti, S.p.A., 8311 Brier Creek
Pkwy., Ste. 105-257, Raleigh, NC
27617
Phone: 919-806-3880
Fax: 919-806-8774
Email: sales@bonetti-valves.com
www.bonetti-valves.com
BORSIG GmbH, Egellsstr. 2, Ber-
lin, WV 13507 Germany
Phone: ++49 30 430101
Fax: ++49 30 43012622
Email: info@borsig.de
www.borsig.de
Bowman (Birmingham) Ltd.,
Chester St., Birmingham, B6 4AP
United Kingdom
Phone: 0044-121-359 5401
Fax: 0044-121-359 7495
Email: info@ejbowman.co.uk
www.ejbowman.co.uk
Braden Mfg., LLC, 5199 N Mingo
Rd., P.O. Box 1229, Tulsa, OK
74117
Phone: 918-272-5371
Fax: 918-272-7414
Email: jtrost@braden.com
www.braden.com
Brand Energy & Infrastructure
Services, 2505 South Main St.,
Kennesaw, GA 30144
Phone: 905-660-8176
Fax: 905-738-1391
Email: faran.latafat@beis.com
www.beis.com
Brandenburg Industrial Service
Co., 2625 South Loomis St.,
Chicago, IL 60608
Phone: 312-326-5800
Fax: 312-326-5055
Email: email@brandenburg.com
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray
International, Inc., 13333
Westland East Blvd., Houston,
TX 77041
Phone: 281-894-5454
Fax: 281-894-0077
Email: bob.bloem@bray.com
www.bray.com
Breen Energy Solutions, 104
Broadway St., Carnegie, PA 15106
Phone: 412-431-4499
Email: support@breenes.com
www.breenES.com
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc.,
P.O. Box 30536, Pensacola, FL
32503
Phone: 850-484-7653
Fax: 850-476-9999
Email: eddiepoles@brownwood-
pensacola.com
www.brownwoodpensacola.com
BRUKS Rockwood, 5975 Shiloh
Rd., Ste. 109, Alpharetta, GA
30005
Phone: 770-849-0100
Fax: 770-495-7195
Email: kuh@bruks.com
www.bruks.com
BRUSH Turbogenerators, Falcon
Works, Nottingham Rd. Loughbor-
ough, Leicestershire, LE11 1EX
United Kingdom
Email: salesuk@brush.eu
www.brush.eu
Buckman Laboratories Inc., Water
Technologies, 1256 N McLean
Blvd., Memphis, TN 38108
Phone: 901-272-8386
Fax: 901-276-6890
Email: agtucker@buckman.com
www.buckman.com
Buell APC, 200 North Seventh
St., Ste. 2, Lebanon, PA 17046
Phone: 717-274-7110
Fax: 717-274-7342
Email: twl@fkinc.com
www.BuellAPC.com
Bulldog Erectors, Inc. - Crane
Division, P.O. Box 879, Newberry,
SC 29108
Phone: 910-620-1305
Fax: 803-276-6915
Email: bulldogcranediv@hotmail.
com
Burns & McDonnell - Energy
Division, 9400 Ward Parkway,
Kansas City, MO 64114
Phone: 816-822-3230
Fax: 816-333-3690
Email: jreyes@burnsmcd.com
www.burnsmcd.com
See our ad on Cover 2
C
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Mainte-
nance, 320 Coweta Industrial
Pkwy., Ste. J, Newnan, GA 30265
Phone: 770-692-6001
Fax: 770-692-6006
Email: ccjensen@ccjensen.com
www.ccjensen.com
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December 2013 70
C.H.Robinson Worldwide, 5550
North Riverside Dr., Fort Worth,
TX 76137
Phone: 866-797-9370
Email: panirud@chrobinson.com
www.chrobinson.com/flatbed
C.I.Agent Solutions, LLC, 11760
Commonwealth Dr., Louisville,
KY 40299
Phone: 502-267-0101
Fax: 502-267-0181
Email: terry@ciagent.com
www.ciagent.com
C.M.G. and Associates, Inc., 1757
Madison Ave., North Port, FL
34286
Phone: 941-429-0890
Fax: 614-386-5591
Email: cmgai@earthlink.net
C.S. Osborne & Co, 125 Jersey
St., Harrison, NJ 07029
Phone: 973-483-3232
Fax: 973-484-3621
Email: cso@csosborne.com
www.csosborne.com
C.U.E., Inc., 11 Leonberg Rd.,
Cranberry Township, PA 16066
Phone: 724-772-5225
Fax: 724-772-5280
Email: sales@cue-inc.com
www.cue-inc.com
Cain Industries, Inc., W194
N11826 McCormick Dr., German-
town, WI 53022
Phone: 262-251-0051
Fax: 262-251-0118
Email: sales@cainind.com
www.cainind.com
Caldwell Energy/Caldwell Tanks,
4000 Tower Rd., Louisville, KY
40219
Phone: 502-964-3361
Fax: 502-810-0983
Email: jkraft@caldwelltanks.com
Calgon Carbon, 400 Calgon Car-
bon Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-6700
Fax: 412 787-6676
www.calgoncarbon.com
Calpine Corp., 50 W San Fer-
nando, San Jose, CA 95113
www.calpine.com
Calvert Wire & Cable Corp., 5091
West 164th St., Brook Park, OH
44142
Phone: 216-433-7618
Fax: 216-433-7618
Email: jvaughan@calvert-wire.
com
www.calvert-wire.com
Camarines sur Polytechnic Col-
lege, Peñafrancia Avenue Naga
City San Vicente, libmanan, 4407
Philippines
Phone: 9197871757
Email: xylhug89@yahoo.com
Cambria Contracting, Inc., 5105
Lockport Rd., Lockport, NY 14094
Phone: 716-625-6690
Fax: 716-625-6693
Email: weichhorn@cambriacon-
tracting.com
www.cambriacontracting.com
CAMCORP, Inc., 9732 Pflumm Rd.,
Lenexa, KS 66215
Phone: 913-831-0740
Fax: 913-831-9271
Email: tracyj@camcorpinc.com
www.camcorpinc.com
Camfil Farr Power Systems, 2785
Ave. Francis Hughes, Laval, QC
H7L 3J6 Canada
Phone: 800-976-9382
Fax: 450-629-5847
Email: gt.americas@camfilfarr.com
www.camfilfarr.com/ps/
Canadian Buffalo, 465 Laird Rd.,
Guelph, ON N1G 4W1 Canada
Phone: 519-837-1921
Fax: 519-837-2380
Email: marcel@canadianbuffalo.com
www.canadianbuffalo.com
Canasia Power Corp., Ste. 306, 73
Simcoe St., Toronto, ON M5J 1W9
Canada
Phone: 416-363-1815
Email: canasia@istar.ca
www.canasiapower.com
Cannon Technologies, Inc., 8301
Golden Valley Rd., #300, Min-
neapolis, MN 55427
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-595-7776
Email: info@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com
Capstone Turbine Corp., 21211
Nordhoff St., Chatsworth, CA
91311
Phone: 818-734-5300
Fax: 818-734-5385
Email: marketing@capstonetur-
bine.com
www.capstoneturbine.com
Carboline, 2150 Scheutz Road, St.
Louis, MO 63146
Phone: 888-227-2654
www.carboline.com
Carling Technologies, 60 Johnson
Ave., Plainville, CT 06062
Phone: 860-793-9281
Email: info@carlingtech.com
www.carlingtech.com
CarrierClass Green Infrastructure,
400 Stenton Ave., Ste. 214,
Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462
Phone: 267-419-8496
Fax: 215-565-2746
Email: james.innes@carrierclass-
group.com
www.ccgigogreen.com
Carver Pump Co, 2415 Park Ave,
Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-263-3410
Email: sales@carverpump.com
www.carverpump.com
Carzoli Engineering Sales, 1541
Ginny Ln., Woodstock, IL 60098
Phone: 815-245-0066
Fax: 815-338-4604
Email: cescarzolieng@sbcglobal.
net
www.carzoli-engineering.com
Casey Industrial, Inc., 11845
Teller St., Broomfield, CO 80020
Phone: 303-460-1274
Fax: 303-465-5562
Email: tlepak@caseyind.com
www.caseyind.com
Cat Pumps, 1681 94th Ln. NE,
Minneapolis, MN 55449-4324
Phone: 763-780-5440
Fax: 763-780-2958
Email: techsupport@catpumps.com
www.catpumps.com
Caterpillar Inc., P.O. Box 610, N4
AC6109, Mossville, IL 61552
Phone: 800-321-7332
Fax: 309-578-2559
Email: cat_power@cat.com
www.cat-electricpower.com
CB&I, 2103 Research Forest Dr.,
The Woodlands, TX 77380-2624
Phone: 832-513-1000
Fax: 832-513-1005
Email: info@cbi.com
www.CBI.com
See our ad on p. 3
CBP Engineering Corp., 185
Plumpton Ave., Washington, PA
15301
Phone: 724-229-1180
Fax: 724-229-1185
Email: halulko@cpbengineering.
com
www.cpbengineering.com
CCC Group, Inc., 5660 Greenwood
Plaza Blvd., Ste. 445, Greenwood
Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-581-1070
Fax: 303-530-3208
Email: jbrowning@cccgroupinc.com
www.cccgroupinc.com
CCI (Control Component, Inc.),
Severe Service Valve Solutions,
22591 Avenida Empresa, Rancho
Santa Margarita, CA 92688
Phone: 949-888-1877
Fax: 949-635-5151
Email: etodd@ccivalve.com
www.ccivalve.com
CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Rd.,
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: 631-549-2300
Fax: 631-549-2654
Email: info@us.cd-adapco.com
www.cd-adapco.com
CDR Systems Group, 146 South
Atlantic Ave., Ormond Beach, FL
32176
Phone: 386-615-9510
Fax: 386-615-9606
Email: sales@cdrsystems.com
www.westernpowerproducts.com
CE Power Solutions, P.O. Box 147,
Lake Hamilton, FL 33851
Phone: 863-439-2992
Fax: 863-439-2991
Email: ncampbell@cepowersol.
com
www.cepowersol.com
CEC Vibration Products, Inc., 746
Arrow Grand Circle, Covina, CA
91722
Phone: 626-938-0200
Fax: 626-938-0202
Email: info@cecvp.com
www.cecvp.com
CECO Compressor Engineering
Corp., 5440 Alder Dr., Houston,
TX 77081
Phone: 713-664-7333
Fax: 713-664-6444
Email: sales@ceconet.com
www.tryceco.com
Ceilcote Products / International
Paint, LLC, 640 N Rocky River Dr.,
Berea, OH 44017
Phone: 440-234-2900
Fax: 440-234-7466
Email: larry.hess@akzonobel.com
www.ceilcotecc.com
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POWER 71
CEMTEK Environmental, 3041
S Orange Ave., Santa Ana, CA
92707
Phone: 714-437-7100
Fax: 714-437-7177
Email: info@cemteks.com
www.cemteks.com
Centrax Ltd., Shaldon Rd.,
Newton Abbot, TQ12 4SQ United
Kingdom
Phone: +44(0)1626 358 000
Fax: +44(0)1626 358 158
Email: sales@centraxgt.com
www.centraxgt.com
Cerrey SA de CV, Republica Mexi-
cana #300, San Nicolas de los
Garza NL, 63450 Mexico
Email: eangulo@cerrey.com.mx
www.cerrey.com.mx
Certified Occupational Safety
Specialist (COSS), 8180 Siegen
Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70810
Phone: 225-766-0955
Fax: 225-766-1099
Email: bgordon@safetylca.org
Cesare Bonetti, Inc., 17, Via
Cesare Bonetti, Garbagnate Mila-
nese, I-20024 Italy
Phone: +3902 99072444
Fax: +3902 99072400
Email: expoert@bont.it
www.cesare-bonetti.it
CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC, Continental
Field Machining, 1875 Fox Ln.,
Elgin, IL 60123
Phone: 800-323-1393
Fax: 847-895-7006
Email: wfinedore@globalfield.net
CGV Engineering Services Ltd., 13
France St. Westhoughton, Bolton,
BL5 2HG United Kingdom
Phone: 07823 322681
Fax: 01942 817285
Email: david@cgvengineeringser-
vices.co.uk
www.cgvengineeringservices.
co.uk
CH2M Hill, 303 Perimeter Center
N, Ste. 800, Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 770-829-6514
Fax: 770-829-6600
Email: alan.champagne@ch2m.
com
www.ch2m.com/power
Champion Valves, Inc., P.O. Box
12901, Wilmington, NC 28405
Phone: 910-794-5547
Fax: 910-794-5581
Email: jphillips@wafercheck.com
www.wafercheck.com
Chanute Manufacturing, 5727 S
Lewis, Ste. 600, Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: 918-491-9191
Email: kbrown@optimus-tulsa.net
www.chanutemfg.com
Chatham Steel Corp., 501 W
Boundary, P.O. Box 2567, Savan-
nah, GA 31498
Phone: 800-869-2762
Fax: 919-682-0322
Email: nuclear@chathamsteel.com
www.chathamsteel.com
CHEMetrics, Inc., 4295 Catlett
Rd., Calverton, VA 20138
Phone: 800-356-3072
Fax: 540-788-4856
Email: bhruska@chemetrics.com
www.chemetrics.com
Chemetron Fire Systems, 4801
Southwich Dr., 3rd Floor, Mat-
teson, IL 60442
Phone: 708-748-1503
Fax: 708-283-6500
Email: pat.brown@chemetron.com
Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc., 212
Najoles Rd., Bldg. D, Millersville,
MD 21108
Phone: 410-271-2652
Email: chessieclean@comcast.net
www.chesapeakesodaclean.com
Chromalloy, 3999 RCA Blvd., Palm
Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Phone: 561-935-3571
Email: andrew_farrant@sequa.com
www.chromalloy.com
Chromalox, Inc., 103 Gamma Dr.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 484-369-8526
Fax: 484-369-8526
Email: david.taylor@chromalox.com
www.chromalox.com
Chromium Corp., 14911 Quorum
Dr., Ste. 600, Dallas, TX 75254
Phone: 972-851-0487
Fax: 972-851-0461
Email: mike.taylor@chromcorp.com
www.chromcorp.com
Cianbro, 101 Cianbro Sq., P.O.
Box 1000, Pittsfield, ME 04967
Phone: 207-487-3311
Email: info@cianbro.com
www.cianbro.com
Citel Surge Protection, 1515 NW
167th St., Ste. #6-303, Miami,
FL 33169
Phone: 305 621 0022
Fax: 305 621 0766
Email: citel@citelprotection.com
www.citelprotection.com
Clear Lake Filtration, 400 Hobbs
Rd., #102, League City, TX 77573
Phone: 281-534-9112
Fax: 281-534-9269
Email: dlewis@clearlakefiltration.
com
www.clearlakefiltration.com
ClearSpan Fabric Structures, 1395
John Fitch Blvd., South Windsor,
CT 06074
Phone: 866-643-1010
Fax: 860-760-0210
Email: trussinquiry@clearspan.com
www.ClearSpan.com
ClearView Monitoring Solutions,
19 Hartum St., Har Hotzvim
Science Park, Jerusalem, 91450
Israel
Phone: +972 2 5400920
Fax: +972 2 5400044
Email: sales@clearviewmonitoring.
com
www.clearviewmonitoring.com
Cleaver-Brooks, 11950 W Lake
Park Dr., Milwaukee, WI 53224
Phone: 414-359-0600
Fax: 414-359-3159
Email: info@cleaver-brooks.com
www.cleaver-brooks.com


Clyde Bergemann Power Group,
4015 Presidential Pkwy., Atlanta,
GA 30340
Phone: 770-557-3600
Fax: 770-557-3641
Email: info@us.cbpg.com
www.cbpg.com
Clyde Bergemann Bachmann, 416
Lewiston Junction Rd., P.O. Box
2150, Auburn, ME 04211
Phone: 207-784-1903
Fax: 207-784-1904
Email: cbauburn@us.cbpg.com
www.cbbachmann.com
CMP Coatings, Inc., 1610 Engi-
neers Rd., Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Phone: 504-392-4817
Email: sales@cmpusa.com
www.cmp.co.jp
Coal Recovery Investments Ltd.,
8 Willowbrook Llandogo Rd., St
Mellons, CF3 0EF United Kingdom
Email: smerald@aol.com
www.gwarexpolska.pl
CoaLogix, 11701 Mt. Holly Rd.,
Charlotte, NC 28214
Phone: 704-827-8933
Fax: 704-827-8935
Email: rs@coalogix.com
www.CoaLogix.com
Coffman Electrical Equipment Co.,
3300 Jefferson Ave. SE, Grand
Rapids, MI 49548
Phone: 616-452-8708
Fax: 616-452-1337
Email: rcoffman@steadypower.com
www.steadypower.com
Cogen Power, Inc., 36929 Mead-
owdale Dr., Solon, OH 44139-
3077
Phone: 440-498-1676
Fax: 440-498-1676
Email: jainsk@cogenpowerinc.com
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc.,
P.O. Box 571, Colville, WA 99114-
0571
Phone: 509-684-2595
Fax: 509-684-8331
Email: mail@colmaccoil.com
www.colmaccoil.com
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc.,
10425 N Bloss Ave., Portland, OR
97203
Phone: 503-286-0685
Fax: 503-286-1743
Email: service@columbiasteel.com
www.columbiasteel.com
Columbian TecTank, Inc., 9701
Renner Blvd., Ste. 150, Lenexa,
KS 66219
Phone: 316-421-0200
Fax: 316-421-9122
Email: sales@columbiantectank.
com
www.columbiantectank.com
Columbus McKinnon, 140 John
James Audubon, Amherst, NY
14228
Phone: 716-689-5678
Email: sales@cmworks.com
www.cmindustrial.com
Commerce Lanes, Inc., 806 Rosa
St., Celebration, FL 34747
Phone: 321-939-2961
Fax: 321-939-1151
Email: business@commercelanes.
com
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December 2013 72
Commodities Consulting & Asset
Management COMCAM, Eigen-
haardstraat 10, Middelburg,
4331HS Netherlands
Email: backoffice@com-cam.com
www.com-cam.com
Commonwealth Dynamics, Inc.,
95 Court St., Portsmouth, NH
03801
Phone: 603-433-6060
Fax: 603-436-0944
Email: clcastanino@comdynam.com
www.comdynam.com
Compact Automation Products,
LLC, 105 Commerce Way, West-
minser, SC 29687
Phone: 864-647-9521
Fax: 864-647-9574
Email: marketing@compactauto-
mation.com
www.compactautomation.com
Computer Power Supply, 7313 SW
Tech Center Dr., Tigard, OR 97223
Phone: 503-684-8026
Email: caleb@cpshv.com
www.cpshv.com
ComRent International, LLC, 7640
Investment Ct., Unit A, Owings,
MD 20736
Phone: 410-257-3000
Fax: 410-257-2240
Email: info@comrent.com
www.comrent.com
Concepts NREC, 217 Billings Farm
Rd., White River Junction, VT
05001-9486
Phone: 802-296-2321
Fax: 802-296-2325
Email: njain@conceptsnrec.com
www.conceptsnrec.com/Corpo-
rate/Contact-us.aspx
Conco Systems, Inc., 530 Jones
St., Verona, PA 15147
Phone: 412-828-1166
Fax: 412-826-8255
Email: info@concosystems.com
www.concosystems.com
Condenser & Chiller Services,
Inc., 13488 Fifth St., Chino, CA
91710
Phone: 800-356-1932
Fax: 909-590-3446
Email: chiller@cyberg8t.com
www.ccs-tubes.com
Conforma Clad, Inc., 501 Park
East Blvd., New Albany, IN 47150
Phone: 812-948-2118
Fax: 812-944-3254
Email: info@conformaclad.com
www.conformaclad.com
ConocoPhillips, 600 N Dairy
Ashford, Houston, TX 77079
Phone: 281-293-2929
Fax: 281-293-1915
Email: donna.m.wood@cono-
cophillips.com
www.conocophillips.com/tech
Conomos Industrial Services,
Coulter & Station Streets, Brid-
geville, PA 15017
Phone: 412-221-1800
Fax: 412-221-4641
Email: ckucherawy@conomos.com
Construction Business Associates,
LLC, 2310 Seven Lakes South,
West End, NC 27376
Phone: 910-400-3113
Email: pghessler@constrbiz.com
www.ConstrBiz.com
Construction Techniques, Inc.,
15887 Snow Rd., Ste. 100, Cleve-
land, OH 44142
Phone: 216-267-7310
Fax: 216-267-9310
Email: bjakers@fabriform1.com
www.fabriform1.com
Container, d.o.o., Bezigrajska
Cesta 6, Celje, 3000 Slovenia
Phone: 00386 3 4263 200
Fax: 00386 3 4263 276
Email: container@maksim.si
www.container.si
Contec Systems, 1566 Medical
Dr., Ste. 310, Pottstown, PA
19464
Phone: 610-326-3235 x21
Fax: 610-326-3238
Email: coreyh@contecsystems.com
www.contecsystems.com
Continental Control Systems,
3131 Indian Rd., Boulder, CO
80301
Phone: 303-444-7422
Fax: 303-444-2903
Email: sales@ccontrolsys.com
www.ccontrolsys.com
Control Plus, Inc., 257 N. West
Ave. c/o Micronics Ultrasonic
Flow, Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: 888-274-8803
Fax: 630-279-9026
Email: bob@controlplusinc.com
www.micronicsflowmeters.com
Conval, Inc., 265 Field Rd.,
Somers, CT 06071
Phone: 860-763-3551
Fax: 860-763-3557
Email: sales@conval.com
www.Conval.com
Convault, Inc., 4109 E Zeering
Rd., Denair, CA 95316
Phone: 209-632-7571
Fax: 209-632-4711
Email: info@convault.com
www.convault.com
Conveyor Services/Classic Con-
veyor Components, 120 Airport
Rd., Blairsville, PA 15717
Phone: 724-459-5261
Fax: 724-459-5605
Email: r_vachal@classicconveyor.
com
www.classicconveyor.com
Cooling Tower Consulting,, LLC,
541 Bauer Rd., Bath, PA 18014
Phone: 610-737-2778
Fax: 610-500-5082
Email: coolingtowers@verizon.net
www.coolingtowerconsultingllc.com
Cooling Tower Depot, Inc., 651
Corporate Cir., Ste. 206, Golden,
CO 80401
Phone: 720-746-1234
Fax: 720-746-1110
Email: dsheldon@ctdepotinc.com
Cooling Tower Technologies, Inc.,
52410 Clark Rd., White Castle,
LA 70788
Phone: 225-545-4144
Fax: 225-545-4151
Email: kcampesi@crownenter-
prises.com
Cooper Power Systems, 505 Hwy.
169 North, Ste. 1200, Minneapo-
lis, MN 55441
Phone: 763-595-7777
Fax: 763-543-7777
Email: jlayer@cannontech.com
www.cannontech.com
Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand,
5602 West Rd., McKean, PA
16426
Phone: 814-476-5800
Fax: 814-476-5834
Email: cv@spx.com
www.copesvulcan.com
CORIMPEX USA, Inc., 501 Main
St., Ste. 208, Klamath Falls, OR
97601
Phone: 541-273-3030
Email: corimpex@qwest.net
Coritech Services, 4716 Delemere,
Royal Oak, MI 48073
Phone: 248-563-7280
Email: rhance@coritech.com
www.coritech.com
Cormetech, Inc., 5000 Interna-
tional Dr., Durham, NC 27712
Phone: 919-595-8721
Fax: 919-595-8701
Email: wensellg@cormetech.com
See our ad on p. 9
Cornerstone Material Handling,
Inc., 258 Prospect St., St.
George, ON N0E 1N0 Canada
Phone: 519-448-3344
Fax: 519-448-4514
Email: brian@cornerstonemateri-
alhandling.com
www.cornerstonematerialhan-
dling.com
Corrosion Control, Inc., 494 Fair-
play St., Rutledge, GA 30663
Phone: 706-557-9624
Fax: 706-557-7923
Email: debbie@corrosioncontro-
linc.com
Corrosion Engineering, P.O. Box
5670, Mesa, AZ 85211
Phone: 480-890-0203
Fax: 480-890-0589
Email: sales@corroeng.com
www.corroeng.com
Corrosion Monitoring Services,
902 Equity Dr., West Chicago, IL
60174
Phone: 630-762-9300
Fax: 630-762-9301
Email: info@cmsinc.us
www.cmsinc.us
Corrosion Service Co. Europe Ltd.,
59-60 Thames St., Windsor, SL4
1TX United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1753 272119
Fax: +44 (0) 1753 272120
Email: sales@corrosionservice.
co.uk
www.corrosionservice.co.uk
Corrpro Companies, Inc., 1055
West Smith Rd., Medina, OH
44256
Phone: 330-723-5082
Fax: 330-722-7606
Email: jlary@corrpro.com
www.corrpro.com
Cortec Corp., 4119 White Bear
Pkwy., St. Paul, MN 55110
Phone: 651-429-1100
Fax: 651-429-1122
Email: productinfo@cortecvci.com
www.cortecvci.com
Cosa Instrument Corp., Process
Control Div, 84G Horseblock Rd.,
Yaphank, NY 11980
Phone: 631-345-3434
Email: cosa@cosaic.com
www.cosa-instrument.com
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CPV Manufacturing, 851 Preston
St., Philadelphia, PA 19104-1598
Phone: 215-386-6508
Fax: 215-387-9043
Email: sales@cpvmfg.com
www.cpvmfg.com
CRC Engineering, P.C., 1261
Broadway, Ste. 608, New York,
NY 10001
Phone: 212-889-1233
Fax: 212-889-1211
Email: cnystrom@crc-eng.com
www.crc-eng.com
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Co.,
Inc., 2400 Reservoir Ave., Trum-
bull, CT 06611-4735
Phone: 203-371-1983
Fax: 203-371-0615
Email: creco@att.net
www.croll-reynoldsengineering.
com
Cryogenic Institute of New
England, Inc., 78 Chilmark St.,
Worcester, MA 01604
Phone: 800-739-7949
Fax: 508-459-7426
Email: rtaylor@nitrofreeze.com
www.nitrofreeze.com
Crystal Communication Ltd.,
Suite 1/B, House-7, Road-14/C,
Sector-4, Uttara, Dhaka, 1230
Bangladesh
Fax: 88028953674
Email: solutionnsources@gmail.
com
www.crystalbgd.com
CSC, 3890 Lancaster Dr,
Doylestown, PA 18902
Phone: 267-247-6876
www.csc.com
CTI Industries, Inc., 283 Indian
River Rd., Orange, CT 06477
Phone: 203-795-0070
Fax: 203-795-7061
Email: kshugrue@cti-ind.com
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron
Co., 421 Browns Hill Rd., P.O.
Box 670, Oakboro, NC 28129
Phone: 704-781-2060
Fax: 704-781-2099
Email: pnance@chicagotube.com
www.cti-power.com
CU Services, LLC, 725 Parkview,
Elk Grove, IL 60007
Phone: 847-439-2303
Fax: 847-439-3006
Email: rcronfel@cuservices.net
www.cuservices.net
Curran International, 4610 Vicks-
burg Ln., Dickinson, TX 77539
Phone: 281-339-9993
Fax: 281-339-9994
Email: edeely@curranintl.com
www.curranintl.com
Custom Expansion Joints, Inc.,
313 N Stewart Rd., Liberty, MO
64068
Phone: 816-781-3507
Fax: 816-781-3520
Email: sales@cej.com
www.cej.com
Cutsforth Products, Inc., 37837
Rock Haven Rd., Cohasset, MN
55721
Phone: 218-326-8263
Fax: 218-327-1006
Email: kcarlstrom@cutsforth.com
See our ad on p. 53
CYME International T&D, 67 S
Bedford St., Ste. 201 East, Burl-
ington, MA 01803-5177
Phone: 781-229-0269
Fax: 781-229-2336
Email: info@cyme.com
www.cyme.com
D
Daniels Manufacturing Corp., 526
Thorpe Rd., Orlando, FL 32824
Phone: 407-855-6161
Email: dmc@dmctools.com
www.dmctools.com
Data Systems & Solutions, LLC,
12100 Sunset Hills Rd., Ste. 310,
Reston, VA 20190
Phone: 703-889-1300
Fax: 703-889-1359
Email: info@ds-s.com
www.ds-s.com
Day & Zimmermann ECM, 1827
Freedom Rd., Ste. 101, Lancaster,
PA 17601
Phone: 215-299-4924
Email: david.bronczyk@dayzim.com
www.dayzim.com
DCM Clean-Air Products, Inc.,
9605 Camp Bowie West Blvd.,
Fort Worth, TX 76116
Phone: 817-696-0044
Fax: 817-451-0615
Email: gale@dcmcleanair.com
Defitec (Filtration), Rue Michel
Verbeck, 16, Waterloo, 1410
Belgium
Phone: +32-2-354 06 10
Fax: +32-2-353 03 77
Email: bd@defitec.com
www.defitec.com
Dekker Vacuum Technologies,
Inc., 935 S Woodland Ave.,
Michigan City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-861-0661
Email: sales@dekkervacuum.com
www.dekkervacuum.com
Delta Instrument, LLC, 148 Veter-
ans Dr., Northvale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-768-7200
Fax: 201-768-5020
Email: info@deltainstrument.com
www.DeltaInstrument.com
Delta Mechcons India Ltd., 3rd
Floor, Arcadian Bldg. No. 12
North Main Road, Koregaon Park,
Pune, 411 001 India
Phone: 020 66077999/970/933
Email: vinit.barai@delta-india.com
www.delta-india.net
Delta Power Services, 363 North
Sam Houston Pkwy. E, #630,
Houston, TX 77060
Phone: 281-405-6853
Fax: 281-405-6862
Email: dhammer@deltapowerser-
vices.com
www.deltapowerservices.com
Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell
Electrical Systems, 515 Railroad
Ave., Northlake, IL 60164
Phone: 708-409-1200
Fax: 708-409-1211
Email: toyya.garner@deltaunibus.
com
www.deltaunibus.com
Design Analysis Services, 857
Bonnie Brae Ln., Bolingbrook,
IL 60440
Phone: 630-783-0384
Email: john@design-analysis.com
www.design-analysis.com
Detroit Stoker Co., 1510 East
First St., Monroe, MI 48161
Phone: 734-241-9500
Fax: 734-241-7126
Email: sales@detroitstoker.com
www.detroitstoker.com
See our ad on p. 51
Dexter Innovative Solutions, LLC,
61 East River St., Orange, MA
01364
Phone: 978-544-2751
Fax: 978-544-8357
Email: dave@dexter-is.com
www.dexter-is.com
DFT, Inc., P.O. Box 566, 140
Sheree Blvd., Exton, PA 19341
Phone: 610-363-8903
Email: jkane@dft-valves.com
www.dft-valves.com
DGH Corp., P.O. Box 5638, Man-
chester, NH 03108
Phone: 603-622-0452
Fax: 603-622-0487
Email: sales@dghcorp.com
www.dghcorp.com
Diamond Power International,
Inc., 2600 E Main St., Lancaster,
OH 43130-0415
Phone: 800-848-5086
Fax: 740-687-4229
Email: dpi_marketing@diamond-
power.com
www.diamondpower.com
DIS-TRAN High Voltage Special-
ists, 4725 Hwy. 28 E, Pineville,
LA 71360
Phone: 318-448-0274
Fax: 318-487-8234
Email: jess.courtright@distran.com
www.distran.com
Distrigas GDF SUEZ, 20 City
Square, Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: 617-526-8300
www.suezenergyna.com
See our ad on p. 11
DMC Power, 2846 Saddlebrook
Way, Marietta, GA 30064
Phone: 404-617-8794
Email: dschrampfer@dmcpower.com
www.dmcpower.com
Doble Engineering Co., 85 Walnut
St., Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-4900
Fax: 617-926-0528
Email: dobleinfo@doble.com
www.doble.com
Dollinger Filtration, an SPX
Brand, 4647 SW 40th Ave., Ocala,
FL 34474
Phone: 800-344-2611
Fax: 352-873-5773
Email: dollinger.sales@dehydra-
tion.spx.com
www.dollinger-spx.com
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December 2013 74
Dongfang Electric Corp. / DSI,
4030 Moorpark Ave., Ste. 216,
San Jose, CA 95117
Phone: 408-850-1416
Fax: 408-519-7091
Email: sales@dongfang-usa.com
www.dongfang-usa.com
Doosan Engineering & Services,
LLC (A Burns & Roe - Doosan
Projects Alliance), 5 Paragon Dr.,
Montvale, NJ 07645
Phone: 201-986-4252
Fax: 201-986-4869
Email: meyna.park@doosan.com
www.doosanheavy.com
Dow Electrical & Telecommuni-
cations, Houston Dow Center,
1254 Enclave Pkwy., Houston, TX
77077
Phone: 800-441-4DOW
www.dowinside.com
DragonWear, P.O. Box 28789,
Seattle, WA 98118
Phone: 800-873-5725
Fax: 206-723-1890
Email: info@truenorthgear.com
www.truenorthgear.com
DREHMO GmbH, Industrie Str. 1,
Wenden, 57482 Germany
Phone: 49 2762 612-311
Fax: 49 2762 612-359
Email: karl.natterer@drehmo.com
www.drehmo.com
Drennen Engineering, Inc., P.O.
Box 937, Windsor, CT 06095
Phone: 860-219-2502
Email: jdrennen@asherosion.com
www.asherosion.com
Dresser-Rand, 299 Lincoln St.,
Worcester, MA 01605
Phone: 508-595-1700
Fax: 508-595-1780
Email: tlevis@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com
Dresser-Rand Co. Ltd., 85 Papyrus
Rd., Peterborough, PE4 5HG
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1733 292200
Fax: +44 1733 292300
Email: info@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com
Dresser-Rand, COPPUS Portable
Ventilators, 299 Lincoln St.,
Worcester, MA 01605
Phone: 508-595-1700
Fax: 508-595-1780
Email: pvdinfo@dresser-rand.com
www.dresser-rand.com/products/
coppus
Dubai Electricity and Water Au-
thority, P.O. Box 564, Dubai, 564
United Arab Emirates
Phone: 97143072462
Fax: 97143248111
Email: dawood.jawahar@dewa.
gov.ae
www.dewa.gov.ae
Ducon Technologies, A/4, Road
No. 1, Wagle Estate, Thane West,
400604 India
Email: gsekhar@ducon.com
www.ducon.com
Ducon Technologies, Inc. - MIP
Div., 19 Engineers Ln., Farming-
dale, NY 11735
Phone: 631-694-1700
Fax: 631-420-4985
Email: michelleg@ducon.com
www.mip.ducon.com
Dueco, Inc., Corporate Headquar-
ters N4 W22610 Bluemound Rd.,
Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-547-8500
Fax: 262-547-8407
Email: info@dueco.com
www.dueco.com
Durag Group, Kollaustr. 105,
Hamburg, 22453 Germany
Phone: +49 40 554218-0
Fax: + 49 584154
Email: info@durag.de
www.durag.de
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc., 199
Courtland Ave., Vaughan, ON L4K
4T2 Canada
Phone: 866-338-0988
Fax: 905-660-8887
Email: durasystems@durasystems.
com
www.durasystems.com
Duromar, Inc., 706 Washington
St., Pembroke, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-2525
Fax: 781-826-2150
Email: knally@duromar.com
www.duromar.com
Dustex Corp., 100 Chastain Ctr
Blvd., Ste. 195, Kennesaw, GA
30144
Phone: 770-429-5575
Fax: 770-429-5556
www.dustex.com
DYLANGroup, Hermanus Boer-
haavestrraat 1, P.O. Box 1208,
Oud-Beijerla, 3260 AG Netherlands
Phone: 31 (0)186 - 64 15 55
Fax: 31 (0)186 - 61 21 57
www.dylangroup.com
Dynamic Systems, Inc., 15331 NE
90th St., Redmond, WA 98052
Phone: 425-284-1662
Fax: 425-861-3978
Email: robf@dsisales.com
www.a-barcode.com
E
E / SYSTEMS, 566 Mack Pl., St.
Clair, MI 48080
Phone: 313-882-1133
Email: intellife@hotmail.com
www.ENXEX.com
E.A.R., Inc., P.O. Box 18888,
Boulder, CO 80308
Phone: 303-447-2619
Fax: 303-447-2637
Email: info@earinc.com
www.earinc.com
E.D.I, Inc., 3415 Belmont Terrace
Davie, Florida, FL 33328
Phone: 954-577-2225
Fax: 954-577-2227
Email: ediequipment@me.com
www.ediequipment.com
E.H. Wachs, 600 Knightsbridge
Pkwy., Lincolnshire, IL 60069
Phone: 847-537-8800
Fax: 847-520-1147
Email: sales@ehwachs.com
www.ehwachs.com
Eagle Eye Power Solutions, 4230
N Oakland Ave., #176, Milwaukee,
WI 53211
Phone: 414-962-3377
Fax: 414-962-3660
Email: kayleighd@eepowersolu-
tions.com
www.eepowersolutions.com
Eagle Technology, Inc., 10500 N
Port Washington Rd., Mequon,
WI 53092
Phone: 262-241-3845
Fax: 262-241-5248
Email: sales@eaglecmms.com
www.eaglecmms.com
Earth Energy Solutions Group,
4230 Cardinal Blvd., Ponce Inlet,
FL 32127
Phone: 877-349-4820
Fax: 727-290-4048
Email: research@earthenergy-
group.com
www.EarthEnergyGroup.com
EchoMail, Inc., 701 Concord Ave.,
Cambridge, MA 02138
Phone: 617-354-8585
Fax: 617-354-8899
Email: jessica.hanson@echomail.
com
www.echomail.com
EcoSys, 800 Westchester Ave.,
Ste. 710, Rye Brook, NY 10573
Phone: 914-304-5000
Fax: 914-464-7320
Email: into@ecossys.net
www.ecosys.net
ECT, Inc., 401 E Fourth St., Bldg.
20, Bridgeport, PA 19405
Phone: 610-239-5120
Fax: 610-239-7863
Email: sales@ectinc.net
www.ectinc.net
Ecutel Systems, 2300 Corporate
Park Dr., Ste. 410, Herndon, VA
20171
Phone: 571-203-8300
Fax: 571-203-8310
Email: info@ecutel.com
www.ecutel.com
EDF Renewable Energy, 15445 In-
novation Dr., San Diego, CA 92128
Phone: 888-903-6926
www.edf-re.com
EdgenMurray, 18444 Highland
Rd., Baton Rouge, LA 70808
Phone: 225-756-7886
Fax: 225-756-8995
Email: info@edgenmurray.com
www.edgenmurray.com
Edwards Industrial Equipment
Corp., 49 14th Ave. SW, St. Paul,
MN 55112
Phone: 651-330-1738
Fax: 651-846-4597
Email: powerplants@mac.com
www.edwardsindustrialequip-
ment.com
Edwards Vacuum, Inc., Highwood
Office Park, One Highwood Dr.,
Ste. 101, Tewksbury, MA 01876
Phone: 800-848-9800
Fax: 866-484-5218
Email: info@edwardsvacuum.cm
www.edwardsvacuum.com
EHC Field Services, Inc., P.O. Box
43, Cedartown, GA 30125
Phone: 866-308-6299
Fax: 678-246-0470
Email: sales@ehcfieldservices.com
www.turbine-flushing-equipment.
com
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POWER 75
EITI - Electrical Industry Training
Institute USA, Inc., 1465 Slater
Rd., P.O. Box 5007, Ferndale, WA
98248-5007
Phone: 877-859-8228
Fax: 877-284-7916
Email: info@eiti.us
www.eiti.us
EK Ekcessories, 575 West 3200
South, Logan, UT 84321
Phone: 435-753-8448
Fax: 435-753-2411
Email: ek@ekusa.com
www.ekusa.com
Elecsys Corp., 846 N Martway Ct.,
Olathe, KS 66062
Phone: 913-982-5672
Email: sales@elecsysscada.com
www.elecsyscorp.com/scada/
director
ElectraTherm, 4750 Turbo Circle,
Reno, NV 89502
Phone: 775-398-4680
Fax: 775-398-4674
Email: cdodge@electratherm.com
www.electratherm.com
ElectraWave, Inc., 1522 Yale
Ave., Stockton, CA 95203
Phone: 209-467-4779
Email: info@electrawavesv.com
www.electrawavesv.com
Electro Industries/GaugeTech,
1800 Shames Dr., Westbury, NY
11590
Phone: 516-334-0870
Fax: 516-338-4741
Email: ndeibler@electroind.com
www.electroind.com
Electrochemical Devices, Inc.,
P.O. Box 31, Albion, RI 02802
Phone: 617-484-9085
Fax: 617-484-3923
Email: info@edi-cp.com
www.edi-cp.com
Electroputere S.A., DIEC, P.O Box
231085, New York, NY 10023
Phone: 212-629-6501
Fax: 212-629-6502
Email: dieccorp@aol.com
Elgin Sweeper, 1300 W. Bartlett
Road, Elgin, IL 60120
Phone: 847-741-5370
Fax: 847-742-3035
elginsweeper.com
See our ad on p. 29
Eliminator Slurry Pumps, 4432
Venture Ave., Duluth, MN 55811
Phone: 218-722-9904
Fax: 218-722-2826
Email: info@gpmco.com
www.eliminatorpumps.com
Ellison Consultants, 4966 Tall
Oaks Dr., Monrovia, MD 21770-
9316
Phone: 301-865-5302
Fax: 301-865-5591
Email: ellisoncon@aol.com
www.ellisoncon.com
Ellison Surface Technologies,
8093 Columbia Rd., Ste. 201,
Mason, OH 45040
Phone: 513-770-4900
Fax: 513-770-4980
Email: edolby@ellisonsurfacetech.
com
www.ellisonsurfacetech.com
Elma Electronic, 760 Veterans
Circle, Warminster, PA 18974
Phone: 800-445-6194
Email: valerie.andrew@elma.com
www.elma.com
Elos Fixturlaser AB, Box 7,
Mölndal, SE-431 21 Sweden
Phone: +46 31 706 28 00
Fax: +46 31 706 28 50
Email: info@fixturlaser.se
www.fixturlaser.com
Elsys Instruments, 234 Cromwell
Hill Rd., Monroe, NY 10950
Phone: 845-238-3933
Fax: 845-782-6045
Email: klaas.vogel@elsys-instru-
ments.com
www.elsys-instruments.com
Emerson Process Management,
Fisher, 301 S 1st Ave., Marshall-
town, IA 50158
Phone: 641-754-3011
Email: fc-valve@emerson.com
www.fisher.com
Emerson Process Management,
Power & Water Solutions, 200
Beta Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 412-963-4000
Fax: 412-963-3644
Email: powerwater@emersonpro-
cess.com
www.emersonprocess-powerwater.
com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Analytical, 6565-P
Davis Industrial Pkwy., Solon, OH
44139
Phone: 440-914-1261
Fax: 440-914-1262
Email: gas.csc@emersonprocess.
com
www.raihome.com
Emerson Process Management,
Rosemount Div., 8200 Market
Blvd., Chanhassen, MN 55438
Phone: 952-906-8888
Fax: 952-949-7001
Email: rosemount.info@emerson-
process.com
www.rosemount.com
eMpasys, 309 Fellowship Rd., Mt
Lurel, NJ 08504
Phone: 856-412-8056
Fax: 814-619-7880
Email: rob@empasys.net
www.empasys.net
EMS Industrial and Service,
10800 North Main St., Richmond,
IL 60071
Phone: 815-678-2700
Fax: 815-678-3094
Email: jonathan@ems-industrial.
com
www.ems-industrial.com
Emtrade International Ltd., Unit
3 Ram Blvd., Foxhills Industrial
Estate Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire,
DN15 8QW United Kingdom
Phone: +44(0)1724851001
Fax: +44(0)1724851002
Email: alan.mosley@emtrade.co.uk
www.emtrade.co.uk
Encore Dredging, Inc., P.O. Box
3069, Clarksville, IN 47131
Phone: 941-876-0559
Fax: 941-876-0560
Email: info@dredgingcompany.com
www.dredgingcompany.com
Enerac, Inc., 67 Bond St., West-
bury, NY 11590
Phone: 516-997-2100
Fax: 516-997-2129
Email: sales@enerac.com
www.enerac.com
Enercon Engineering, Inc., No
1 Altorfer Ln., East Peoria, IL
61611
Phone: 309-694-1418
Fax: 309-694-3703
www.enercon-eng.com
Energy and Process Corp., 2146-B
Flintstone Dr., Tucker, GA 30085
Phone: 770-934-3101
Fax: 770-938-8903
Email: blake.richardson@energ-
yandprocess.com
www.energyandprocess.com
Energy Associates, P.C., Montville
Office Park, 150 River Rd., Ste.
J4, Montville, NJ 07045
Phone: 973-331-8100
Email: hr@energy-pc.com
www.Energy-PC.com
Energy Concepts Co., 627 Ridgely
Ave., Annapolis, MD 21401
Phone: 410-266-6521
Fax: 410-266-6539
Email: enerconcep@aol.com
www.energy-concepts.com
Energy Equipments & Products
Co., No.9/203, Rubin, Premjyot
Complex Ghatkopar - Mankhurd
Link Road, Near Indian Oil Nagar,
Mumbai, MA 400 043 India
Email: energy.epco@yahoo.com
www.energy.epco.com
Energy Products of Idaho, 3568
W Industrial Loop, Coeur d’Alene,
ID 83815-6016
Phone: 208-765-1611
Fax: 208-765-0503
Email: epi2@energyproducts.com
www.energyproducts.com
Energy Providers Coalition for
Education (EPCE), 6021 S Syra-
cuse Way, Ste. #213, Greenwood
Village, CO 80111
Phone: 303-804-4673
Email: epce@cael.org
www.epceonline.org
Energy Storage and Power, 520
US Hwy. 22 E, Ste. 205, Bridge-
water, NJ 08807
Phone: 908-393-0526
Email: info@caespower.com
www.caespower.com
Enerscan Engineering, Inc., 22
Julies Walk, Halifax, NS B3M 2Z7
Canada
Phone: 902-445-4433
Fax: 902-457-3283
Email: dale@eei.ca
www.enerscanengineering.com
Enertech, a Business Unit of
Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Co.,
2950 Birch St., Brea, CA 92821
Phone: 714-528-2301
Email: enertech@curtisswright.com
www.enertech.cwfc.com
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December 2013 76
Engineering Consultants Group,
Inc., 1236 Weathervane Ln., Ste.
200, Akron, OH 44313
Phone: 330-869-9949
Fax: 330-869-9995
Email: santuccim@ecg-inc.com
www.ecg-inc.com
Engineering Software, P.O. Box
1180, Germantown, MD 20875
Phone: 301-540-3605
Fax: 301-540-3605
Email: info@engineering-4e.com
www.engineering-4e.com
Engineers India Ltd., EIB 4th
Floor, Cost Engg Department, 1
Bhikaji cama Place, R.K.Puram,
New Delhi, 110066 India
Phone: 9540066619
Email: nishendra_mishra@redif-
fmail.com
Enidine, Inc., 7 Centre Dr.,
Orchard Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-662-1900
Fax: 716-662-1909
Email: marketing@enidine.com
www.enidine.com
ENMET Corp., P.O. Box 979,
680 Fairfield Ct., Ann Arbor, MI
48106
Phone: 734-761-1270
Fax: 734-761-3220
Email: info@enmet.com
www.enmet.com
ENOSERV, LLC, 5630 S Memorial,
Tulsa, OK 74145
Phone: 918-622-4530
Fax: 918-622-6569
Email: info@enoserv.com
www.enoserv.com
ENOTEC, Inc., 6206 Sandy Ridge
Circle NW, North Canton, OH
44720-6686
Phone: 330-498-0202
Fax: 330-497-9802
Email: john.stewart@dial.pipex.
com
www.enotec.com
eNPure Process Systems, Inc.,
54 Ingleside Ave., Cranston, RI
02905
Phone: 617-823-0860
Fax: 401-447-3976
Email: pavisco@enpureinc.com
www.enpureinc.com
Entech Design, Inc., 315 S Lo-
cust, Denton, TX 76201
Phone: 940-898-1173
Fax: 940-382-3242
Email: rminnis@entechdesign.
com
www.entechdesign.com
ENV Environmental, 1466 Ripchak
Rd., Corona, CA 92879
Phone: 909-739-0738
Fax: 909-739-0738
Email: richard_booth@sbcglobal.
net
www.enverr.com
Environment One Corp., 2773 Ball-
town Rd., Niskayuna, NY 12309
Phone: 518-346-6161
Fax: 518-346-6188
Email: eone@eone.com
www.eone.com
EPG - Enginuity Portable Grid,
2500 State Hwy. 160, Warrior, AL
35180
Phone: 205-647-4279
Fax: 205-590-3885
Email: info@epginc.us
www.EPGinc.us
epro GmbH, Joebkesweg 3, Gro-
nau, D-48599 Germany
Phone: 49 2562 709-460
Email: alexa.tenbrink@emerson.
com
www.epro.de
Equipment Maintenance Services,
Inc., 2412 West Durango St.,
Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-258-8545
Email: bert.serak@emsusa.com
www.wmsusa.com
Eren Energy Power Plant, Eren
Enerji Elektrik Uretim A.S.
Catalagzi, Zonguldak, TX 67300
Turkey
Email: hilmi.unal@erenholding.
com.tr
www.erenholding.com.tr
Ergonomic Office Chairs by
United Group, Inc., 13700 Polo
Trail Dr., Lake Forest, IL 60045
Phone: 847-816-7100
Fax: 847-816-7102
Email: hbrehmer@unitedgp.com
www.eocUSA.com
Erickson Air-Crane, Inc., 3100
Willow Springs Rd., P.O. Box
3247, Central Point, OR 97502
Phone: 541-664-5544
Fax: 541-664-9469
Email: marketing@ericksonair-
crane.com
www.ericksonaircrane.com
ERICO International Corp., 34600
Solon Rd., Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 800-677-9089
www.erico.com
Ernst Flow Industries, 116 Main
St., Farmingdale, NJ 07727-1495
Phone: 732-938-5641
Fax: 732-938-9463
Email: info@ernstflow.com
www.ernstflow.com
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products,
411 S Ebenezer Rd., Florence, SC
29501
Phone: 843-669-4411
Email: info@esabna.com
www.esabna.com
ESI, Inc. of Tennessee, 1250 Rob-
erts Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144
Phone: 770-427-6200
Fax: 770-425-3660
Email: info@esitenn.com
www.esitenn.com
ESP/Energy Systems Products,
Inc., 6830 N Eldridge Pkwy.,
#506, Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-937-6336
Fax: 713-937-6378
Email: bobw@espforenergy.com
www.espforenergy.com
E-Tech, Inc., 20701 E 81st St.,
Ste. 3, Broken Arrow, OK 74014
Phone: 918-665-1930
Fax: 918-665-1935
Email: bhanson@e-techinc.com
www.e-techinc.com
EtherWAN Systems, 4570 E Eisen-
hower Circle, Anaheim, CA 92807
Phone: 714-779-3800
Fax: 714-779-3806
Email: info@etherwan.com
www.etherwan.com
Eutech Scientific Engineering,
Dennewartstraße 25-27, Aachen,
52068 Germany
Phone: 49-241-963-2380
Fax: 49-241-963-2389
Email: power@eutech.de
www.eutech-scientific.de
Eutectic Corp., N94 W14355 Gar-
win Mace Dr., Menomonee Falls,
WI 53051
Phone: 262-532-4677
Fax: 262-255-5542
Email: marketing@eutecticusa.com
www.eutecticusa.com
Everlasting Valve Co., 108
Somogyi Ct., South Plainfield,
NJ 07080
Phone: 908-769-0700
Fax: 908-769-8697
Email: djenkins@everlasting-
valveusa.com
www.everlastingvalveusa.com
Exact Metrology, P.O. Box 7536,
Algonquin, IL 60108
Phone: 630-258-2656
Email: deans@exactmetrology.com
www.exactmetrology,com
Exlar Corp., 18400 West 77th St.,
Chanhassen, MN 55317
Phone: 952-500-6200
Email: info@exlar.com
www.exlar.com
Exponential Engineering Co.,
328 Airpark Dr., Fort Collins, CO
80524
Phone: 970-207-9648
Fax: 970-207-9657
Email: ghidossit@exponentialen-
gineering.com
www.exponentialengineering.com
Express Integrated Technologies,
LLC, 1640 South 101st East Ave.,
Tulsa, OK 74128
Phone: 918-622-1420
Fax: 918-622-1457
Email: sales@expresstechtulsa.com
www.ExpressTechTulsa.com
Expro Services, Inc., 501 Scott
St., Worthington, KY 41183
Phone: 606-834-9402
Email: craigsherman@charter.net
www.explosiveprofessionals.com
ExxonMobil Lubricants & Petro-
leum Specialties (Mobil Industrial
Lubricants), 3225 Gallows Rd.,
Room 6C0631, Fairfax, VA 22031
Phone: 703-846-1998
Fax: 703-846-3041
Email: mike.j.zinngrabe@exxon-
mobil.com
www.mobilindustrial.com
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors, 2000
S Cherokee St., Denver, CO 80223
Phone: 800-821-9966
Fax: 303-733-5642
Email: ez@ezliftconveyors.com
www.ezliftconveyors.com
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F
F.E. Moran Special Hazard
Systems, 2265 Carlson Dr., North-
brook, IL 60062
Phone: 847-498-4800
Email: femoranshsinfo@femoran.
com
www.femoranshs.com
Faber Burner Co., 1000 East Bald
Eagle St., Lock Haven, PA 17745
Phone: 570-748-4009
Fax: 570-748-4324
Email: tprobst@faberburner.com
www.faberburner.com
Fabreeka International, Inc.,
1023 Turnpike St., P.O. Box 210,
Stoughton, MA 02072
Phone: 781-341-3655
Fax: 781-341-3983
Email: info@fabreeka.com
www.fabreeka.com
Factory Sales & Engineering,
Inc., 74378 Hwy. 25, Covington,
LA 70435
Phone: 985-867-9150
Email: cculpepper@fsela.com
www.fsela.com
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair
Water, 3601 Fairbanks Ave.,
Kansas City, KS 66106
Phone: 913-371-5000
Fax: 913-748-4025
Email: fairbanks_info@pentair-
pump.com
www.fmpump.com
FAIST Anlagenbau GmbH, Am
Mühlberg 5 Niederraunau,
Krumbach (Schwaben), 86381
Germany
Phone: +49 8282 8880-0
Fax: +49 8282 8880-88
Email: anlagenbau@faist.de
www.faist.de
FARO, 125 Technology Park, Lake
Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 800-736-0234
Fax: 407-333-4181
Email: info@faro.com
www.faro.com
FCI-Fluid Components Interna-
tional, 1755 La Costa Meadows
Dr., San Marcos, CA 92078-5115
Phone: 760-744-6950
Fax: 760-736-6250
Email: fcimarcom@fluidcompo-
nents.com
www.fluidcomponents.com
Fenner Dunlop Americas, 21 Lar-
edo Dr., Scottdale, GA 30079
Phone: 404-297-3115
Fax: 404-296-5165
Email: jill.schultz@fennerdunlop.
com
Fern Engineering, 55 Portside
Dr., P.O. Box 3380, Pocasset, MA
02559
Phone: 508-563-7181
Fax: 508-564-4851
Email: mail@fernengineering.com
www.fernengineering.com
Fibergrate Composite Structures,
5151 Beltline Rd., Ste. 700, Dal-
las, TX 75254
Phone: 972-250-1633
Fax: 972250-1530
Email: info@fibergrate.com
www.fibergrate.com
Field Works, Inc., 1220 Armstrong
St., Algonquin, IL 60102
Phone: 847-658-8200
Fax: 847-658-4300
Email: januszb@fieldworksinc.com
www.fieldworksinc.com
FilterSense, 800 Cummings Ctr,
357W, Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: 978-927-4304
Fax: 978-927-4329
Email: info@filtersense.com
www.filtersense.com
Filtration & Membrane Technol-
ogy, Inc., 8342 Silvan Wind,
Houston, TX 77040
Phone: 713-870-1120
Fax: 713-422-2533
Email: fmt-houston@att.net
www.fmt-houston.com
Filtration Advantage, 178 Lily
St., San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: 415-255-8484
Fax: 415-255-8484
Email: gcomeau@filtrationadvan-
tage.com
www.filtrationadvantage.com
Fine Tubes Ltd., Plymbridge Rd.
Estover, Plymouth, PL6 7LG
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1752 697216
Fax: +44 (0) 1752 733301
Email: feedback@fine-tubes.co.uk
www.finetubes.com
Fireaway, Inc., 5852 Baker Rd.,
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Phone: 952-935-9745
Fax: 952-935-9757
Email: info@statx.com
www.statx.com
Fisher Tank Co., 3131 West 4th
St., Chester, PA 19013
Phone: 610-494-7200
Fax: 610-485-0157
Email: sales@fishertank.com
www.FisherTank.com
FlaktWoods, 1110 Main Place
Tower, Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: 716-845-0500
Fax: 716-845-5055
Email: jim.t.greenzweig@flakt-
woods.com
www.flaktwoods.com
Flexco, 2525 Wisconsin Ave.,
Downers Grove, IL 60543
Phone: 800-541-8028
Fax: 800-225-4833
Email: info@flexco.com
www.flexco.com
Flexco Engineered Systems Group,
401 Remington Blvd., Ste. A,
Bolingbrook, IL 60440
Phone: 815-609-7025
Email: rsouffrant@flexco.com
www.flexcoengineeredsystems.com
FLEX-CORE, 4970 Scioto Darby
Rd, Hilliard, OH 43026
Phone: 614-889-6152
Fax: 614-876-8538
Email: sales@flex-core.com
www.flex-core.com
Flexim Americas Corp., 250-V Ex-
ecutive Dr., Edgewood, NY 11717
Phone: 631-492-2300
Fax: 631-492-2117
Email: usinfo@flexim.com
www.flexim.com
Flexware, 364 Wheatridge Drive,
Jeannette, PA 15644
Phone: 724-527-3911
Fax: 724-527-5701
www.flexwareinc.com
Flight Systems Industrial
Products, 1015 Harrisburg Pike,
Carlisle, PA 17013
Phone: 717-254-3747
Fax: 717-254-3778
Email: tgasull@fsip.biz
www.fsip.biz
FlowMeters.com, 1755 E Nine
Mile Rd., P.O. Box 249, Hazel
Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
Email: sales@flowmeters.com
www.flowmeters.com
Flowrox Oy, Marssitie 1, Lappeen-
ranta, 53600 Finland
Phone: +358 201 113 311
Fax: +358 201 113 300
Email: info@flowrox.com
www.flowrox.com
Flowrox, Inc., 808 Barkwood Ct.,
Ste. N, Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 410-636-2250
Email: todd.loudin@flowrox.com
www.flowrox.us


