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SUMMARY: Survey of CIRM-funded Shared Facilities 17 centers, 15 responses

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

1. What are the three most significant accomplishments of your Stem Cell Core that have added to the scientific infrastructure for Regenerative Medicine in California? Increasing hESC research activities, including for non-CIRM funded scientists. Training stem cell scientists and technical staff, who then contribute to the workforce. Supporting activities of CIRM Disease Teams and Bridges Training. Providing consultation and a fast start for stem cell projects, i.e. test the water/accelerate entry before committing whole-heartedly. Facilitating a highly collaborative and multidisciplinary environment where new ideas and projects originate. Developing, evaluating and standardizing new protocols and technologies for stem cell research. Sharing resources with other institutions (e.g. banked and GMP level hESCs iPSCs). Established centers with high-end technologies have helped in recruitment of stem cell scientists. 2. Do you want to seek continued funding for your Stem Cell Core from CIRM? All 15 responders replied with yes. 3. What do you see as the most significant value that a shared stem cell facility offers to regenerative medicine and stem cell science in California? Enabling and accelerating stem cell research. Generating preliminary data to attract funding. Training the next generation of stem cell scientists. Promoting collaboration. Hub/nucleus for information exchange among new and experienced researchers. Offering time and cost savings. Providing space and high-end instrumentation for stem cell research. Offering complete access to technology most grant writing labs cannot afford on their own. Highly trained technical staff that operate and maintain equipment. Offering standardized technologies in order to overcome hurdles and achieve reproducible successes. These facilities are absolutely essential for keeping California at the forefront of hIPSC research. 4. What is your priority if Shared Laboratories funding were to be extended. For example, for UCSD, wed seek funds for personnel? Support for personnel: 15 Service contracts on high-end equipment: 5 Supplies and reagents: 1 Overhead costs: 1 5. What Federal grants you have obtained as a result of CIRM funding your Stem Cell Core under the Shared Labs and Stem Cell Techniques Course RFA 07-01? Total = ~125 1

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

6. What is the method you have used to achieve financial sustainability so far? CIRM Shared Facilities Grant Traditional recharges for equipment use and services (e.g. teratoma formation, myco testing, iPS derivation) Rates based on individual labs use of basal media Cost recovery for supplies and materials only. Other grants, private and institutional funds. Philantropy 7. What is the number of publications resulting from work in your Stem Cell Core? Total = 440 8. What is the number of labs you count as major users of your Stem Cell Core? Total = 352 (14 labs reported numbers) 9. What is your Annual recharge revenue for your Stem Cell Core? Total = $1,630,000 (9 labs reported numbers) 10. How much is your Institutional matching support? No matching funds: 6 institutes Matching funds total at 6 institutes: $4.5+ M