Flowserve, 1900 S Saunders St.,
Raleigh, NC 27603
Phone: 919-831-3200
Fax: 919-831-3369
Email: fbensinger@flowserve.com
www.Flowserve.com
Flow-Tek Inc., A subsidiary of
Bray International, Inc., 8323 N
Eldridge Pkwy., #100, Houston,
TX 77041
Phone: 832-912-2300
Fax: 832-912-2301
Email: joey.forlini@flow-tek.com
www.flow-tek.com
FLSmidth, Inc., 2040 Ave. C,
Bethlehem, PA 18017
Phone: 610-264-6800
Fax: 610-264-6307
Email: info-us@flsmidth.com
www.flsmidth.com
Fluke Corp., P.O. Box 9090, Ever-
ett, WA 98206-9090
Phone: 800-443-5853
Fax: 425-446-5116
Email: fluke-info@fluke.com
www.fluke.com
Fluor Enterprises, Inc., 100 Fluor
Daniel Dr., Greenville, SC 29607-
2770
Phone: 864-281-4400
Fax: 864-517-1290
Email: jody.teykl@fluor.com
www.fluor.com
FMC Technologies, Inc., P.O. Box
904, 400 Highpoint Dr., Chalfont,
PA 18914
Phone: 215-822-4300
Fax: 215-996-4513
Email: info.mhs@fmcti.com
www.fmctechnologies.com
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December 2013 78
Forney Corp., 3405 Wiley Post
Rd., Carrollton, TX 75006
Phone: 972-458-6100
Fax: 972-458-6195
Email: sales@forneycorp.com
www.forneycorp.com
Fortescue Metals Group Ltd, Level
2, 87 Adelaide Terrace, East Perth
WA 6004, Australia
Phone: +61 8 6218 8888
Fax: +61 8 6218 8880
Email: fmgl@fmgl.com.au
www.fmgl.com.au
Foster Wheeler Ltd., Foster
Wheeler North America Corp.,
Perryville Corp Park, P.O. Box
4000, Clinton, NJ 08809-4000
Phone: 908-730-4000
Fax: 908-730-5310
Email: powerproducts@fwc.com
www.fwc.com
Fox Venturi Eductors, 85 Franklin
Rd., Dover, NJ 07801
Phone: 973-328-1011
Fax: 973-328-3651
Email: ryan@foxvalve.com
www.foxvalve.com
FP Turbomachinery, Wiesen-
strasse 57, Emmendingen, 79312
Germany
Phone: +49 (0)7641-55346
Fax: +49 (0)7641-55319
Email: contact@fpturbo.com
www.fpturbo.com
Frederick Cowan & Co., Inc., 48
Kroemer Ave., Riverhead, NY
11901
Phone: 631-369-0360
Fax: 631-369-0637
Email: info@fcowan.com
www.fcowan.com
FreeWave Technologies, Inc.,
1880 S Flatiron Ct., Ste. F, Boul-
der, CO 80301
Phone: 303-381-9276
Fax: 303-786-8393
Email: noellec@freewave.com
FrenchCreek Production, Inc., 626
13th St., Franklin, PA 16323
Phone: 814-437-1808
Fax: 814-437-2544
Email: fcpmarketing@velocity.net
www.frenchcreekproduction.com
Frenzelit North America, 4165
Old Salisbury Rd., Lexington, NC
27295
Phone: 336-956-3956
Fax: 336-956-3913
Email: fna@frenzelit.net
www.frenzelit.net
Freudenberg Filtration Technolo-
gies SE & Co. KG, Hoehnerweg
2-4, Weinheim, 69465 Germany
Phone: +49 6201 80-6264
Fax: +49 6201 88-6299
Email: viledon@freudenberg-
filter.com
www.freudenberg-filter.com
Frontier Industrial Corp, 26 Mis-
sissippi Street, Ste. 400, Buffalo,
NY 14203
Phone: 716-447-7587
Fax: 716-447-7593
Email: rzuchlewski@fic-services.
com
www.fic-services.com
FSE Energy, 74378 Highway 25,
Covington, LA 70435
Phone: 985-867-9150
Fax: 985-867-9155
www.fseenergy.com
See our ad on p. 12
Fuel Purification, 1208 W Mar-
shall St., Richmond, VA 23220
Phone: 804-512-9320
Fax: 804-358-4200
Email: sales@fuelpurification.com
www.fuelpurification.com

Fuel Tech, Inc., 27601 Bella Vista
Pkwy., Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone: 800-666-9688
Fax: 630-845-4501
Email: info@ftek.com
www.ftek.com
Furnace Mineral Products, Inc.,
7065 Tranmere Dr., Unit 6, Mis-
sissauga, ON L5S 1M2 Canada
Phone: 905-676-1969
Fax: 866-591-9018
Email: aliberatore@fmpcoatings.
com
www.fmpcoatings.com
Fusion Babbitting Co., Inc., 4540
W Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI
53219
Phone: 800-613-5118
Fax: 414-645-6606
Email: mmckindley@sbcglobal.net
www.fusionbabbitting.com
G
GAI Consultants, Inc., 385 East
Waterfront Dr., Homestead, PA
15120-5005
Phone: 412-476-2000
Email: r.houston@gaiconsultants.
com
www.gaiconsultants.com
Galco Industrial Electron-
ics, 26010 Pinehurst, Madison
Heights, MI 48071
Phone: 248-542-9090
Fax: 248-414-5974
Email: sales@galco.com
www.galco.com
Gantrex, Inc., 2000 Oxford Dr.,
Ste. 400, Bethel Park, PA 15102
Phone: 800-242-6873
Fax: 412-655-3814
Email: tom.berringer@gantrex.com
www.Gantrex.com
Gardner Denver, 1800 Gardner
Expwy, Quincy, IL 62305
Phone: 217-222-5400
Fax: 217-228-8243
Email: maggie@gardnerdenver.com
www.gardnerdenver.com
Garlock Sealing Technologies,
1666 Division St., Palmyra, NY
14522
Phone: 315-597-4811
Fax: 315-597-3039
Email: gst.info@garlock.com
www.garlock.com
Gas Corporation of America, P.O.
Box 5183, Wichita Falls, TX 76307
Phone: 940-723-6015
Email: gascorp@wf.net
www.gas-corp.com
Gas Depot S.A., Boulevard Vista
Hermosa 23-89 Zona15, Guate-
mala, 1015 Guatemala
Phone: 50223695676
Fax: 50223658110
Email: gasdepotsa@yahoo.es
Gas Turbine Efficiency, 300 Sun-
port Ln., Orlando, FL 32809
Phone: 407-304-5200
Fax: 407-304-5201
Email: info@gtefficiency.com
www.gtefficiency.com
Gastops Ltd., 1011 Polytek St.,
Ottawa, ON K1J 9J3 Canada
Phone: 613-744-3530
Fax: 613-744-8846
Email: sales@gastops.com
www.gastops.com
GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc.,
733 Heights Blvd., Houston, TX
77007
Phone: 713-802-1761
Fax: 713-869-0680
Email: spress@gc3.com
www.gc3.com
GE Energy, 8800 East 63rd St.,
Raytown, MO 64113-4801
Phone: 816-356-8400
Email: filtration@ge.com
www.GE-energy.com/filtration
GE Inspection Technologies,
721 Visions Dr., Skaneateles, NY
13152
Phone: 888-332-3848
Fax: 866-899-4184
Email: info-geit@ge.com
www.geinspectiontechnologies.com
GE Water & Process Technologies,
4636 Somerton Road, Trevose,
PA 19053
Phone: 215-355-3300
www.gewater.com
GEA Heat Exchangers - Cooling
Tower Solutions Division, 17755
US Hwy. 19 North, Ste. 250,
Clearwater, FL 33764
Phone: 727-530-9000
Fax: 727-530-9006
Email: coolingtowers.hx.us@
gea.com
www.gea-heatexchangers.com/
products/wet-cooling-towers
GEA Process Engineering, 9165
Rumsey Rd., Columbia, MD 21045
Phone: 410-997-8700
Fax: 410-997-5021
Email: gea.pe.na@gea.com
www.niroinc.com
Gearhart McKee, Inc., 47 Walnut
St., Johnstown, PA 15901
Phone: 814-532-8870
Fax: 814-532-8875
Email: tgearhart@gearhartmck-
eeinc.com
www.gearhartmckeeinc.com
General Equipment Co., 620
Alexander Dr. SW, Owatonna, MN
55060
Phone: 507-451-5510
Fax: 507-451-5511
Email: general@generalequip.com
www.generalequip.com
General Monitors, 26776 Simpa-
tica Circle, Lake Forest, CA 92630
Email: info@generalmonitors.com
www.generalmonitors.com
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POWER 79
Genesis Lamp Corp., 375 N St.
Clair St., Painesville, OH 44077
Phone: 800-685-5267
Fax: 440-354-0624
Email: mark@genesislamp.com
www.genesislamp.com
Geometrica, Inc., 12300 Dundee
Ct, Suite 200, Cypress, TX 77429
Phone: 832-220-1200
www.geometrica.com
Georg Fischer, 2882 Dow Ave.,
Tustin, CA 92780
Phone: 714-731-8800
Email: us.ps@georgfischer.com
www.us.piping.georgefischer.com
Georg Fischer Piping Systems
Ltd., Ebnatstrasse 111, Schaff-
hausen, 8201 Switzerland
Phone: 0041 52 631 3909
Email: sanjay.patel@georgfischer.
com
www.piping.georgfischer.com
George H. Bodman, Inc., P.O. Box
5758, Kingwood, TX 77325-4225
Phone: 281-359-4006
Fax: 281-359-4225
Email: blrclgdr@aol.com
www.boilercleaningdoctor.com
Geospatial Corp., 229 Howes Run
Rd., Sarver, PA 16055
Phone: 724-353-3400
Email: info@geospatialcorpora-
tion.com
www.geospatialcorporation.com
GEOTEK, Inc./PUPI Crossarms,
1421 2nd Ave. NW, Stewartville,
MN 55976
Phone: 507-533-6076
Fax: 507-533-4784
Email: pupisales@geotekinc.com
www.geotekinc.com
Gestra AG, Muenchener Strasse
77, Bremen, 28215 Germany
Phone: 0049 421 35030
Fax: 0049 421 3503397
Email: gestra.ag@flowserve.com
www.gestra.de
GETAC, Inc., 20762 Linear Ln.,
Lake Forest, CA 92630
Phone: 866-464-3822
Fax: 949-699-1440
Email: general.sales@getac.com
www.getac.com
Gilbert Electrical Systems &
Products, P.O. Box 1141, Beckley,
WV 25801
Phone: 304-252-6243
Fax: 304-252-6292
www.gilbertelectrical.com
Gill Manufacturing Ltd., 9 Ken-
view Blvd., Brampton, ON L6T
5G5 Canada
Phone: 905-792-0999
Fax: 905-792-0091
Email: raj@gillmanufacturing.com
www.gillmanufacturing.com
GIW Industries, Inc., 5000
Wrightsboro Rd., Grovetown, GA
30813
Phone: 706-863-1011
Fax: 706-863-5637
Email: marketing@giwindustries.
com
www.giwindustries.com
GKS Inspection Services & Laser
Design, 9401 James Ave., #132,
Bloomington, MN 55112
Phone: 952-884-9648
Fax: 952-884-9653
Email: quote@gks.com
www.gks.com/ppc_lps_gks/ter-
restrial_new.asp
Global Industrial Solutions, 219
Glider Circle, Corona, CA 92880
Phone: 951-279-9429
Fax: 951-279-6706
Email: info@globalindustrialsolu-
tions.net
www.globalindustrialsolutions.net
Global Power Supply, 5383 Hollis-
ter Ave., Ste. 220, Santa Barbara,
CA 93111
Phone: 805-683-3828
Fax: 805-683-3823
Email: mike.wolfe@globalpwr.net
www.globalpwr.net
Global Training Solutions, Inc.,
P.O. Box 26067, 3163 Winston
Churchill Blvd., Mississauga, ON
L5L 5W7 Canada
Phone: 416-806-5777
Email: info@globaltrainingsolu-
tions.ca
www.globaltrainingsolutions.ca
Gorman-Rupp Co., 305 Bowman
St., P.O. Box 1217, Mansfield, OH
44903
Phone: 419-755-1011
Fax: 419-755-1251
Email: grsales@gormanrupp.com
www.GRpumps.com
GP Strategies Corp., Energy
Services Group, 25 Northpointe
Pkwy., Amherst, NY 14228
Phone: 716-799-1080
Fax: 716-799-1081
Email: performance@gpstrategies.
com
www.gpstrategies.com
Graham Corp., 20 Florence Ave.,
Batavia, NY 14020
Phone: 585-343-2216
Fax: 585-343-1097
Email: equipment@graham-mfg.com
www.graham-mfg.com
Graphite Metallizing Corp.,
Graphalloy Division, 1050 Nep-
perhan Ave., Yonkers, NY 10703
Phone: 914-968-8400
Fax: 914-968-8468
Email: sales@graphalloy.com
www.graphalloy.com
Great Northern Products, P.O. Box
750, Exeter, NH 03833
Email: nknox@gnpinc.com
www.gnpinc.com
Greencisco Industrial Co. Ltd.,
Cuiyuan Bldg., Songgyuan
New Village, Hengkeng Indus-
trial Area, Liaobu, Dongguan HI
523413 China
Email: sales@greencisco.com
www.greencisco.com


Greens Power Equipment USA,
Inc., 601 Carlson Pkwy., Ste.
1050, Minnetonka, MN 55305
Phone: 952-475-6333
Fax: 952-449-5101
Email: greens@greenspower.us
www.greenspower.us
Gremp Steel Co., 14100 S West-
ern Ave., Posen, IL 60469
Phone: 708-489-1000
Email: sales@grempsteel.com
www.grempsteel.com
GSE Consulting, LP, 808 Travis
St., Ste. 802, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-395-1990 ext 209
Fax: 713-395-1995
Email: andrewb@gulfstatesenergy.
com
www.gseconsultinglp.com
GSE Systems, Inc., 1332 London-
town Blvd., Ste. 200, Sykesville,
MD 21784
Phone: 410-970-7800
Fax: 410-970-7995
Email: info@gses.com
www.gses.com
GSI - Generator Services Int,
Inc., 1865 Scott Futrell Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28208
Phone: 704-399-5422
Fax: 704-399-5983
Email: ljohnson@gsionsite.com
www.gsionsite.com
GTI, Box 1269, 2 Central Ave.,
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: 973-360-0170
Fax: 973-360-0176
Email: erussick@gti-e.com
www.gti-e.com
GulfRim Navigation, P.O. Box
1214, Abbeville, LA 70511
Phone: 877-893-0789
Fax: 337-893-6256
Email: larry@gulfrim.com
www.gulfrim.com
H
H&L Instruments, P.O. Box 580,
34 Post Rd., North Hampton, NH
03862-0580
Phone: 603-964-1818
Fax: 603-964-8881
Email: hmoyer@hlinstruments.com
www.hlinstruments.com
H2O Innovation USA, Inc., 6840
Shingle Creek Pkwy., Ste. 20,
Brooklyn Center, MN 55430
Phone: 763-566-8961
Fax: 763-566-8972
Email: dale.iverson@h2oinnova-
tion.com
www.h2oinnovation.com
Haberberger, Inc., 9744 Pauline
Pl., Saint Louis, MO 63116
Phone: 314-631-3324
Fax: 314-631-2751
Email: stevejh@haberbergerinc.com
www.haberbergerinc.com
Hach, P.O. Box 389, Loveland,
CO 80539
Phone: 866-450-4248
Fax: 970-669-2932
Email: orders@hach.com
www.hach.com


Hadek Protective Systems, Foster
Plaza 5, 651 Holiday Dr., Pitts-
burgh, PA 15220
Phone: 412-204-0028
Fax: 412-204-0039
Email: sales@hadek.com
www.hadek.com
Haefely Test AG, Birsstrasse 300,
Basel, 4052 Switzerland
Phone: +41 61 373 4111
Fax: +41 61 373 49 12
Email: sales@haefely.com
www.haefely.com
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December 2013 80
Haldor Topsoe, Inc., 17629 El
Camino Real, Ste. 300, Houston,
TX 77058
Phone: 281-228-5000
Fax: 281-228-5109
Email: tnw@topsoe.com
www.topsoe.com
Halfen GmbH, Liebigstrasse 14,
Langenfeld, 40764 Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 2173/970-0
Fax: +49 (0) 2173/970-123
Email: info@halfen.com
www.halfen.com
Halfen USA, Inc., 8521 FM 1976,
P.O. Box 547, Converse, TX 78109
Phone: 800-423-9140
Fax: 888-277-1695
Email: info@halfenusa.com
www.halfenusa.com
Hamon Custodis, Inc., 58 East
Main St., Somerville, NJ 08876
Phone: 908-333-2000
Fax: 908-333-2151
Email: info.hcusus@hamonusa.com
www.hamoncustodis.com
Hanover Technical Sales, Inc.,
P.O. Box 70, Battery Park, VA
23304
Phone: 757-357-2677
Email: hanover@visi.net
www.HanoverTechnical.com
HARCO, 186 Cedar Street, Bran-
ford, CT 06405-6011
Phone: 203-483-3700
www.harcolabs.com
Hardy Process Solutions, 9440
Carroll Park Dr., Ste. 150, San
Diego, CA 92121
Phone: 800-821-5831
Email: hardyinfo@hardysolutions.
com
www.hardysolutions.com
Harrington Hoists, Inc., 401 West
End Ave., Manheim, PA 17545
Phone: 800-233-3010
Fax: 717-665-2861
Email: customerservice@har-
ringtonhoists.com
www.harringtonhoists.com
Hatch, 330 Hatch Drive, Foster
City, CA 94404
Phone: 858-847-0655
Fax: 866-388-8595
www.hgpauction.com
Hawk Measurement, 7 River St.,
Middleton, MA 01949
Phone: 978-304-3000
Fax: 978-304-1462
Email: gina.travers@hawkmeasure.
com
www.hawkmeasure.com
Hayden Laser Services, LLC, 333
River St., West Springfield, MA
01089
Phone: 413-734-4981
Fax: 413-785-5052
Email: dch@haydencorp.com
www.haydenlaser.com
Hayward Tyler, 1 Kimpton Rd.,
Luton, LU1 3LD United Kingdom
Phone: 01582 731144
Fax: 01582 722920
Email: marketing@haywardtyler.
com
www.haywardtyler.com
HC Controls, Inc., 3271 Pleasant
Ter., Crestview, FL 32539
Phone: 850-398-8078
Fax: 850-398-4030
Email: chris@hccontrols.com
www.hccontrols.com
Headwaters, Inc., 10653 S River
Front Pkwy., Ste. 300, South
Jordan, UT 84095
Phone: 801-984-9400
Fax: 801-984-9410
Email: info@flyash.com
www.flyash.com
Heath Consultants, Inc., 9030
Monroe Rd., Houston, TX 77061
Phone: 713-844-1300
Fax: 713-844-1309
Email: customerservice@heathus.
com
www.heathus.com
Heatrex, Inc., P.O. Box 515,
Meadville, PA 16335
Phone: 814-724-1800
Fax: 814-333-6580
Email: sales@heatrex.com
www.heatrex.com
Helmick Corp., P.O. Box 71, Fair-
mont, WV 26555-0071
Phone: 304-366-3520
Fax: 304-366-8923
Email: custserv@helmickcorp.com
www.HelmickCorp.com
Hessler Associates, Inc., 3862
Clifton Manor Pl., Haymarket, VA
20169
Phone: 703-753-1602
Email: david@hesslerassociates.com
www.hesslernoise.com
Heyl & Patterson, Inc., P.O. Box
36, Pittsburgh, PA 15230
Phone: 412-788-9810
Fax: 412-788-9822
Email: info@heylpatterson.com
www.heylpatterson.com
HFP Acoustical Consultants, 6001
Savoy Drive, Suite 215, Houston,
Texas 77036-3322
Phone: 713-789-9400
Fax: 713-789-5493
www.hfpacoustical.com
HGP, Inc., 1720 N Pleasantburg
Dr., Greenville, SC 29609
Phone: 864-370-0213
Fax: 864-370-0215
Email: fgiffels@hgp-inc.com
www.hgp-inc.com
Highland Technology, Inc., 18
Otis St., San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: 415-551-1700
Fax: 415-551-5129
Email: info@highlandtechnology.
com
www.highlandtechnology.com
Highline Products, 800 South St.,
Waltham, MA 02453
Phone: 781-736-0002
Fax: 781-647-3607
Email: pault@highlineproducts.com
www.highlineproducts.com
Highpoint Sales, Inc., 21151
John Milless Dr., P.O. Box 483,
Rogers, MN 55374
Phone: 763-416-9707
Fax: 763-416-9708
Email: sales@highpointsales.com
www.highpointsales.com
Hilco Industrial, 31555 West
Fourteen Mile Rd. Suite 301,
Farmington Hills, MI 48334
Phone: 248-254-9999
Fax: 248-254-9995
www.hilcoind.com
Hiller Systems, Inc., 1242 Execu-
tive Blvd., Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-9123
Fax: 757-549-1083
Email: mark.herzog@hillerva.com
www.hillersystemsinc.com
Hillscape, Inc., 869 East 725
South, Centerville, UT 84014
Phone: 801 554 3791
Email: hillscape@comcast.net
www.hillscape.us
Hindusthan Mica Mart, Main
Road, Giridih-815301, Giridih,
815301 India
Email: lallgrd@gmail.com
www.micaexport.diytrade.com
Hinkel Equipment Rental As-
sociates, Inc., 2410 High Rd.,
Huntingdon Valley, PA 19006
Phone: 215-673-6700
Fax: 215-938-0609
Email: hinkrent@erols.com
www.hinkrent.com
Hitachi Power Systems America
Ltd., 645 Martinsville Rd., Bask-
ing Ridge, NJ 07920
Phone: 908-605-2800
Fax: 908-604-6211
Email: power.info@hal.hitachi.com
www.hitachipowersystems.us
Hitech Instruments, Great Mar-
lings Butterfield, Luton, LU2 8DL
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1582 435600
Fax: +44 1582 400901
Email: hitechsales@cooperindus-
tries.com
www.hitech-inst.co.uk
Hoffmann, Inc., 6001 49th St. S,
Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 563-263-4733
Fax: 563-263-0919
Email: hoffmann@hoffmanninc.
com
www.hoffmanninc.com
Hoppy Industrial Co. Ltd., 74,
Lane 255, Ren-Ai St., San-Chung
District, New Taipei City, 241
Taiwan
Phone: 886-2-2985-3001
Fax: 886-2-2985-5490
Email: csw@hoppy.com.tw
www.hoppy.com.tw
HORIBA, 240 Spring Hill Dr., Ste.
410, Spring, TX 77386
Phone: 877-646-7422
Email: rick.struzynski@horiba.
com
www.horiba.com/us/en/
Hose Master, LLC, 1233 East
222nd St., Cleveland, OH 44117
Phone: 216-481-2020
Email: info@hosemaster.com
www.hosemaster.com
Howden North America, Inc.,
7079 Parklane Rd., Ste. 300,
Columbia, SC 29223
Phone: 803-741-2700
Fax: 866-757-0941
Email: sales@howdenbuffalo.com
www.howden.com
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Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works,
Inc., 23 Meter St., Penacook, NH
03303
Phone: 603-753-6321
Fax: 603-753-9592
Email: sales@hoytmeter.com
www.hoytmeter.com
HR Power, 42010 Koppernick Rd.,
Ste. 117, Canton, MI 48187
Phone: 734-416-9328
Fax: 734-416-9368
Email: sales@hrpco.com
www.hrpco.com
HTRI, 150 Venture Dr., College
Station, TX 77845
Phone: 979-690-5050
Fax: 979-690-3250
www.HTRI.net
Hubbell Power Systems, Inc., 210
North Allen, Centralia, MO 65240
Phone: 573-682-5521
Fax: 573-682-8714
Email: hpsliterature@hps.hub-
bell.com
www.hubbellpowersystems.com
Hurst Technologies Corp., 4005
Technology Dr., Ste. 1000, Angle-
ton, TX 77515
Phone: 979-849-5068
Fax: 979-849-6663
Email: bobb@hursttech.com
www.hursttech.com
HydraTech Engineered Products,
10448 Chester Rd., Cincinnati,
CT 45215
Phone: 513-827-9169
Fax: 513-827-9171
Email: info@hydratechllc.com
www.hydratechllc.com
HydraTight / D.L. Ricci, 5001
Moundview Dr., Red Wing, MN
55066
Phone: 651-388-8661
Fax: 651-388-0002
Email: redwing@hydratight.com
www.dlricci.com
Hydro Dyne, Inc., P.O. Box 318,
225 Wetmore Ave. S.E., Massillon,
OH 44648-0318
Phone: 330-832-5076
Fax: 330-832-8163
Email: howard@hydrodyneinc.com
www.hydrodyneinc.com
Hydro, Inc., 834 West Madison
St., Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: 312-738-3000
Fax: 312-738-3226
Email: lkoziol@hydroinc.com
Hydropro, Inc., 2631 Highway J,
Bourbon, MO 65441
Phone: 573-732-3318
Fax: 573-732-9408
Email: sales@hpro.com
www.hpro.com
Hypercat Advanced Catalyst
Products, 1075 Andrew Dr., Ste.
C, West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 610-692-3490
Fax: 610-692-3971
Email: c.jackson@hypercat-acp.
com
www.hypercat-acp.com
HYTORC, 333 Route 17, Mahwah,
NJ 07430
Phone: 201-512-9500
Fax: 201-512-9501
Email: joepaul@hytorc.com
www.hytorc.com
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.,
140-2 Kye-Dong, Chongro-Ku,
Seoul, 110-793 South Korea
Phone: 822-746-7576
Fax: 922-746-7548
Email: mark@hhi.co.kr
www.hyundai-elec.com/eng
I
I.C.M.I.(Inductive Components
Mfg., Inc.), 1200 Ferris Rd., P.O.
Box 188, Amelia, OH 45102
Phone: 513-752-4731
Fax: 513-752-4738
Email: dwm@icmiinc.com
www.ICMIinc.com
ICL-IP, 16800 Imperial Valley
Drive, Houston, TX 77060
Phone: 281-445-0676
Fax: 281-445-2284
www.calciumbromides.com
IFS North America, Inc., 200
South Executive Dr., Brookfield,
WI 53005
Phone: 262-317-7480
Fax: 262-317-7401
Email: melissa.visel@ifsworld.com
www.ifsworld.com
igus®, Inc., P.O. Box 14349, East
Providence, RI 02914
Phone: 401-438-2200
Fax: 401-438-7270
Email: sales@igus.com
www.igus.com
ILLICA Group, 475 Silver St.,
Poca, WV 25159
Phone: 304-776-9370
Fax: 304-776-9464
Email: info@illica.com
www.bluepeterseries.com
ILT-RES, LLC, M.Pokrovskaya st.
18, of. 312 Kostina St. 2, of 132,
Nizhniy Novgorod, 603000 Rus-
sian Federation
Phone: +7 906 366 12 78
Fax: +7 831 433 77 14
Email: alexander.elin@ilt-res.com
www.ilt-res.com
Imbibitive Technologies America,
Inc., 8 Hiscott St., Ste. #1, St.
Catharines, ON L2R 1C6 Canada
Phone: 888-843-2323
Fax: 877-439-2323
Email: jcp@imbiberbeads.com
www.imbiberbeads.com
Imeco Ltd., Imeco House, Budge
Budge Trunk Road Maheshtalla,
Dakghar, Kolkata, 700141 India
Email: lda@imecolimited.com
www.imecolimited.com
IMR, Inc., 3634 Central Ave., St.
Petersburg, FL 33711
Phone: 727-328-2818
Fax: 727-328-2826
Email: info@imrusa.com
www.imrusa.com
Incon, 92 Industrial Park Rd.,
Saco, ME 04072
Phone: 207-283-0156
Fax: 207-283-0158
Email: sales@incon.com
www.incon.com
Indeck Power Equipment Co.,
1111 Willis Ave., Wheeling, IL
60090
Phone: 847-541-8300
Fax: 847-541-9984
Email: rrabago@indeck-power.com
www.indeck.com
Independent Turbine Consulting,
LLC, 15905 Brookway Dr., Ste.
4101A, Huntersville, NC 28078
Phone: 804-397-9411
Email: independent@turbine-
fieldservice.com
www.TurbineFieldService.com
Indigo Technologies, 8980 Perry
Hwy., Pittsburgh, PA 15237
Phone: 412-358-0171
Email: bob@indigotechnologies-
us.com
www.indigotechnologise-us.com
InduMar Products, Inc., 3355 West
Alabama, Ste. 110, Houston, TX
77098
Phone: 713-977-4100
Fax: 713-977-4164
Email: stopit@indumar.com
www.indumar.com
Industrial Contract Services, Inc.,
P.O. Box 13158, Grand Forks, ND
58208
Phone: 701-775-8480
Fax: 701-775-8479
Email: ics@icsgf.com
www.icsgf.com
Industrial Engineering, S.A., P.O.
Box 4146, Florence, SC 29502
Phone: 843-665-9984
Fax: 843-667-1424
Email: twalters@industrialengi-
neering-sa.com
www.industrialengineering-sa.com
Industrial Insite, LLC, P.O. Box
286, Osseo, MN 55369
Phone: 763-753-7595
Email: kpitman@industrialinsite.
com
www.Industrialinsite.com
Industrial Magnetics, Inc., 1385
M-75 S., Boyne City, MI 49712
Phone: 231-582-3100
Email: doleary@magnetics.com
www.magnetics.com
Industrial Marketing Systems,
P.O. Box 890, Twin Peaks, CA
92391-0890
Phone: 909-337-2238
Fax: 909-336-5293
Email: info@imswe.com
www.imswe.com
Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc.,
17650 Malyn Blvd., Fraser, MI
48026
Phone: 586-296-0960
Fax: 586-296-0375
Email: klamberti@indservo.com
www.indservo.com
Industrial Solutions Internation-
al, 326 Carter Moir Dr., Lancaster,
PA 17601
Phone: 717-560-0310
Email: dbenn63@attglobal.net
www.indsolint.com
Industrial Training International,
9428 Old Pacific Hwy, Woodland,
WA 98674
Phone: 360-225-1100
www.iti.com
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December 2013 82
Infolytica Corp., Place du Pare
300 Leo Pariseau, Ste. 2222,
Montral, Quebec H2X 4B3 Canada
Phone: 514-849-8752
Fax: 514-849-4239
Email: info@infolytica.com
www.infolytica.com
Infor, 13560 Morris Rd., Ste.
4100, Alpharetta, GA 30004
Phone: 800-260-2640
Fax: 678-319-8682
Email: sales@infor.com
www.infor.com
InfoSight Corp., 20700 US Hwy.
23, Chillicothe, OH 45601
Phone: 740-642-3600
Fax: 740-642-5001
Email: sales@infosight.com
www.infosight.com
INNER-TITE Corp., 110 Industrial
Dr., Holden, MA 01520
Phone: 508-829-6361
Fax: 508-829-4469
Email: security@inner-tite.com
www.inner-tite.com
Innovative Control Systems, Inc.,
26 Corporate Dr., Clifton Park,
NY 12065
Phone: 518-383-8078
Fax: 518-383-5966
Email: techinfo@icsworldwide.com
www.icsworldwide.com
Inspectech Corp., 8550 W
Charleston Blvd., #102-148, Las
Vegas, NV 89117
Phone: 800-705-4357
Email: nlindell@inspectechcon-
sulting.com
www.weldtracking.com
InStep Software, 55 East Monroe
St., Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-894-7837
Email: sales@instepsoftware.com
www.instepsoftware.com
Instrument Transformer Equip-
ment Corp. (ITEC), P.O. Box
23088, Charlotte, NC 28227
Phone: 704-282-4331
Fax: 704-283-3017
Email: sales@itec-ctvt.com
www.itec-ctvt.com
Intek, Inc., 751 Intek Way,
Westerville, OH 43082
Phone: 614-895-0301
Email: jreynolds@intekflow.com
www.intekflow.com
Interdevelopment, Inc., 1629 K
St. NW, Ste. 300, Washington,
DC 20006
Phone: 202-508-1459
Fax: 202-331-3759
Email: interdevelopment@
starpower.net
www.interdevelopment.com
Intergraph Corp., 300 Intergraph
Way, Madison, AL 35758
Phone: 256-730-3390
Email: cathy.lamberth@intergraph.
com
www.intergraph.com/ppm
Interliance, LLC, 4 Hutton Centre,
Ste. 1050, Santa Ana, CA 92707
Phone: 714-540-8889
Fax: 714-540-6113
Email: info@interliance.com
www.interliance.com
International Business Systems,
90 Blue Ravine Rd., Folsom, CA
98630
Phone: 916-985-3900
Email: clark.greenjr@ibs.net
www.ibs.net
International Paint, Stoneygate
Lane Felling, Gateshead, NE10
0JY United Kingdom
Phone: +44 191 402 2661
Email: protectivecoatings@
akzonobel.com
www.international-pc.com/coal
International Power Machinery
Co., 50 Public Sq. Terminal Tower,
Ste. 834, Cleveland, OH 44113
Phone: 216-621-9514
Fax: 216-621-9515
Email: kernx06@sbcglobal.net
www.intlpwr.com
Interpolymer Corp., 200 Dan Rd.,
Canton, MA 02021
Phone: 781-828-7120
Fax: 781-821-2485
Email: info@interpolymer.com
www.interpolymer.com
Intertek AIM, 16100 Cairnway
Dr., Ste. 310, Houston, TX 77084-
3597
Phone: 832-593-0550
Fax: 832-593-0551
Email: aimengineering.info@
intertek.com
www.intertek.com/power-gener-
ation/
Inuktun Services Ltd., 2569-C
Kenworth Rd., Nanaimo, BC V9T
3M4 Canada
Phone: 250-729-8080
Fax: 250-729-8077
Email: sales@inuktun.com
www.inuktun.com
Invenergy LLC, One South Wacker
Drive, Suite 1900, Chicago, IL
60606
Phone: 312-224-1400
Fax: 312-224-1444
www.invenergyllc.com
Invensys, 10900 Equity Dr.,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 888.869.0059
Fax: 713-329-1700
Email: contact@invensys.com
www.IOM.Invensys.com
Ionics, Inc., 65 Grove St., Water-
town, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-2500
Fax: 617-926-4304
Email: info@ionics.com
www.ionics.com
Iris Power LP, 3110 American Dr.,
Mississauga, ON L4V 1T2 Canada
Phone: 905-677-4824
Fax: 905-677-8498
Email: marketing@irispower.com
www.irispower.com
IRIS Systems, Inc., 7583 Vantage
Pl., Delta, BC V4G 1A5 Canada
Phone: 604-584-4747
Fax: 604-581-9790
Email: flame@iris-systems.com
www.iris-systems.com
IRISS, 10306 Technology Ter.,
Bradenton, FL 34211
Phone: 941-907-9128
Email: info@iriss.com
www.iriss.com
Ironworker Management Progres-
sive Action Cooperative Trust
(IMPACT), 1750 New York Avenue,
Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 800-545-4921
Fax: 202-393-1148
www.impact-net.org
ITT Flygt Corp., 35 Nutmeg Dr.,
Trumbull, CT 06611
Phone: 203-380-4700
Fax: 203-380-4705
Email: mengxing.yao@itt.com
www.flygtus.com
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings,
1685 Galt Industrial Blvd., St.
Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-733-1110
Fax: 314-733-1164
Email: dbryant@futuracoatings.
com
www.futuracoatings.com
Iveco Motors Of North America,
245 E Carol Stream, Carol Stream,
IL 60188
Phone: 630-260-4226
Fax: 630-260-4267
Email: margaret.bunting@iveco.
com
www.ivecomotors.com
J
J Custom Supply, Inc., 10013
Mammoth, Baton Rouge, LA
70814
Phone: 225-272-2210
Fax: 225-272-2223
Email: robert@jcustom.com
www.jcustom.com
J7 Learning & Consulting, P.O.
Box 888, Levittown, PA 19058
Phone: 215-945 4217
Fax: 215-943-0447
Email: ed@j7learning.com
www.J7Learning.com
Jamison Products, LP, 27760
Commercial Park Rd., Tomball, TX
77375
Phone: 713-466-6951
Fax: 713-466-5051
Email: kabbey@jamisonproducts.
com
www.jamisonproducts.com
Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc.,
932 Sohn Alloway Rd., Lyons, NY
14489
Phone: 315-871-4420
Fax: 315-871-4430
Email: dean.bailey@jamkocorp.com
www.jamkocorp.com
Jarret, Inc., 7 Centre Dr., Orchard
Park, NY 14127
Phone: 716-662-0406
Fax: 716-740-5121
Email: contact@jarret.com
www.jarret.com
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems
Controls, Inc., 2303 W Alameda
Dr., Tempe, AZ 85282
Phone: 602-438-4400
Fax: 602-438-4420
Email: sales@jasc-controls.com
www.jasc-controls.com
Jefferson Electric, 9650 S Frank-
lin Dr., Franklin, WI 53132
Phone: 414-209-1620
Fax: 414-209-1621
Email: info@jeffersonelectric.com
www.jeffersonelectric.com
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Jeffrey Rader Corp., 398 Willis
Rd., Woodruff, SC 29388
Phone: 864-476-7523
Email: buster@penncrusher.com
www.jeffreyrader.com
See our ad on p. 27
Jenny Products, 850 N Pleasant
Ave., Somerset, PA 15501
Phone: 814-445-3400
Fax: 814-445-2280
www.jennyproductsinc.com
Jiangsu High Hope International
Group Co. Ltd., High Hope Man-
sion, 91 Baixia Road, Nanjing,
210008 China
Phone: 86-25-84691037
Fax: 86-025-84691038
Email: hhyp@high-hope.com
www.high-hope.com
John Crane, Inc., Mechanical
Seals Div., 6400 W Oakton St.,
Morton Grove, IL 60053
Phone: 847-967-2400
Fax: 847-967-3915
Email: seals@johncrane.com
www.johncrane.com
John R Robinson Inc., 3805 30th
St, Long Island City, NY 11101
Phone: 718-786-6088
www.johnrrobinsoninc.com
John Zink Hamworthy Combus-
tion, John Zink Company LLC,
Coen Division 951 Mariners
Island Blvd. Ste. 410, San Mateo,
CA 94404
Phone: 650-522-2100
Fax: 650-522-2147
www.coen.com
Johnson Bros Metal Forming Co.,
5520 McDermott Dr., Berkeley, IL
60163-1203
Phone: 708-449-7050
Fax: 708-449-0042
Email: info@jobroco.com
www.JohnsonRollForming.com
Johnson Matthey Catalysts, LLC,
1121 Alderman Dr., Ste. 204,
Alpharetta, GA 30005
Phone: 678-341-7521
Fax: 678-341-7509
Email: bruce.gobbel@jmusa.com
www.ect.jmcatalysts.com
Jonas, Inc., 4313 Nebraska Ct.,
Pomfret, MD 20675
Phone: 301-934-5605
Fax: 301-934-5606
Email: jonasinc@steamcycle.com
www.steamcycle.com
Joseph Oat Corp., 2500 Broad-
way, Camden, NJ 08104
Phone: 856-541-2900
Fax: 856-541-0864
Email: sales@josephoat.com
www.josephoat.com
JoshiJampala Engineering Pvt
Ltd., M 64 Additional MIDC,
Satara, 415004 India
Phone: 2162240097
Fax: 2162240017
Email: info@joshijampala.com
www.joshijampala.com
JOWA USA, Inc., 59 Porter Rd.,
Littleton, MA 01460
Phone: 978-486-9800
Fax: 978-486-0170
Email: info@jowa-usa.com
www.jowa-usa.com
JR Associates Construction
Services, Inc., 1231 Villanova Pl.,
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone: 951-789-8655
Fax: 951-780-4607
Email: javedz@earthlink.net
JSHP Trasnformer, 68 Kunlun
Development Zone, Liyang, CA
213300 China
Phone: 87319632
Email: jimcai@jshp.com
www.jshp.com
JVI Vibratory Equipment, Inc.,
P.O. Box 40564, Houston, TX
77240-0564
Phone: 832-467-3720
Fax: 832-467-3800
Email: sales@navco-jvi.com
www.jvivibratoryequipment.com
K
K&G Power Systems, 150 Laser
Ct., Hauppauge, NY 11788
Phone: 631-342-1171
Fax: 631-342-1172
Email: jr@kgpowersystems.com
www.kgpowersystems.com
Kafko Intl. Ltd., 3555 W Howard,
Skokie, IL 60175
Phone: 800-528-0334
Fax: 847-763-0334
Email: rmorgando@kafkointl.com
www.oileater.com
Kahn & Co., Inc., 885 Wells Rd.,
Wethersfield, CT 06109
Phone: 860-529-8643
Fax: 860-529-1895
Email: adsorb@kahn.com
www.kahn.com
Kansas City Deaerator, 6731 W
121st St., Overland Park, KS
66209
Phone: 913-338-2111
Fax: 913-338-2144
Email: info@deaerator.com
www.deaerator.com
Karl Storz Endoscopy, Mittelstras-
se 8, Tuttlingen, 78532 Germany
Phone: 33628750510
Email: kdaouadi@karlstorz.fr
www.karlstorz.com
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Ameri-
cas, 8829 North Sam Houston
Pkwy., Houston, TX 77064
Phone: 281-970-3255 ext 18
Fax: 281-970-6465
Email: steve.cernik@kmc-usa.com
www.kawasakigasturbines.com
Kaydon Filtration, 1571 Lukken
Industrial Dr. West, LaGrange, GA
31907
Phone: 706.884.3041
Fax: 706-883-6199
Email: kaydon@filtration.com
www.kaydonfiltration.com
KCF Technologies, 336 South Fra-
ser St., State College, PA 16801
Phone: 814-867-4097
Fax: 814-690-1579
Email: sales@kcftech.com
www.kcftech.com
KE-Burgmann EJS, 10035 Pros-
pect Ave., Ste. 202, Santee, CA
92071
Phone: 619-562-6083
Fax: 619-562-0636
Email: sales@keb-ejs.com
www.keb-ejs.com
KE-Burgmann USA, Inc., 2100
Conner Rd., Ste. 200, Hebron, KY
41048
Phone: 859-746-0091
Fax: 859-746-0094
Email: info@kebusa.com
www.ke-burgmann.com
Keco Engineered Controls, 1200
River Ave., Bldg. 3A, Lakewood,
NJ 08701
Phone: 732-901-5900
Fax: 732-901-5904
Email: keco@optonline.net
www.kecocontrols.com
Keith Mfg. Co., 401 NW Adler St.,
Madras, OR 97741
Phone: 541-475-3802
www.keithwalkingfloor.com
Kentube, 555 W 4th St., Tulsa,
OK 74107
Phone: 918-446-4561
Fax: 918-445-4001
www.kentube.com
KEPCO/KPS, Jeongja 1-ro,
Bundang-gu,, Seongnam-si, 463-
729 South Korea
Phone: 82-31-710-4127
Email: kst3651@kps.co.kr
www.kps.co.kr/eng/
Keystone Electrical Manufacturing
Co., 2511 Bell Ave., Des Moines,
IA 50321
Phone: 515-661-2775
Email: dlepage@keystoneemc.com
www.KeystoneEMC.com
K-Flow Engineering Co. Ltd.,
No.120-1 , Niaosong 3rd. St.,
Yongkang District, Tainan, 71042
Taiwan
Phone: 2422231
Fax: 2424819
Email: kflow@seed.net.tw
www.kffilters.com.tw
Kiewit Power, 9401 Renner Blvd.,
Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 913-928-7000
www.kiewit.com
K-II Enterprises, 3996 Box Car
Ln., Syracuse, NY 13219
Phone: 315-468-3596
Fax: 315-468-0454
Email: kiient@kiienterprises.com
www.kiienterprises.com/products/
KIMA Echtzeitsysteme GmbH,
Guestener Strasse 72, D-52428
Juelich, Germany
Phone: +49 2463 9967 0
Fax: +49 2463 9967 99
Email: contakt@kimaE.de
www.kimae.de
KIMRE, Inc., P.O. Box 571240,
Miami, FL 33257-1240
Phone: 305-233-4249
Fax: 305-233-8687
Email: sales@kimre.com
www.kimre.com
King Filtration Technologies,
Inc., 1255 Research Blvd., St.
Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-432-8441
Fax: 314-432-5147
Email: bburns@kingfiltration.com
www.king-filter.com
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December 2013 84
Kingfisher Industrial, Cradley
Business Park, Overend Rd., Crad-
ley Heath, B64 7DW UK
Phone: +44(0) 1384 410777
Fax: +44(0) 1384 410877
Email: jbrindley@kingfisher-
industrial.co.uk
www.kingfisher-industrial.co.uk
Kingsbury, Inc., 10385 Drummond
Rd., Philadelphia, PA 19154
Phone: 215-824-4000
Fax: 215-824-4999
Email: sales@kingsbury.com
www.kingsbury.com
Kistler Instrument Corp., 75 John
Glenn Dr., Amherst, NY 14228-
2171
Phone: 716-691-5100
Fax: 716-691-5226
Email: sales.us@kistler.com
www.kistler.com
Kistler-Morse Corp., 150 Venture
Blvd., Spartanburg, SC 29305-
3805
Email: kmcorp@aol.com
Kitmondo Ltd., 55 Penn Rd., Lon-
don, N7 9RE United Kingdom
Phone: +44 870 366 6150
Fax: +44 870 922 3109
Email: richard@kitmondo.com
www.kitmondo.com
Kleentek, 4440 Creek Rd., Cincin-
nati, OH 45242
Phone: 800-252-4647
Fax: 513-891-4171
Email: info@kleentek.com
www.kleentek.com
KMPT AG, Industriestrasse 1-3,
Vierkirchen, 85256 Germany
Email: info@kmpt.com
www.kmpt.com
KMPT USA, Inc., 8070 Production
Dr., Florence, KY 41042
Phone: 859-547-1100
Fax: 859-547-1098
Email: sales@kmpt.net
www.kmpt.net
Knight Piésold Consulting, 1400-
750 West Pender St., Vancouver,
BC V6C 2T8 Canada
Phone: 604-685-0543
Fax: 604-685-0147
Email: vancouver@knightpiesold.
com
www.knightpiesold.com
KnightHawk Engineering, 17625
El Camino Real, #412, Houston,
TX 77058
Phone: 281-282-9200
Fax: 281-282-9333
Email: dlewis@knighthawk.com
www.knighthawk.com
Knotts & Co, P.O. Box 1335,
Salem, UT 84653
Phone: 801-423-8080
Fax: 801-423-8028
Email: info@knottsco.net
www.knottsco.net
Komline-Sanderson, 12 Holland
Ave., P.O. Box 257, Peapack, NJ
07977
Phone: 908-234-1000
Fax: 908-234-9487
Email: info@komline.com
www.komline.com
Krueger Engr & Mfg. Co., Inc.,
P.O. Box 11308, Houston, TX
77293-1308
Phone: 281-442-2537
Fax: 281-442-6668
Email: jsylvester@kemco.net
www.kemco.net
K-TEK Corp., 18321 Swamp Rd.,
Prairieville, LA 70769
Phone: 225-673-6100
Fax: 225-673-2525
www.ktekcorp.com
KTSDI, LLC, 141 Lost Creek Dr.,
Youngstown, OH 44512
Phone: 330-783-2000
Email: sales@ktsdi.com
www.ktsdi.com
KUKA Real-Time Products, 17821
E 17th St., Ste. 293, Tustin, CA
92780
Phone: 714-505-1485
Fax: 714-505-1149
Email: e.rankin@kuka-rtosusa.com
www.kuka-rtosusa.com
L
La Marche Mfg. Co., 106 Bradrock
Dr., Des Plaines, IL 60018
Phone: 847-299-1188
Fax: 847-299-3061
Email: www.sales@lamarchemfg.
com
www.lamarchemfg.com
Laboratory Testing, Inc., 2331
Topaz Dr., Hatfield, PA 19440
Phone: 800-219-9095
Fax: 800-219-9096
Email: sales@labtesting.com
www.labtesting.com
Lake Shore Electric Corp., 205
Willis St., Bedford, OH 44146
Phone: 440-232-0200
Fax: 440-232-5644
Email: sales@lake-shore-electric.
com
www.lake-shore-electric.com
Lanier Consulting, LLC, 141 Lu-
cretia Ln., Columbiana, OH 44408
Phone: 330-322-9185
Fax: 330-482-9236
Email: info@lanierconsult.com
www.lanierconsult.com
Lanj Tools, LLC, 1314-B Center
Dr., #424, Medford, OR 97501
Phone: 888-419-1963
Fax: 541-639-4264
Email: jim@lanjtools.com
www.Lanjtools.com
LAP Power Engineering, 800
Village Walk, #237, Guilford, CT
06437
Phone: 203-464-9123
Fax: 203-488-3439
Email: lap.power.engineering@
comcast.net
Laser Imaging Systems, 204-A
E McKenzie St., Punta Gorda, FL
33950
Phone: 941-639-3533
Fax: 941-639-6458
Email: lis@sunline.net
www.sunline.net/lis
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR, 16
Sixth Line Rd., Bristol, QC J0X
1G0 Canada
Phone: 819-647-3085
Fax: 819-647-3085
Email: bobf@lasermap.com
www.lasermap.com
Lazar Scientific, Inc., 51097
Bittersweet Rd., P.O. Box 1128,
Granger, IN 46530
Phone: 574-271-7020
Fax: 574-271-7477
Email: mike@lazarsci.com
www.lazarsci.com
LCI Corp., 4433 Chesapeake Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-394-8341
Fax: 704-392-8507
Email: info@lcicorp.com
www.lcicorp.com
LCR Electronics, 9 South Forest
Ave., Norristown, PA 19401
Phone: 610-278-0840
Fax: 610-278-0935
Email: sales@lcr-inc.com
www.lcr-inc.com
LEA International, 10701 Airport
Dr., Hayden, ID 83835
Phone: 800-881-8506
Fax: 208-762-6099
www.leaintl.com
Lectrus Corp., 2215-C Olan Mills
Dr., Chattanooga, TN 37421
Phone: 423-894-9268
Fax: 423-894-9337
Email: daustin@lectrus.com
www.lectrus.com
LEDtronics, Inc., 23105 Kashiwa
Ct., Torrance, CA 90505
Phone: 310-534-1505
Fax: 310-534-1424
Email: jpapanier@ledtronics.com
www.LEDtronics.com
Leeco Steel, LLC, 8255 S Lemont
Rd., Ste. 100, Darien, IL 60561
Phone: 800-621-4366
Fax: 630-427-2190
Email: jstreicher@leecosteel.com
www.leecosteel.com
Lenox Instrument Co., Inc., 265
Andrews Rd., Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-322-9990
Fax: 215-322-6126
Email: sales@lenoxinst.com
www.lenoxinst.com
Leslie Controls, Inc., 12501 Tele-
com Dr., Tampa, FL 33637
Phone: 813-978-1000
Fax: 800-933-7543
Email: tware@lesliecontrols.com
www.lesliecontrols.com
Liberty Steel Fabricators, 5292
Hog Mountain Rd., Flowery
Branch, GA 30542
Phone: 770-616-4042
Fax: 770-967-8005
Email: libertysteelfab@aol.com
www.LibertySteelFabricators.com
Liburdi Dimetrics Corp., 2599
Charlotte Hwy., Mooresville, NC
28117
Phone: 704-892-8872
Email: mschwall@dimetrics.com
www.liburdi.com
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POWER 85