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ALL COMMENTS

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

1. What are the three most significant accomplishments of your Stem Cell Core that have added to the scientific infrastructure for Regenerative Medicine in California? A: Having a significant impact on [the institute]'s stem cell and regenerative medicine program. Training stem cell scientists. Sharing resources with other institutions. A: Stem cell therapy for Age-related Macular Degeneration (CIRM Disease Team). Neurodegenerative disease-specific iPSCs. Scaffolds/defined substrates for stem cell culture A: It led to the creation of a new stem cell center, the [] Institute for the Biology of Stem Cells, which has seeded additional stem cell projects on the campus. This increase in the quality and quantity of stem cell research led to the need for additional stem-cell-focused research space on campus, provided in the form of a dedicated floor in our new biomedical sciences building and a new, improved vivarium. We acquired equipment and instrumentation that helped in successfully recruiting additional stem cell faculty. For our core facilities, we have hired experts in stem cell research and high-end instrumentation who have facilitated and enhanced stem cell research in several laboratories. A: We have increased embryonic stem cell research on campus 250% since 2010, bringing in studies involving Retinoblastoma, Ewings Sarcoma, Spina bifida, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, and a collaboration with [ ] working towards a phase I-II stem cell-mediated therapy for high-grade glioma clinical trials. We have provided training and research support for students in the Early Investigators High School program, CIRM Bridges program, doctoral students and researchers at [the institute], encouraging stem cell research at this institution as well as out side of this institution. We have begun building a pediatric disease specific iPSC bank that will be available to outside researchers. With the large range of pediatric diseases we see at [the institute], it is important we leverage our unique situation to push the research and treatments of childhood disease. A: Brought together a critical mass of researchers learning and applying cutting edge stem cell techniques to answer outstanding questions about the biology of pluripotency, cell fate determination, and/or molecular and cellular underpinnings of their disease of interest. Received, disseminated and standardized emerging stem cell technologies and material/equipment resources from around the world for use by researchers with specific applications regardless of those researcher's ability to access and test these technologies in their own laboratories. Training of researchers in iPSC generation has had a major effect on the community. Created and maintained an environment where scientists from various disciplines (molecular/cell biology, biochemistry, chemistry, engineering, genetics) and with a variety of expertise are encouraged and supported to work together to accelerate technology and overcome hurdles in order to achieve their unique stem cell-related goals. A: Our Stem Cell Core has trained 134 researchers in the hands on art of human pluripotent stem cell culture, reprogramming and directed differentiation. These researchers have come from 23 different research groups at our Institute, only 7 of which have received CIRM funding. It is important to emphasize the importance the stem cell core facility provides to enabling access to stem cell research to a very broad range of research groups that otherwise would not have had such opportunities. The Stem Cell Core has been the vehicle to introduce and evaluate new technologies and make them widely available to the research community. An initial focus of our Core was centered around the development of viral vector technologies and their specific application to stem cell research. Later we have focused on the evaluating and developing emerging technologies for achieving efficient reprogramming of human cell samples. Finally the development and sharing of techniques for directing differentiation to specific cell

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

lineages continues to be a major focus of development. The Stem Cell Core has provided the physical space, dedicated equipment and trained personnel to support a broad array of stem cell based projects that range from developing models of various diseases including: autism, parkinson's, schizophrenia, bipolar, cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, Duchenne's MD, progeria, XSCID, Alports, William's syndrome, Huntington's. A: Training more than 300 scientists in culture and characterization of human pluripotent stem cells. Facilitating collaborations that resulted in more than 40 high-profile stem cell publications. Making genomic analysis of stem cells available to researchers all over the world through collaborations and the PluriTest pluripotency assay. As of this time, more than 7,500 assays have been analyzed using PluriTest. A: I believe that the solid support of personnel, equipment maintenance, and cell culture space are the three greatest accomplishments that the Stem Cell Core has added to the scientific infrastructure at [the institute] in the area of Regenerative Medicine in California. During the period of CIRM support researchers have been able to progress from in vitro work to working in rat models partly to the reasonable recharge pricing of sophisticated microscopy equipment. Having the facility manager to help the researchers use the equipment effectively is critical as well as having adequate service contracts so the equipment is repaired quickly when there is a problem. At first the researchers tried using their own lab cell culture areas for doing stem cell work but as time went on, more and more researchers are looking to the Stem Cell Core as a haven for best practices and success in an antibiotic free environment as is often the need when growing iPS cells or hESCs. A: Training of students at all levels thus major contribution to workforce and new investigators. A: Educated users on techniques in Flow Cytometry on hES cells, iPS cells, and their derivatives. This allows users to gather large data sets on multiple parameters on their own. Our Core averages over 20 cell sorting experiments per week, making us the largest FACS Facility on the UCSD campus. We support researchers from several other institutes as well. Isolating pure populations of cells has become integral in many researchers projects. Have added new technology to the building, such as In Vivo imaging on the Olympus Vivaview, multiplexing qPCR instruments for mRNA analysis, infrared gel imaging for protein content on our Licor Odyssey, as well as high content screening of cells on our Thermo Fisher Cell Insight. A: FDA compliant GMP level iPSC & hESC derivation and scale-up facilities in which we have derived 12 hESC lines on the NIH Stem Cell Registry, six other hESC lines pending NIH Stem Cell Registry fast-track approval and more than 50 disease specific and control xeno-free iPSC lines (including DMD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis). FDA compliant GMP-GTP level preclinical labs for translational pathway research, including multiple CIRM Disease Team, Early Translational, and Tools & Technology grants. Stem Cell Core Bank that provides banking and distribution of human pluripotent stem cell lines to investigators. Cells were critical for CIRM, NIH, and other grants. Laboratory space for specific collaborative research with translational goals. Supports critical stem cell training including CIRM Training and Bridges grants. A: Research done in our Stem Cell Core has made significant contributions to various areas of regenerative medicine including osteoporosis, arthritis, endothelial cell differentiation, cell growth in bioreactors, development of matrices for stem cell implants, and prevention disease by identifying chemicals harmful to stem cells. Much of this work was done in the Core and all of it used equipment available in the Core. We would not have been able to perform much of this work without the Core facility. The Core provided the necessary structure for the 5 new assistant professors we hired in both the College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences and in the Department of Engineering. These faculty and their students/post docs use the Core daily and have been very productive and made contributions to the areas mentioned above. Without the