Lifting Gear Hire Corp., 9925
S Industrial Dr., Bridgeview, IL
60455
Phone: 800-878-7305
Fax: 708-430-3536
Email: sales@lgh-usa.com
www.lgh-usa.com
Lineal Recruiting Services, 46
Copper Kettle Rd., Trumbull, CT
06611
Phone: 203-386-1091
Fax: 203-386-9788
Email: lisalineal@lineal.com
www.lineal.com
Linita Design & Mfg. Corp., 1951
Hamburg Trpk., #24, Buffalo, NY
14218
Phone: 715-566-7753
Email: andrea@linita.com
www.linita.com
Lisbon Hoist, Inc., 321 South
Beaver St., Lisbon, OH 44432
Phone: 330-424-7283
Fax: 330-424-7445
Email: info@lisbonhoist.com
www.lisbonhoist.com
Lista International Corp., 106
Lowland St., Holliston, MA 01746
Phone: 800-722-3020
Fax: 508-626-0353
Email: sales@listaintl.com
www.listaintl.com
LoadBanks of America, 2004
Howard Ln., Austin, TX 78728
Phone: 877-288-4482
Email: casey@loadbanksofamerica.
com
www.loadbanksofamerica.com
Lockmasters USA, P.O. Box 2532,
Panama City, FL 32402
Phone: 800-461-0620
Fax: 850-914-9754
Email: sales@lockmastersusa.com
www.lockmastersusa.com
Lockwood Greene, CH2M Hill, P.O.
Box 491, Spartanburg, SC 29304
Phone: 864-578-2000
Fax: 864-599-4117
Email: lockwood@lg.com
www.lg.com
Look Technologies, LLC, 2723
Wilshire Ave., West Lafayette, IN
47906
Phone: 217-419-5641
Fax: 888-600-7610
Email: support@lookrvi.com
www.Lookrvi.com
LPP Combustion, LLC, 8940 Old
Annapolis Rd., Ste. K, Columbia,
MD 21045
Phone: 410-884-3089
Fax: 410-884-3267
Email: couslere@lppcombustion.
com
www.lppcombustion.com
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc., 2048 Bun-
nell Rd., Warrington, PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-0411
Fax: 215-343-7388
Email: info@luciferfurnaces.com
www.luciferfurnaces.com
Ludeca, Inc., 1425 NW 88th Ave.,
Doral, FL 33172
Phone: 305-591-8935
Fax: 305-591-1537
Email: info@ludeca.com
www.ludeca.com
Lufft USA, 123 Gray Ave., Santa
Barbara, CA 93101
Phone: 805-453-9668
Email: apattison@abbeon.com
www.lufftusa.com
LumaSense Technologies, 3033
Scott Blvd., Santa Clara, CA
95054-3316
Phone: 408-727-1600
Fax: 408-727-1677
Email: info@lumasenseinc.com
www.lumasenseinc.com
LYNN Engineered Systems, LLC,
28835 N Herky Dr., Ste. 103, Lake
Bluff, IL 60044
Phone: 847-549-8900
Fax: 847-549-8901
Email: ned@lynnengineeredsys-
tems.com
www.lynnengineeredsystems.com
M
M+P Labs, Inc., 2210 Technology
Dr., Schenectady, NY 12308
Phone: 518-382-0082
Fax: 518-382-1182
Email: info@mandplabs.com
www.mandplabs.com
M+W Group, Lotterbergstraße 30,
Stuttgart, 70499 Germany
Phone: 4971188040
Email: mario.borst@mwgroup.net
www.mwgroup.net
Macchi - A Division of Sofinter
S.p.A., Largo Buffoni 3, Gallarate
(VA), 21013 Italy
Email: macchi@macchiboiler.it
www.macchiboiler.it
Machine Control Systems, 90
Monarch Rd., Guelph, ON N1K
1S3 Canada
Phone: 519-767-0830
Fax: 519-767-0841
Email: info@mcsltd.ca
www.machinecontrolsystems.ca
Machinery Mounting Solutions,
Inc., 8000 Research Forest Dr.,
Ste. 115-244, Spring, TX 77382
Phone: 281-298-9911
Fax: 281-220-8368
Email: rotachock@ymail.com
www.machinerymountingsolutions.
com
MacroTech, Inc., 246 Mamaroneck
Rd., Scarsdale, NY 10583-7242
Phone: 914-723-6185
Fax: 914-723-6085
Email: wjblume@verizon.net
www.macrotechinc.com
Magellan Professional Solutions,
Inc., 109-G Gainsborough Sq.,
#744, Chesapeake, VA 23320
Phone: 757-549-1880
Fax: 866-861-9647
Email: dlong@magellan-ps.com
www.magellan-ps.com
Magnatech, LLC, 6 Kripes Rd.,
P.O. Box 260, East Granby, CT
06026
Phone: 860-653-2573
Fax: 860-653-0486
Email: info@magnatechllc.com
www.magnatechllc.com
Magnetics Division, Global
Equipment Mktg., Inc., P.O. Box
810483, Boca Raton, FL 33481-
0483
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
Email: info@globalmagnetics.com
www.globalmagnetics.com
Magnetrol International, Inc.,
5300 Belmont Rd., Downers
Grove, IL 60515
Phone: 630-690-4000
Fax: 630-969-9489
Email: kcacciato@magnetrol.com
www.magnetrol.com
See our ad on p. 5
Mainsaver, 15150 Ave. of Science,
San Diego, CA 92128
Phone: 858-674-8700
Email: mainsaver.info@mainsaver.
com
www.mainsaver.com
MajorPower Corp., 7011 Indus-
trial Dr., Mebane, NC 27302
Phone: 919-563-6610
Fax: 919-563-6620
Email: order-spport@majorpower.
com
www.majorpower.com
MAN Turbo, Inc. USA, 2901
Wilcrest Dr., Ste. 345, Houston,
TX 77042
Phone: 713-780-4200
Fax: 713-780-2848
Email: powergeneration@
manturbo-us.com
www.manturbo.com
Marathon Sensors, Inc., 3100
E Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, OH
45241-7788
Phone: 513-772-1000
Fax: 513-326-7090
www.marathonsensors.com
Martech Media, Inc., 9450
Grogan’s Mill Rd., Ste. 150, The
Woodlands, TX 77380
Phone: 281-465-0625
Email: contactus@martechmedai.
com
www.martechmedia.com
Martin Engineering, One Martin
Pl., Neponset, IL 61345
Phone: 309-852-2384
Email: info@martin-eng.com
www.martin-eng.com
See our ad on p. 54
Master Bond, Inc., 134 Hobart
St., Hackensack, NJ 07601
Phone: 201-343-8983
Fax: 201-343-2132
Email: main@masterbond.com
www.masterbond.com
Matec In America, 71 South St.,
Hopkinton, MA 01748
Phone: 508-293-8400
Fax: 508-435-1919
Email: info@matecinamerica.com
www.matecinamerica.com
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December 2013 86
Matrix SME, 5100 East Skelly
Drive # 700, Tulsa, OK 74135
Phone: 918-838-8822
Fax: 918-838-0782
Email: dstarcher@matrixservice.com
www.matrixsme.com
Maven Power, LLC, 134 Vintage
Park Blvd., Ste. A-101, Houston,
TX 77070
Phone: 832-552-9225
Fax: 832-460-3760
Email: info@mavenpower.com
www.mavenpower.com
Mazzella Lifting Technologies,
21000 Aerospace Pkwy., Cleve-
land, OH 44142
Phone: 440-239-7000
Fax: 440-239-7010
Email: mminissale@mazzellalift-
ing.com
www.mazzellalifting.com
MB Oil Filters, c/o Meiji Corpora-
tion, 660 Fargo Ave., Elk Grove
Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-364-9333 x 652
Email: troyl@mboilfilters.com
www.mboilfilters.com
MBDi (Mastering Business
Development, Inc.), 7422 Carmel
Executive Park Dr., Ste. 202,
Charlotte, NC 28226
Phone: 704-553-0000
Fax: 704-553-0001
Email: info@mbdi.com
www.mbdi.com
McCrometer, 3255 W Stetson
Ave., Hemet, CA 92545
Phone: 951-652-6811
Fax: 951-652-3078
www.mccrometer.com
McDermott Brothers Products,
2435 W Union St., Allentown, PA
18104
Phone: 610-432-6188
Fax: 610-432-5690
Email: tnunn@iso-con.com
www.iso-con.com
McGill AirClean, LLC, 1777 Refu-
gee Rd., Columbus, OH 43207
Phone: 614-829-1200
Fax: 614-445-8759
Email: sales@mcgillairclean.com
www.mcgillairclean.com
McGills Equipment, 4803 N Mil-
waukee Ave., Chicago, IL 60630
Phone: 773-209-3211
Email: mcgillsequip@aol.com
www.mcgillsequipment.com
MCNS Environmental Systems,
Inc., 5940 Young St., Smithville,
ON L0R 2A0 Canada
Phone: 905-957-7041
Email: mcnsenv1@aol.com
www.mcnsenvironmental.com
MDF Cable Bus Systems, 4465
Limaburg Rd., Hebron, KY 41048
Phone: 888-808-1655
Fax: 859-586-6572
Email: mmiller@mdfbus.com
www.mdfbus.com
Mead & Hunt, Inc., 6501 Watts
Rd., Madison, WI 53719
Phone: 608-273-6380
Email: miro.kurka@meadhunt.com
www.meadhunt.com
Measurement Specialties, Inc.,
1000 Lucas Way, Hampton, VA
23666
Phone: 800-678-7226
Fax: 757-766-4297
Email: denise.topping@meas-spec.
com
www.meas-spec.com
Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions,
Inc., 730 Superior St., Bldg. 16,
Carnegie, PA 15106
Phone: 412-429-8991
Fax: 412-429-8766
Email: kevinb@mcs-pa.com
www.mcs-pa.com
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis,
Ltd., 19 British American Blvd.,
Latham, NY 12110
Phone: 518-399-3616
Fax: 518-399-3929
Email: info@mdaturbines.com
www.MDAturbines.com
MECS, Inc., 14522 S Outer Forty
Rd., Chesterfield, MO 63017
Phone: 314-275-5700
Fax: 314-275-5701
Email: generalquestions@goldwing.
mecsglobal.com
www.mecsglobal.com
Meeco, Inc., 250 Titus Ave., War-
rington, PA 18976
Phone: 215-343-6600
Fax: 215-343-4194
Email: sales@meeco.com
www.meeco.com
Megger, 4271 Bronze Way, Dallas,
TX 75237
Phone: 800-723-2861
Fax: 214-331-7379
Email: ussales@megger.com
www.megger.com
Meltric Corporation, 4640 Iron-
wood Drive, Franklin, WI 53132
Phone: 414-817-6160
Email: mail@meltric.com
www.meltric.com
Membrana, 13800 S Lakes Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28273
Phone: 704-587-8888
Fax: 704-587-8610
Email: info@liqui-cel.com
www.liqui-cel.com
MEN Micro, Inc., 24 North Main
St., Ambler, PA 19002
Phone: 215-542-9575
Fax: 215-542-9577
Email: stephen.cunha@menmicro.
com
www.menmicro.com
Mercer International Oil Water
Separators, P.O. Box 540, Mend-
ham, NJ 07945
Phone: 973-543-9000
Email: aellman@mercerows.com
www.oil-water-separators.com
MET - Marsulex Environmental
Technologies, 200 North Seventh
St., Lebanon, PA 17046
Phone: 908-235-5125
Email: bstolzman@met.net
www.met.net
Metabo Corp., 1231 Wilson Dr.,
West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 800-638-2264
Fax: 800-638-2261
Email: abrogan@metabousa.com
www.metabousa.com
Metalfab, Inc., 11 Prices Switch
Rd., P.O. Box 9, Vernon, NJ
07462
Phone: 973-764-2000
Fax: 973-764-0272
Email: dhiggins@metalfabinc.com
www.metalfabinc.com
Meteodyn America, 2207 Chest-
nut St., Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 33240710505
Fax: 33240710506
Email: delphine.pouzet@meteodyn.
com
www.meteodyn.com
Metric Systems Corp., 2320
Cousteau Ct., Ste. 201, Vista, CA
92081
Phone: 760-560-0348
Fax: 760-560-0356
Email: dbarak@metricsystems.com
www.metricsystems.com
Metrix Instrument Co., A Roper
Industries Company, 1771 Town-
hurst Dr., Houston, TX 77043
Phone: 713-461-2131
Fax: 713-461-8223
Email: sales@metrix1.com
www.metrix1.com
Metrohm-Peak, 12521 Gulf Free-
way, Houston, TX 77034
Phone: 281-484-5000
Fax: 281-484-5001
Email: info@mp-ic.com
www.mp-ic.com
Metso Power, 3430 Toringdon
Way, Charlotte, NC 28277
Phone: 704-541-1453
Fax: 704-541-1128
Email: info.power@metso.com
www.metsopower.com
Mettler-Toledo Thornton, Inc.,
36 Middlesex Trpk., Bedford, MA
01730
Phone: 781-301-8600
Fax: 781-301-8701
Email: craig.lazinsky@mt.com
www.us.mt.com
MGE UPS Systems, 1660 Scenic
Ave., Costa Mesa, CA 92626
Phone: 714-557-1636
Fax: 714-434-0865
www.mgeups.com/us
MHT Access Services, Inc., 4127
Hollister St., Ste. A, Houston, TX
77080
Phone: 713-460-4001
Email: howard.wall@mhtgroup.net
www.mhtgroup.net
Microbeam Technologies, Inc.,
4200 James Ray Dr., Ste. 193,
Grand Forks, ND 58203
Phone: 701-777-6530
Fax: 701-777-6532
Email: info@microbeam.com
www.microbeam.com
Mid America Engine, 2500 State
Hwy. 160, Warrior, AL 35180
Phone: 205-590-3505
Fax: 205-590-3558
Email: sales@maegen.com
www.maegen.com
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POWER 87
Midland-ACS, P.O. Box 422,
Grimsby, ON L3M 4H8 Canada
Phone: 905-309-1834
Fax: 905-309-1835
Email: marketing@midland-acs.com
www.midland-acs.com
Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc.,
2731 77th Ave. SE, Ste. 100,
Mercer Island, WA 98040
Phone: 800-382-2208
Fax: 206-762-7694
Email: info@mid-mountain.com
www.mid-mountain.com
Midwest Towers, 1153 Hwy. 19
East, Chickasha, OK 73018
Phone: 405 224 4622
Fax: 405 224 4625
Email: sales@midwesttowers.com
www.midwesttowers.com
MikroPul, 4433 Chesapeake Dr.,
Charlotte, NC 28216
Phone: 704-998-2600
Fax: 704-998-2601
Email: info@mikropul.com
www.mikropul.com
Milbank Mfg. Co., 4801 Deramus,
Kansas City, MO 64120
Phone: 816-483-5314
Fax: 816-483-6357
Email: lbirks@milbankmfg.com
www.milbankmfg.com
Miller Engineering-ANM Equip-
ment, 3801 N Highway Dr.,
Tucson, AZ 85705
Phone: 520-888-2605
Fax: 520-888-5984
Email: dwarren@anm-equipment.
com
www.anm-equipment.com
Mil-Ram Technology, Inc., 4135
Business Center Dr., Fremont, CA
94538
Phone: 510-656-2001
Fax: 510-656-2004
Email: sls@mil-ram.com
www.mil-ram.com
Minnotte Manufacturing Corp.,
Minnotte Sq., Pittsburgh, PA
15220
Phone: 412-922-2963
Email: martinj@minnotte.com
www.minnotte.com
MinTech Enterprises, P.O. Box
19903, Atlanta, GA 30325
Phone: 404-355-4580
Fax: 404-963-0459
Email: mintech@momar.com
Mission Instruments, 26705 Loma
Verde, Mission Viejo, CA 92691
Phone: 949-582-0889
Fax: 949-916-2193
Email: missionist@aol.com
www.cegrit.com
Mitsubishi Power Systems, Inc.,
100 Colonial Center Pkwy., Lake
Mary, FL 32746
Phone: 407-688-6100
www.mpshq.com
Moffitt Corp., 1351 13th Ave.
South, Ste. 130, Jacksonville
Beach, FL 32250
Phone: 904-241-9944
Fax: 904-246-8333
Email: ilachut@moffitthvac.com
www.moffitthvac.com
Mogas Industries, 14330 E Hardy
St., Houston, TX 77039
Phone: 281.449.0291
Fax: 281-590-3412
Email: mogas@mogas.com
www.mogas.com
Moisttech, 5140 Commerce Ave.,
Moorpark, CA 93021
Phone: 805-378-1160
Fax: 803-378-1163
Email: jfordham@moisttech.com
www.moisttech.com
Mole-Master Services Corporation,
Reno Business Park, 27815 State
Route 7, Marietta, Ohio 45750
Phone: 740-374-6726
Fax: 740-374-5908
Email: contactus@molemaster.com
www.molemaster.com
Moon Fabricating Corp., 700 W
Morgan St., Kokomo, IN 46901
Phone: 765-459-4194
Fax: 765-452-6090
Email: gveach@moontanks.com
www.moontanks.com
MOPAC Plant & Building Service,
836 Joseph Lowery Blvd., P.O.
Box 93325 (30337), Atlanta, GA
30318
Phone: 404-872-0434
Fax: 404-892-0250
Email: mopac@mopac.biz
www.mopac.biz
Moran Iron Works, Inc., 11739
M-68 Hwy., P.O. Box 732, On-
away, MI 49765
Phone: 989-733-2011
Fax: 989-733-2371
Email: sales@moraniron.com
www.moraniron.com
Morgan Schaffer Systems, 5110
Avenue de Courtrai, Montreal, QC
H3W 1A7 Canada
Phone: 514-739-1967
Fax: 514-739-0434
Email: info@morganschaffer.com
www.morganschaffer.com
Mott Corp., 84 Spring Ln., Farm-
ington, CT 06032
Phone: 860-747-6333
Fax: 860-747-6739
Email: quest@mottcorp.com
www.mottcorp.com
MPW Industrial Services, 9711
Lancaster Rd. SE, Hebron, OH
43025
Phone: 740-927-8790
Fax: 740-928-8033
Email: info@mpwservices.com
www.mpwservices.com
MSE-Tetragenics, 65 East Broad-
way, Butte, MT 59701
Phone: 406-533-6800
Fax: 406-533-6818
Email: tgcontact@mse-ta.com
www.tetragenics.com
MTA Transit, 2 Broadway, New
York, NY 10004
Phone: 718-330-1234
www.new.mta.info/nyct
MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH,
88040 Friedrichshafen, Ger-
many
Phone: +49 7541 90 77777
Fax: +497541 90 77778
Email: info@mtu-online.com
www.mtuonsiteenergy.com

MTU Onsite Energy Corp., 100
Power Drive, Mankato, MN
56001
Phone: 507-625-7973
Fax: 507-625-2968
Email: powergen3@mtu-online.
com
www.mtuonsiteenergy.com
Multifab, Inc. Fabricators, 1200
Elmwood Ave., Sharon Hill, PA
19079
Phone: 610-534-2000
Fax: 610-534-7308
Email: multifabinc@rcn.com
www.multifabinc.com
Muns Welding and Mechanical,
Inc., 205 Cary Dr., Beech Island,
SC 29842
Phone: 803-827-1572 x202
Fax: 803-827-9034
Email: lmuns@munswelding.com
www.munswelding.com
Munters Corp., 225 S Magnolia
Ave., Buena Vista, VA 24416
Phone: 540-291-1111
Fax: 540-291-3333
Email: dhinfo@munters.com
www.munters.us
Munters Corp., Mist Eliminator &
Tower Packing Div., 210 Sixth St.
SE, Fort Myers, FL 33907
Phone: 239-936-1555
Fax: 239-278-1316
Email: usfmycs_me@americas.
munters.com
www.munters.us
MWM GmbH, Carl-Benz-Straße 1,
Mannheim, 68167 Germany
Phone: 6213840
Fax: 621384880
Email: info@mwm.net
www.mwm.net
Myrex Industries, 9119 Weedy
Ln., Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-691-5200
Email: ppatel@myrex.com
www.myrex.com
N
N.O.W. & Associates, Inc., 172
Bradwick Dr., Concord, ON K4K
1K8 Canada
Phone: 905-669-2461
Fax: 905-669-2685
Email: nowassociates@bellnet.ca
www.nowassociates.com
NAB, 902-904 Whitehorse Rd.,
Boxhill, VA 3051 Australia
Phone: 03-88430397
Fax: 03-88430397
Email: diana.lin@nab.com.au
NAES Corporation, 1180 NW
Maple St., Ste. 200, Issaquah,
WA 98027
Phone: 425-961-4700
Fax: 425-961-4646
Email: jeanette.carroll@naes.com
www.naes.com
See our ad on p. 44
NAES Power Contractors, Inc.,
1180 NW Maple St., Ste. 200,
Issaquah, WA 98027
Phone: 425-961-4700
Fax: 425-961-4646
Email: sales@naes.com
www.naes.com
Nalco Air Protection Technolo-
gies, 1601 W Deihl Rd., Naper-
ville, IL 60563
Phone: 630-305-1328
Email: nalcomobotec@nalco.com
www.nalcomobotec.com
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December 2013 88
Namco, 2100 West Broad St.,
Elizabethtown, NC 28337
Phone: 910-862-2511
Fax: 910-879-5486
Email: dcoe@dancon.com
www.danaherspecialtyproducts.
com/Namco/
Nash, A Gardner Denver Product,
Alta Vista Business Park, 200
Simko Blvd., Charleroi, PA 15022
Phone: 724-239-1500
Email: nash@gardnerdenver.com
www.GDNash.com
Nat-Com, 8515 Lafrenaie Blvd.,
St. Leonard, QC H1P 2B3 Canada
Phone: 514-326-2571
Fax: 514-326-9347
Email: info@national-combustion.
com
www.natcomonline.com
National Chimney and Stack, 176
North Industrial Blvd., Trenton,
GA 30752
Phone: 706-657-1575
Email: eddie@nationalchim-
neystack.com
www.nationalchimneystack.com
National Conveyors Co., Inc., 33
Nicholson Rd., East Granby, CT
06026
Phone: 860-653-0374
Fax: 860-653-2965
Email: info@nationalconveyors.com
www.nationalconveyors.com
National Electric Coil, 800 King
Ave., Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: 614-488-1151
Fax: 614-488-8892
Email: sendinfo@national-electric-
coil.com
www.national-electric-coil.com
National Inspection & Consul-
tants, Inc., 9911 Bavaria Rd., Ft.
Myers, FL 33913
Phone: 941-475-4882
Fax: 321-234-0305
Email: charlie.moore@nicinc.com
www.nicinc.com
National Technical Systems,
24007 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 200,
Calabasas, CA 91302
Phone: 818-591-0776
Fax: 818-591-0899
Email: info@ntscorp.com
www.ntscorp.com
Nationwide Boiler, Inc., 42400
Christy St., Fremont, CA 94538
Phone: 510-490-7100
Fax: 510-490-0571
Email: lday@nationwideboiler.com
www.nationwideboiler.com
NatronX Technologies, LLC, 1735
Market St., Philadelphia, PA
19103
Phone: 215-299-6208
Fax: 215-299-6387
Email: denise.daponte@fmc.com
www.natronx.com
Navigant Consulting, Inc., 30 S
Wacker St., Ste. 3100, Chicago,
IL 60606
Phone: 312-583-5700
Email: dprobasco@navigantcon-
sulting.com
www.navigantconsulting.com/
industries/energy
NEM Energy bv, P.O.Box 162,
2300 AD Leiden, The Netherlands
Phone: +31 71579 2444
Fax: +31 71579 2792
Email: info@nem.nl
www.nem-group.com
Neptune Underwater Services
(USA), LLC., 123 Sentry, Mans-
field, TX 76063
Phone: 800-860-2178
Fax: 817-447-0021
Email: jschrader@neptunems.com
www.neptunems.com
NES Rentals, 8770 W Bryn Mawr,
4th Floor, Chicago, IL 60631
Phone: 773-695-3999
Fax: 773-714-0538
Email: request_info@nesrentals.
com
www.nesrentals.com
Nesco Sales & Rentals, 3112
East State Rd. 124, Bluffton, IN
46714
Phone: 800-252-0043
Fax: 260-824-6350
Email: sales@nescosales.com
www.nescosales.com
NeuCo, Inc., 33 Union St., 4th
Floor, Boston, MA 02108
Phone: 617-587-3188
Fax: 617-262-4186
Email: levy@neuco.net
www.neuco.net
Newport Electronics, Inc., 2229 S
Yale St., Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-540-4914
Email: literature@newportus.com
www.newportus.com
Niagara Blower Co., 673 Ontario
St., Buffalo, NY 14207
Phone: 716-875-2000
Fax: 716-875-1077
Email: sales@niagarablower.com
www.niagarablower.com
Nilfisk CFM, 300 Technology Dr.,
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 800-645-3475
Fax: 610-647-6427
Email: questions@nilfisk-advance.
com
www.nilfiskcfm.com
www.nol-tec.com
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc., 425
Apollo Dr., Lino Lakes, MN
55014
Phone: 651-780-8600
Fax: 651-780-4400
Email: sales@nol-tec.com
www.nol-tec.com
See our ad on p. 49
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc., 1509 Ocello
Dr., Fenton, MO 63026
Phone: 636-651-1000
Fax: 636-651-1500
Email: sales@ne.com
www.ne.com
NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau
NORD GmbH & Co. KG, Rudolf-
Diesel-Str. 1, Bargteheide, 22941
Germany
Phone: +49 4532 401-0
Fax: +49 4532 401-253
Email: info@nord.com
www.nord.com
NORD-LOCK, 1051 Cambridge Dr.,
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 877-799-1097
Fax: 224-875-3256
Email: julie.pereyra@nord-lock-inc.
com
www.nord-lock.com
North Side Power Transmission
Corp., 309 Morgan Ave., Brook-
lyn, NY 11211
Phone: 718-782-5800
Fax: 718-782-1757
Email: sales@nsptcorp.com
www.nsptcorp.com
Northern Cast Parts Co., Inc.,
304-2185 Marine Dr., Oakville, ON
L6L 5L6 Canada
Phone: 905-465-1773
Fax: 905-465-1775
Email: sales@northerncastparts.
com
www.northerncastparts.com
Norton Corrosion Ltd., 8820
222nd St. SE, Woodinville, WA
98077
Phone: 425-483-1616
Fax: 425-485-1754
Email: jweiser@nortoncorrosion.com
www.nortoncorrosion.com
Nova Analytical Systems, Inc.,
1925 Pine Ave., Niagara Falls, NY
14301
Phone: 800-295-3771
Fax: 716-282-2937
Email: sales@nova-gas.com
www.nova-gas.com
Nova Machine Products, Inc.,
18001 Sheldon Rd., Middleburg
Heights, OH 44130
Phone: 216-267-3200
Fax: 216-267-8518
Email: tdavis@curtisswright.com
www.novamachine.com
Novinda Corp., 2000 S Colorado
Blvd., Ste. 3-A, Denver, CO 80222
Phone: 720-473-8320
Fax: 720-473-8360
Email: m.henessee@novinda.com
www.novinda.com
Novinium, 1221 29th St. NW, Ste.
D, Auburn, WA 98001
Phone: 253-288-7100
Fax: 206-774-9754
Email: steve.sparkman@novinium.
com
www.novinium.com
NRG Energy Services, 1000 Main
Street, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 855-532-4984
nrgenergy.com/energyservices/
oandm
NSP Specialty Products, P.O. Box
4690, Pinehurst, NC 28374-4690
Phone: 910-235-0468
Fax: 910-235-3902
Email: lharrison@nsp-specialty.com
www.nsp-specialty.com
Nuclear Systems Associates, Inc.,
2701 Saturn St., Brea, CA 92821
Phone: 949-499-9980
Fax: 949-499-9980
Email: nuclearsystems@cox.net
www.nuclearsystems.com
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O
Oak Park Chimney, 1800 Des
Plaines Ave., Forest Park, IL
60130
Phone: 800-476-2278
Fax: 708-386-4004
Email: cwessels@oakparkchimney.
com
O’Donnell Consulting Engineers,
Inc., 2940 South Park Rd., Bethel
Park, PA 15102
Phone: 412-835-5007
Fax: 412-835-5017
Email: wo@odonnellconsulting.
com
www.odonnellconsulting.com
Oil Skimmers Inc., P.O. Box
33092, 12800 York Rd., Cleve-
land, OH 44133
Phone: 440-237-4600
Fax: 440-582-2759
Email: info@oilskim.com
www.oilskim.com
OILKLEEN, Inc., 1510 River Dr.
SW, Ste. A, Ruskin, FL 33570
Phone: 813-333-6356
Fax: 813-944-2893
Email: paul@oilkleen.com
www.oilkleen.com
Olin Brass - Fineweld Tube, 102
Progress Pkwy., Cuba, MO 65453
Phone: 573-885-6546
Fax: 573-885-6500
Email: fwt@olinbrass.com
www.fineweldtube.com
Omaha Standard PALFINGER,
3501 S 11th St., Council Bluffs,
IA 51501-0876
Phone: 800-279-2201
Fax: 712-328-8383
Email: os@omahastd.com
www.omahastd.com
OMSCO, 2150 Baneberry Dr.,
Birmingham, AL 35244-1400
Phone: 205-994-1847
Fax: 205-403-0829
Email: david.brunson@omscoinc.
com
www.omscoinc.com
Onset, HOBO Data Loggers, 470
MacArthur Blvd., Bourne, MA
02532
Phone: 800-564-4377
Fax: 508-759-9100
Email: sales@onsetcomp.com
www.onsetcomp.com
Open Systems International
(OSI), 3600 Holly Ln. N, Ste. 40,
Minneapolis, MN 55447-1286
Phone: 763-551-0559
Fax: 763-551-0750
Email: sales@osii.com
www.osii.com
OpenLink, 1021 Main St., Ste.
1200, Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-655-9600
Fax: 713-655-9605
Email: info@olf.com
www.olf.com
Oracle Primavera, Three Bala
Plaza West, Ste. 700, Bala Cyn-
wyd, PA 19004
Phone: 800-633-0738
www.oracle.com
Orbeco Analytical Systems, Inc.,
185 Marine St., Farmingdale, NY
11735
Phone: 631-293-4110
Fax: 631-293-8258
Email: kay@orbeco.com
www.orbeco.com
Orion Instruments, LLC, 2105 Oak
Villa Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA 70815
Phone: 225-906-2343
Fax: 225-906-2344
Email: emoore@orioninstruments.
com
www.orioninstruments.com


Orival Water Filters, 213 S Van
Brunt St., Englewood, NJ 07631
Phone: 201-568-3311
Fax: 201-568-1916
Email: filters@orival.com
www.orival.com
OVIVO USA, LLC, 4246 Riverboat
Rd., Ste. 300, Salt Lake City, UT
84123
Phone: 801-931-3113
Fax: 801-931-3090
Email: guy.beauchesne@ovivowa-
ter.com
www.ovivowater.com
P
P&S Vorspannsysteme AG, Ri-
etwiesstrasse 2, St.Gallenkappel,
8735 Switzerland
Phone: +41 55 284 64 64
Email: f.rueegg@p-s.ch
www.p-s.ch
Pacific Northwest National
Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd,
Richland, WA 99354
Phone: 509-375-2121
www.pnnl.gov
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd.,
Paharpur House 8/1/B Diamond
Harbour Road, Kolkata, 700
027 India
Phone: 91-33-4013 3000
Fax: 91-33-4013 3499
Email: pctccu@paharpur.com
www.paharpur.com
See our ad on p. 23
Palfinger North America, P.O.
Box 846, 7942 Dorchester Rd.,
Niagara Falls, ON L2E 6V6 Canada
Phone: 800-567-1554
Fax: 905-374-1203
Email: info@palfingerna.com
www.palfinger-northamerica.com
Pall Corp., 25 Harbor Park Dr.,
Port Washington, NY 11050
Phone: 516-484-3600
Fax: 516-484-0364
Email: michele_asquino@pall.com
www.pall.com
Palm Beach Resource Recovery.,
6501 N Jog Rd, West Palm Beach,
FL 33412
Phone: 561-478-3800
Palmetto Depot Services, LLC, 3
Conservation Ct., Savannah, GA
31419
Phone: 912-660-8118
Email: palmettodepot@aol.com
Panasonic Computer Solutions
Co., 50 Meadowland Pkwy.,
Secaucus, NJ 07094
Phone: 800-662-3537 ext 5
Fax: 201-271-3460
www.panasonic.com/toughbook/
energy

Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.,
1301 16 Ave. NW, Calgary, AB
T2M 0L4 Canada
Phone: 866-256-8193
Fax: 403-284-8863
Email: info@powerengineering.org
www.powerengineering.org
Paragon Airheater Technologies,
23143 Temescal Canyon Rd., Ste.
B, Corona, CA 92883
Phone: 951-277-8035
Fax: 951-277-8031
Email: cturner@paragonairheater.
com
www.paragonairheater.com
Parker Fluid Control Division, 95
Edgewood Ave., New Britain, CT
06051
Phone: 860-827-2300
Fax: 860-827-2384
Email: llofrumento@parker.com
www.parkerfluidcontrol.com
Parker Hannifin- Precision Cool-
ing Systems Division, 10801 Rose
Ave., New Haven, IN 46774
Phone: 509-552-5112
Email: joe.baddeley@parker.com
www.parker.com/pc
Parkline, Inc., P.O. Box 65,
Winfield, WV 25213
Phone: 800-786-4855
Fax: 304-586-3842
Email: sales@parkline.com
www.Parkline.com
See our ad on p. 38
Parkson Corp., 5420 Spring Ln.,
Minnetonka, MN 55345
Phone: 954-558-4470
Email: jswanson@parkson.com
www.parkson.com
Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd., 28, A
Bhaktinagar Industrial Estate,
Rajkot, 360004 India
Phone: 91-0281-362256
Fax: 91-0281-365240
Email: info@parmarmetal.com
www.parmarmetal.com
Patriot Solar Group, 1007 Indus-
trial Ave., Albion, MI 49224
Phone: 517-629-9292
Fax: 517-629-9296
Email: info@patriotsolargroup.
com
www.patriotsolargroup.com
Paul Mueller Co., 1600 West
Phelps St., Springfield, MO 65802
Phone: 417-575-9000
Fax: 417-575-9669
Email: sales@paulmueller.com
www.paulmueller.com
PB Power, a Division of Parsons
Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, 75
Arlington St., 4th Floor, Boston,
MA 02116
Phone: 617-960-4864
Fax: 617-960-5460
Email: durica@pbworld.com
www.pbworld.com
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December 2013 90
PECO, 27881 Clemens Rd., West-
lake, OH 44145
Phone: 440-899-3888
Fax: 440-899-3890
Email: info@peco-fgc.com
www.peco-fgc.com
Pemamek Oy Ltd., Lamminkatu
47, Loimaa, 32201 Finland
Phone: 760415
Fax: 7628304
Email: jukka.rantala@pemamek.
com
www.pemamek.com
Penn Separator Corp., P.O.
Box 340, 5 South Pickering,
Brookville, PA 15825
Phone: 814-849-7328
Fax: 814-849-4510
Email: info@pennseparator.com
www.pennseparator.com
Pennsylvania Breaker, LLC, 30
Curry Ave., P.O. Box 441, Canons-
burg, PA 15301
Phone: 724-743-4376
Fax: 724-743-4850
www.pabreaker.net
Pennsylvania Crusher, 600 Abbott
Dr., Broomall, PA 19008
Phone: 610-544-7200
Email: buster@penncrusher.com
www.penncrusher.com
PENTA Industrial Corp., 10276
Bach Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132
Phone: 314-878-0143
Fax: 314-878-0166
Email: mmohan@penta.net
www.pentaindustrial.com
Pentair Valves & Controls (for-
merly known as Tyco Valves &
Controls), 4607 New West Dr.,
Pasadena, TX 77507
Phone: 832-261-2416
Fax: 281-291-8801
Email: ssdcustomercare@tyco-
valves.com
www.pentair.com/valves
People and Processes, Inc., P.O.
Box 460, Yulee, FL 32041
Phone: 843-814-3795
Email: tpickett@peopleandpro-
cesses.com
www.peopleandprocesses.com
Performance Consulting Services,
154 Colorado Ave., Montrose, CO
81401
Phone: 970-240-4381
Fax: 720-528-8107
Email: montrose@pcs-mail.com
www.pcs-mail.com
Petro-Valve, 11248 East Hardy
St., Houston, TX 77093
Phone: 713-676-1212
Fax: 832-615-5303
Email: shawnw@petrovalve.com
www.petrovalve.com
PFBC Environmental Energy Tech-
nology, Inc., 111 Riverview Dr.,
Monessen, PA 15062
Phone: 724-684-4844
Fax: 724-684-4944
Email: kshoup@pfbceet.com
www.pfbceet.com
PGH Marketing, 1028 Oakmont
Ave., Unit A, Oakmont, PA 15139
Phone: 412-225-7478
Fax: 412-202-0450
Email: sbarbaro@pghmarketing.
com
www.pghmarketing.com
PGI International, 16101 Vallen
Dr., Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-466-0056
Fax: 800-744-9899
www.pgiint.com


Phenix Technologies, Inc., 75
Speicher Dr., Accident, MD 21520
Phone: 301-746-8118
Fax: 301-895-5570
Email: info@phenixtech.com
www.phenixtech.com
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc., 7424 W
Plank Rd., Peoria, IL 61604
Phone: 309-697-9200
Fax: 309-697-2400
Email: sales@philsystems.com
www.philsystems.com
Phillips 66, E-Gas Technology
for Gasification, P.O. Box 4428,
Houston, TX 77210
Phone: 832-765-1398
Fax: 918-662-8717
Email: donna.m.wood@p66.com
www.e-gastechnology.com
Phillips 66, Lubricants, P.O. Box
4428, Houston, TX 77210
Phone: 832-765-2132
Fax: 918-977-8769
Email: bill.c.brown@p66.com
www.phillips66lubricants.com
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc., 1453 Mars
Ave., Lakewood, OH 44107
Phone: 216-228-8468
Fax: 216-228-8596
Email: phoenix@bge.net
Photon Control, 8363 Lougheed
Hwy., Burnaby, BC V5A 1X3
Phone: 604-422-8861
Email: sales@photon-control.com
www.photon-control.com
PIC Group, Inc., 1000 Parkwood
Circle, Ste. 1000, Atlanta, GA
30339
Phone: 770-850-0100
Fax: 770-850-2200
Email: marketing@picworld.com
www.picworld.com
See our ad on p. 19