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

Core, their research would have moved much more slowly and they would not have had their current level of success. The Stem Cell Core has trained CIRM Bridges students from Cal Poly and from Cal State San Bernardino the past 4 years. This includes offering a hands-on course in stem cell culture and providing internships in our stem cell laboratories. We also offer a formal course in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Culture (CMDB 211) which is taken by graduate students who are beginning project with stem cells. Both of these courses have played a vital role in introducing the CIRM Bridges students and graduate students/postdocs to stem cell research. Many of these students have gone on to fill positions in stem cell biology labs or have gone on to graduate school in stem cell biology. Some have also received their own extramural funding (NSF and NIH pre-doctoral awards). These course are taught in the Core facility and would not have been possible without it. A: The CIRM Shared Laboratory and Teaching Facility provides the specialized tissue culture rooms that are required to work with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This is the first time that many of our users have worked with human cells. As a result, their individual labs either lack tissue culture rooms or have substandard equipment. Until the CIRM Facility opened this was a very large problem and, if it closes, the situation will be the same as before. In addition, this space is used for work with nonfederal hESC lines. Many of our users use hESC lines that were derived with CIRM support from single blastomeres of 8-cell stage human embryos. They were registered by CIRM, but not by NIH since they do not meet the Federal definition of hESCs as being derived from blastocyststage embryos. Thus, we still have a critical need for nonfederal space. Our Shared laboratory provides specialized equipment and reagents. With regard to equipment, we have 16 variable oxygen incubators, which allow our users to explore the effects of oxygen tension in their experiments. The facility also offers a specialized arrangement of inverted fluorescence microscopes for imaging cells directly in culture plates. In addition, we have high resolution microscopes, housed in biological safety cabinets or laminar flow hoods, for the collection and selection of pluripotent colonies under sterile conditions. Through a recharge mechanism, we provide tissue culture reagents in a storeroom mode. Our Facility has become a meeting place for stem cell researchers across many disciplines. Principal Investigators and group members discuss their work. As a result, many have initiated collaborations. Investigators at all stages of their careers have benefited from working with colleagues. For example, the Facility allows researchers new to the stem cell field to get the help they need to jump-start their work. The infrastructure also gives less established researchers access to specialized equipment, maintained by trained facility personnel. A: Training We have trained upwards of 500 students ranging from high school to tenure track professors in techniques for maintaining pluripotent stem cells. This has enabled a wide number of laboratories to either begin research involving pluripotent stem cells or to improve their current research practices. Consultation We have provided a signifcant amount of onsite and off site consultation to help researchers one on one achieve their research goals and troubleshoot the problems they are facing. Support of other CIRM funded programs we have supported two disease team awards and seven CIRM bridges programs. The support we provide to CIRM bridges training is pretty significant. Each year we host two bridges interns in the lab, coordinate the placement and internships of students from around 8 colleges and train over 50 Bridges students from the LA area in stem cell culture techniques. A: Training of multiple investigators that have gone on to develop disease teams and early translation grants. 2. Do you want to seek continued funding for your Stem Cell Core from CIRM? All replied yes.

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A: Yes, definitely. For us, this is a critical need.

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

A: Continued funding for the Shared Lab, CIRM funded Stem Cell Core would be a tremendous benefit to advancing stem cell based research and it's applications for finding cures to human diseases. Stem Cell core is the only venue where scientists who are not experts in the field can do preliminary work. Recently cognitive neuroscientists at our institute have initiated experiments to make iPS cells from non-human primates, marmosets to begin to study them as a model system for human diseases. A: Yes even if to support staff salaries to some extent. A: The continued support of by CIRM of the Stem Cell Core would ensure that high quality capabilities and reduced pricing would continue to be extended to PIs for researchers who pursue stem cell research and thus enable the longer term, high risk experiments to be performed within their research budgets. A: The Shared Lab and the Training Courses are the heart of regenerative medicine. A: Continued support for staff would be appreciated. A: Yes- absolutely. The Core is a vital component of our Stem Cell Center and research effort. We definitely want to seek continued funding for our Stem Cell Core. 3. What do you see as the most significant value that a shared stem cell facility offers to regenerative medicine and stem cell science in California? A: As described in our last progress report, 28 labs and 44 scientists are currently using our tissue culture facilities. Our equipment is used by 91 individuals from 40 labs. These individuals totally rely on the resources that our Shared Laboratory provides. The CIRM Facility is also where the laboratory portion of our Course is held. How can we teach techniques without a laboratory? A: hIPSC provide one of the most significant developments in recent years for studying and treating human diseases and the only viable model for certain diseases. On account of the hIPSC revolution there are to date more researchers wishing to work with pluripotent stem cells than when the shared labs first opened. This number is only set to increase when the CIRM hIPSC repository opens for business. However there are very few researchers who are able to truly harness the vast potential of hIPSC without the support provided by the stem cell cores. Even seasoned hIPSC researchers benefit through the time and cost savings that core facilities provide. These facilities are absolutely essential for keeping California at the forefront of hIPSC research. A: Skilled staff to train investigators in pluripotent stem cell biology, support of every aspect of pluripotent stem cell biology, maintenance of ~55 million of capital equipment, training on high value equipment, safe-harbor for deriving iPS lines and cell quarantine facility. A: With the technical challenges of stem cell research, it has been essential to have both a critical mass of researchers as well as standardized technologies in order to overcome hurdles and achieve reproducible successes. The CIRM Shared Research Facilities provide both of those things in a way that does not happen when individual labs participate in stem cell research in the more traditional, solitary setting of their individual labs. This is achieved by not only providing space and equipment for the research, as the CIRM Shared Facilities Grants initially did, but also by employing highly skilled research support in the form of Research Associates or Staff Scientists who focus on providing quality control, SOP development, training (formal or informal) and standardized services, which is exactly what [the institute] has used the CIRM Shared Facility Grant to fund in recent years.