Pick Heaters, Inc., 730 S Indiana
Ave., West Bend, WI 53095
Phone: 262-338-1191
Fax: 262-338-8489
Email: info1@pickheaters.com
www.pickheaters.com
PICOR, 1730 Old Gray Station
Rd., Gray, TN 37615
Phone: 423-282-9900
Fax: 423-282-3118
www.picor.biz
Pittsburg Tank & Tower Mainte-
nance Co., P.O Box 913, Hender-
son, KY 42419
Phone: 270-826-9000
Fax: 270-827-4417
Email: sales@watertank.com
www.watertank.com
Plant Professionals, 1851 Albright
Rd., Montgomery, IL 60538
Phone: 630-844-1300 X220
Fax: 630-844-0064
Email: huntera@benetechusa.com
www.plantprofessionals.com
Plant Specialties, Inc., P.O. Box
110537, Carrollton, TX 75011-
0537
Phone: 972-245-9673
Fax: 972-245-9699
Email: psi@bryer-dfw.com
www.bryer-dfw.com
PlantKorea Co., 1366-6 Joong-
Dong, Gwangyang-City, 545880
South Korea
Phone: 82-10-3310-4529
Fax: 82-61-795-4529
Email: plantkorea@gmail.com
www.plantkorea.net
Platts UDI, 1200 G St NW, Ste.
1000, Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-942-8788
Fax: 202-942-8789
Email: udi@platts.com
www.platts.com
Plymouth Tube Co., 29W150
Warrenville Rd., Warrenville, IL
60555
Phone: 630-393-3550
Fax: 630-393-3551
www.plymouth.com
Pneumafil Corp., Gas Turbine
Div., P.O. Box 16348, Charlotte,
NC 28297
Phone: 704-399-7441
Fax: 704-398-7507
Email: gtinfo@pneumafil.com
www.pneumafil.com
POLARIS Laboratories, 7898
Zionsville Rd., Indianapolis, IN
46268
Phone: 877-808-3750
Fax: 317-808-3751
Email: sales@polarislabs.com
www.polarislabs.com
Political Robo Calls. GOTV
Robocalls, 30150 Telegraph Rd.,
Bingham Farms, MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: shaaren@capitolcommuni-
cation.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/po-
litical.asp
Polsinelli Shughart, PC, 1152
15th St., NW, Ste. 800, Washing-
ton, DC 20005
Phone: 202-626-8356
Fax: 202-315-3050
Email: mross@polsinelli.com
www.polsinelli.com
Polycorp Ltd., 33 York St., Elora,,
ON N0B 1S0 Canada
Phone: 519-846-2075
Fax: 519-846-2372
Email: pkumar@poly-corp.com
www.poly-corp.com
Portland Bolt & Manufacturing,
3441 NW Guam St., Portland, OR
97210
Phone: 800-547-6758
Fax: 503-227-4634
Email: adam@portlandbolt.com
www.portlandbolt.com
Positron, Inc., 5101 Buchan St.,
Montreal, QC H4P 2R9 Canada
Phone: 514-345-2200
Fax: 514-345-2271
Email: powerdivision@positron-
power.com
www.positronpower.com
Power & Industrial Services,
95 Washington Street, P.O. Box
211, Donora, PA 15033
Phone: 800-676-7116
www.piburners.com
See our ad on p. 14
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POWER 91
POWER Engineers, Inc., 3940
Glenbrook Dr., Hailey, ID 83333
Phone: 208-788-3456
Fax: 208-788-2082
Email: generation@powereng.com
www.powereng.com
Power Equipment Maintenance,
19300 Statesville Rd., Ste. #300,
Cornelius, NC 28031
Phone: 864-622-2129
Email: scavendish@peminc.net
www.peminc.net
Power Generation Service, Inc.,
1160 McKinley St., Anoka, MN
55303
Phone: 763-421-1104
Fax: 763-421-3451
www.powergensvc.com
Power Source International, 6408
East 95th Pl., #200, Tulsa, OK
74137
Phone: 918-764-8817
Fax: 918-764-8817
Email: power.source@att.net
www.powermag.com
Power Systems Mfg., LLC, 1440
W Indiantown Rd., Jupiter, FL
33458
Phone: 561-354-1100
Fax: 561-354-1199
Email: power@powermfg.com
www.powermfg.com
Powerspan Corp., 100 Interna-
tional Dr., Ste. 200, Portsmouth,
NH 03801
Phone: 603-570-3000
Fax: 603-570-3100
Email: info@powerspan.com
www.powerspan.com
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detec-
tion, 8440 Central Ave., Newark,
CA 94560
Phone: 510-794-4296
Fax: 510-794-4330
Email: sales@kwjengineering.com
www.pragmatics-arson.com
Praxair Surface Technologies,
7615 Fairview St., Houston, TX
77041
Phone: 443-831-1536
Email: greg_groff@praxair.com
www.praxairsurfacetechnologies.
com
Precast Specialties Corp., 999 Ad-
ams St., P.O. Box 86, Abington,
MA 02351
Phone: 781-828-7220
Fax: 781-878-7464
Email: precastspecialties@msn.com
www.precastspecialtiescorp.com
Precision Blasting, Inc., P.O. Box
785, Flatwoods, KY 41139
Phone: 606-836-2600
Fax: 606-836-2698
Email: precision_blasting@
worldnet.att.net
www.bpionline.com
Premier Energy Services, Inc.,
140 Colony Center Dr., Ste. 202,
Woodstock, GA 30188
Phone: 770-592-1398
Fax: 770-592-2316
Email: info@premierenergy.com
www.premierenergy.com
Pressure Systems, Inc., 34 Re-
search Dr., Hampton, VA 23666
Phone: 757-865-1243
Fax: 757-865-8744
Email: denise.topping@pressure-
systems.com
www.pressuresystems.com
Price Brothers Co., 333 W First
St., Ste. 700, Dayton, OH 45402
Phone: 937-226-8829
Fax: 937-226-8752
Email: jkillin@pricebrothers.com
www.pipesite.com
Primesouth, Inc., 246 Stoneridge
Dr., Ste. 101, Columbia, SC 29210
Phone: 803.753.5199
Fax: 803-354-4260
Email: tevergetis@primesouthinc.
com
www.primesouth.biz
PRO Solutions, Inc., 30 Bethel
Rd., Glen Mills, PA 19342
Phone: 865-414-7644
Email: jdischner@p-rosolutions.
com
www.p-rosolutions.com
Process Automation and Control,
Inc., 4502 Cogswell Ave., Pell
City, AL 35125
Phone: 205-338-1147
Fax: 205-338-1167
Email: tbassett@pac-service.com
www.pac-service.com
Process Barron, P.O. Box 1607,
2770 Welborn Street, Pelham, AL
35124
Phone: 888-663-2028
Fax: 205-663-6037
www.processbarron.com/
Process Engineering & Manufac-
turing, 13653 Beach St., Cerritos,
CA 90703
Phone: 310-548-1523
Fax: 562-602-1918
Email: rscrews@peandm.com
www.peandm.com
Process Equipment/Barron Indus-
tries, 2770 Welborn St., Pelham,
AL 35124
Phone: 205-663-5330
Fax: 205-663-6037
Email: wunderwood@processbar-
ron.com
Processes Unlimited Interna-
tional, Inc., 5500 Ming Ave., Ste.
400, Bakersfield, CA 93309
Phone: 661-396-3770
Fax: 661-396-3782
Email: marketing@prou.com
www.prou.com
Prochaska & Associates, 11317
Chicago Circle, Omaha, NE 68154-
2633
Phone: 402-334-0755
Fax: 402-334-0868
Email: cjones@prochaska.us
www.architectsusa.com
Proe Power Systems, LLC, 5072
Morning Song Dr., Medina, OH
44256-6747
Phone: 800-315-0084
Email: raproe@proepowersys-
tems.com
www.proepowersystems.com
ProEnergy Services, 2001
ProEnergy Blvd., Sedalia, MO
65301
Phone: 660-829-5100
Fax: 660-829-1160
Email: acairer@proenergyser-
vices.com
www.proenergyservices.com
See our ad on Cover 4
Promecon USA, Inc., 314 Collins
Blvd., Orrville, OH 44667
Phone: 330-683-9074
Email: todd.melick@promecon.us
www.promecon.us
ProMinent Dosiertechnik GmbH,
Im Schuhmachergewann 5-11,
Heidelberg, 69123 Germany
Phone: +49 6221 842 0
Fax: +49 6221 842 617
Email: info@prominent.com
www.prominent.com
ProSonix, P.O. Box 26676, Mil-
waukee, WI 53226-0676
Phone: 800-849-1130
Fax: 800-849-1130
Email: info@pro-sonix.com
www.pro-sonix.com
Proton OnSite, 10 Technology Dr.,
Wallingford, CT 06492
Phone: 203 949 8697
Fax: 203 949 8016
Email: customerservice@pro-
tonenergy.com
www.protononsite.com
PS International, Inc., 5309 East
Ryan Pl., Sioux Falls, SD 57110
Phone: 605-332-1885
Fax: 605-332-1293
Email: gale@psinternational.com
www.psinternational.com
PSB Industries, 1202 West 12th
St., Erie, PA 16501
Phone: 814-453-3651
Fax: 814-454-3492
Email: al.wassel@psbindustries.com
www.psbindustries.com
PTMW, Inc., 5040 NW US Hwy.
24, Topeka, KS 66618
Phone: 785-232-7792
Fax: 785-232-7793
Email: pgoff@ptmw.com
www.ptmw.com
Pugmill Systems, Inc., 212 Cem-
etery Ave., Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-388-0626
Fax: 931-380-0319
Email: pugjohn@charter.net
www.pugmillsystems.com
Pulse Corp., PMB 216, 1799 W
5th Ave., Columbus, OH 43212-
2322
Phone: 800-394-5688
Fax: 614-340-7106
www.lifehook.com
Pumping Solutions, Inc., 2850
139th St., Blue Island, IL 60406
Phone: 708-272-1800
Fax: 708-272-1825
Email: sm@pump96.com
www.pump96.com
Pure Technologies Ltd., 4700
Dixie Rd., Mississauga, ON L4W
2R1 Canada
Phone: 289-374-3598
Email: info@puretechltd.com
www.puretechltd.com
PWR - Plasma Waste Recycling,
250 Finney Dr., Huntsville, AL
35824
Phone: 256-258-2800
Fax: 256-258-2803
Email: betty.hall@astutemarket-
ing.net
www.plasma-wr.com
Q
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey In-
strument and Controller Co. Ltd.,
367 Wenhua Road, Qinhuangdao,
Hebei, 66000 China
Phone: 0086-13633333120
Fax: 0086-335-3640930
Email: access0001@163.com
www.hdsc.net
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December 2013 92
Quanta Services, 2800 Post Oak
Blvd., Ste. 2600, Houston, TX
77056
Phone: 713-629-7600
Email: info@quantaservices.com
www.quantaservices.com
Quest-Tec Solutions, P.O. Box
2127, Stafford, TX 77497
Phone: 866-240-9906
Email: rhett.baker@questtecsolu-
tions.com
www.questtecsolutions.com
Quietly Making Noise, 300 W
Mitchell Hammock Rd., Ste. 8,
Oviedo, FL 32765
Phone: 407-359-5146
Fax: 407-977-9646
Email: wbmccune@peoplepc.com
www.quietlymakingnoise.com
R
R&G Laboratories, Inc., 217
Hobbs St., Ste. 105, Tampa, FL
33619
Phone: 813-643-3513
Fax: 813-793-4429
Email: cheryl@randglabs.com
www.randglabs.com
R. W. Beck, Inc., 1801 California
St., Ste. 2800, Denver, CO 80202
Phone: 303-299-5200
Fax: 303-297-2811
www.rwbeck.com
Randall Industries, 741 S Route
83, Elmhurst, IL 60126-4268
Phone: 800-966-7412
Fax: 630-833-9108
Email: b.skoda@randallind.com
www.fiberglassscaffolds.com
RCI Technologies, 462 Borrego
Ct., Ste. D, San Dimas, CA 91773
Phone: 800-868-2088
Fax: 909-305-1245
Email: info@rcitechnologies.com
www.rcitechnologies.com
RdF Corp., 23 Elm Ave., Hudson,
NH 03051
Phone: 603-882-5195
Fax: 603-882-6925
Email: sensor@rdfcorp.com
www.rdfcorp.com
React 365, Inc., P.O. Box 2788,
Pawleys Island, SC 29585
Phone: 866-811-8365
Fax: 866-450-0553
Email: info@react365.com
www.react365.com
Redline Industries, Inc., 8401
Mosley Rd., Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-946-5355
Fax: 713-946-0747
Email: johnk@redlineindustries.com
www.redlineindustries.com
Reef Industries, Inc., Griffolyn,
9209 Almeda Genoa Rd., Hous-
ton, TX 77075
Phone: 713-507-4251
Fax: 713-507-4295
Email: ri@reefindustries.com
www.reefindustries.com
Reliance industries Ltd., 2/31,
Kaveri Apartment Dahej Bypass
Road, Bharuch, 392001 India
Phone: 9898201310
Email: sohilkapasi@yahoo.co.in
REMBE GmbH - Safety + Control,
Gallbergweg 21, Brilon, 59929
Germany
Phone: +49 2961 7405-0
Fax: +49 2961 50714
Email: sales@rembe.de
www.rembe.de
Remtron, 1916 West Mission Rd.,
Escondido, CA 92029
Phone: 800-328-5570
Fax: 760-737-7810
Email: info@remtron.com
www.remtron.com
Renewal Parts Maintenance, 4485
Glenbrook Rd., Willoughby, OH
44094
Phone: 440-946-0082
Fax: 440-946-5524
Email: sdecrow@mdaturbines.com
www.RenewalParts.com
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc.,
5025-A East Business 20,
Abilene, TX 79601-6411
Phone: 325-672-3400
Fax: 325-672-9996
Email: sales@rentechboilers.com
www.rentechboilers.com
RetubeCo, Inc., 6024 Ooltewah-
Georgetown Rd., Ooltewah, TN
37363
Phone: 423-238-4814
Fax: 423-238-9028
Email: sales@retubeco.com
www.retubeco.com
Reverso Pumps, Inc., 201 SW 20th
St., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33064
Phone: 954-523-9396
Email: info@reversopumps.com
www.reversopumps.com
REW Solar USA, 215-415 Northern
Blvd., Bayside, NY 11361
Phone: 718-225-6600/2
Fax: 718-225-6605
Email: nbrand.rewsolar@gmail.com
www.rewsolarusa.com
Reynolds, Inc., 4520 North State
Rd. 37, Orleans, IN 47452
Phone: 812-865-3232
Fax: 812-865-3075
Email: tporter@reynoldsinc.com
www.reynoldsinc.com
RF System Lab, 123 W Main St.,
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone: 989-731-5083
Fax: 989-688-5966
Email: bsprotte@rfsystemlab.us
www.rfsystemlab.us
RH Systems, 3416 Vista Alameda
NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113
Phone: 505-856-5766
Fax: 866-891-3399
Email: kris@rhs.com
www.rhs.com
Richmond Engineering Works,
1601 Parkway View Dr., Pitts-
burgh, PA 15205
Phone: 412-787-9640
Fax: 412-787-9645
Email: dfetcko@richmondengi-
neering.com
www.richmondengineering.com
Rig-A-Lite, 8500 Hansen Rd.,
Houston, TX 77075
Phone: 713-943-0340
Fax: 713-943-8354
Email: rossblanford@azz.com
www.rigalite.com
Riley Power, Inc., 5 Neponset St.,
P.O. Box 15040, Worcester, MA
01615-0040
Phone: 508-852-7100
Fax: 508-852-7548
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.babcockpower.com
Ritepro Inc., A subsidiary of
BRAY International, Inc., 12200
Alberty Hudon Blvd., Montreal,
QC H1G 3K7 Canada
Phone: 514-324-8900
Fax: 514-324-9525
Email: strudel@bray.qc.ca
www.ritepro.com
Rittal, 1 Rittal Place, Urbana,
OH 43078
Phone: 937-399-0500
Fax: 937-390-5599
Email: rittal@rittal.us
www.rittal-corp.com
See our ads on p. 40 & 41
River Consulting, LLC, 445
Hutchinson Ave., Ste. 740,
Columbus, OH 43235
Phone: 614-890-3456
Fax: 614-890-1883
Email: janderson@riverconsulting.
com
www.riverconsulting.com
Roberts & Schaefer Co., 222
S Riverside Plaza, Ste. 1800,
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-236-7292
Fax: 312-726-2872
Email: bobw@eni.com
www.r-s.com/
Rochem Technical Services, 4711
SW Huber St., Ste. 7E, Portland,
OR 97219
Phone: 503-246-8618
Fax: 503-246-8697
Email: bob.auguston@rochemltd.
com
www.rochemltd.com
Rodney Hunt-Fontaine, 46 Mill
St., Orange, MA 01364
Phone: 978-544-2511
Fax: 978-544-3928
Email: t.downing@vag-group.com
www.rodneyhunt.com
Rolls-Royce PLC, 105 Sandusky,
Mount Vernon, OH 43050
Phone: 740-393-8015
Email: jonathan.li@rolls-royce.
com
www.rolls-royce.com
RoMaDyn, 1711 Orbit Way, Min-
den, NV 89423-4114
Phone: 775-783-0155
Fax: 775-783-4650
Email: services@romadyn.com
www.romadyn.com
Rotek Instrument Corp., 390 Main
St., P.O. Box 504504, Waltham,
MA 02454
Phone: 781-899-4611
Fax: 781-894-7273
Email: sales@rotek.com
www.rotek.com
Rotex Global, 1230 Knowlton St.,
Cincinnati, OH 45223
Phone: 513-541-1236
Fax: 513-541-4888
Email: info@rotex.com
www.Rotex.com
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POWER 93
Rotork, 5607 W Douglas Ave.,
Milwaukee, WI 53218
Phone: 414-461-9200
Fax: 414-461-1024
Email: katie.wilson@rotork.com
www.rotork.com
Rotork Controls, Inc., 675 Mile
Crossing Blvd., Rochester, NY
14624
Phone: 585-247-2304
Fax: 585-247-2308
Email: info@rotork.com
www.rotork.com
RTDS Technologies, Inc., 100-150
Innovation Dr., Winnipeg, MB
R3T 2E1 Canada
Phone: 204-989-9700
Fax: 204-452-4303
Email: rtds@rtds.com
www.rtds.com
Russelectric, Inc., South Shore
Park, 99 Industrial Park Rd.,
Hingham, MA 02043
Phone: 781-749-6000
Fax: 781-749-4205
Email: info@russelectric.com
www.russelectric.com
S
S & B Engineers and Construc-
tors Ltd., 7809 Park Place Blvd.,
P.O. Box 266245, Houston, TX
77087/77207
Phone: 713-845-3176
Fax: 713-640-0045
Email: sbpower@sbec.com
www.sbec.com
S&C Electric Company, 6601 N.
Ridge Blvd., Chicago, IL 60626
Phone: 773-338-1000
www.sandc.com
S.M. Stoller Corp., 105 Technol-
ogy Dr., Ste. 190, Broomfield, CO
80021
Phone: 303-546-4300
Email: eolson@stoller.com
www.stoller.com
SABIA, Inc., 15070 Avenue of
Science, Ste. 200, San Diego, CA
92128
Phone: 858-217-2200
Fax: 858-217-2203
Email: sales@sabiainc.com
www.sabiainc.com
Sabre Tubular Structures, 8653 E
Hwy. 67, Alvarado, TX 76009
Phone: 817-852-1700
Fax: 817-850-1703
Email: utilityinfo@sabreindustries.
com
www.SabreTubularStructures.com
Safanicu, No.134, Arbab
Alley-Ahmadabad St., Esfahan,
8155637343 Kuwait
Phone: 2291457
Fax: 2291457
Email: majid_kalbasi@yahoo.com
www.sinarayan.com
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc., 5915
Stockbridge Dr., Monroe, NC
28110
Phone: 704-821-7920
Email: marvin@safefiredetection.
com
www.safefiredetection.com
Safway Services, LLC, N19
W24200 Riverwood Dr., Wauke-
sha, WI 53188
Phone: 262-523-6500
Email: info_request@safway.com
www.safway.com
Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics,
Inc., 1 New Bond St., MS 301-
432, Worcester, MA 01606-2614
Phone: 508-795-2963
Fax: 508-795-5011
Email: susan.m.munyon@saint-
gobain.com
www.refractories.saint-gobain.com
Salem Stainless Steel Suppli-
ers PVT Ltd., 33, Lawyer Chinna
Thambi St. Kondithope, Chennai,
600079 India
Phone: 044-23463000
Fax: 044-25207353
Email: ssss.vipul@gmail.com
www.ssssgroup.com
Sanford Rose Opportunity Center,
265 S Main St., Akron, OH 44308
Phone: 330-762-6211
Fax: 330-762-6161
Email: deilertson@sraoc.com
www.sraoc.com
Santee Cooper, 1 Riverwood
Drive, Moncks Corner, SC 29461
Phone: 843-761-8000
www.santeecooper.com


Sargent & Lundy, LLC, 55 East
Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: 312-269-2000
Fax: 312-269-3680
Email: thinkingpower@sargent-
lundy.com
www.sargentlundy.com
SAS Global Power (Divison of SAS
Global Corp.), 21601 Mullin Ave.,
Warren, MI 48089
Phone: 248-414-4470
Fax: 248-414-4490
Email: justinb@sasglobalcorp.com
www.sasglobalcorp.com
SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH,
Dorstener Strasse 360, Herne,
44653 Germany
Phone: 49232558740
Email: info@schade-lagertechnik.de
www.schade-lagertechnik.com
Scheck Industries, 500 E Plain-
field Rd., Countryside, IL 60525
Phone: 708-482-8100
Fax: 708-482-8185
Email: thodous@goscheck.com
www.gosccheck.com
Schenck Trebel Corp., 535 Acorn
St., Deer Park, NY 11729
Phone: 631-242-4010
Fax: 631-242-8715
Email: bernard.bohnhorst@
schenck-usa.com
www.schenck-usa.com/index.asp
Schmidt + Clemens GmbH + Co.
KG, Edelstahlwerk Kaiserau,
Kaiserau 2, D- 51789 Lindlar,
Germany
Phone: +49 2266 92-0
Fax: +49 2266 92-370
Email: info@schmidt-clemens.de
www.schmidt-clemens.de
5CHM|D1
|NDU51Þ|L5


Schmidt Industries, 3290 Patter-
son Rd., Bay City, MI 48706
Phone: 989-684-3216
Fax: 989-684-3228
Email: schmidtind@aol.com
www.schmidtindustries.com
Schonstedt Instrument Co., 100
Edmond Rd., Kearneysville, WV
25430
Phone: 304-725-1050
Fax: 304-725-1095
Email: info@schonstedt.com
www.schonstedt.com
Schutte & Koerting, 2510 Metro-
politan Dr., Trevose, PA 19053
Phone: 215-639-0900
Fax: 215-639-1597
Email: sales@s-k.com
www.s-k.com
Scientific Instruments, 200 Saw
Mill River Rd., P.O. Box 268, Haw-
thorne, NY 10532
Phone: 914-769-5700
Fax: 914-769-5473
Email: b.sherry@worldnet.att.net
www.scientificinstrumentsny.com
Scott Specialty Gases, 6141
Easton Rd., P.O. Box 310, Plum-
steadville, PA 18949-0310
Phone: 215-766-8861
Fax: 215-766-2476
Email: markreq@scottgas.com
www.scottgas.com
SDS Power Co. Ltd., 1805 Founder
Tower, 1122 New Jinqiao Road,
Pudong, Shanghai, 200135 China
Phone: 0086-21-61052072
Email: gunjan@sdspower.com
www.sdspower.com;www.sdscom-
merce.com
Sealeze, 8000 Whitepine Road,
North Chesterfield, VA 23237
Phone: 804-275-1675
Fax: 804-743-3413
www.sealeze.com
Securicon, LLC, 5520 Cherokee
Ave., Ste. 230, Alexandria, VA
22312
Phone: 703-914-2780 ext 101
Fax: 703-914-2785
Email: info@securicon.com
www.securicon.com
seepex, Inc., 511 Speedway Dr.,
Enon, OH 45323
Phone: 937-864-7150
Fax: 937-864-7157
Email: sales@seepex.net
www.seepex.com
Sefar AG, Hinterbissaustrasse 12,
Heiden, 9410 Switzerland
Phone: 41718985700
Email: filtration@sefar.com
www.sefar.com
Sega, Inc., 16041 Foster, P.O. Box
1000, Overland Park, KS 66085
Phone: 913-681-2881
Email: info@segainc.com
www.segainc.com
Selkirk Corp., 5030 Corporate
Exchange Blvd. SE, Grand Rapids,
MI 49512
Phone: 800-992-VENT
Fax: 877-393-4145
Email: sales@selkirkinc.com
www.selkirkcorp.com/commercial-
and-industrial/
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December 2013 94
Senior Flexonics Pathway, 2400
Longhorn Industrial Dr., New
Braunfels, TX 78130
Phone: 830-629-8080
Fax: 830-629-6899
Email: sales@pathway.flexonics.
com
www.myej.com
Sensor Developments, Inc., 1050
W Silver Bell Rd., Orion, MI
48359
Phone: 248-391-3000
Fax: 248-391-0107
Email: sales@sendev.com
www.sendev.com
Sentry Equipment Corp., 966 Blue
Ribbon Circle North, Oconomo-
woc, WI 53066
Phone: 262-567-7256
Fax: 262-567-4523
Email: sales@sentry-equip.com
www.sentry-equip.com
Separator Spares & Equipment,
LLC, 144 Intracoastal Dr., Houma,
LA 70363
Phone: 985-346-0122
Fax: 985-346-0244
Email: info@separatorequipment.
com
www.separatorequipment.com
Sera ProDos GmbH, Sera-Strasse
1, Immenhausen, 34376 Ger-
many
Phone: 49 (0) 5673 999-02
Fax: 49 (0) 5673 999-03
Email: info@sera-web.com
www.sera-web.com
Shawcity Ltd., 91-92 Shrivenham
Hundred Business Park Watch-
field, Oxfordshire, SN6 8TY
United Kingdom
Phone: 1793780622
Email: nicola.stokes@shawcity.co.uk
www.shawcity.co.uk
Shell Lubricants, 700 Milam St.,
Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713-546-8038
Fax: 713-423-8203
Email: melissa.cantuell@shell.com
Sick Maihak, Inc., 4140 World
Houston Pkwy., Ste. 180, Hous-
ton, TX 77032
Phone: 281-436-5100
Fax: 281-436-5200
Email: information@sick.com
www.sicknorthamerica.com
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Co., Kilo
36 Alex-Cairo Road, Alexandria -
Egypt, Alex, 1416 Egypt
Phone: 20121189877
Fax: 4770126
Email: friskytazmania@yahoo.com
www.sidpec.com
Siemens AG, I IA AS PA CIS Karl-
Legien-Str. 190, Bonn, 53117
Germany
Phone: +49 228 64805210
Fax: +49 228 64805125
Email: info.comos@siemens.com
www.siemens.com/comos
Siemens Energy, 4400 Alafaya
Trl., Orlando, FL 32826
Phone: 407-736-2000
Fax: 407-736-5008
www.siemens.com/energy
Siemens Energy, Inc. - Environ-
mental Systems & Services, 501
Grant St., 4th Floor, Pittsburgh,
PA 15219-4429
Phone: 412-572-3700
Email: martin.craig@siemens.com
www.energy.siemens.com/hq/en/
power-generation/environmental-
system/
Siemens Industries, Inc., 1201
Sumneytown Pike, Spring House,
PA 19477
Phone: 215-646-7400
Fax: 215-283-6343
Email: diane.dunn@siemens.com
www.industry.usa.siemens.com/
automation/us/en/process-
instrumentation-and-analytics/
Pages/process-instrumentation-
and-analytics.aspx
Siemens Industry, Inc. - Water
Technologies Business Unit, 181
Thorn Hill Rd., Warrendale, PA
15086
Phone: 866-926-8420
Email: information.water@
siemens.com
www.water.siemens.com
Sierra Instruments, Inc., 5 Harris
Ct., Bldg. L, Monterey, CA 93940
Phone: 800-866-0200
Fax: 831-373-4402
Email: m_washington@sierrain-
struments.com
www.sierrainstruments.com
Sigma, Inc., 1295 Hwy. 62,
Charlestown, IN 47111
Phone: 800-210-6907
Fax: 812-256-5275
Email: vic@sigmappc.com
www.sigmappc.com
Signal-X-Press Concept, 12,
Industrial Crescent Ilupeju
Recreation Hall, Ilupeju, 23401
Nigeria
Email: signal@signalxpresscon-
cept.com
www.signalxpressconcept.com
Silicon Power Corp., 275 Great
Valley Pkwy., Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 610-407-4705
Fax: 610-407-3688
Email: robert_berta@silicon-
power.com
www.siliconpower.com
Simutech Multimedia, Ste. 412,
2249 Carling Ave., Ottawa, ON
K2B 7E9 Canada
Phone: 613-656-1592
Fax: 613-722-2043
Email: tracy@simutechmultime-
dia.com
www.troubleshootingskills.com
SISCO, Inc., 6605 19 1/2 Mile
Rd., Sterling Heights, MI 48314
Phone: 586-254-2000
Fax: 586-254-0053
Email: info@sisconet.com
www.sisconet.com
SKF USA, 4141 Ruffin Rd., San
Diego, CA 92123-1841
Phone: 619-496-3400
Fax: 619-496-3531
www.skfcm.com
SKODA JS a.s., Orlik 266, Plzen,
31606 Czech Republic
Phone: +420-378 042 410
Fax: +420-377 520 600
Email: info@skoda-js.cz
www.skoda-js.cz
SkyFuel, Inc., 18300 West Hwy.
72, Arvada, CO 80007
Phone: 303-330-0276
Fax: 866-422-1292
Email: alison.mason@skyfuel.com
www.skyfuel.com
SMA America, 6020 West Oaks
Blvd., Ste. 300, Rocklin, CA
95765
Phone: 916-625-0870
Fax: 916-625-0871
Email: info@sma-america.com
www.sma-america.com
See our ad on p. 15
Smith & Loveless, Inc., 14040
Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, KS
66215
Phone: 913-888-5201
Email: answers@smithandlove-
less.com
www.smithandloveless.com
SMS Energy-Engineering, Inc.,
Ste. 201, 447 Speers Rd.,
Oakville, ON L6K 3S7 Canada
Phone: 905-845-5148
Fax: 905-845-8007
Email: sharon@smsenergy-engi-
neering.com
www.smsenergy-engineering.com
SNC Manufacturing, 101 West
Waukau Ave., Oshkosh, WI 54902
Phone: 800-558-3325
Fax: 920-231-1090
Email: telecom@sncmfg.com
www.sncmfg.com
Sodimate, Inc. - Dry Chemical
Feed System Specialist, 639 W
Diversey Pkwy. Ste. 219, Chicago,
IL 60614
Phone: 773-665-8800
Fax: 773-665-8805
Email: sodimate.inc@sodimate.com
www.sodimate-inc.com
SoftPLC Corp., 25603 Red Bran-
gus, Spicewood, TX 78669
Phone: 512-264-8390
Fax: 512-264-8399
Email: info@softplc.com
www.softplc.com
Sohre Turbomachinery, Inc., 128
Main St., Monson, MA 01057
Phone: 413-267-0590
Fax: 413-267-0592
Email: tsohre@sohreturbo.com
www.sohreturbo.com
Solar Turbines, Inc., 2200 Pacific
Hwy., San Diego, CA 92186
Phone: 619-544-5352
Fax: 619-544-2444
Email: powergen@solarturbines.com
www.solarturbines.com
SolarBOS, Inc., 310 Stealth Ct.,
Livermore, CA 94551
Phone: 925-456-7744
Fax: 925-456-7710
Email: sales@solarbos.com
www.solarbos.com
SolarDock, P.O. Box 711, Wilm-
ington, DE 19899
Phone: 302-504-0124
Fax: 302-225-8716
Email: info@solardock.com
www.solardock.com
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POWER 95
Solberg Filtration & Separation,
1151 Ardmore Ave., Itasca, IL
60143
Phone: 630-616-4411
Fax: 630-773-0727
Email: info@oilmistsolutions.com
www.solbergmfg.com
Sologic, LLC, 2501 Washington
St., 2nd Floor, Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 425-225-5885
Email: cory.boisoneau@sologic.com
www.sologic.com
Solon Manufacturing Co., 425
Center St., P.O. Box 207, Chardon,
OH 44024
Phone: 440-286-7149
Email: heland@solonmfg.com
www.solonmfg.com
SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemi-
cals, Inc., 3333 Richmond Ave.,
Houston, TX 77098
Phone: 713-525-6500
Fax: 713-525-6759
Email: solvay@solvaychemicals.com
www.solvair.us
SOR, Inc., 14685 West 105th St.,
Lenexa, KS 66215-5964
Phone: 913-888-2630
Fax: 913-888-8150
Email: mbuckley@sorinc.com
www.sorinc.com
Sound Technologies, 310 Com-
merce Sq., Michigan City, IN
46360
Phone: 2198792600 x3409
Email: s_schreeg@soundtech.us
www.soundtech.us
Southern Environmental, 6690
W Nine Mile Rd., Pensacola, FL
32526
Phone: 850-944-4475
Fax: 850-944-8270
Email: apcsales@sei-group.com
www.southernenvironmental.com
Southern Research, 500 South-
land Dr., Ste. 238, Birmingham,
AL 35226
Phone: 205-978-8630
Fax: 205-978-8675
Email: nelson@sri.org
www.southernresearch.org
Southwell Industries, 265 Arch
St., Laguna Beach, CA 92651
Phone: 949-497-6051
Fax: 949-497-6665
Email: m-daud@cox.net
www.southwellindustries.com
Southwest Microwave, Inc., 9055
S McKemy St., Tempe, AZ 85284
Phone: 480-783-0201
Fax: 480-783-0401
Email: infossd@southwestmicro-
wave.com
www.southwestmicrowave.com/ssd
Span-O-Matic, 825 Columbia St.,
Brea, CA 92821
Phone: 714-256-4700
Fax: 714-245-4401
Email: skrause@spanomatic.com
www.spanomatic.com
Specialized Safety Products, Inc.,
4321 W Knox Ave., Chicago, IL
60641
Phone: 773-777-7100
Fax: 773-777-0909
Email: sales@specializedsafety-
products.com
www.specializedsafetyproducts.com
Spinwave Systems, Inc., 235
Littleton Rd., Westford, MA
01886
Phone: 978-392-9000
Fax: 978-692-8400
Email: cinge@spinwavesystems.com
www.spinwavesystems.com
Spirax Sarco, Inc., 1150 North-
point Blvd., Blythewood, SC
29016
Phone: 803-714-2000
Fax: 803-714-2222
Email: ssisales@spirax.com
www.spiraxsarco.com/us
SPL WorldGroup, Inc., 525 Market
St., 33rd Fl, San Francisco, CA
94150
Phone: 415-963-5600
Fax: 415-963-5601
Email: splinfo@splwg.com
www.splwg.com
Spraying Systems Co., North Ave.
at Schmale Rd., P.O. Box 7900,
Wheaton, IL 60189
Phone: 630-517-1494
Fax: 630-260-9727
Email: bob.jett@spray.com
www.spray.com
SPX Cooling Technologies, Inc.,
7401 W 129 St., Overland Park,
KS 66213
Phone: 913 664 7400
Email: spxcooling@spx.com
www.spxcooling.com
SPX Flow Technology, 611 Sugar
Creek Rd., Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: 800-252-5200
Fax: 800-252-5012
www.spxprocessequipment.com
SRC Greenpower PVT Ltd., 222,
Sidco Industrial Estste Ambuttur,
Chennai, 600098 India
Phone: 28586999
Email: ganesh@srcgreenpower.
com
www.srcgreenpower.com
SRP, P.O. Box 52025, KYS102,
Phoenix, AZ 85079-2025
Phone: 602-236-8754
Fax: 602-685-3271
Email: kelly.may@srpnet.com
www.investmentrecovery.srpnet.com
SS Power Systems, 2 Corporate
Dr., Ste. 430, Shelton, CT 06484
Phone: 203-926-9388
Fax: 203-926-9720
Email: j.hochstein@shock-system.
com
www.shock-system.com
SSS Clutch Co., Inc., 610 W Basin
Rd., New Castle, DE 19720
Phone: 302-322-8080
Fax: 302-322-8548
Email: engineering@sssclutch.com
www.sssclutch.com
St. Lawrence Steel, 2500 Crane
Centre Dr., Streetsboro, OH 44241
Phone: 800-837-3789
Fax: 330-562-1100
Email: dharvanek@stlawrencesteel.
com
www.stlawrencesteel.com
Stainless & Nickel Alloys, LLC,
217 Deer Park Trail, Canton, GA
30114
Phone: 678-880-7880
Fax: 704-521-4460
Email: t.sigler@sandnalloys.com
www.S&N.com
Stanley Consultants, Inc., 225
Iowa Ave., Muscatine, IA 52761
Phone: 800-553-9694
Fax: 563-264-6658
Email: power@stanleygroup.com
www.stanleyconsultants.com
STAR & STAR Field Fit, Inc.
(Steam Turbine Alternative
Resources), 116 Latourette St.,
Marion, OH 43302
Phone: 740-387-5535
Fax: 740-383-2089
Email: vince@starturbine.com
www.starturbine.com
StatSoft, Inc. / STATISTICA, 2300
East 14th St., Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 918-749-1119
Email: info@statsoft.com
www.statsoftpower.com
STEAG Energy Services, LLC, P.O.
Box 1727, 304 Linwood Rd., Ste.
102, Kings Mountain, NC 28086
Phone: 704-734-0688
Fax: 704-734-1088
Email: dorothee.seidel@steag.us
www.steag.us
Sterling Energy International,
26893 Calle Hermosa, Capistrano,
CA 92624
Phone: 949-248-2017
Email: markj@sterling-energy.com
www.Sterling-Energy.com
Sterling Lumber Co., 3415 W
127th St., Blue Island, IL 60406
Phone: 708-388-2223
Email: carson@sterlinglumber.com
www.sterlinglumber.com
Sterling Strips Ltd., 2/10, Meghal
Industrial Estate, Devidayal Road,
Mulund (West), Mumbai, 400 080
India
Email: ssl@hathway.com
www.sterlingstripsltd.com
STF S.p.A., Via Robecco 20,
Magenta, 20013 Italy
Phone: 02-972091
Fax: 02-9794977
Email: stf@stf.it
www.stf.it
See our ad on p. 20
Stock Equipment Co., 16490
Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, OH
44023-4398
Phone: 440-543-6000
Fax: 440-543-5944
Email: david.ratcliffe@stock-
equipment.com
www.stockequipment.com
Stock Fairfield Corp., 16490
Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, OH
44023
Phone: 440-543-6000
Fax: 440-543-3936
Email: don.wolf@stockequipment.
com
www.stockequipment.com
Stork H&E Turbo Blading, Inc.,
334 Comfort Rd., Ithaca, NY
14850
Phone: 607-277-4968 x292
Fax: 607-277-1193
Email: joe.walker@storkhe.com
www.he-machinery.com
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December 2013 96
Storm Copper Components, 240
Industrial Dr., P.O. Box 99, Decatur,
TN 37322
Phone: 423-506-4178
Email: dkrikorian@stormcopper.com
www.stormgrounding.com
StormwateRx, 122 SE 27th Ave.,
Portland, OR 97214
Phone: 800-680-3543
Email: beckyb@stormwaterx.com
www.stormwaterx.com
Structural Integrity Associates,
Inc., 5215 Hellyer Ave., Ste.
210, San Jose, CA 95138
Phone: 877-474-7693
Fax: 704-597-0335
Email: info@structint.com
www.structint.com
See our ad on p. 13
Struthers Wells, 10375 Slusher
Dr., Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Phone: 323-726-0641
Fax: 323-726-9592
Email: sales@strutherswells.com
www.strutherswells.com
Sturtevant, 348 Circuit St.,
Hanover, MA 02339
Phone: 781-829-1433
Fax: 781-829-1463
Email: cstevens@sturtevantinc.com
www.sturtevantinc.com
STYL&TECH, 1-2435 Watt Ave.,
Quebec, QC G1P 3X2 Canada
Phone: 418-656-1661
Email: rchampagne@stylntech.com
www.stylntech.com
SUBNET Solutions, Inc., #100,
4639 Manhattan Rd. SE, Calgary,
AB T2G 4B3 Canada
Phone: 403-270-8885
Fax: 403-270-9631
Email: info@subnet.com
www.SUBNET.com
Sullair, 3700 E Michigan Blvd.,
Michigan City, IN 46360
Phone: 219-879-5451
Fax: 219-874-1267
Email: sullairsolutions@sullair.com
www.sullair.com
Sulzer Turbo Services, 11518 Old
Laporte Rd., La Porte, TX 77571
Phone: 713-567-2700
Fax: 713-567-2830
Email: sulzertshouston@sulzer.com
www.sulzerts.com
Summit Filter Corp., 20 Milltown
Rd., Union, NJ 07083
Phone: 800-321-4850
Fax: 908-687-4202
Email: sales@summitfilter.com
www.summitfilter.com
Summit Training Source, 4170
Embassy Dr. SE, Grand Rapids, MI
49546
Phone: 800-842-0466
Fax: 616-949-5684
Email: info@safetyontheweb.com
www.safetyontheweb.com
SUN Technical Services, 60
Industrial Park Rd., Plymouth,
MA 02360
Phone: 800-225-0385
Fax: 508-746-3113
Email: lauren@bartlettinc.com
Sunrise Systems Ltd., Sunrise
Business Park, Ely Rd., Water-
beach, Cambridge, TX CB25 9QZ
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1223 441311
Email: olga@sunrise-sys.com
www.sunrise-sys.com
SUNRNR of Virginia, Inc., P.O.
Box 102, Port Republic, VA 24471
Phone: 540-271-3403
Fax: 540-433-7253
Email: jennyf@sunrnr.com
www.sunrnr.com
Super Radiator Coils, 451
Southlake Blvd., Richmond, VA
23236
Phone: 804-378-1300
Fax: 804-379-2118
Email: ray.birk@superradiator-
coils.com
www.superradiatorcoils.com
Superbolt, Inc., 1000 Gregg St.,
Carnegie, PA 15106
Phone: 412-279-1149
Email: jmilburn@superbolt.com
www.superbolt.com
Superior Interlock Corp., 7339
Central Ave., Glendale, NY 11385-
8202
Phone: 718-821-8949
Fax: 718-417-6162
Email: info@superiorinterlock.com
www.superiorinterlock.com
Superior Water Screen Co., Inc.,
28230 Orchard Lake Rd., Ste.
204, Farmington Hills, MI 48334
Phone: 248-419-5322
Email: kbridge@superiorwater-
screens.com
www.superiorwaterscreens.com
SuperPower, Inc., 450 Duane
Ave., Schenectady, NY 12304
Phone: 518-346-1414
Fax: 518-346-6080
Email: info@superpower-inc.com
www.superpower-inc.com
SW Funk Industrial Contractors,
Inc., 1710 W Hundred Rd., Ches-
ter, VA 23836
Phone: 804-748-0461
Fax: 804-748-0474
Email: rfunk@swfunk.com
www.swfunk.com
Swagelok Co., 31500 Aurora Rd.,
Solon, OH 44139
Phone: 440-349-5934
Fax: 440-349-5843
Email: publicrelations@swagelok.
com
www.swagelok.com
Swan Analytical USA, 225 Larkin
Dr., Unit 4, Wheeling, IL 60090
Phone: 847-229-1290
Fax: 847-229-1320
Email: sales@swan-analytical-usa.
com
www.swan-analytical-usa.com
Sword CTSpace, 49 Stevenson
St., Ste. 950, San Francisco, CA
94105
Phone: 415-882-1888
Fax: 415-882-1888
Email: sword.ctspace@live.com
www.sword-ctspace.com
Synergy, 1982 Ohio St., Lisle, IL
60532
Phone: 630-724-1960
Fax: 630-724-1969
Email: hunter@synsysinc.com
www.synsysinc.com
Syscom Instruments S.A., Rue de
L’Industrie 21, Sainte-Croix, CH-
1450 Switzerland
Phone: 314-361-5084 (USA)
Email: ayden@syscominstru-
ments.net
www.syscom.ch
T
Tapeswitch Corp., 100 Schmitt
Blvd., Farmingdale, NY 11735
Phone: 800-234-8273
Fax: 631-630-0442
Email: marketing@tapeswitch.com
www.tapeswitch.com
Tatman Associates, Inc., P.O. Box
39400, 29015 Solon Rd., Solon,
OH 44139-0400
Phone: 440-248-0644
Fax: 440-248-0649
Email: tatmansubs@sbcglobal.net
www.tatmansubstations.com
Taylor Technologies, Inc., 31
Loveton Circle, Sparks, MD 21152
Phone: 800-TEST-KIT
Fax: 410-771-4291
Email: customerservice@tay-
lortechnologies.com
www.taylortechnologies.com
TEAM Industrial Services, 200
Hermann Dr, Alvin, TX 77511
Phone: 281-331-6154
www.teamindustrialservices.com
See our ad on p. 17
Tech Center, 265 S Main St.,
Akron, OH 44308
Phone: 330-762-6212
Fax: 330-762-2035
Email: douge@techcenterinc.com
www.techcenterinc.com
Tech Products, Inc., 105 Willow
Ave., Staten Island, NY 10305
Phone: 718-442-4900
Email: team@techproducts.com
www.techproducts.com
Techinomics Inc., 1382 Old Free-
port Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: 412-963-7300
Fax: 412-291-1054
Email: info@techinomics.com
www.techinomics.com
Technical Services Group, Inc.,
P.O. Box 140268, Edgewater, CO
80214
Phone: 720-232-7107
Fax: 303-462-0318
Email: xfmrfieldservice@aol.com
Technology Transfer Services,
14497 North Dale Mabry Hwy.,
Ste. 120N, Tampa, FL 33618
Phone: 813-908-1100
Email: mmiller@techtransfer.com
www.techtransfer.com
TEi Construction Services, Inc.,
170 Tucapau Rd., Duncan, SC
29334
Phone: 864-485-0600
Fax: 864-485-0655
www.babcockpower.com
TEi Services, 201 North 4th Ave.,
Royersford, PA 19468
Phone: 610-948-5400
Fax: 610-948-5779
www.teiservices.com
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Temp-Pro, Inc., 200 Industrial
Dr., Northampton, MA 01060
Phone: 413-584-3165
Email: stanley.grip@temp-pro.com
www.temp-pro.com
Terrington Data Management, IT
Centre, York Science Park Hes-
lington, York, YO10 5NP United
Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)1904 567674
Fax: +44 (0)1904 567719
Email: tm@terringtondm.com
www.terringtondm.com
Teseq, 52 Mayfield Ave., Edison,
NJ 08837
Phone: 732-225-9533
Fax: 732-225-4789
Email: mjsalvador@teseq.com
www.teseq.com
Tesla Energy Solutions, 36068
Hidden Springs Rd., Ste. C - 119,
Wildomar, CA 92595
Phone: 888-583-7525
Fax: 888-837-6086
Email: damberson@teslaenergyllc.
com
www.teslaenergyllc.com
Testo, Inc., 40 White Lake Rd.,
Sparta, NJ 07871
Phone: 800-227-0729
Fax: 862-354-5020
Email: info@testo.com
www.testo.com
Thaker Simulation Technologies,
57 W Farms Rd., Canaan, NH
03741
Phone: 603-632-3767
Fax: 603-632-4546
Email: info@thakerllc.com
www.thakerllc.com
Thayer Scale-Hyer Industries,
Inc., 91 Schoosett St., Pembroke,
MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-8101
Fax: 781-826-7944
Email: tpicone@thayerscale.com
www.ThayerScale.com
The Avogadro Group, LLC, 2825
Verne Roberts Circle, Antioch, CA
94509
Phone: 877 602 1023
Fax: 925-680-4416
Email: craig.thiry@avogadro-
group.com
www.avogadrogroup.com
The Conklin Sherman Co, Inc., 59
Old Turnpike Rd., Beacon Falls,
CT 06403
Phone: 203-881-0190
Fax: 203-881-0178
Email: conklin59@aol.com
www.conklin-sherman.com
The David Wood Co., P.O. Box
87875, Vancouver, WA 98687-
7875
Phone: 360-260-0979
Fax: 360-253-5292
Email: dwood@staffing.net
www.powerindustrycareers.com
The Dow Chemical Co., P.O. Box
1206, Midland, MI 48642
Phone: 989-832-1560
Fax: 989-832-1465
Email: dowcig@dow.com
www.dow.com
The Graphic Works, 1141 Dith-
ridge Dr., Johnstown, PA 15905
Phone: 814-255-6417
www.TheGraphicWorksUSA.com
The Halvorsen Co., 7500 Grand
Division Ave., Garfield Heights,
OH 44125
Phone: 216-341-7500
Fax: 216-341-7557
Email: guysipe@bellsouth.net
www.halvorsenusa.com
The International Brotherhood of
Boilermakers, 753 State Avenue,
Kansas City KS 66101
Phone: 913-371-2640
www.boilermakers.org
The Protectowire Co., Inc., P.O.
Box 200, Hanover, MA 02359
Phone: 781-826-3878
Fax: 781-826-2045
Email: pwire@protectowire.com
www.protectowire.com
The Proudfoot Co., P.O. Box 276,
Monroe, CT 06468
Phone: 203-459-0031
Fax: 203-459-0033
www.soundcell.biz
The Ripley Co., 46 Nooks Hill Rd.,
Cromwell, CT 06416
Phone: 860-635-2200
Fax: 860-635-3631
www.ripley-tools.com
The Silchem Group, P.O. Box
231487, Encinitas, CA 92923
Phone: 760-798-4390
Fax: 901-328-1427
Email: custsvc@silchem.com
www.silchem.com
The Solid Waste Authority of
Palm Beach County, 7501 North
Jog Rd., West Palm Beach, FL
33412
Phone: 561-640-4000
Fax: 561-640-3400
Email: andyg@swa.org
www.swa.org
The Stellar Group, 2900 Hartley
Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32257
Phone: 904-260-2900
Fax: 904-268-4932
Email: stellar@thestellargroup.com
www.thestellargroup.com
The Tata Power Co. Ltd., Regis-
tered Office Bombay House 24,
Homi Mody St., Fort Mumbai,
400001 India
Phone: 022-6655-8282
Fax: 022-6665-8801
Email: shalinis@tatapower.com
www.tatapower.com
The Utility FPE Group, Inc. (Plant
Risk Engineering), 15937 Swin-
don Ct., Midlothian, VA 23112
Phone: 540-729-0095
Fax: 804-378-3357
Email: edouberly@ufpeg.com
www.ufpeg.com
Thermal Engineering Associates,
1424 Farrington Dr., Knoxville,
TN 37923
Phone: 865-357-2002
Fax: 865-357-2002
Email: lthomas@thermalea.com
www.thermalea.com
Thermal Engineering Internation-
al (USA), Inc., 10375 Slusher Dr.,
Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Phone: 323-726-0641
Fax: 323-726-9592
Email: sales@thermalengint.com
www.thermalengint.com
Thermal Instrument Co., 217
Sterner Mill Rd., Trevose, PA
19053
Phone: 215-355-8400
Fax: 215-355-1789
www.thermalinstrument.com
Thermal Kinetics, 667 Tifft St.,
Buffalo, NY 14220
Phone: 716-826-3836
Fax: 716-826-3853
Email: mdiefenbach@thermalki-
netics.net
www.thermalkinetics.net
ThermaSteel Corp., 847 S Randall
Rd., Ste. 191, Chicago, IL 60123
Phone: 224-400-8134
Email: ghisky@hotmail.com
www.thermasteelcorp.com
Thermo Scientific, 166 Cummings
Center, Beverly, MA 01915
Phone: 978-232-6228
Email: sara.whyte@thermofisher.
com
www.thermoscientific.com/water
Thielsch Engineering, 8761 May-
field Rd., Ste. 308, Chesterland,
OH 44026
Phone: 440-729-8866
Fax: 440-729-8060
Email: psmoske@thielsch.com
www.thielschfes.com
ThirdPartyInspections.com, 559
Union Church Rd., Elkton, MD
21921-3135
Phone: 410-620-0392
Fax: 270-573-3594
Email: steven.christian@third-
partyinspections.com
www.thirdpartyinspections.com
Thomas & Betts, 8155 T&B Blvd.,
Memphis, TN 38125
Phone: 305-842-4240
Fax: 800-888-0690
Email: monica.perez-therese@
tnb.com
www.tnb.com
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd., 48,
Noothanchary, Madambakkam,
Selaiyur, Chennai, 600073 India
Phone: 0091 44 22781148
Fax: 0091 44 22781362
Email: info@tianode.com
www.tianode.com
Tioga Air Heaters, 9201 Inter-
national Pkwy., Minneapolis, MN
55428
Phone: 763-525-4000
Fax: 763-525-9796
Email: bwallace@tioga-inc.com
www.tioga-inc.com
Tioga Pipe Supply Co., Inc., 2450
Wheatsheaf Ln., Philadelphia, PA
19137
Phone: 215-831-0700
Fax: 215-533-1645
Email: jshaw@tiogapipe.com
TITAN Rail, Inc., One East Mer-
chants Dr., Ste. 304, Oswego, IL
60543
Phone: 630-892-9020
Fax: 630-892-9090
Email: ebachman@titanrail.com
www.titanrail.com
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TLT-Babcock, 260 Springside Dr.,
Akron, OH 44333
Phone: 330-867-8540
Fax: 330-869-4819
www.tltbabcock.com
Topographic Imaging, Inc.,
11211 Katy Freeway, Ste. 625,
Houston, TX 77079
Phone: 713-973-8676
Fax: 713-973-8670
Email: colemanj@lidarmapping.
com
www.lidarmapping.com
Toshiba International Corp., 6623
West Washington St., West Allis,
WI 53213
Phone: 414-475-2800
Email: mark.mcneely@psd.
toshiba.com
Toshiba International Corp.,
Power Systems Div., 6 Dickinson
Dr., Bldg. 300, Ste. 2, Chadds
Ford, PA 19317
Phone: 610-361-9300
Fax: 610-459-7846
Email: info@toshibatic-pa.com
Total Power Ltd., 6450 Kestrel
Rd., Mississauga, ON L5T 1Z7
Canada
Phone: 905-670-1535
Email: sales@totalpower.ca
www.totalpower.ca
Tower Elevator Systems, Inc., 900
RR 620 South, C206, Lakeway,
TX 78734
Phone: 512-266-6200
Fax: 512-266-6210
Email: info@towerelevators.com
www.towerelevators.com
Tower Performance, Inc., 23 Vree-
land Rd., Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: 800-314-1695
Fax: 970-472-1304
Email: jfritz@towerperformance.
com
www.coolingtowercomponents.
com
Trachte Prefabricated Buildings,
422 N Burr Oak Ave., Oregon, WI
53575
Phone: 608-835-5707
Fax: 608-835-3920
Email: sales@trachteusa.com
www.trachteusa.com
Tradewinds Power Corp., 5820 NW
84 Ave., Miami, FL 33166
Phone: 305-592-9745
Fax: 305-592-7461
Email: sales@tradewindspower.com
www.tradewindspower.com
Transfer Bulk Systems, 600 W
Roosevelt Rd., B2, Wheaton, IL
60187-2302
Phone: 630-784-9671
Fax: 775-659-1598
Email: info@semcotbs.com
www.transferbulksystems.com
Trans-Global Distributions, 357,
10654 82 Ave., Edmonton, AB
T6E 2A7 Canada
Phone: 780 907 2929
Fax: 780 433 5706
Email: tgd2006@telus.net
www.tgdtrading.ca
Transocean Equipment Manage-
ment, LLC, P.O. Box 53924,
Fayetteville, NC 28305
Phone: 910-483-7828
Fax: 910-483-7876
Email: containers@nc.rr.com
Transoceancontainers.net
Tranter, 1900 Old Burk Hwy.,
Wichita Falls, TX 76306
Phone: 940-723-7125
Fax: 940-723-1131
Email: jstone@tranter.com
www.tranter.com
Tranter International AB, P.O. Box
17233, SE-10462 Maria Skolgata
79B, Stockholm, SE-118 53
Sweden
Phone: +46-8-442 49 70
Fax: +46-8-442 49 80
Email: info@se.tranter.com
www.tranter.com
TRAX, LLC, 107 Vista Centre Dr.,
Forest, VA 24551-2601
Phone: 434-385-7250
Fax: 434-385-8233
Email: tjkane@traxcorp.com
www.traxcorp.com
TRC - Nuclear Generation Services,
14 Gabriel Dr., Augusta, ME 04330
Phone: 207-620-3862
Fax: 207-621-8226
Email: bgriffin@trcsolutions.com
www.trcsolutions.com
Trent Tube, 2015 Energy Dr., East
Troy, WI 53120
Phone: 262-642-7321
Fax: 262-642-9571
Email: sales@trent-tube.com
www.trent-tube.com
Triangle Enterprises, Inc., 3630
Cairo Rd., Paducah, KY 42001
Phone: 270-443-2424
Email: bsayner@triangle-co.com
www.triangle-co.com
Tricor Metals, 3225 West Old Lin-
coln Way, Wooster, OH 44691
Phone: 330-264-3299
Fax: 330-262-6678
Email: chuck@tricormetals.com
www.tricormetals.com
Trinity Industries, Inc., P.O. Box
568887, Dallas, TX 75356-8887
Phone: 214-589-8529
Fax: 214-589-8553
Email: don.wallace@trin.net
www.trin.net
Triple-S Steel Supply, P.O. Box
21119, 6000 Jensen Dr., Hous-
ton, TX 77226
Phone: 713-697-7105
Fax: 713-697-5945
Email: davids@sss-steel.com
www.sss-steel.com
Tuf-Lok International, P.O. Box
5078, Madison, WI 53705
Phone: 608-270-9478
Fax: 608-270-2080
Email: info@tuflok.com
www.tuflok.com
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC,
4627 N Sam Houston Pkwy. E,
Houston, TX 77032
Phone: 281-227-0090
Fax: 281-227-0098
Email: sales@turbineenergysolu-
tions.com
www.turbineenergysolutions.com
Turbine Generator Maintenance,
Inc., 4635 Coronado Pkwy., Cape
Coral, FL 33914
Phone: 239-549-7500
Fax: 239-549-0767
Email: teamtgm@turbinegenera-
tor.com
www.turbinegenerator.com
Turbo Parts, LLC, 767 Pierce Rd.,
Ste. 2, Clifton Park, NY 12065
Phone: 518-885-3199
Fax: 518-885-3072
Email: info@turbopartsllc.com
www.turbopartsllc.com
TurboCare, Inc., 2140 Westover
Rd., Chicopee, MA 01022
Phone: 413-593-0500
Fax: 413-593-3424
Email: mletendre@turbocare.com
www.turbocare.com
TurboGen Consultants, Inc., 78
South Trooper Rd., Norristown,
PA 19403
Phone: 610-631-3480
Fax: 610-631-3481
Email: info@turbogen.net
www.turbogen.net
Turnell Corp., 17269 Wild Horse
Creek Rd. Ste. 220, Chesterfield,
MO 63005
Phone: 314-971-0920
Email: victort@turnellcorp.com
www.turnellcorp.com
Turner Business Services, LLC,
1300 Gladolas Dr., Winter Park,
FL 32792
Phone: 407-927-6517
Email: turnerbizservices@gmail.
com
Tuthill Energy Systems, Millbury
Industrial Park, P.O. Box 8000,
Millbury, MA 01527-8000
Phone: 508-756-8391
Fax: 508-754-4516
www.tuthill.com
TVC Systems, 284 Constitution
Ave., Portsmouth, NH 03801
Phone: 603-431-5251
Fax: 603-431-8909
Email: adam@tvcsystems.com
www.tvcsystems.com
TWR Lighting, Inc./Orga Aviation,
4300 Windfern Rd., Ste. #100,
Houston, TX 77041
Phone: 713-973-6905
Fax: 713-973-9352
Email: info@twrlighting.com
www.twrlighting.com
Tyco Flow Control, See Pentair
Valves & Controls, Pasadena, TX
77507
Phone: 832-261-2416
Email: ssdcustomercare@tyco-
valves.com
www.pentair.com/valves
U
U. S. Metals, 19102 Gundle,
Houston, TX 77073
Phone: 281-443-7473
Fax: 281-443-6748
Email: steve_tralie@usmetals.com
www.usmetals.com
U.S. Underwater Services, LLC,
123 Sentry Dr., Mansfield, TX
76063
Phone: 800-860-2178
Fax: 817-447-0021
Email: jimschrader@usunderwa-
terservices.com
www.usunderwaterservices.com
UBE, 261 Madison Ave., 28th
Floor, New York, NY 10016
Phone: 212-551-4700
Email: admin@ube.com
www.ube.com
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Ukraine Partnership Bureau, 84,
Balzaka Str. App.116, Kiyv, 2232
Ukraine
Phone: 677397425
Fax: 677397425
Email: andrey.s@uapb.eu
www.uapb.eu
Ultraflo Corp., A subsidiary of
BRAY International, Inc., P.O. Box
423, Ste. Genevieve, MO 63670
Phone: 573-883-8881
Fax: 573-883-8882
Email: ultraflo@ultraflovalve.com
www.ultraflovalve.com
Ultramax Corp., 110 Boggs Ln.,
Ste. 325, Cincinnati, OH 45246
Phone: 513-469-8629
Email: ultramax@ultramax.com
www.ultramax.com
Unimar, Inc., 4944 Verplank Rd.,
P.O. Box 220, Clay, NY 13041
Phone: 315-699-4400
Fax: 315-699-3700
Email: maurita@unimar.com
www.unimar.com
Unitech Power Technology Co.
Ltd., 9126 Richards Dr., Mentor,
OH 44060
Phone: 440-257-3504
Email: sean@ut-power.com
www.ut-power.com
United Conveyor Corp., 2100
Norman Dr. West, Waukegan, IL
60085
Phone: 847-473-5900
Fax: 847-473-5959
Email: contactucc@unitedcon-
veyor.com
www.unitedconveyor.com
United Dynamics Corp., 2681 Coral
Ridge Rd., Brooks, KY 40109
Phone: 502-957-7525
Fax: 502-957-5441
Email: sales@udc.net
www.udc.net
United Electric Controls, 180 Dex-
ter Ave., Watertown, MA 02472
Phone: 617-926-1000
Email: msandlin@ueonline.com
www.ueonline.com
United Fiberglass of America,
Inc., P.O. Box 1511, Springfield,
OH 45503
Phone: 937-325-7305
Fax: 937-325-7380
Email: sales@unitedfiberglass.com
www.unitedfiberglass.com
United Rentals, 5 Greenwich Of-
fice Park, Greenwich, CT 06831
Phone: 203-618-7185
Fax: 203-622-4325
Email: mabbey@ur.com
www.unitedrentals.com
Universal Analyzers, Inc., 5200
Convair Dr., Carson City, NV 89706
Phone: 775-883-2500
Fax: 775-883-6388
Email: marketing@universalana-
lyzers.com
www.universalanalyzers.com
Universal Flow Monitors, Inc.,
1755 E Nine Mile Rd., P.O. Box
249, Hazel Park, MI 48030
Phone: 248-542-9635
Fax: 248-398-4274
Email: ufm@flowmeters.com
www.flowmeters.com
Universal Utility Services, LLC,
P.O. Box 30608, 2900 NE Sixth,
Amarillo, TX 79120
Phone: 806-378-4186
Fax: 806-378-4196
Email: david.l.theel@ue-corp.com
www.uus-llc.com
UnseenHeroes, P.O. Box 726,
Artesia, CA 90703
Phone: 760-985-4376
Email: dave@unseenheroes.com
www.unseenheroes.com
URS, Power Business Unit, 510
Carnegie Ctr, Princeton, NJ 08543
Phone: 609-720-2000
Fax: 609-720-2050
www.urscorp.com
Utility Consultants, Inc., 1810
Water Pl., Ste. 200, Atlanta, GA
30339
Phone: 770-955-9922
Fax: 770-955-9955
www.ucinc.net
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp.,
N4 W22610 Bluemound Rd., P.O.
Box 177, Waukesha, WI 53186
Phone: 262-547-1600
Fax: 262-544-8546
Email: rent@uelc.com
www.uelc.com
UTILX Corp., 22820 Russell Rd.,
P.O. Box 97009, Kent, WA 98064-
9709
Phone: 253-395-0200
Fax: 253-395-1040
Email: marketing@utilx.com
www.utilx.com
V