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

A: It enables expansionqualitatively and quantitativelyof research in regenerative medicine for both existing and new stem cell investigators. It enables stem cell scientists to generate data that led to new funding from a variety of sources. It increases scientists ability to focus on scientific questions, as opposed to maintaining facilities such as cell culture, flow cytometry, and microscopy A: Cores like ours offers complete access to technology most grant writing labs cannot afford on their own. A vast array of experiments are possible in one clean, maintained, centralized space, from cell culture to cell sorting to genetic analysis. Our Personnel also retains the expertise in using emerging technologies and protocols so retention of personnel is key to prevent the loss of knowledge. A: The most significant value that a shared stem cell facility offers to the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell sciences is the focused advancement of translational stem cell therapies that establishes CA as a clear leader in the field. This advancement is facilitated by access to the appropriate infrastructure, equipment and training that are offered by the shared stem cell laboratories. A: The Stem Cell Core Facility has provided research infrastructure to 11 stem cell labs which has enabled them to perform research that would otherwise not have been possible. The Core has also enabled research to progress at a much faster rate than would otherwise be possible. Students and postdocs who work in the Core interact with each other daily, and the community that has formed in the Core exchanges information, protocols and ideas, all of which add tremendous value to the stem cell research being done by our labs. This latter point is an intangible aspect, but it should be emphasized that there is strength in numbers and in collaboration and the Core provides a focus for working together in a collegial environment, and this enhances research productivity and quality tremendously. A: Opportunities for training in a spectrum of stem cell related techniques, stem cell-related services at reasonable cost, recharge to grants of users, and availability of high quality equipment and related expertise. A: Serves as: A primary stem cell and regenerative medicine translational research environment, including GMP level facility. Training and shared resource facility. Stem cell derivation and banking facility. A: The Shared Stem Cell Facility offers a nucleus that both new and experienced researchers in the stem cell field can come to for advice, collaboration with other labs, product information, informational seminars, and excellent hands-on experience with sophisticated instruments that are important in academia, medicine, and industry. The Shared Stem Cell Facility manager works with the researchers to ensure that they have success with their experiments and helps them to build networks beyond their labmates and PIs to answer questions that may present themselves but may seem like they dont have the immediate tools to investigate. It is truly community forming. Building a collective community with a broad knowledge base and experimental capabilities is absolutely critical for progress in this complex area of biomedical research. CIRM support helped in several ways (Stem Cell Center Retreat, Student Stem Cell Center Journal Club), and having a Shared Facility definitely plays a critical role in community creation and providing important instrumentation for investigatory work. The facility continues to grow. For example, researchers have recently begun to embark on screening stem cell lines with siRNA and shRNA libraries to identify differences in important cell signaling pathways in iPS cell lines, other stem cell lines, and other model mammalian cell lines. This high throughput screening work will be pursued using instrumentation that is now part of the Shared Stem Cell Facility offerings. The expertise in high throughput automation and high-content/high throughput imaging within a stem cell context will be continuously growing and emerging as a

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

resource to the community in the next few years, and continued CIRM support would help greatly towards making this a reality at [the institute]. A: Bring stem cell scientists together. A: Making quality-controlled human pluripotent stem cell lines and technologies accessible to California scientists. Providing well-trained stem cell researchers for academic and industry jobs. Launching the careers of young scientists through the Bridges to Regenerative Medicine internship program. A: Bringing researchers together in a common shared facility has enabled so many to advance so quickly in this field with stringent technical demands. Having the shared stem cell core equipped, staffed and funded has enabled our institutes researchers to move quickly and nimbly in developing new applications for using stem cells to study human diseases. Most importantly, it has offered a shared research environment for new researchers to gain entry into this promising field. One of the major issues in the field of stem cells is the shortage of trained personnel needed by academia and industry. We have trained 14 undergraduates from various places (SDSU, CSU-San Marcos, San Louis Obispo) as part of the CIRM Bridges program. Many of these past trainees are now working as technicians and graduate students in stem cell research fields. A: Stem Cell Cores and Shared Labs allow the space, equipment, and environment for stem cell work that many labs on our campus do not provide or have. Since this lab has been in place, we have been able to provide training for new stem cell scientists, giving them a strong technical background to pursue successful stem cell research. These labs permit the exploration of new avenues of research related to stem cells by reducing initial cost and time investment, as well as providing the appropriate facilities for laboratories to conduct stem cell research properly. These labs also provide the necessary research infrastructure for sponsored (especially federally-funded) translational stem cell biology research. One of our clients says, A core facility is required for transitioning into stem cell related research. Guidance and technical expertise provided by trained specialists at the stem cell core facility is extremely valuable. Their supervision helped us in conducting research experiments in a scientifically ethical fashion. The core facility offers us scientist to use its basic laboratory as well as sophisticated instruments such as superior imaging and transfection tools. This helps researchers to save essential dollars for their research projects. They provide us with protocols and link us to various available resources that allow for collaborations to forward understanding of human disease through stem cell research. This core facility has helped foster interactions between researchers on a daily basis and has allowed for exchange of ideas and troubleshooting hurdles that we face at the bench. Another client states, The most significant value provided by shared stem cell facilities, is that it allows new PIs with limited startup funds a chance at developing a successful research program. It has allowed spending of the bulk of my resources on the generation of data, rather than on the purchase of hoods, centrifuges, freezers, incubators, and microscopes. We are currently in the process of preparing our first manuscript describing the role of neural stem cells in early central nervous system development. The Stem Cell Core has been absolutely critical to this work. 4. What is your priority if Shared Laboratories funding were to be extended. For example, for UCSD, wed seek funds for personnel? A: Extending funding for the highly trained personnel will have the most significant impact on advancing the opportunities that our Stem Cell Core offers to California stem cell researchers. A: We would also seek funds for personnel. We are not able to recover personnel costs through recharges. We currently have one Administrative Coordinator who oversees daily

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

management/operation of the Core, one technician who maintains and distributes cells and who performs numerous routine Core lab operations, and one part time (20%) administrative assistant who provides support for computers, instrumentation, and Sales and Service and inventories. A: Our budget would remain the same. The funds would be used to support our seasoned personnel, many of whom have been in place from the beginning. We also need support for service contracts and for replacing broken equipment. A: Retention of existing, highly trained personnel with expertise in stem cell research. A: Personnel. A: Personnel. A: Personnel. A: Personnel costs. A: Funds for personnel. A: Personnel. Laboratory supplies and operations. A: Personnel. Service contracts for existing equipment. A: Personnel is the highest priority. We also must consider, at private research institutes, the fact that we need overhead costs to retain the space and maintain the CIRM-funded equipment. A: 1st priority- personnel; 2nd priority- service contracts and equipment maintenance costs A: We would seek funding to continue the activities of the stem cell core facility. We are not a large lab, but the research the scientists are working on are vital to the progression of pediatric treatments. A: There are two major expenses for any facility: personnel and service contracts. Our experience is that a recharge system that does not overly tax research grants, which we have implemented, can cover all of one of these and a small part of the other. However, it cannot cover both at reasonable prices. Therefore, CIRM funding has been critical in providing personnel support for our broadly used facility. 5. What Federal grants you have obtained as a result of CIRM funding your Stem Cell Core under the Shared Labs and Stem Cell Techniques Course RFA 07-01? A: The Shared lab has not received federal grants, but our clients have been awarded federal grants that they would not have without the Core. A: Many but probably the most notable are the new NIH training grant we obtained which will use the core, an NSF career award for a new assistant professor, a UH2 award and an award to the Alzheimers group to develop iPSC in the core [12 itemized grants]. A: We are averaging about 12 grants and 25 graduate/postdoctoral fellowships/year. A: Our stem cell core is currently subcontracting on a NHLBI U01 grant to create 225 iPSC lines to perform a detailed study of genetic factors involved in heart disease. Additional NIH applications are pending. A: We have obtained a number of grants from various agencies as a results of CIRM funding for the Core. I do not have complete information on this, but these grants include [8 itemized funding sources].