Valdes Engineering Co., 100 West
22nd St., Lombard, IL 60148
Phone: 630-792-1886
Fax: 630-792-1986
Email: mprestemon@valdeseng.com
www.valdeseng.com
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes,
Inc., 5501 Air Park Blvd., Mor-
ristown, TN 37813
Phone: 423-587-1888
Fax: 423-585-4215
Email: us.contact@valtimet.com
www.vallourec.com
Valmont Industries, Structures
Div., 7002 N 288th St., Valley,
NE 68064
Phone: 402-359-2201
Fax: 402-359-6221
Email: polesinfo@valmont.com
www.valmont.com
Valquest Systems, 351 S Sherman
Ste. 100, Richardson, TX 75081
Phone: 972-234-2954
Email: feliz@valquest.net
www.valquest.net
Valvesearch.com, P.O. Box 85,
Malvern, PA 19355
Phone: 484-320-8043
Email: sales@valvesearch.com
www.valvesearch.com
Vandal Shields, 8560 Roland St.
#E, P.O. Box 434, Buena Park, CA
90621
Phone: 714-523-0572
Fax: 714-523-3328
Email: sales@vandalshields.com
www.vandalshields.com
VEGA Americas, Inc., 4170 Ross-
lyn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45209
Phone: 800-367-5383
Email: americas@vega.com
www.vega-americas.com
Velan Valve Corp., 94 Ave. C, Wil-
liston, VT 05495
Phone: 514-748-7743
Fax: 514-748-8635
Email: sales@velan.com
www.velan.com
Velcon Filters, Inc., 1210 Garden
of the Gods Rd., Colorado
Springs, CO 80907-3410
Email: vfsales@velcon.com
www.velcon.com
Ventyx, an ABB Co., 400
Perimeter Center Ter., Ste. 500,
Atlanta, GA 30346
Phone: 678-830-1000
Email: gary.frazier@ventyx.abb.com
www.ventyx.com
Vericor Power Systems, 3625
Brookside Pkwy., Ste. 500,
Alpharetta, GA 30022
Phone: 770-569-8838
Fax: 770-569-7524
Email: ken.peters@vericor.com
www.vericor.com
Verizon, One Verizon Way, Bask-
ing Ridge, NJ 07920
Phone: 800-526-3178
www.verizon.com
VERSITRON, Inc., 83-C Albe Dr.,
Newark, DE 19702
Phone: 302-894-0699
Fax: 302-894-0624
Email: fiberlink@versitron.com
www.versitron.com
VibroSyst M, 2727 E Jacques-
Cartier Blvd., Longueuil, QC J4N
1L7 Canada
Phone: 450-646-2157
Fax: 450-646-2164
Email: sales@vibrosystm.com
www.vibrosystem.com
Victaulic, 4901 Kesslersville Rd.,
Easton, PA 18040
Phone: 610-559-3300
Email: blowar@victaulic.com
www.victaulic.com
Victory Energy Operations, LLC,
10701 E 126th St. N., Collins-
ville, OK 74021
Phone: 918-382-4840
Fax: 918-594-7240
Email: cswallow@victoryenergy.com
www.victoryenergy.com
Virtual Phone System, 30150
Telegraph Rd., Bingham Farms,
MI 48025
Phone: 800-962-0126
Email: sales@voiceshot.com
www.voiceshot.com/public/vr.asp
Viryanet, 2 Willow St., Southbor-
ough, MA 01745
Phone: 508-490-8600
Fax: 508-490-8666
Email: jack.mcavoy@viryanet.com
www.viryanet.com
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Vista Control Systems, Inc., 2101
Trinity Dr., Ste. Q, Los Alamos,
NM 87544-4103
Phone: 505-662-2484
Email: vista-sales@vista-control.
com
www.vista-control.com
Vogt Power International, Inc.,
13551 Triton Park Blvd., Ste.
2000, Louisville, KY 40223
Phone: 502-899-4500
Fax: 502-899-4690
Email: sales@vogtpower.com
www.vogtpower.com
Voith Turbo BHS Getriebe GmbH,
Hans-Boeckler-Strasse 7, Son-
thofen, 87527 Germany
Phone: +49 8321 802-0
Fax: +49 8321 802-689
Email: info.bhs@voith.com
www.voith.com/bhs-turbo-gear
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG,
Voithstr. 1, Crailsheim, 74564
Germany
Phone: +49 7951 32-0
Fax: +49 7951 32-500
Email: industry@voith.com
www.voith.com
Voith Turbo, Inc., 25 Winship
Rd., York, PA 17406
Phone: 717-767-3200
Fax: 717-767-3210
Email: vti-information@voith.
com
www.usa.voithturbo.com
Vooner FloGard Corp., 4729
Stockholm Ct., Charlotte, NC
28273
Phone: 704-552-9314
Fax: 704-554-8230
Email: info@vooner.com
www.vooner.com
Vulcan Iron Works, Inc., 400
3rd Ave., Ste. 100, Kingston, PA
18704-5816
Phone: 717-822-2161
W

Wabash Power Equipment Co.,
444 Carpenter Ave., Wheeling,
IL 60090
Phone: 847-541-5600
Fax: 847-541-1279
Email: info@wabashpower.com
www.wabashpower.com
Wahlco, Inc., 3600 W Segerstrom,
Santa Ana, CA 92704
Phone: 714-979-7300
Email: sales@wahlco.com
www.wahlco.com
Walters Power International,
2915 N Classen Blvd., Ste. 400,
Oklahoma City, OK 73106
Phone: 405-528-2860
Email: jay@walterspower.com
www.walterspower.com
Warren & Baerg Manufacturing,
Inc., 39950 Rd. 108, Dinuba, CA
93618
Phone: 559-591-6790
Fax: 559-591-5728
Email: info@warrenbaerg.com
www.warrenbaerg.com
Wartsila North America, Inc.,
16330 Air Center Blvd., Houston,
TX 77032
Phone: 281-233-6200
Fax: 281-233-6233
Email: amy.reynolds@wartsila.com
www.wartsila.com/us
Watlow, 12001 Lackland Rd., St.
Louis, MO 63146
Phone: 800-WATLOW2
Fax: 314-878-6814
Email: inquiry@watlow.com
www.watlow.com
Watthour Engineering Co, 333
Crosspark Dr., Pearl, MS 39208
Phone: 601-933-0900
Fax: 601-933-0901
Email: sales@watthour.com
www.watthour.com
Waukesha Bearings Corp.,
W231N2811, Ste. 200, Pewaukee,
WI 53072
Phone: 262-506-3000
Email: info@waukbearing.com
www.waukeshabearing.com
WebLayers, Inc., 100 Cambridge
Park Dr., 3rd Floor, Cambridge,
MA 02140
Phone: 617-500-7620
Email: carlos.bernal@weblayers.com
www.weblayers.com
Weidmann Systems International,
One Gordon Mills Way, P.O. Box
799, St. Johnsbury, VT 05851-
0799
Phone: 802-748-3936
Fax: 802-748-8630
Email: service@weidmann-
systems.com
www.weidmann-systems.com
Weir Minerals, Box 7610, Madi-
son, WI 53716
Phone: 608-221-2261
www.weirminerals.com
Weir Slurry North America, 2701
S Stoughton Rd., Madison, WI
53716
Phone: 608-221-2261
Fax: 608-221-5810
Email: msngeneralinfo@weirslur-
rygroup.com
www.weirslurrygroup.com
Welding Technologies, 2330 Cen-
tennial Dr., Gainesville, GA 30504
Phone: 877-935-3832
Fax: 770-297-6511
Email: info@babcockpower.com
www.weldingtechnologies.com
Weldstar Co., 1750 Mitchell Rd.,
Aurora, IL 60505
Phone: 630 859 3100
Fax: 630 859 3199
Email: bdecker@weldstar.com
www.weldstar.com
WennSoft, 1970 S Calhoun Rd.,
New Berlin, WI 53151
Phone: 262-821-4100
Email: contact@wennsoft.com
www.wennsoft.com
Weschler Instruments, 16900
Foltz Pkwy., Cleveland, OH 44149
Phone: 440-238-2550
Fax: 440-238-0660
Email: sales@weschler.com
www.weschler.com
WesTech Engineering, 3665 S
West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT
84115
Phone: 801.265.1000
Fax: 801-265-1080
Email: info@westech-inc.com
www.westech-inc.com/en-usa
Western Integrated Technologies,
13406 SE 32nd St., Bellevue, WA
98005
Phone: 425-747-0927
Fax: 425-747-0940
Email: sales@westernintech.com
www.westernintech.com
Westfalia Separator, Inc., Mineral
Oil Div., 100 Fairway Ct., North-
vale, NJ 07647
Phone: 201-767-3900
Fax: 201-767-3416
Westinghouse Electric Co., 1000
Westinghouse Dr., Cranberry
Township, PA 16066
Phone: 412-374-2558
Fax: 724-940-8518
Email: rossmams@westinghouse.
com
www.westinghousenuclear.com
Weston Solutions, Inc., 1400
Weston Way, West Chester, PA
19380
Phone: 610-701-3000
Email: wes.fritz@westonsolutions.
com
www.emissionstestingsolutions.
com
WH Salisbury & Co, 7520 N Long
Ave., P.O. Box 1060, Skokie, IL
60077
Phone: 847-679-6700
Fax: 847-679-2401
www.whsalisbury.com
Wheelwash USA, P.O. Box
810607, Boca Raton, FL 33481
Phone: 561-750-8662
Fax: 561-750-9507
Email: global@gate.net
www.WheelwashUSA.com
WIKA Instrument Corp. - Electri-
cal Temperature Division, 950
Hall Ct., Deer Park, TX 77536
Phone: 713-475-0022
Fax: 713-475-0011
Email: info@wikaetemp.com
www.wika.com
WIKA Instruments Canada Ltd.,
3103 Parsons Rd., Edmonton, AB
T6N 1C8 Canada
Phone: 780-463-7035
Fax: 780-462-0017
Email: info@wika.ca
www.wika.ca
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William Frick & Co., 2600 Com-
merce Dr., Libertyville, IL 60048
Phone: 847-918-3808
Fax: 847-918-3701
Email: barbara.crystal@fricknet.com
www.fricknet.com
Williams Metals and Welding
Alloys, Inc., 125 Strafford Ave.,
Ste. 108, Wayne, PA 19087
Phone: 877-499-1544
Email: sales@wmwa.net
www.wmwa.net
Williamson Corp., 70 Domino Dr.,
Concord, MA 01742
Phone: 978-396-9607
Fax: 978-369-5485
Email: sales@williamsonir.com
www.williamsonir.com
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc., 607
US 70-A East, P.O. Box 1329,
Hillsborough, NC 27278
Phone: 919-732-9351
Fax: 919-732-9359
Email: info@wilmoreelectronics.
com
www.wilmoreelectronics.com
Winco, Inc., 225 South Cordova
Ave., Le Center, MN 56057
Phone: 507-357-6821
Fax: 507-357-4857
Email: sales@wincogen.com
www.wincogen.com
Winsted Corp., 10901 Hampshire
Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN
55438
Phone: 800-237-5606
Fax: 770-840-9685
Email: custom@winsted.com
www.winstedcustom.com
Winters Instruments, 600 Ens-
minger Rd., Buffalo, NY 14150
Phone: 716-874-8700
Fax: 716-874-8800
Email: usasales@winters.com
www.winters.com
Wiznucleus, Inc., 244 Fifth Ave.,
Ste. K227, New York, NY 10001
Phone: 646-367-1947 x 501
Email: kshetty@wiznucleus.com
www.wiznucleus.com
Wolf Material Handling Systems,
12680 Industrial Blvd., Elk River,
MN 55330
Phone: 763-576-9040
Fax: 763-576-9070
Email: sales@wolfmhs.com
www.wolfmhs.com
Wood Group GTS, 15600 John F
Kennedy Blvd., Ste. 500, Hous-
ton, TX 77032
Phone: 281-227 5600
Fax: 281-227 5655
Email: gts@woodgroup.com
www.woodgroup.com
Woodward GmbH, Handwerkstr.
29, Stuttgart, 70656 Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 711 789 54-0
Fax: +49 (0) 711 789 54-1
Email: stgt-info@woodward.com
www.woodward.com
WorleyParsons Group, Inc., 2675
Morgantown Rd., Reading, PA
19607
Phone: 610-855-2000
Fax: 610-855-2602
Email: wwwfeedback@worleypar-
sons.com
www.worleyparsons.com
WPC, Inc., 10907 Downs Rd.,
Charlotte, NC 28134
Phone: 704-927-4000
Fax: 704-927-4001
Email: icooper@wpceng.com
www.wpceng.com
WRB Communications, 4200
Lafayette Center Dr., Chantlly, VA
20151
Phone: 703-449-0520
Email: denise.dixon@wrbcorp.com
www.wrbcorp.com
X
Xdot Engineering and Analysis,
PLLC, 370C Greenbrier Dr., Char-
lottesville, VA 22901
Phone: 434-972-9368
Email: erik@xdotea.com
www.xdotea.com
Xenics, Ambachtenlaan 44, Leu-
ven, 3001 Belgium
Phone: +3216 389900
Email: kve@xenics.com
www.xenics.com
Xtralis, 700 Longwater Dr., Nor-
well, MA 02061
Phone: 800-229-4434
Email: marketing@xtralisameri-
cas.com
www.xtralis.com
Y
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans
Chicago Corp., P.O. Box 6620,
3905 Enterprise Ct., Aurora, IL
60598-0620
Phone: 630-236-5500
Fax: 630-236-5511
Email: sales@yccpump.net
www.yeomanspump.com
Yieh Corp., No.6, E-DA Rd.,
Yanchao Town, Kaohsiung County,
82445 Taiwan
Phone: 88676151000
Fax: 88676153000
Email: ec@yieh.com
www.yieh.com
Yokogawa Corporation of
America, 2 Dart Rd., Newnan, GA
30265
Phone: 770-254-0400
Fax: 770-251-2088
Email: meters-instr@
us.yokogawa.com
www.yokogawa-usa.com/
Yuba Heat Transfer, 2121 N 161 E
Ave., Tulsa, OK 74116-4802
Phone: 918-234-6000
Fax: 918-437-3429
Z
Zachry Engineering Corp., 101
West Colfax Avenue #500 Denver,
CO 80202
Phone: 303-928-4400
www.zhi.com
Zensol Automation, Inc., 7075
Place Robert-Joncas, Ste. 139,
St. Laurent, QC H4M 2Z2 Canada
Phone: 514-333-3488
Fax: 514-333-3499
Email: zensol@zensol.com
www.zensol.com
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio In-
novations), 2121 second Street
B-107, Davis, CA 95618
Phone: 530-750-2800
Email: zequanox@marronebio.
com
www.zequanox.com
Zinkan Enterprises, Inc., 1919
Case Pkwy. North, Twinsburg, OH
44087
Phone: 800-229-6801
Email: sales@zinkan.com
www.zinkan.com
Zollern GmbH & Co. KG, Hitzkofer
Strasse 1, Sigmaringendorf,
72517 Germany
Phone: +49 7571 70-0
Fax: +49 7571 70-602
Email: raik.flaemig@zollern.de
www.zollern.com
Zolo Technologies, Inc., 4946
North 63rd St., Boulder, CO
80301
Phone: 303-604-5800
Fax: 303-530-1843
Email: sales@zolotech.com
www.zolotech.com
ZSI, 45065 Michigan Ave., Can-
ton, MI 48188
Phone: 800-323-7053
Fax: 734-844-0066
Email: twright@zsi-inc.com
www.zsi-inc.com
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PRODUCTS
DIRECTORY
ACI SYSTEMS FOR MERCURY
CONTROL
ADA Environmental Solutions
Breen Energy Solutions
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
ACOUSTICS
1 Acoustics - General
10 Instrumentation
15 Noise abatement, transformers
20 Panels
Hawk Measurement (10)
Hessler Associates, Inc. (1)
Sound Technologies (1,15,20)
The Proudfoot Company
ACTUATORS
AZZ | N L I
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Blac Inc.
Compact Automation Products LLC
Flowserve
Rotork
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
ADDITIVES, COAL
10 Coal-pile binders
20 Dust-suppression agents
30 Freeze-conditioning agents
40 Slag modifiers
Benetech (10,20,30,40)
ADDITIVES, FUEL-OIL
Jiangsu High Hope International Group Co.
Ltd
AERATORS
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
AERIAL LIFTS
10 Basket testers
Dueco Inc
Hinkel Equipment Rental Associates, Inc.
Nesco Sales & Rentals
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp
AIR PREHEATER BASKETS
SUPPLY
Imeco Limited
Tesla Energy Solutions
AIRFLOW MEASUREMENT,
COMBUSTION
Enerac, Inc
PROMECON USA Inc.
Testo Inc.
ALARMS
Kistler-Morse Corp
SKF USA
The Protectowire Co Inc
ALIGNMENT SYSTEM SHAFT
10 Laser
20 Dial indicator
Elos Fixturlaser AB
LUDECA, INC.
Machinery Mounting Solutions, Inc. (10,20)
ALIGNMENT SYSTEMS
TURBINE COMPONENT
Alignment Supplies, Inc.
ANALYZERS, AIR-POLLUTION
1 Analyzers, air-pollution - General
10 CO, CO2
20 Continuous emissions monitors
30 HCL
40 HF
50 Hydrocarbons
60 Hydrogen sulfide
70 NH3
80 NO, NOx
100 SO2 and/or SO3
110 Stack-gas
Air Instruments & Measurements LLC
CEMTEK Environmental
Cosa Instrument Corp, Process Control Div
Delta Instrument LLC (10,20,30,40,50,60,70,
80,100,110)
Ducon Technologies Inc, MIP Div
Emerson Process Management, Rosemount
Analytical
ENOTEC Inc. (1,10,20,110)
FilterSense
HORIBA (1,10,20,50,60,70,80,100,110)
ANALYZERS, AIR-QUALITY
1 Analyzers, air-quality - General
ENMET Corporation (1)
Pragmatics Hydrogen Leak Detection
ANALYZERS, HYDROGEN
PURITY
10 H2-cooled Power Generators
Hitech Instruments
Nova Analytical Systems Inc. (10)
ANALYZERS, WATER-PURITY
1 Analyzers, water-purity - General
10 Alkalinity
20 Boron
30 Calcium hardness
40 Chloride
50 Hydrazine
60 Hydrogen
70 Oxygen
80 Silica
90 Sodium
100 Sulfide
Camarines sur Polytechnic college
CHEMetrics, Inc.
Hach
Metrohm-Peak
Mettler-Toledo Thornton, Inc.
Orbeco Analytical Systems Inc
Scientific Instruments
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,40,50,60,70,80,90)
Swan Analytical USA
Taylor Technologies Inc
(1,10,20,30,40,50,80,90,100)
Thermo Scientific
ARRESTERS
CITEL SURGE PROTECTION
ASH-HANDLING SYSTEMS
1 Ash-handling systems - General
10 Air washers
20 Blowers
30 Ceramic lined pipe
40 Clinker grinders (crushers)
50 Combining tubes
60 Conveyors
70 Coolers
80 Dewatering bins
90 Exhausters
100 Feeders
110 Fluidizers
120 Jet ash pumps
140 Receiver/separators (air/ash)
150 Rotary unloaders
160 Sluice pumps
170 Storage bins
180 Storage tanks
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,30,40,60,70,80)
AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG
(1,70,110)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Detroit Stoker Company (40,150)
See our ad on p. 51
Diamond Power International Inc
(1,30,40,60,70,80)
December 2013
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Ducon Technologies (1)
FLSmidth Inc. (1,20,60,100,120,150)
Helmick Corporation (40,50,90,120)
National Conveyors Company Inc
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Philippi-Hagenbuch, Inc.
United Conveyor Corporation
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,80,90,100,110,
120,140,150,160,170,180)
BAGHOUSES
Buell APC
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Global Power Supply
MCNS Environmental Systems Inc.
Southern Environmental
BAGS
Summit Filter Corporation
BATTERIES/CHARGERS
La Marche Mfg. Co.
BEARINGS
1 Bearings - General
30 Sleeve babbitt
40 Sleeve, bronze
50 Thrust, special
60 Magnetic
Bently Pressurized Bearing Co
Fusion Babbitting Co. Inc (30)
Graphite Metallizing Corp, Graphalloy Division
igus® Inc.
Kingsbury Inc
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,40,50)
Renewal Parts Maintenance
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
Waukesha Bearings Corporation (1,50,60)
ZOLLERN GmbH & Co. KG
BELTS SAFETY/TOOL
FrenchCreek Production, Inc.
BLADE MANUFACTURING
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
BLOWERS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Tuthill Energy Systems
BOILER PARTS
20 Pressure and non-pressure parts
AIR SYSTEMS LIMITED
CTI Power/Chicago Tube & Iron Company
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (20)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc
BOILERS
Factory Sales & Engineering, Inc.
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc.
Indeck Power Equipment Company
STF spa
See our ad on p. 20
Victory Energy Operations, LLC
Wabash Power Equipment Company
BOILERS, FLUIDIZED-BED
AE&E Austria GmbH & Co KG
Energy Products of Idaho
Metso Power
STERLING STRIPS LTD
BOILERS, INDUSTRIAL
Babcock Power Inc.
BOILERS, UTILITY
Babcock Power Inc.
BOLTS
Applied Bolting
Portland Bolt & Manufacturing
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
BOXES TOOL/PICK-UP TRUCK
Lista International Corp.
BRUSHES
Cutsforth Products Inc.
See our ad on p. 53
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc
BUCKETS
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
BURNERS
1 Burners - General
10 Coal, pulverized
20 Gas, natural
30 Management Systems
40 NOx, low
50 Oil
60 Orimulsion
90 Waste fuels
Detroit Stoker Company (40)
See our ad on p. 51
Faber Burner Company
Fuel Tech Inc. (1,20,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1,10,40)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Nat-Com
Riley Power Inc (10,20,30,40,60,90)
Vulcan Iron Works Inc
BURNERS, SUPPORT
EQUIPMENT
Forney Corporation
Frederick Cowan & Co Inc
BUS
1 Bus - General
10 Aluminum/copper
EMS Industrial and Service
MDF Cable Bus Systems (1,10)
Williams Metals and Welding Alloys Inc (10)
BUS DUCT
1 Bus duct - General
Delta Unibus Division
Delta/Unibus, Div. of Powell Electrical
Systems
MDF Cable Bus Systems (1)
BUSHINGS/BUSHING WELLS
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
CABLE 600 V-34.5 KV
safanicu
CABLE ACCESSORIES
10 Fittings & connectors
ZSI (10)
CABLE LAYERS
Dow Electrical & Telecommunications
CABLE SUPERCONDUCTING
Parmar Metals Pvt. Ltd
.
CABLE TERMINATIONS/
SPLICES
20 Potheads
30 Splice kits, distribution
40 Splice kits, transmission
50 Stress cone kits
Thomas & Betts (20,30,40,50)
CABLE,
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Calvert Wire & Cable Corporation
CABLE, TRANSMISSION
SNC Manufacturing
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December 2013 104
CALIBRATION EQUIPMENT
Beamex, Inc.
CAPACITORS/CONTROLS
LCR Electronics
Valquest Systems
CASTINGS
1 Castings - General
10 Ferrous
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (1,10)
Hillscape, Inc. (1)
Northern Cast parts Company Inc
CATALYST
CoaLogix
Cormetech, Inc.
See our ad on p. 9
DAEYOUNG C & E CO., LTD.
Fuel Tech Inc.
Haldor Topsoe Inc.
Hypercat Advanced Catalyst Products
Johnson Matthey Catalysts LLC
CATHODIC PROTECTION
Advance Products & Systems
Corrpro Companies, Inc.
Norton Corrosion Ltd
CENTRIFUGES
Bird Machine Co
KMPT AG
KMPT USA, Inc.
Separator Spares & Equipment, LLC
Westfalia Separator Inc, Mineral Oil Div
CHEMICALS, FLUE-GAS
DESULFURIZATION
10 Reagents
SOLVAir Solutions/Solvay Chemicals, Inc. (10)
CHEMICALS,
TURBOMACHINERY
ECT Inc
FP Turbomachinery
Rochem Technical Services
CHEMICALS, WATER-
TREATMENT
Ashland Water Technologies, Drew Industrial
Buckman Laboratories Inc, Water Technolo-
gies
GC3 Specialty Chemicals, Inc.
The Dow Chemical Company
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio Innovations)
CHILLERS
AZZ | N L I
CHIMNEYS
Commonwealth Dynamics, Inc.
Hadek Protective Systems
Hamon Custodis, Inc.
Hoffmann, Inc
Oak Park Chimney
CHLORINATORS
Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio Innovations)
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, HIGH
VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, high voltage - General
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Carling Technologies
Pennsylvania Breaker LLC
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LOW
VOLTAGE
1 Circuit breakers, low voltage - General
10 Air-magnetic
20 Moulded case
30 Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
AZZ | N L I (1,10,20,30)
CLOTHING, PROTECTIVE
10 Glove testing, electric
DragonWear
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
WH Salisbury & Co
CLUTCHES
1 Clutches - General
10 Automatic
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10)
SSS Clutch Company Inc
COAL FEEDERS
10 Gravimetric
Bedeschi America, Inc
Stock Equipment Company (10)
THAYER SCALE-HYER INDUSTRIES, INC.
COAL-CLEANING EQUIPMENT
Coal Recovery Investments Ltd
COAL-SAMPLING/ANALYSIS
SYSTEMS
Thermo Scientific
COATINGS
1 Coatings - General
10 Insulating
30 Protective
40 Sealing
Belzona Western Ltd.
BHI Energy (1,30,40)
See our ad on p. 1
Blome International
CMP Coatings, Inc.
Duromar Inc
Ellison Surface Technologies (1)
Furnace Mineral Products Inc. (30)
Hadek Protective Systems (1,10,30,40)
Hayden Laser Services, LLC (1)
International Paint
ITW Devcon Futura Coatings
Kingfisher Industrial
Master Bond, Inc.
NSP Specialty Products (1,30,40)
Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc. (1,30)
The Silchem Group
COGENERATION SYSTEMS,
PACKAGED
2G - CENERGY Power Systems Technologies
Inc.
Alturdyne
American DG Energy Inc.
Centrax Limited
COILS & BARS
10 High-voltage
National Electric Coil (10)
COMBUSTERS
AE&E - Von Roll Inc
COMBUSTION AIRFLOW
MEASUREMENT
AMETEK Land, Inc.
LPP Combustion LLC
Shawcity Limited
COMBUSTION-CONTROL
SYSTEMS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
DURAG GROUP
Eutech Scientific Engineering
IMR Inc
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Marathon Sensors Inc
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COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS/
EQUIPMENT
1 Communications systems/equipment -
General
20 Fiber-optics
50 Modems
60 Networking products
Aitech Defense Systems
Alcatel-Lucent
E.A.R., Inc.
Elma Systems Division
EtherWAN Systems
H&L Instruments (1,20,50,60)
MEN Micro Inc
SISCO, Inc. (60)
VERSITRON Inc
COMPRESSORS
1 Compressors - General
Air Engineering Inc.
Atlas Copco Compressors LLC
Bauer Compressors Inc.
Jenny Products (1)
sera ComPress GmbH
COMPUTER SOFTWARE
30 Environmental compliance
60 Maintenance management
90 Operations & maintenance
100 Performance monitoring
110 Piping systems
Automation Technology, Inc
CD-adapco
CYME International T&D
Eagle Technology Inc
EchoMail Inc
Ecutel Systems
ENOSERV, LLC
HTRI
Infor
Intergraph Corporation
Mainsaver
NeuCo, Inc.
Siemens AG
SPL WorldGroup, Inc
Sunrise Systems Ltd (110)
Terrington Data Management (30,60,90,100)
Ultramax Corporation
Ventyx, an ABB company (60,90)
Wiznucleus, Inc.
COMPUTER TERMINALS/
KEYBOARDS/PRINTERS
5 Control Room Furniture
Ergonomic Office Chairs by United Group,
Inc. (5)
COMPUTER-AIDED-DESIGN
EQUIPMENT (CAD)
Infolytica Corp
COMPUTERS
GETAC Inc.
Panasonic Computer Solutions Co
CONDENSERS
40 Surface
Ambassador Heat Transfer Co (40)
LYNN Engineered Systems LLC
Niagara Blower Company
CONDENSERS, TWO PLUG
The Conklin Sherman Co, Inc
CONDUIT
United Fiberglass of America Inc
CONNECTORS
Amphenol Industrial Operations
Aries Electronics
DMC Power
Hubbell Power Systems, Inc
J Custon Supply, Inc
CONTROL SYSTEMS
1 Control systems - General
10 Compressor
30 Gas-turbine
40 Main plant
ABB Inc (1,30)
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Diamond Power International Inc (1)
Emerson Process Management, Power & Water
Solutions
Enercon Engineering Inc
Environment One Corporation
Gastops Ltd
GE Energy
Innovative Control Systems, Inc.
Invensys
Machine Control Systems
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,40)
TVC Systems
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10,30)
CONTROLLERS (ENERGY
MANAGEMENT)
10 Demand
20 Load
30 Power-factor
E / SYSTEMS (10,20,30)
CONTROLLERS (KEY
MEASUREMENTS)
BinMaster Level Controls
CONTROLLERS,
PROGRAMMABLE
I.C.M.I.(Inductive Components Mfg.,Inc.)
SoftPLC Corporation
CONVERTERS
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc
CONVEYOR ACCESSORIES
1 Conveyor accessories - General
ASGCO Manufacturing, Inc.
Benetech
C.U.E., Inc.
Flexco
Martin Engineering (1)
See our ad on p. 54
CONVEYOR DRIVES
10 Hydrodynamic
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (10)
CONVEYORS
1 Conveyors - General
10 Belt
20 Drag
30 Flight
40 High-angle
50 Pneumatic
60 Rentals
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,10,20,50)
Beltservice de Mexico
BEUMER Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co. KG
Conveyor Services/Classic Conveyor Compo-
nents
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors
(1,10,20,30,40,60)
Fenner Dunlop Americas
Flexco Engineered Systems Group
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Transfer Bulk Systems
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COOLING TOWERS
1 Cooling towers - General
10 Dry
20 Wet, mechanical draft
30 Wet, natural draft (hyperbolic)
40 Wet/dry
BIS Both Industrial Services BV
Cooling Tower Depot, Inc.
GEA Heat Exchangers - Cooling Tower Solu-
tions Division (1,10,20,30,40)
Midwest Towers
Paharpur Cooling Towers Ltd
See our ad on p. 23
Parker Hannifin- Precision Cooling Systems
Division (1)
SPX Cooling Technologies, Inc
Thermal Kinetics
Tower Performance, Inc. (1,20)
CORROSION CONTROL
10 Inhibitors
20 Monitors