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

A: The core has 0 federal grants. I cannot speak for our clients. Im not sure how many federal grants they have obtained. A: We don't have complete information at this time. Federal grants received include multiple NIH R01 and P01 grants. A: [20 itemized NIH grants] A: [18 itemized NIH grants] A: [16 itemized NIH grants] A: [9 itemized grants/funding agencies] A: [12 itemized grants] A: It is important to note that almost all federal grants for human stem cell research require a pre-existing stem cell facility. The NIH will not fund equipment purchases for establishing stem cell labs. [4 itemized grants].In addition to grants we have obtained funding from philanthropic sources, including: Parkinsons Association of San Diego Summit 4 Stem Cell for Parkinson's disease research San Diego Institute for Conservation Research Esther O'Keeffe Foundation Millipore Foundation Marie Mayer Foundation for melanoma research Kevin and Karen Craven for multiple sclerosis research 6. What is the method you have used to achieve financial sustainability so far? A: Using CIRM funds to leverage institutional matches. User recharge fees. Indirect costs from other CIRM grants. A: We have relied on CIRM funding, which we thought would continue due to the success of our efforts. A: We recharge for services (this brings in only 33% of the running costs). We are starting high school education programs and extending our training programs. This has the potential to bring in another 50%. To maintain the current infrastructure is difficult without some funding. A: Recharges for use of equipment such as Cell Sorters, qPCR instruments, and Microscopes. A: We recharge for some services, and we have used funds from our Stem Cell Foundation which includes philanthropic donations to the Stem Cell Center. We plan to increase both of these revenue streams in the future. A: CIRM Shared Research Laboratory funding. A: Our core operates on a partial cost recovery recharge model. Cost recovery is for supplies and materials only. The personnel cost to date have been covered by grant, private and institutional funding. We have found that the materials and supply cost for stem cell research is significant and that bulk purchase discounts made through the core can be passed on to individual user of the stem cell core. Even with this added savings, the supplies and materials cost is so significant for most users that it prohibits adding personnel support to this recharge model. A: We have used a combination of the support from CIRM to fund the Shared Stem Cell Facility managers salary, a large proportion of equipment maintenance, and supplies. The rest of the 10

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

expenses are recovered through recharge with the goal of coming out even at the end of each year. A: Direct CIRM funding for the lab, CIRM funding of projects performed in the lab, NIH funding, and tuition for courses. A: Philanthropy, contracts & grants, and overhead from CIRM grants. A: The CIRM Shared Research Facility established a recharge system beginning in 2009. Because of the shared nature of this facility and the fact that each user is carrying out a unique set and quantity of experiments using resources (plasticware, reagents, equipment) that are freely available in the space, we created a recharge system based on the users consumption of basal media. Under this system, our Stem Cell Core purchases basal media (E8, mTeSR, DMEM, Neurobasal, etc.) and resells it to the users at a price that accounts for their use of plasticware, reagents and other consumables. These prices were determined by calculations based on the average workflow of a user during the consumption of a bottle of each of these media. Other services, such as teratoma formation, mycoplasma testing, and iPS cell derivation are provided by the staff and charged using more traditional recharge calculations. The funds provided by CIRM under the Shared Facility Grant are used to offset personnel and service contracts and equipment maintenance costs. In particular, the personnel costs for maintaining the Facility and for training others is very difficult to include in recharge costs for supplies and if we did this, we would likely lose users and thereby also lose the benefits of having the stem cell researchers working in a common area and sharing ideas and approaches. A: We are analyzing the finances now are in the process of creating a business plan for the Stem Cell Core. A: Established university approved recharge rates for direct billing to users. 7. What is the number of publications resulting from work in your Stem Cell Core? A: We took a quick survey and from respondents (10 PIs) revealed that 55 publications and 10 pending resulted from use of our Shared Stem Cell Facility (including Flow Cytometry Sorter). A: 10. A: 7. A: 55 refereed journal articles. A: Many many. I havent been exhaustive in searching. But see for example [8 references listed]. A: The core staff have directly contributed to 4 publications. The services and training we have provided have enabled many other publications where we are not authors but I dont have a complete list. A: The number varies from about 75-100. A: Too numerous to count, most publications from 2011 to present by Stem Cell Program Researchers have gathered some or all of their data in our Core. A: There have been over 70 publications resulting from work in our Stem Cell Core. A: 17 publications. A: Stem cell labs have published 77 papers (7 are in press) since August 2010 when the Core opened.

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A: 12 publications to date. A: We don't have current information at this time.

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

A: Regarding significant publications that have emerged from work conducted using the instrumentation available in the Shared Stem Cell Facility, these are three recent manuscripts A: There have been 42 publications resulting from the Stem Cell Shared Lab so far. 8. What is the number of labs you count as major users of your Stem Cell Core? A: We have 11 labs that are major users of the Core and 5 labs that use the Core occasionally. There are 55 graduate students, postdocs and technicians in the major users labs that work in the Core. A: 21 labs total. A: 28 labs and 44 scientists. A: 30. A: 25 labs total. A: ~40 labs. Then 6 cal state universities and Passadena City College rely heavily on the facility for training. A: Approximately 30. A: The Bank and Derivation facilities and other core facilities serve more than 40 labs. Individual research labs = ~20. A: Past and current users include 75 researchers from 20 research groups, representing collaborations with 12 companies and 17 different Universities and Research Institutes. A: 7. A: We have 11 major users including stem cell work and shared equipment, with 2 more incoming this year. A: We have 12 research groups that are major users, and in total have supported 23 different research groups. A: This year, we served 90 customers from 20 different labs. 98% of usage comes from 10 different labs. A: 29 laboratories are collaborating with the Shared Lab, usually for our genomic analysis.

9. What is your annual recharge revenue for your Stem Cell Core? A: This year, we will exceed $500k in recharge revenue. A: It was $54k last year. A: No recharge. A: About $170K. A: Approximately $25-30K. A: $30K A: $18K.

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A: $500K+ in FY13. A: TOTAL: $78K (Cytometry: $30K, Microscopy: $48K).

December 10, 2013 Compiled by K. Willert, UCSD

A: Our recharge is structured in a way that funnels the revenue back to our Shared Lab, where we use the funds to purchase supplies in bulk for our users who buy them at reduced costs. A: Although we have a recharge system approved and ready to go, we are not currently recharging facility users from non-profit organizations. We have, however charged several forprofit companies. The plan is to roll this out gradually before our CIRM funding runs out in 2015. A: We collect annual recharges of approximately $250k. That covers most of our supplies and materials expenses at approximately $300k/yr, leaving approximately $50k/yr to be covered by grant and institutional support. Recharges do NOT cover any of the personnel cost. A: We work on a collaborative basis and do not have a recharge system. Collaborators provide supplies specific to their projects, and we provide equipment and professional oversight and support. For example, all cultures in our laboratory are tested for mycoplasma every month. 10. How much is your Institutional matching support? A: The [institute] does not provide matching support to the core other than equipment and space. A: The [institute] provided the space for the Facility. We do not receive any monetary support. In the first year, [the institute] matched $1 million to pay for build-out and equipping the Stem Cell Core. Subsequent years have averaged about $50k in institutional support for operations and facility maintenance. Additionally, [the institute] matched the $50k provided by CIRM for equipment to expand the Core in 2011. A: TOTAL: $282K (UC General Funds FY14: $235K; Match from California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences FY14: $47K). A: $0. The facility is expected to be self sufficient. A: The [institute] does not provide institutional matching support for shared or core labs. A: Our institutional and private matching support is over 50% of the total operating budget for our shared labs, stem cell core facility. This does not include building costs associated with stem cell core research facility expansions to accommodate increasing demand from faculty and post-doctoral researchers. A: The [institute] does not directly fund the Core. However it has provided startup funds to 5 Assistant Professors who routinely use the Core and who spend this funding in the Core. Startup packages generally range from $500,000 to $800,000/ new hire. The [institute] has also provided seed funding to help stem cell researchers obtain extramural funding for stem cell research and this has resulted in extramural funding that is used in part in the Core. A: ~$894,000 for initial renovation & equipment. A: No institutional support or matching funds (after initial match to build the facility). A: $680K per year.

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