30 Protection
Corrosion Service Company Europe Ltd
Cortec Corporation (10,30)
Electrochemical Devices, Inc. (20)
Hadek Protective Systems (30)
PENTA Industrial Corp. (30)
COUPLINGS
North Side Power Transmission Corp.
Tuf-Lok International
Victaulic
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
CRANES/DERRICKS
1 Cranes/derricks - General
5 120,000 lb overhead crane
30 Fuel-handling
40 Gantry
50 Radwaste-handling
60 Traveling, overhead
Gantrex Inc. (1,30,40,50,60)
Mazzella Lifting Technologies
NES Rentals
Remtron
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES (5)
CROSSARMS
DIS-TRAN Wood Products, LLC
GEOTEK, Inc/PUPI Crossarm
s
CRUSHERS/BREAKERS
40 Reversible mills
Pennsylvania Crusher
Sturtevant (40)
DAMPER ACTUATORS
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc
Jarret Inc
Keco Engineered Controls
DAMPERS
1 Dampers - General
10 Guillotine
20 Louvers
30 Special-design
Braden Mfg LLC
Clyde Bergemann Bachmann (1,10,20,30)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
McDermott Brothers Products
Senior Flexonics Pathway
DATA ACQUISITION/
MANAGEMENT
Contec Systems
DGH Corporation
Elsys Instruments
InStep Software
Lufft USA
Onset
StatSoft, Inc. / STATISTICA
DEAERATORS (STEAM
GENERATION)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Kansas City Deaerator
DEGASIFIERS
Membrana
DEHUMIDIFIERS
Arid Dry by Controlled DH (IMS)
DEMINERALIZERS
Pall Corporation
DESUPERHEATERS
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Schutte & Koerting
DIGESTORS
BIOFerm Energy Systems
DRILLS
Metabo Corporation
DRY SCRUBBERS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Dustex Corporation
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
DRYERS
1 Dryers - General
AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co.
KG (1)
Kahn & Company Inc
DUCT BURNERS
John Zink Hamworthy Combustion
DUCT JOINTS, EXPANSION
Energy Systems Products
DUCT SEALANT
American Polywater Corp
DUCT WORK
Moon Fabricating Corp.
DUST-COLLECTION
20 Systems
Airtrol, Inc.
Benetech (20)
CAMCORP, Inc.
DCM Clean-Air Products, Inc.
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
MikroPul
Nilfisk CFM
EARTH-MOVING EQUIPMENT
Emtrade Intrnational Ltd
ECONOMIZERS
1 Economizers - General
10 Nonsteaming
20 Steaming
Cain Industries, Inc.
Chanute Manufacturing (1)
E-Tech, Inc. (1,10,20)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (1,10)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
EJECTORS
10 Vapor
Fox Venturi Eductors (10)
ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS
Beltran Technologies, Inc.
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
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Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
PECO
Southern Environmental
ELEVATORS
Alimak Hek, Inc
Tower Elevator Systems, Inc
.
EMISSIONS-SAMPLING
SYSTEMS
10 Extractive
20 In-situ
Apex Instruments, Inc. (10,20)
Sentry Equipment Corp (10)
SICK MAIHAK, Inc. (10,20)
Universal Analyzers Inc.
ENCLOSURES
10 Acoustical
60 Switchgear
CDR Systems Group
Elma Electronic
Lectrus (60)
Reef Industries Inc, Griffolyn
Sound Technologies (10)
Span-O-Matic
Trachte Prefabricated Buildings
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
SYSTEMS/CONTROLS
1 Energy management systems/controls -
General
10 Distribution automation equipment
International Business Systems (1,10)
Woodward GmbH
ENERGY STORAGE
Caldwell Energy/Caldwell Tanks
Energy Storage and Power
ENGINES (FUEL)
10 Dual-fuel
20 Full-diesel
30 Spark-ignitions gas
Iveco Motors Of North America
Wartsila North America, Inc. (10,20,30)
ENVIRONMENTAL
COMPLIANCE
1 Environmental compliance - General
30 NOx control
40 SOx control
Basic Concepts
Benetech
C.I.Agent Solutions, LLC (1)
Lenox Instrument Company, Inc. (1,30)
Plant Professionals
Southern Environmental (1,40)
StormwateRx
ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS
1 Environmental products - General
10 Activated Carbon
ADA Carbon Solutions (10)
Babcock Power Inc.
Chesapeake Soda Clean, Inc.
Indigo Technologies
Industrial Solutions International
MET - Marsulex Environmental Technologies
(1)
Stock Environmental Co.
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio Innovations)
EQUIPMENT (SURPLUS)
Commerce Lanes, Inc
EQUIPMENT PARTS (REPAIR/
REPLACE)
1 Equipment parts (repair/replace) - General
10 Ash-handling equipment
20 Coal-handling equipment
25 Pulverizer
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (1,10,20,25)
Conforma Clad Inc
HR Power
EVAPORATORS
1 Evaporators - General
10 Distillation
20 Falling-film
30 Thin-film
40 Vapor-compression
50 Vertical-tube
Aston Evaporative Services
AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG
(1,10,20,30,40,50)
LCI Corporation
EXPANSION JOINTS
4-STAR Hose & Supply
Advanced Flexible Systems Inc
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc
Braden Mfg LLC
Custom Expansion Joints, Inc.
ESP/Energy Systems Products, Inc
Frenzelit North America
Garlock Sealing Technologies
Hose Master LLC
KE-Burgmann EJS
KE-Burgmann USA, Inc.
Multifab Inc. Fabricators
FABRIC FILTERS (DESIGN)
1 Fabric filters (design) - General
10 Pulse-jet
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
McGill AirClean LLC (1,10)
SEFAR AG
FABRIC FILTERS (MATERIALS)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
FABRICATION
10 Metal
20 Steel
CERREY SA de CV
Chanute Manufacturing (20)
CTI Industries, Inc.
Delta Mechcons India Ltd. (20)
Gill Manufacturing ltd
Gremp Steel Company
Johnson Bros Metal Forming Co. (10,20)
Liberty Steel Fabricators (10,20)
Moran Iron Works Inc. (20)
Myrex Industries
N.O.W. & Associates Inc
Process Equipment/Barron Industries
PTMW, INC
Redline Industries, Inc.
The Halvorsen Company
Tricor Metals (10)
FANS
Canadian Buffalo
FlaktWoods
Howden North America Inc.
Industrial Marketing Systems
TLT-Babcock
FASTENERS (ADHESIVES,
WASHERS, ETC)
NORD-LOCK
Nova Machine Products, Inc.
FEEDERS
1 Feeders - General
JVI Vibratory Equipment Inc
Sodimate, Inc. - Dry Chemical Feed System
Specialist (1)
St. Lawrence Steel
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FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
10 High-pressure (downstream of feedpump)
20 Low-pressure (upstream of feedpump)
American Exchanger Services
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Thermal Engineering International (USA) Inc
(10,20)
Yuba Heat Transfer
FIBERGLASS
Fibergrate Composite Structures
FILTER
Dollinger Filtration, an SPX Brand
GE Energy
Komline-Sanderson
FILTERS (PUMPS,
COMPRESSORS)
Reverso Pumps, Inc.
FILTERS (TURBINES, DIESELS)
1 Filters (turbines, diesels) - General
10 Fuel-oil
20 Intake-air
30 Lube-oil
ADVANCED FILTRATION CONCEPTS (1,20)
Braden Mfg LLC (20)
C.C. Jensen, Inc. Oil Maintenance
Camfil Farr Power Systems
DEFITEC (FILTRATION)
Filtration Advantage (1)
Freudenberg Filtration Technologies SE & Co.
KG (20)
MB Oil Filters (1,10,30)
RCI Technologies
Solberg Filtration & Separation
Velcon Filters Inc
FILTERS, LIQUID
1 Filters, liquid - General
10 Activated-carbon
30 Polishing
50 Water intake
Clear Lake Filtration
Croll-Reynolds Engineering Company Inc
Filtration & Membrane Technology, Inc.
(1,10,30,50)
Kaydon Filtration
King Filtration Technologies Inc
FILTERS, WATER
Orival Water Filters
FIRE-PROTECTION SYSTEMS
1 Fire-protection systems - General
American Fire Technologies Inc
Chemetron Fire Systems
DuraSystems Barriers, Inc.
Fireaway Inc. (1)
Hiller Systems, Inc.
SAFE Fire Detection, Inc.
FLOWMETERS
1 Flowmeters - General
10 DP (differential pressure: orifice, venturi)
20 Nonintrusive (magnetic, resonance,
ultrasonic)
30 PD (positive displacement : Dighragm
rortary vane)
40 Swirl, vortex-shedding
50 Totalizers
60 Turbine
70 Variable-area (plug, rotameter)
Control Plus Inc.
Emerson Process Management, Rosemount Div
FCI-Fluid Components International (1,20)
FLEXIM AMERICAS Corporation
FlowMeters.com
McCrometer
Phoenix Air Flow, Inc.
Photon Control
Siemens Industries, Inc.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70)
Sierra Instruments, Inc. (1,20,40)
Spirax Sarco, Inc.
Thermal Instrument Co
Universal Flow Monitors Inc
Yokogawa Corporation Of America
FLUE-GAS DESULFURIZATION
UNITS
40 Wet limestone
ANDRITZ Environmental Solutions Inc.
Babcock & Wilcox Company
See our ad on p. 7
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (40)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Powerspan Corp.
FUEL ANALYZERS
Lazar Scientific, Inc.
FUEL ECONOMIZERS
ALGAE-X International (AXI)
Kentube
FUEL MANAGMENT
Engineering Consultants Group, Inc.
Fuel Purification
FUEL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
1 Fuel-handling equipment - General
10 Stacker/reclaimers
Benetech (1,10)
Roberts & Schaefer Company
Stock Fairfield Corporation
FUEL-OIL HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
seepex Inc.
GAS TURBINE AIR-INTAKE
SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC
Dollinger
FAIST Anlagenbau GmbH
Pneumafil Corp, Gas Turbine Div
GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY
SYSTEMS
Braden Mfg LLC
Chromalox, Inc.
GAS TURBINE AUXILIARY
SYSTEM REPLACEMENT PARTS
Braden Mfg LLC
GAS TURBINE EXHAUST
SYSTEMS
Alloy Bellows and Precision Welding
ATCO Emissions Management
Braden Mfg LLC
SELKIRK CORPORATION
Sound Technologies
GAS-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
Advanced Specialty Gases
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Scott Specialty Gases
GAUGE GLASSES
Ernst Flow Industries
Hindusthan Mica Mart
GAUGES
Quest-Tec Solutions
GAUGES PRESSURE
WIKA Instruments Canada Ltd.
Winters Instruments
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GAUGES, LIQUID-LEVEL
1 Gauges, liquid-level - General
10 Capacitance
30 Hydrostatic
40 Noncontact
50 Resistance
Automation Products, Inc. - DYNATROL® Divi-
sion (1)
Diamond Power International Inc (1)
JOWA USA, Inc. (50)
Orion Instruments LLC
Pressure Systems, Inc
Qinhuangdao Huadian Survey Instrument and
Controller Co.,Ltd.
VEGA Americas, Inc. (1,10,30,40)
GAUGES, STRAIN
Sensor Developments Inc
GEARS
1 Gears - General
10 Engineered gear drives
Allen Gears Ltd
Amarillo Gear Company
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
Voith Turbo BHS Getriebe GmbH (10)
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1,10)
Voith Turbo Inc
GENERATOR, HYDRAULIC
Western Integrated Technologies
GENERATOR/ENGINE SETS, IC
Coffman Electrical Equipment Company
Mid America Engine
MWM GmbH
Tradewinds Power Corp
GENERATOR/TURBINE SETS,
GAS (GT)
Belyea Company Inc
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
International Power Machinery Co
Kawasaki Gas Turbines - Americas
Rolls-Royce plc
Siemens Energy
Solar Turbines Incorporated
Vericor Power Systems
GENERATORS
BRUSH Turbogenerators
Caterpillar Inc.
EPG - Enginuity Portable Grid
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
MTU Onsite Energy Corporation
SDS Power Company Ltd
Total Power Limited
Wabash Power Equipment Company
WINCO INC
GENERATORS, ELECTRIC
1 Generators, electric - General
10 Continuous-duty
20 Standby
APOYOTEC (Plantas de Energía)
ElectraWave Inc.
National Electric Coil (1,10)
Power Source International (1,10,20)
SUNRNR of Virginia, Inc (1,20)
GENERATORS, HOT-WATER
40 Watertube
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (40)
GENERATORS, HYDROGEN
GAS
Proton OnSite
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
10 Boilers
20 Firetube
30 Heat-recovery
50 Nuclear
90 Watertube, industrial
100 Watertube, special - design
110 Watertube, utility
ANSALDO CALDAIE SPA (1,10,30,110)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc.
(1,10,20,90,100)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,10,30,50)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
MACCHI - A DIVISION OF SOFINTER SPA
(1,10,30,90)
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1,10,30,90,100)
Wabash Power Equipment Company
(10,20,90,110)
GENERATORS/ENGINES,
DIESEL
ABC - Diesel
Belyea Company Inc
Wabash Power Equipment Company
Walters Power International
GRADUATED STRAIGHTENING
GRID
Fuel Tech Inc.
GROUND CLAMPS/
CONNECTORS
Storm Copper Components
HEAT EXCHANGERS
1 Heat exchangers - General
10 Air coolers
20 All-welded plate
30 Bare-tube
40 Economizers
50 Fin & round tube
60 Finned-tube
80 Heat-recovery
130 Shell-and-tube
140 Straight-tube
190 U-tube
Alfa Laval
Babcock Power Inc.
Bowman (Birmingham) Ltd
Chanute Manufacturing (10,30,60,140,190)
Chromalox
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Joseph Oat Corporation
Munters Corporation (20)
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10,60,130)
Super Radiator Coils (1,40,50,80)
Tranter International AB
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes, Inc. (60)
HEAT RECOVERY STEAM
GENERATORS (HRSGS)
Babcock Power Inc.
Vogt Power International Inc
HEATERS COAL THAWING
(INFRARED)
Advanced Detection Systems, LLC
HEATERS, AIR
1 Heaters, air - General
20 Tubular
Armstrong-Hunt, Inc. (1)
Greens Power Equipment USA Inc. (1,20)
Heatrex Inc
Tioga Air Heaters
HEATERS, ELECTRIC
Watlow
HEATERS, THERMAL-LIQUID
Pick Heaters, Inc.
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Struthers Wells
HOISTS
1 Hoists - General
20 Chain
30 Lever
40 Powered
Columbus McKinnon
Cornerstone Material Handling Inc.
Harrington Hoists, Inc.
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation (1,20,30,40)
Lisbon Hoist, Inc.
HUMIDIFIERS
Atomizing Systems Inc
AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG
INSPECTION EQUIPMENT
30 Infrared
AcousticEye
Aqua-Vu
Exact Metrology
FARO
Inuktun Services Ltd.
IRISS (30)
Karl Storz Endoscopy
RF System Lab
INSULATION ( ENERGY
MANAGMENT)
Advanced Industrial Systems Inc.
INSULATION (GENERAL)
10 Cable
20 Pipe
30 Valves and fittings
40 Vessel
AB Technology Group (10,20,30,40)
Triangle Enterprises, Inc.
INSULATION (MATERIAL)
10 High-temperature
AB Technology Group
Mid-Mountain Materials, Inc. (10)
INTERLOCKS
Unitech Power Technology Company, LTD
INVASIVE MUSSEL CONTROL
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio Innovations)
INVERTERS
10 DC/AC
MajorPower Corporation
SMA America (10)
See our ad on p. 15
LIGHTNING (EQUIPMENT)
10 Protection
ERICO International Corporation (10)
Positron Inc (10)
LIGHTS
Genesis Lamp Corporation
GulfRim Navigation
LEDtronics, Inc.
Rig-A-Lite
TWR Lighting, Inc./Orga Aviation
Unimar, Inc.
LIME STONE SUPPLIERS
Palmetto Depot Service’s LLC
LIMESTONE-GRINDING
SYSTEMS
Polycorp Ltd.
LININGS
10 Duct
60 Stack
Ceilcote Products / International Paint LLC
Hadek Protective Systems (10,60)
LOAD MANAGEMENT
EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS
AeroGo, Inc.
ALEASOFT
Cannon Technologies, Inc
Cooper Power Systems
LoadBanks of America
PICOR
LOCATORS/TRACERS
b3o enviroTek
LOCKS
Lockmasters USA
Superior Interlock Corporation
LUBRICANTS
ExxonMobil Lubricants & Petroleum Special-
ties (Mobil Industrial Lubricants)
Phillips 66, Lubricants
Shell Lubricants
MARKERS/LABELS
1 Markers/labels - General
10 Bar codes
20 metal
30 Pipe marker tags
50 Self-adhesive
InfoSight Corporation (1,10,20,30,50)
Tech Products, Inc
MATERIALS-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
1 Materials-handling equipment - General
10 Railcar hopper unloaders
AeroGo, Inc. (1)
Airfloat, LLC
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1)
AUMUND Fördertechnik GmbH
B&W Mechanical Handling Ltd.
Benetech (1,10)
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
E-ZLIFT Portable Conveyors (1,10)
Jeffrey Rader Corporation
See our ad on p. 27
KEITH Mfg. Co. (1)
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
Metalfab, Inc.
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Palfinger North America
Rotex Global
SAS Global Power (Divison of SAS Global
Corp.)
SCHADE Lagertechnik GmbH
Wolf Material Handling Systems (1
)
METALS
10 Non-ferrous, processing & manufacture
Chatham Steel Corporation
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc
LEECO STEEL, LLC
Lucifer Furnaces, Inc. (10)
SALEM STAINLESS STEEL SUPPLIERS PVT LTD
METER ACCESSORIES
Milbank Mfg Co
Watthour Engineering Co
METER-READING EQUIPMENT
K-II Enterprises
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30 Clamp-on
40 Demand
70 kWh, electronic
110 Panel
120 Power
130 Power-factor
140 Relative humidity
150 Revenue-meters
220 Watthour
480 Wattmeter
Ametek Power Instruments (150)
Continental Control Systems
(30,40,70,120,130,150,220,480)
Hanover Technical Sales, Inc. (120)
HOYT ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT WORKS INC.
moisttech (140)
Weschler Instruments (110)
Yokogawa Corporation of America
MIST ELIMINATORS
KIMRE, Inc.
Munters Corporation, Mist Eliminator & Tower
Packing Div
MIXERS
AVA Americas, LLC./AVA-Huep GmbH u. Co. KG
Pugmill Systems, Inc
MONITORS/DETECTORS/
INDICATORS
1 Monitors/detectors/indicators - General
10 Air in-leak
20 Air-pollution ambient
30 Conductivity
40 Continuous emissions (CEMS)
50 Fault locators
70 Flame
80 Gas
90 Gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
100 Gases poisonous
110 Gases, combustible
160 pH monitors
200 Transformer
220 Vibration
Arizona Instrument LLC
Banner Engineering
CEC Vibration Products Inc. (220)
ENERGY EQUIPMENTS & PRODUCTS COMPANY
General Monitors
Heath Consultants Inc
Incon
IRIS Systems Inc
KCF Technologies (220)
K-TEK Corp
Meeco Inc
Metrix Instrument Co, A Roper Industries
Company
Mil-Ram Technology, Inc.
(1,10,20,40,70,80,90,100,110)
Morgan Schaffer Systems
Phenix Technologies Inc (50)
Schonstedt Instrument Company
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30,160)
VibroSyst M
Weschler Instruments (200)
Xtralis
MOTOR CONTROL CENTERS
AZZ | N L I
MOTOR DRIVES (ADJUSTABLE-
FREQUENCY)
1 Motor drives (adjustable-frequency) -
General
Galco Industrial Electronics
Toshiba International Corp.
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (1)
MOTORS
Baldor Electric Company
See our ad on p. 21
Exlar Corporation
MOTORS, INDUCTION
(FRAMES)
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.
NITROGEN-OXIDES CONTROL
1 Nitrogen-oxides control - General
5 Combustion modeling & NOx control
10 Low-NOx combustion systems
30 SCR catalysts
40 SCR systems
50 SNCR systems (urea, NH3)
Braden Mfg LLC (40)
Breen Energy Solutions
Fuel Tech Inc. (5,10,30,40,50)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,5,10,30,40)
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Wahlco, Inc.
NUCLEAR ANALYZERS
SABIA, Inc.
NUCLEAR CORE INTERNALS
SKODA JS a.s.
NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES
Energy and Process Corp
NUCLEAR METERS/
INSTRUMENTS
1 Nuclear meters/instruments - General
Sentry Equipment Corp (1)
NUCLEAR MONITORS/
DETECTORS/INDICATORS
1 Nuclear monitors/detectors/indicators -
General
30 Contamination
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,30)
NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
NUCLEAR RADIATION
SHIELDING
CONTAINER, d.o.o.
NUCLEAR RADWASTE-
TREATMENT EQUIPMENT
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
NUCLEAR REACTORS
AREVA Inc.
NUCLEAR REMOTE HANDLING
DEVICES
KTSDI LLC
NUTS
HYTORC
OEM
Alstom USA
OIL
Gas Depot S.A.
OIL SPILL/LEAK CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
Andax Industries LLC
InduMar Products, inc.
PS International, Inc
OIL-HANDLING EQUIPMENT
5 Filtration systems
Kleentek (5)
Oil Skimmers Inc
OILKLEEN, Inc.
OVERTORQUE PROTECTORS
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
PACKAGE WATERTUBE BOILER
Wabash Power Equipment Company
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PACKING
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
STAR & STAR Field Fit, Inc. (Steam Turbine
Alternative Resources)
PIPE
1 Pipe - General
10 High-carbon steel
30 Ductile iron
60 Lined
70 Low-alloy steel
I50 ron/steel
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (1,10,30,50,60,70)
Beetle Plastics, LLC
CBP Engineering Corp
EdgenMurray
Georg Fischer Piping Systems Ltd
PLANTKOREA COMPANY
Price Brothers Company
Tioga Pipe Supply Co. & Inc. (1,10,50,70)
Triple-S Steel Supply
U. S. Metals
YIEH CORP.
PIPE BENDS/FABRICATION
Chanute Manufacturing
Haberberger, Incorporated
Mechanical & Ceramic Solutions, Inc.
Muns Welding and Mechanical, Inc.
PIPE FITTINGS (MATERIALS)
DYLANGroup
PIPE FITTINGS (TYPE)
Anvil International
PIPE JOINTS, EXPANSION
PLANT SPECIALTIES INC
PIPE SUPPORTS
1 Pipe supports - General
Anvil Engineered Pipe Supports
Binder Group Pty Ltd
HALFEN GmbH
HALFEN USA Inc. (1)
PIPE TOOLS
E.H. Wachs
Metabo
PLUGS
Great Northern Products
POLE ACCESSORIES
Vandal Shields
POLES, DISTRIBUTION
Brown Wood Preserving Co., Inc.
POLES, STREETLIGHT
Valmont Industries, Structures Div
POLES, TRANSMISSION
Sabre Tubular Structures
POLYMERS
Interpolymer Corporation
Sidi Kerir Petrochemicals Company
POWER CENTERS
LEA International
Lectrus Corporation
POWER QUALITY EQUIPMENT
1 Power quality equipment - General
Electro Industries/GaugeTech (1)
POWER SUPPLIES
1 Power supplies - General
10 High voltage
20 Uninterruptible
Ametek, Solidstate Controls
APC by Schneider Electric
Computer Power Supply
Greencisco Industrial Co., Ltd (1,20)
MGE UPS Systems
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
Reliance industries limited
PRECAST CONCRETE
Precast Specialties Corp
PRESSUE RELIEF
REMBE GmbH - Safety + Control
PRESSURE SEAL HEADS
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
PRESSURE VESSELS (CODE/
NON-CODE)
Benjamin Company
PROTECTORS, INTERFERENCE,
COMMUNICATION AND RELAY
ALSTOM PROJECTS INDIA LIMITED
Beckwith Electric Co., Inc.
PULVERIZERS
35 Parts, replacement wear
40 Roller-and-race
American Pulverizer Company
Columbia Steel Casting Co, Inc (35)
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (40)
Wabash Power Equipment Company
PUMPS (GENERAL)
1 Pumps (general) - General
10 Ash-service
50 Dewatering
65 End suction
120 Metering
170 Rotary
190 Sewage/sludge
200 Slurry
205 Submersible
210 Sump
240 Vacuum
270 Water
Andritz AG - Pumps Division
CAT PUMPS
Dekker Vacuum Technologies, Inc.
Edwards Industrial Equipment Corp
Edwards Vacuum Inc
Eliminator Slurry Pumps
(1,10,50,65,190,200,205,210,270)
Fairbanks Morse Pump, Pentair Water
Flowrox Inc. (1,120,170,190,200,240,270)
GIW Industries Inc
(1,10,50,190,200,205,210,270)
Gorman-Rupp Co.
Hayward Tyler
Highpoint Sales, Inc.
Hydro, Inc.
Indeck Power Equipment Company
ITT Flygt Corporation
Nash, A Gardner Denver Product
ProMinent Dosiertechnik GmbH
Pumping Solutions, Inc.
Vooner FloGard Corporation
Weir Slurry North America
Yeomans Pump - Div. Yeomans Chicago Corp.
RADIOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
FreeWave Technologies, Inc.
RAILROAD/RAILCAR
EQUIPMENT
20 Railcar dumpers (rotary)
Albert Products
Heyl & Patterson,Inc. (20)
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
TITAN Rail, Inc.
RECTIFIERS
Corrosion Control Inc.
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REFRACTORY
Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc
RELAYS
Basler Electric
Gas Turbine Efficiency
RENTAL BOILER
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Wabash Power Equipment Company
RESINS, ION EXCHANGE
1 Resins, ion exchange - General
10 Beaded
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10)
REVERSE-OSMOSIS
EQUIPMENT
Pick Heaters, Inc.
RIGGING EQUIPMENT
Aeris Corp
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation
Sterling Lumber Company
SAMPLERS
1 Samplers - General
10 Coal
20 Liquid
30 Trace elements
40 Wastewater
Jonas, Inc
Mission Instruments
Sentry Equipment Corp (1,10,20,30,40)
SCADA
1 SCADA - General
10 Data acquisition systems
20 Remote terminal units
30 Supervisory control systems
Elecsys Corp. (1,10,20,30)
Metric Systems Corporation
MSE-Tetragenics
Open Systems International (OSI)
SUBNET Solutions Inc
Vista Control Systems, Inc. (1)
SCAFFOLDING
Atlantic Plant Services
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
Brand Energy & Infrastructure Services
Randall Industries
Safway Services, LLC
SCALES, WEIGHING
Berthold Technologies USA, LLC
Hardy Process Solutions
SCR BYPASS SYSTEMS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Silicon Power Corporation
SCREENS, LIQUID
1 Screens, liquid - General
10 Bar
20 Rotating-disc
30 Traveling
Beaudrey A.S. (1,10,20,30)
Superior Water Screen Company, Inc
SCRUBBERS & AUXILIARIES
1 Scrubbers & auxiliaries - General
10 Dry
20 In-duct sorbent injection
50 Spray-tower
80 Venturi
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
(1,20,50,80)
Komline-Sanderson (10)
Process Engineering & Manufacturing
SEALS (TYPE)
1 Seals (type) - General
10 Mechanical
20 Steam turbine
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1,10,20)
John Crane Inc, Mechanical Seals Div
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20)
Paragon Airheater Technologies
SECURITY EQUIPMENT/
SYSTEMS
EK Ekcessories
INNER-TITE Corp
Southwest Microwave, Inc.
Winsted Corporation
SEISMIC EQUIPMENT
Syscom Instruments S.A.
SELECTIVE CATALYTIC
REDUCTION
Indeck Power Equipment Company
SENSORS, CURRENT AND
VOLTAGE
epro GmbH
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc
Spinwave Systems, Inc
SENSORS, TEMPERATURE
1 Sensors, temperature - General
30 RTDs (resistance temperature detectors)
40 Thermistors
50 Thermocouples
ILLICA Group
LumaSense Technologies
RdF Corporation
Temp-Pro Inc. (1,30,40,50)
WIKA Instrument Corporation - Electrical
Temperature Division
Williamson Corporation
SEPARATORS
Industrial Magnetics, Inc.
Penn Separator Corp
UBE
SHAFT GROUNDING
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc
SIGNAL CONDITIONERS
Acromag, Inc.
SIGNS/FLAGS
B & H Engineering
William Frick & Company
SILENCERS (GENERAL)
1 Silencers (general) - General
10 Duct
20 Exhaust
30 Piping
Braden Mfg LLC (20)
CU Services LLC (1,30)
Sound Technologies (1,10,20,30)
SILENCERS (HEAT RECOVERY)
Sound Technologies
SILOS
10 Concrete
Hoffmann, Inc (10)
SIMULATORS
10 System
RTDS Technologies Inc. (10)
TRAX LLC
SLAG REMOVAL SYSTEMS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
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SLINGS
1 Slings - General
10 Web
20 Wire-rope
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation (1,10,20)
SLUDGE-CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
Entech Design, Inc
Matec In America
SOIL TESTERS
WPC, Inc.
SOLAR BOILERS
Aalborg CSP A/S
SOLAR COLLECTOR SYSTEMS
SkyFuel, Inc.
SolarDock
SOLAR PV
Patriot Solar Group
REW Solar USA
SolarBOS, Inc.
SOLID-WASTE-HANDLING
EQUIPMENT (INDUSTRIAL/
MUNICIPAL)
1 Solid-waste-handling equipment (indus-
trial/municipal - General)
Corrosion Engineering
Magnetics Division, Global Equipment Mktg
Inc
Warren & Baerg Manufacturing, Inc. (1)
SOOTBLOWERS
1 Sootblowers - General
10 Acoustic
20 Air
30 Detonation
40 Steam
50 Water
Advanced Acoustic Technologies, LLC
Analytec Corp
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
(1,10,20,40,50)
Diamond Power International Inc
(1,20,30,40,50)
SS Power Systems
SORBENT INJECTION
Breen Energy Solutions
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Fuel Tech Inc.
NatronX Technologies, LLC
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Novinda Corporation
United Conveyor Corporation
SPACERS
10 Cable
Enerscan Engineering Inc. (10)
SPARGERS
Mott Corporation
SPRAY NOZZLES
Spraying Systems Co.
STACKS
1 Stacks - General
Hadek Protective Systems (1)
Hoffmann, Inc (1)
STOKERS, MASS-BURNING
10 Chaingrate
20 Water-cooled vibrating grate
Detroit Stoker Company (10,20)
See our ad on p. 51
Indeck Power Equipment Company
STOKERS, SPREADER
50 Traveling grate
60 Vibrating grate
Detroit Stoker Company (50,60)
See our ad on p. 51
Indeck Power Equipment Company
STOKERS, UNDERFEED
10 Multiple retort
20 Single retort
Detroit Stoker Company (10,20)
See our ad on p. 51
Indeck Power Equipment Company
STORAGE
1 Storage - General
20 Hazardous materials
30 Units
Big Top Manufacturing
ClearSpan Fabric Structures
Transocean Equipment Management, LLC
(1,20,30)
STRAINERS
Jamison Products, LP
SUBSTATIONS (GENERAL)
1 Substations (general) - General
10 Outdoor
20 Packaged
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Beta Engineering
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations
Parkline, Inc.
See our ad on p. 38
SUBNET Solutions Inc.
Tatman Associates Inc (1,10,20)
SUBSTATIONS (MATERIALS)
DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations
SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE
RH Systems
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
(GENERAL)
Chromium Corporation
SURGE PROTECTORS
Carzoli Engineering Sales
Transtector Systems
SWITCHBOARDS
Keystone Electrical Manufacturing Company
SWITCHES
1 Switches - General
50 Vacuum
CORIMPEX USA, Inc.
Namco (1)
United Electric Controls (1,50)
SWITCHES, TRANSFER
Lake Shore Electric Corp
SWITCHES CONTROL
Tapeswitch Corporation
SWITCHGEAR
1 Switchgear - General
Belyea Company Inc (1)
Gilbert Electrical Systems & Products
Russelectric Inc
TANKS
1 Tanks - General
10 Reaction
20 Settling
30 Storage
40 Storage thermal energy
Allegheny Industrial Sales Inc (30)
Columbian TecTank Inc
CONVAULT INC
Fisher Tank Company (1,10,20,40,40)
Gas Corporation of America
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Paul Mueller Company (1,10,30,40)
Pittsburg Tank & Tower Maintenance Co.
Trinity Industries, Inc.
TELEMETERING SYSTEMS/
EQUIPMENT
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc
TENSIONERS
P&S Vorspannsysteme AG
Superbolt, Inc.
TERMINAL BLOCKS
HOPPY Industrial Co., Ltd.
TEST EQUIPMENT
1 Test equipment - General
20 Circuit breaker
30 Communications
50 Ground resistance
60 High current
70 HV impulse
80 HV test sets
90 Insulation
100 Load banks
110 Oil
130 Reclosers
170 Testing standards
American Aerospace Controls, Inc
AMREL/AMERICAN RELIANCE
Doble Engineering Company
Eagle Eye Power Solutions (1,30,50,100,170)
Fluke Corporation
Haefely Test AG
Highland Technology, Inc.
Iris Power-Qualitrol
Laser Imaging Systems
Megger
Newport Electronics, Inc.
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Phenix Technologies Inc
(1,20,60,70,80,90,110,130)
Rotek Instrument Corp (170)
Teseq
Zensol Automation Inc
TEST EQUIPMENT,
NONDESTRUCTIVE
1 Test equipment, nondestructive - General
10 Borescopes
20 Remote visual
30 Videoimagescopes
Advanced Inspection Technologies Inc.
(1,10,20,30)
Phenix Technologies Inc (1)
TOOLS
10 Battery powered
20 Hand
50 Portable
Associated Electric Products,Inc
Atlas Copco Tools and Assembly Systems
C.S. Osborne & Co
Daniels Manufacturing Corp
Metabo Corporation (10,20,50)
The Ripley Company
TORQUE CONVERTERS
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG
TOWERS, TRANSMISSION
DIS-TRAN Steel, LLC
TRAILERS/PRE-FAB
BUILDINGS/SHELTERS
ThermaSteel Corp
TRAINING MATERIALS –
TEXTBOOKS, WORKBOOKS,
MEDIA, ONLINE LEARNING
PORTAL
1 Training - General
10 Environmental
20 Equipment
30 Fossil
40 Management and Supervisory
50 Online LMS – Educator supported and Self
Directed
60 Safety
Energy Providers Coalition for Education
(EPCE) (1,50)
Global Training Solutions Inc
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
Panglobal Training Systems Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60)
Simutech Multimedia (50,60)
Technology Transfer Services (1,20,30,50)
TRANSDUCERS
Kistler Instrument Corp
Measurement Specialties Inc
TRANSFORMER PADS
Highline Products
TRANSFORMERS,
DISTRIBUTION
Belyea Company Inc
Jefferson Electric
TRANSFORMERS,
TRANSMISSION/SUBSTATION
JSHP Trasnformer
TRANSMISSION MECHANICAL
10 Gears gear boxes
20 Couplings
NORD Drivesystems - Getriebebau NORD GmbH
& Co. KG
Voith Turbo GmbH & Co. KG (10,20)
TRANSMITTERS
Magnetrol International, Inc
See our ad on p. 5
TRASH RACKS
Linita Design & Mfg. Corp.
TRUCK DUMPERS
Airoflex Equipment
TUBE CLEANERS
Conco Systems Inc.
TUBE SHIELDS
Indeck Power Equipment Company
TUBES
Fine Tubes Ltd.
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes, Inc.
TUBES, MATERIALS
1 Tubes, materials - General
50 Stainless steel
60 Titanium
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes, Inc.
(1,50,60)
TUBES, REPLACEMENT
1 Tubes, replacement - General
10 Boilers
20 Condensers
30 Heat exchangers
Chanute Manufacturing (1,10)
Indeck Power Equipment Company
Knotts & Co
Minnotte Manufacturing Corp. (10)
Plymouth Tube Co
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes, Inc.
(1,20,30)
TUBING
1 Tubing - General
10 Copper
20 Stainless-steel
Boiler Tube Co of America (1,20)
Olin Brass - Fineweld Tube (10)
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Plymouth Tube Company (1,20)
Trent Tube
Vallourec Heat Exchanger Tubes, Inc. (1,20)
TURBINE
Alstom Thermal Services
Capstone Turbine Corporation
ConocoPhillips
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
Wabash Power Equipment Company
TURBINE BLADES
1 Turbine blades - General
20 Steam turbine
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (1,20)
Stork H&E Turbo Blading Inc
TURBINE COMPONENTS
Turbo Parts, LLC
Sohre Turbomachinery Inc
TURBINE/ROTOR/SHELL
REPAIR
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
ap+m
Applied Gas Turbines (1)
Ares Technology, LLC
Capstone Turbine Corporation
Chromalloy (1)
E.D.I, Inc
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
Turbine Energy Solutions, LLC
Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)
TURBINES, HYDRAULIC
Dongfang Electric Corp / DSI
TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
10 Spare
Dresser-Rand
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (1,10)
Wabash Power Equipment Company (1)
VALVE ACTUATORS/
POSITIONERS
1 Valve actuators/positioners - General
10 Electric, motor
30 Electrohydraulic
40 Pneumatic, cylinder
Alcon Solenoid Valves
Beck, Harold Beck & Sons Inc (1,10)
DREHMO GmbH
Flowserve (1,10,30,40)
Midland-ACS
Rotork Controls Inc
VALVES
10 Abrasion-resistant
20 Airlocks
40 Control
60 Diaphragm
70 Corrosion-resistant
80 Test equipment
90 Vacuum
180 Nuclear
Allen-Sherman-Hoff (10,20,40,60,80,90)
American Industrial Supply
Asco Valve Inc
Bonetti, S.p.A.
CCI (Control Component Inc)
Champion Valves, Inc.
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Conval, Inc
Copes-Vulcan, An SPX Brand
DFT Inc. (40)
Emerson Process Management, Fisher
Everlasting Valve Company
Flowrox Oy (former Larox Flowsys Oy) (10,40)
Flowserve (20,40,70,)
GESTRA AG
JoshiJampala Engineering Pvt Ltd
Leslie Controls, Inc. (40)
Mogas Industries (40,90)
Parker Fluid Control Division
Pentair Valves & Controls (formerly known as
Tyco Valves & Controls)
Petro-Valve
PSB Industries
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
SIGMA, INC
SOUTHWELL INDUSTRIES
SPX Flow Technology
Tyco Flow Control
VEHICLES/TRUCKS/TRUCK
BODIES
Omaha Standard PALFINGER
VENTILATORS
Dresser-Rand, COPPUS Portable Ventilators
General Equipment Co.
Moffitt Corporation
VIBRATION ISOLATORS
Enidine Inc
Fabreeka International, Inc.
VIBRATORS
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
VOLTAGE REGULATORS
ABB Switzerland Ltd
Phenix Technologies Inc
WASHERS
1 Washers - General
Solon Manufacturing Company (1)
Wheelwash USA
WASTE-MANAGEMENT
GTI
WASTE-TO-ENERGY SYSTEMS
ElectraTherm
Proe Power Systems, LLC
PWR - Plasma Waste Recycling
WASTEWATER TREATMENT
SYSTEMS
Amiad Filtration Systems
Aquatech International Corporation
GEA Process Engineering
Mercer International Oil Water Separators
Pick Heaters, Inc.
Sera ProDos GmbH
Siemens Industry, Inc. - Water Technologies
Business Unit
Smith & Loveless Inc.
WesTech Engineering
WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS
1 Water treatment systems - General
5 Electrodeionization
NAB
eNPure Process Systems, Inc.
H2O Innovation USA, Inc
Ionics Incorporated
MacroTech, Inc.
MPW Industrial Services
OVIVO USA LLC (1,5)
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Parkson Corporation (1)
Zinkan Enterprises, Inc.
WEB-BASED PRODUCTS
Atlas Business Solutions, Inc. (ABS)
Inspectech, Corporation
Viryanet
WELDING EQUIPMENT
Arc Machines, Inc.
Astro Arc Polysoude Inc
ESAB Welding & Cutting Products
Eutectic Corporation
Liburdi Dimetrics Corporation
Magnatech LLC
Pemamek Oy Ltd
Weldstar Company
WET ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS
Southern Environmental
WINCHES
10 Portable
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation (10)
WIND TURBINES USED
SRC Greenpower pvt ltd
WINDINGS
10 Generator/motor
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (10)
National Electric Coil (10)
WIRE
Anixter
Stainless & Nickel Alloys, LLC
WIRE SUPER CONDUCTING
SuperPower Inc.
WIRING PRODUCTS
BMC P. Ltd.
SERVICES
DIRECTORY
ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY
GAS TURBINE REBUILDING
Sulzer Turbo Services
AERIAL LIFTS
Utility Equipment Leasing Corp
AERIAL SURVEY
Topographic Imaging Inc
AIR-PREHEATER CLEANING
Breen Energy Solutions
Corrosion Monitoring Services
ALIGNMENT
1 Alignment - General
10 Shaft
20 Turbine component
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20)
ASH POND MAINTENANCE
Encore Dredging, Inc.
ASSET RECOVERY
SRP
ASSOCIATION,
PROFESSIONAL AND/OR
TRADE
American Wind Energy Association
Signal-X-Press Concept
Ukraine Partnership Bureau
BALANCING
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
Schenck Trebel Corporation
BOILER OPTIMIZATION
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Diamond Power International Inc
Fuel Tech Inc.
BOILERS
1 Boilers - General
Babcock Power Services Inc (1)
BORSIG GmbH
Cleaver-Brooks
Expro Services Inc.
George H. Bodman Inc.
Industrial Engineering, S.A.
Nationwide Boiler Incorporated
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1)
CABLE RESTORATION AND
CONDITION ASSESSMENT
Novinium
UTILX Corp
CALL PROCESSING
WRB Communications
CERTIFICATION & TESTING
American Association of Boiler Assessors, Inc.
Laboratory Testing Inc.
CLEANING (EQUIPMENT)
1 Cleaning (equipment) - General
AIMS LLC
Cryogenic Institute of New England, Inc.
MinTech Enterprises
React 365 Inc.
Specialized Safety Products, Inc. (1)
COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES
1 Communications services - General
Crystal Communication Ltd.
Political Robo Calls. GOTV Robocalls
Virtual Phone System (1)
COMPRESSORS
CECO Compressor Engineering Corp
Fluor Enterprises, Inc.
Gardner Denver
K&G Power Systems
MAN Turbo Inc USA
Sullair
COMPUTING SERVICES/
SOFTWARE
1 Computing services/software - General
5 Computer modeling
20 Database services
40 Information management
50 Software design
EcoSys
Engineering Software (1,5,20,40,50)
KUKA Real-Time Products
Navigant Consulting Inc.
OpenLink
Sword CTSpace
WebLayers, Inc.
CONDENSERS
10 Inspection
Curran International
Graham Corp
Intek, Inc.
RetubeCo, Inc. (10)
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Data Systems & Solutions LLC
Drennen Engineering, Inc. (37)
Exponential Engineering Company
(30,37,60,75,80)
Fern Engineering
GSE Consulting, LP
HGP Inc.
Interliance LLC
JR ASSOCIATES CONSTRUCTION SERVICES INC.
Lanier Consulting, LLC
LAP Power Engineering
Lockwood Greene
M+P Labs, Inc. (50)
MBDi (Mastering Business Development, Inc)
MECS Inc
National Technical Systems
PB Power, a division of Parsons Brinckerhoff
Quade & Douglas
People and Processes, Inc
R. W. Beck, Inc
Sargent & Lundy LLC (10,20,30,35,37,45,50,6
0,70,75,80,90)
Securicon, LLC
SUN Technical Services
The Stellar Group
The Utility FPE Group, Inc. (Plant Risk Engi-
neering)
URS, Power Business Unit
CONSULTING/SERVICES,
ENVIRONMENTAL
1 Consulting/services, environmental - Gen-
eral
10 Emissions control
30 Continuous emissions monitoring
Airflow Sciences Corporation
Albemarle Environmental Division (1)
Alchemy Consultants, Inc.
Benetech
Ellison Consultants
ENV Environmental
S.M. Stoller Corp. (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,30)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
Weston Solutions Inc
COOLING TOWERS
Cooling Tower Consulting, LLC
Cooling Tower Technologies, Inc.
SPX Cooling Technoogies
Universal Utility Services, LLC
CRANES/DERRICKS
Barnhart
DESIGN SERVICES
1 Design services - General
Bibb EAC
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
ELECTRIC SERVICES
Flight Systems Industrial Products
ELECTROSTATIC
PRECIPITATORS
Beltran Technologies, Inc.
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
SERVICES
1 Energy efficiency services - General
10 Energy audits
40 Equipment sale and or lease
earth energy Solutions GROUP (40)
Energy Concepts Company (1,10,40)
ENERGY SERVICES
1 Energy services - General
10 Consulting
20 Plant or system operations
30 Plant or system maintenance & other
40 Products & Installation
3Degrees
Aptech Engineering Services Inc
Dubai Electricity and Water Authority
Eren Energy Power Plant (1)
FMC Technologies, Inc.
GP Strategies Corporation, Energy Services
Group (1,10,20,40)
PIC Group, Inc. (1,10,20,30,40)
See our ad on p. 19
ENERGY SYSTEM
MANAGEMENT
Calpine Corp
Performance Consulting Services
PFBC Environmental Energy Technology Inc
ENGINEERING SERVICES
Ampirical Solutions, LLC
BARTEC GmbH
Bechtel
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
RENTAL/LEASING
Bulldog Erectors, Inc. - Crane Division
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation
CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
1 Construction services - General
10 Buildings/shelters
20 Distribution line
BE&K Construction Company, LLC
Cambria Contracting, Inc.
Casey Industrial, Inc.
CB&I
See our ad on p. 3
CIANBRO
Conomos Industrial Services
Construction Business Associates, LLC (1)
Industrial Contract Services Inc (10)
Kiewit Power
NAES Power Contractors, Inc. (1,20)
Quanta Services
S & B Engineers and Constructors, Ltd. (1)
SW Funk Industrial Contractors, Inc. (1,10)
TEi Construction Services, Inc. (1)
The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach
County
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
CONSULTANT
GSI - Generator Services Int, Inc
Hurst Technologies Corp.
SMS Energy-Engineering Inc.
CONSULTING
1 Consulting - General
10 Computer/software
20 Consulting services information systems
30 Energy management
35 Independent system operators
37 Inspection
45 Market structures
50 Materials
55 Organization/Industrial Development
60 Power generation systems
70 Soil mechanics
75 Substation automation
80 System engineering
90 T&D economics
100 Telecommunications
125 Psychological
Allegro
Asia Carbon Energy
(30,45,50,55,60,80,90,125)
Belgrave Management Ltd
Cogen Power Inc
Commodities Consulting & Asset Management
COMCAM
Construction Business Associates, LLC
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Bilfinger Berger Power Services GmbH
Design Analysis Services
Energy Associates, P.C.
Intertek AIM
Kiewit Power
Knight Piésold Consulting
Mead & Hunt, Inc.
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
POWER Engineers, Inc.
Pure Technologies Ltd.
Richmond Engineering Works
Sega Inc.
Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.
See our ad on p. 13
Synergy
Tech Center
Thaker Simulation Technologies
Thielsch Engineering
Turnell Corp.
Xdot Engineering and Analysis, pLLc
ENGINEERING STUDIES
Alden
Nuclear Systems Associates, Inc.
ENGINEERING, DESIGN
SERVICES
1 Engineering, design services - General
10 Distribution systems
20 Environmental
30 Field Service
40 Noise abatement
50 Protective systems
60 Stacks
70 Substations
80 Transmission line
Abengoa
Aquatic Sciences L.P.
Benetech (1,20,30)
Beu-Math Engineering, Inc.
BICE Engineering and Consulting
CCC Group Inc., Air Control Science Division
CCC Group, Inc. Engineering & Design Division
CE Power Solutions
CH2M HILL
Concepts NREC (20)
CRC Engineering, P.C.
Doosan Engineering & Services, LLC ( A Burns
& Roe - Doosan Projects Alliance)
ESI Inc of Tennessee
GAI Consultants, Inc.
KnightHawk Engineering
M+W Group
MAVEN POWER, LLC
Processes Unlimited International Inc.
(1,70,80)
Prochaska & Associates
Quietly Making Noise
River Consulting, LLC (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC
(1,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80)
Sega Inc
Southern Research
Stanley Consultants, Inc. (1)
STEAG Energy Services LLC (1,20,30)
STYL&TECH
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
Utility Consultants Inc
Valdes Engineering Company
Weidmann Systems International
Zachry Engineering Corporation (1,20,70)
ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSULTING
Sargent & Lundy LLC
EXECUTIVE SEARCH
CONSULTANTS
Barry Persky & Company, Inc.
Sanford Rose Opportunity Center
FANS
Boldrocchi Srl
FEEDWATER HEATER &
CONDENSER SERVICES
TEi Services
FEEDWATER HEATERS
(CLOSED)
1 Feedwater heaters (closed) - General
10 Rebuilding
40 Removal/Installation
50 Repair
60 Retubing/Rebundle
70 Tube plugging
80 Tube sleeving
90 Welding
Hydro Dyne Inc. (1,10,40,50,60,70,80,90)
FILTERS, FABRIC
1 Filters, fabric - General
K-Flow Engineering Co., Ltd. (1)
Southern Environmental
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Altec Capital Services, LLC
Interdevelopment, Inc.
FLOW MEASUREMENT/
CALIBRATION SERVICES
1 Flow measurement/calibration services -
General
Sentry Equipment Corp (1)
FLOW MODELING
Braden Mfg LLC
FLUE-GAS CONDITIONING
SYSTEM SERVICES
Fuel Tech Inc.
FUEL SUPPLY SERVICES
1 Fuel supply services - General
10 Brokering
20 Fuel cost minimization
30 Procurement, delivery or management
Advanced Remediation LLC (1,10,20,30)
Bannerstone Energy
FUEL-HANDLING SERVICES
Benetech
FULL-INSTALLATION SERVICES
URS, Power Business Unit
GALVANIZING
American Galvanizers Association
Imbibitive Technologies America, Inc.
GAS SERVICES
Phillips 66, E-Gas Technology for Gasification
GENERATORS, STEAM
1 Generators, steam - General
10 Fluidized bed
20 Rebuilding
30 Upgrading
Foster Wheeler Ltd, Foster Wheeler North
America Corp
Nooter/Eriksen, Inc
Premier Energy Services Inc
Rentech Boiler Systems, Inc (1,10,20,30)
GENERATORS/MOTORS
AGT Services Inc
Equipment Maintenance Services, Inc.
KEPCO/KPS
HEAT EXCHANGERS
Colmac Coil Manufacturing, Inc.
Condenser & Chiller Services, Inc.
Hydropro Incorporated
Krueger Engr & Mfg Co, Inc
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O’Donnell Consulting Engineers, Inc.
Tranter
HELICOPTERS, HELICOPTER
SERVICES
Erickson Air-Crane Inc
INFORMATION SERVICES
Platts UDI
INSPECTION SERVICES
1 Inspection services - General
20 Eddy current testing
40 Infrared
Express Integrated Technologies LLC
GE Inspection Technologies
GKS Inspection Services & Laser Design
Jamko Technical Solutions, Inc.
Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)
Look Technologies, llc (1)
MHT Access Services, Inc.
National Chimney and Stack (1)
National Electric Coil
National Inspection & Consultants, Inc. (1)
Pure Technologies Ltd.
ThirdPartyInspections.com
U.S. Underwater Services, LLC
UNITED DYNAMICS CORPORATION (1,20,40)
URS, Power Business Unit (1)
INSTRUMENTATION/CONTROL
SYSTEM SERVICES
1 Instrumentation/control system services -
Gene
10 Calibration
20 Component replacement
30 Diagnostics
40 Installation
AquatiPro™
Coritech Services
HC Controls Inc.
Phenix Technologies Inc (10)
Process Automation and Control, Inc.
Scheck Industries (1,10,20,30,40)
SOR Inc.
Zolo Technologies, Inc.
INVASIVE MUSSEL CONTROL
Zequanox (by Marrone Bio Innovations)
INVENTORY SERVICES
Dynamic Systems, Inc.
LAGAL SERVICES
Polsinelli Shughart, PC
LONG TERM SERVICE
AGREEMENTS
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
LUBE OIL
Analysts, Inc.
MAINTENANCE SERVICES/
PRODUCTS
A.J. Weller Corporation
ASB Industries, Inc.
Benetech
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
CGV Engineering Services Ltd
ClearView Monitoring Solutions
Construction Techniques, Inc
Day & Zimmermann ECM
EHC Field Services, Inc.
Field Works Inc
Iris Power LP
Kafko Intl. Ltd.
Lanj Tools LLC
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
National Electric Coil
R&G Laboratories, Inc.
TurboCare Inc
MAPS/MAPPING SERVICES
Geospatial Corporation
Lasermap Image Plus/GPR
MARKETERS
Allied Union Inc.
ILT-RES, LLC
PGH Marketing
TURNER BUSINESS SERVICES LLC
MATERIALS HANDLING
MANAGEMENT
10 Materials flow modeling
20 Materials quality tracking
Benetech (10,20)
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
MERCURY CONTROL
Fuel Tech Inc.
Nalco Air Protection Technologies
MODELING
Fuel Tech Inc.
MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL
Babcock Power Environmental Inc
Breen Energy Solutions
Fuel Tech Inc.
Nol-Tec Systems, Inc.
See our ad on p. 49
Siemens Energy Inc. - Environmental Systems
& Services
NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES
Westinghouse Electric Company
NUCLEAR POWERPLANT
1 Nuclear power plant - General
10 Component replacement
BHI Energy (1,10)
See our ad on p. 1
HydraTight / D.L. Ricci
Neptune Underwater Services(USA)LLC.
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1)
TRC - Nuclear Generation Services (1)
URS, Power Business Unit (1,10)
OPERATIONS AND
MAINTENANCE SERVICES
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
Delta Power Services
NAES Corporation
See our ad on p. 44
OMSCO
Primesouth Inc.
PRO Solutions, Inc
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Sterling Energy International
URS, Power Business Unit
PERSONNEL SUPPORT
SERVICES
1 Personnel support services - General
10 Consultants
20 Craft labor
25 Recruitment/employment
30 Technical/professional
Aerotek Energy Services
BHI Energy (1,10,20,25,30)
See our ad on p. 1
Lineal Recruiting Services
The David Wood Co
UnseenHeroes
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PIPE
Beetle Plastics, LLC
CBP Engineering Corp
EdgenMurray
Georg Fischer
Price Brothers Company
PIPELINE REHABILITATION
HydraTech Engineered Products
POWER QUALITY SERVICES
1 Power quality services - General
10 Assessment and/or monitoring
20 Management
30 Upgrades and/or improvements
Allied Industrial Marketing, Inc. (1)
Sargent & Lundy LLC (1,10,20,30)
URS, Power Business Unit (1,30)
POWER/BROKERS/
MARKETERS/SUPPLIERS
Advanta Energy Corp.
eMpasys
PROJECT DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES
ILT-RES, LLC
Benetech
Canasia Power Corp.
CarrierClass Green Infrastructure
Engineers India Limited
F.E. Moran Special Hazard Systems
Sargent & Lundy LLC
PUMPS
Miller Engineering-ANM Equipment
RENEWABLE ENERGY
The Tata Power Company Limited
SAFETY PROGRAMS
Belt Conveyor Guarding
COSS
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
Summit Training Source
SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS
American Efficiency Services, LLC
Bianchi Industrial Services, LLC
Bierlein Companies
Brandenburg Industrial Service Co.
Enertech, a business unit of Curtiss-Wright
Flow Control Company
Magellan Professional Solutions, Inc.
MOPAC Plant & Building Service
Precision Blasting Inc
ProEnergy Services
See our ad on Cover 4
URS, Power Business Unit
SIMULATORS TRAINING
GSE Systems, Inc
SITING SERVICES
20 Environmental studies
Sargent & Lundy LLC (20)
SPARE PARTS
Beumer Kansas City LLC
BRUKS Rockwood
Clyde Bergemann Power Group
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
STACKS
1 Stacks - General
Hoffmann, Inc (1)
STEAM TURBINE AND
COMPRESSOR OVERHAUL
Dresser-Rand Company Ltd
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
SCHMIDT INDUSTRIES
STOKERS
Detroit Stoker Company
See our ad on p. 51
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
SERVICES
Automated Appointment Reminders
Verizon
TESTING
1 Testing - General
10 Motors (electric)
20 Oil
30 Switchgear
40 Vibration analysis
American Electrical Testing Co., Inc.
Breen Energy Solutions
ComRent International, LLC
Gearhart Mckee Inc.
Laboratory Testing Inc. (1)
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (1,40)
Microbeam Technologies Inc. (1)
Phenix Technologies Inc (10,20,30)
POLARIS Laboratories
RoMaDyn
The Avogadro Group, LLC
THERMOGRAPHIC
EQUIPMENT/SERVICES
Xenics
TRAINING
1 Training - General
10 Automation
20 Environmental
40 Maintenance
50 Management and Supervisory
60 Nuclear
80 Safety
360training.com and LKItraining.com
Automation Training Inc. (1,10,40,50,80)
AVO Training Institute, Inc.
EITI - Electrical Industry Training Institute
USA Inc.
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1,60)
IFS North America, Inc
Industrial Insite, LLC
Martech Media, Inc
Martin Engineering
See our ad on p. 54
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd. (40)
Pulse Corp
Sargent & Lundy LLC
Sologic, LLC (20,40,60)
The Graphic Works
Thermal Engineering Associates
TRANSFORMERS
20 Rebuilt, sales/lease
50 Testing
ABB Transformer Remanufacturing and Engi-
neering Services
Belyea Company Inc (20)
FLEX-CORE
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd.
Instrument Transformer Equipment Corp (ITEC)
Phenix Technologies Inc (50)
Technical Services Group Inc
TRANSPORT/PROCESSING,
COAL-ASH
Headwaters Inc
TRANSPORTATION
C.H.ROBINSON WORLDWIDE
ATM Air Freight
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TURBINES, GAS
1 Turbines, gas - General
10 Blade repairing
30 Engineering
50 Overhauling
60 Rebuilding
70 Servicing
Active3D Inc.
Advanced Combustion Technology Inc
Allied Power Group (1)
Gas Turbine Maintenance LLC
Independent Turbine Consulting, LLC
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,30,50,60,70)
Mitsubishi Power Systems Inc
NAES Corporation (10,50,60,70)
See our ad on p. 44
Power Systems Mfg LLC
Wood Group GTS
WorleyParsons Group, Inc.
TURBINES, STEAM
1 Turbines, steam - General
10 Blade repairing
20 Coupling bolts
30 Generator-drive
40 Induction bolt heating
50 Mechanical-drive, multistage
60 Mechanical-drive, single-stage
70 Oil flush
80 Overhauling
90 Rebuilding
100 Rotor aligning
110 Servicing
Belyea Company Inc (1)
BHI Energy (1,40,70,80,90,100,110)
See our ad on p. 1
Electroputere S.A., DIEC
Global Industrial Solutions
Hitachi Power Systems America Ltd. (1)
Kingsbury Repair & Service
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,20,30,50,60,80,90,100,110)
Power Equipment Maintenance
Power Generation Service, Inc
Toshiba International Corp, Power Systems Div
Toshiba International Corporation
(1,10,40,70,80,90,100,110)
Turbine Generator Maintenance, Inc
USED EQUIPMENT SALES
Kitmondo Ltd
McGills Equipment
Trans-Global Distributions
VALVES
1 Valves - General
10 Abrasion-resistant
20 Angle
30 Ball
40 Butterfly
45 Control
50 Check
70 Corrosion-resistant
120 Gate
130 Globe
140 Installation
160 Modifying
180 Nuclear
220 Reconditioning
230 Repairing
AZZ | N L I (180)
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
Bonetti Valves and Gauges
BRAY Controls, Division of Bray International,
Inc.
Cesare Bonetti Inc.
CFM/VR-TESCO, LLC-Continental Field Machin-
ing
CPV Manufacturing
Dexter Innovative Solutions LLC (230)
Flowserve (1,20,30,40,45,50,70,
120,130,160,180,220,230)
Flow-Tek Inc, A subsidiary of BRAY Interna-
tional Inc
Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc.
JASC: Jansens Aircraft Systems Controls Inc
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
(1,10,140,160,220,230)
PGI International
Ritepro Inc, A subsidiary of BRAY Interna-
tional, Inc
Rodney Hunt-Fontaine (40)
Swagelok Company
Ultraflo Corporation, A subsidiary of BRAY
International, Inc
Valvesearch.com
Velan Valve Corp
WATER AND/OR WASTEWATER
SERVICES
1 Water and/or wastewater services - General
C.M.G. AND ASSOCIATES INC
ASI Group Ltd.
J7 Learning & Consulting (1)
Reynolds, Inc
Sentry Equipment Corp (1)
WELDING
BHI Energy
See our ad on p. 1
Welding Technologies
WIND FARM DESIGN &
MAPPING
METEODYN AMERICA
Sargent & Lundy LLC
WIND FARM OPERATION &
MAINTENANCE
Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis, Ltd.
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POWER
Classifieds
CONTACT
Diane Burleson
PHONE
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FAX
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dianeb@powermag.com
www.powermag.com POWER
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December2013
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POWER www.powermag.com 127
Babcock & Wilcox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . 5
www.babcock.com
Baldor Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21. . . . . . . . 15
www.baldor.com
BHI Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 2
www.bhienergy.com
Burns & McDonnell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 2 . . . . . 1
www.burnsmcd.com
CB&I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . 3
www.cbi.com
Cormetech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . 6
www.cormetech.com
Cutsforth Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53. . . . . . . . 25
www.cutsforth.com
Detroit Stoker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51. . . . . . . . 24
www.detroitstoker.com
Distrigas GDF Suez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. . . . . . . . 7
www.distrigas.com
Elgin Sweeper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. . . . . . . . 18
www.elginsweeper.com
Fibrwrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48. . . . . . . . 22
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FSE Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. . . . . . . . 8
www.fseenergy.com
Magnetrol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . 4
www.magnetrol.com
Martin Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54. . . . . . . . 26
www.martin-eng.com
MTU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
www.mtu-online.com
NAES Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44. . . . . . . . 21
www.naes.com
Nol-Tec Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49. . . . . . . . 23
www.nol-tec.com
Paharpur. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. . . . . . . . 16
www.paharpur.com
Parkline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38. . . . . . . . 19
www.parkline.com
PIC Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19. . . . . . . . 13
www.picworld.com
Power & Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . . . 10
www.piburners.com
ProEnergy Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover 4 . . . . . 27
www.proenergyservices.com/experience
Rittal Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-41 . . . . . . 20
www.rittal-corp.com
STF S.p.A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20. . . . . . . . 14
www.stf.it
Structural Integrity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . 9
www.structint.com
TEAM Industrial Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. . . . . . . . 12
www.teaminc.com
TerraSource Global . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27. . . . . . . . 17
www.terrasource.com
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December 2013 128
COMMENTARY
T
he global energy environment is increasing in complexity
and uncertainty. We are in a much more challenging world
than previously envisaged. The World Energy Council’s (WEC)
analysis has exposed a number of myths that have influenced our
understanding of the global energy landscape:
■ Myth 1: Global energy demand will flatten out. Reality: Energy
demand will continue to increase and double by 2050.
■ Myth 2: Peak oil. Reality: There is no shortage in sight for fos-
sil fuel resources.
■ Myth 3: Demand growth will be fully met by new clean energy
sources. Reality: According to our scenarios, the contribution
of fossil fuels to global energy demand is still growing in ab-
solute terms.
■ Myth 4: We can reduce global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
by 50% by 2050. Reality: Even in the best case we will see a
near doubling of GHG emissions compared to 1990 levels.
■ Myth 5: Current business models and markets are delivering.
Reality: Current designs are unable to cope with the increasing
renewable shares, decentralized systems, or growing informa-
tion architecture.
■ Myth 6: Current programs will deliver universal access to en-
ergy within the next 10 to 15 years. Reality: WEC’s analysis
shows that on current paths, between 320 million and 530
million people will still be without electricity in 2050.
■ Myth 7: On a global scale capital is cheap and abundant. Real-
ity: Capital is extremely sensitive to perceived political and
regulatory risks. Moreover, due to the growing pressures on
public finances in most countries, public funds will not be
available to augment private energy financing.
Our studies reveal that current pathways fall short of deliver-
ing on the global aspirations of energy access, energy security,
and environmental sustainability—the three pillars for balanc-
ing the “energy trilemma.”
Busting these myths helps set us on the right path toward
agreeing on the actions for the future we need.
Defning the Future
Energy leaders in both the public and private sectors need to
make inspired decisions. Action is needed now. Energy leaders
agree on many of the actions necessary, but significantly, they
are not aligned on the nature, value, and importance of political
and institutional risks and their critical impact on investment.
Here’s a brief look at the mismatch and how we can secure the
future we need.
We are looking in the wrong place. The focus of current
thinking about the energy system is biased and inadequate. The
focus must shift from the supply mix to demand efficiency. We
need more demand-side investments, innovation, incentives, and
stronger technical standards to reduce energy intensity. Price
controls, subsidies, trade barriers, and absolute targets for indi-
vidual technologies distort the market and can have unintended
consequences, so policymakers must only use them sparingly.
In order to attract the needed investment, national policy
and regulatory frameworks have to be balanced. The “en-
ergy trilemma” provides a solid framework for every country to
assess its own political risk and work towards balanced, pre-
dictable, and stable policy and institutional frameworks. There
is little agreement between investors and governments on the
nature, price, and value of risks. Without an understanding about
risks, investment will not flow.
We need significant investments in research, develop-
ment, and demonstration. We urgently need to realize the
potential of breakthrough technologies such as electricity stor-
age and carbon capture, use, and storage (CCUS). WEC analysis
shows that the 450 parts per million CO
2
goal cannot be achieved
without CCUS. It is essential that there are clear and unambigu-
ous policy and institutional frameworks to support investment in
this technology.
The energy map is changing, and our institutions need
to change to keep pace with developments. The center of
gravity in energy has moved outside Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development countries—and so have interac-
tions between countries and regions. Existing multilateral and
plurilateral energy institutions need to reflect these changes, be
more inclusive and responsive, or risk becoming obsolete.
To ensure universal access to energy, we need to de-
risk and support entrepreneurial approaches. The WEC rec-
ognizes the need for urgent additional action and supports the
objectives of the UN Secretary General’s Sustainable Energy for
All initiative. The WEC further supports the inclusion of universal
energy access as a key and distinct element in the post-2015
Millennium Development Goals. However, we caution that with-
out supporting mechanisms and suitable funding, this goal will
be extremely difficult to achieve.
It’s no longer just about mitigation. Risks from the energy/
water nexus, extreme weather events, or cyber attacks (to name
but a few) expose our energy infrastructure to potential disas-
ters. We need to urgently adapt, rethink, and redefine the resil-
ience for energy infrastructure.
Action Is Needed Now
How we can tackle these issues to secure tomorrow’s energy to-
day was on top of the discussion agenda in October at the World
Energy Congress, the World Energy Council’s flagship triennial
event. There, energy leaders—ministers, company chief execu-
tives, and key decision-makers—were in agreement that if we
are to derive the full economic and social benefits from energy
resources, we must take incisive and urgent action to modify our
approach to energy solutions.
It’s time to get real in defining our future. ■
—Christoph Frei, secretary general, World Energy Council, www.
worldenergy.org, @WECouncil
Defining the Future:
Time to Get Real
Christoph Frei
APRIL 1-3, 2014
|
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