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Faculty of Education Sciences School of Pedagogy in Language and English Culture Core of Cultural Studies on English Speakers 2

Work N2:

Sonnet XCVIII
By William Shakespeare

Names:

Miss: Date:

Camila Bustos Barras Gonzalo Diaz Ponce Felipe ora Parraguez arcelino !ald"s !ergara #asna Cay$n Pacheco Friday% ay &'st% 2('&

*e1liography 2 . .C!))) Poem Analysis .First Semester 2('& Index )ntroduction *illiam Shakespeare+s Brief Biography Sonnet . Figures of speech 0he type of rhyme 0heme of the poem 2 & 6 / '' '& ''2 Conclusion Bi1liography . .

C!)) refers to a person 4ho is hurt 1ecause his lo7e is a1sent and also he reminds his young life% the poem take part in a 1eautiful place surrounding 1y s4eet flo4ers and songs of 1irds% 1ut it is not enough 1ecause he feels sad and melancholic for those memories5 8n the other hand% 4e are also going to mention a1out the Shakespeare6s life% main e7ents and 4orks5 *e are going to analyze and paraphrase the sonnet using the real sonnet to identify and clarify in more simply 4ords a1out 4hat the sonnet is going to 1e a1out5 9fter that% 4e are going to mention the figures of speech that they are going to help us to gi7e a concept or interpretation of the phrases: 4e can o1tain figures as metaphors% similes% hyper1oles% personifications% or alliterations 4ith the corresponding e.amples from the poem5 Furthermore% 4e refer to the type of rhyme% the form% the scansion% the rhyming scheme and also the pattern of stressed and unstressed sylla1les5 oreo7er% the theme is one of the most important aspects in a poem% for that reason 4e interpreted it from the author6s feelings and the rele7ant characteristics of the sonnet5 Finally% after a deep analysis of the sonnet% in the conclusion 4e are going to gi7e a personal opinion a1out our perspecti7e and point of 7ie4 of the poem5 For that reason% 4e in7ite to read this 4ork and promote enter to the 4orld poetry5 & .C!))) 1y the English play4right and poet *illiam Shakespeare5 0his sonnet is part of a group of sonnets kno4n as Fair #outh5 0his corresponds to the second sonnet of a group of three that talk a1out the separation and a1sence of the author6s lo7e5 Particularly% the sonnet .Introduction 3ere 4e are going to analyze and interpret the Sonnet .

) %6%6+: )n the tragicomedy% Shakespeare looking to put a happy ending to his 4orks as in Pericles% Coriolanus and 0imon of 9thens% all 4ritten in '/(=5 9nd in Cym1eline >'/'(? and *inter6s 0ale >'/'(?5 • )n poetry% it is 1elie7ed that Shakespeare 4as 7alued himself more as lyrical as a play4right and as such e. in '2=25 "irst sta!e# drama $%&'( ) %&'*+: 3is first 4orks 4ere four dramas that had as its 1ackground the ci7il strife in fifteenth.upon.'2@2?% 0he and 0he century5 erchant of !enice >'2@/.'2@C?% uch 9do a1out Bothing >'2@@? erry *i7es of *indsor >'/((?5 0his period is Aomeo and <uliet >'2@2?% one of his most kno4n and popular% 1y remem1ering the sentimental no7el of the fifteenth • .tensi7e narrati7e and mythological poems% is 1est remem1ered as an outstanding author of purely lyrical sonnets5 • 3is 4orks are !enus and 9donis tells the passionate teenager lo7e of !enus for 9donis5 ac1eth% the cruel temptations .century England5 0hese 4orks 4ere 3enry !)% first% second and third >'2@(.hird sta!e# tra!edy $%6(( ) %6(-+: 9ppears <ulius Caesar >'/((?% 3amlet >'/('?% 4hich reflects the ina1ility to react to the moral dilemma 1et4een re7enge and forgi7eness% 8thello >'/(2?% 4hich sho4s the cruelty free of Dealousy% of po4er >'/(2?% among the 1est kno4n5 • .97on in '2/-5 *illiam 4as the third of eight 1rothers5 3e 4as son of <ohn Shakespeare and ary 9rden5 Shakespeare failed to finish their studies su1stitute his father in 1usiness5 )n '2=2% he married 9nne 3atha4ay% 4ith 4hom he had a daughter% Susan% in '2=&% and t4ins% a 1oy >3amnet? 4ho died at '' years old% and a girl ><udith? .William Shakespeare’s Brie Bio!raphy • • • • • • • • Shakespeare 4as a play4right% poet and actor5 any Brits consider him the greatest play4right of all time5 3e 4as 1orn in Stratford.he last sta!e# tra!icomedy $%6(.pected only endure in time5 9lthough% he has 4ritten especially e.'2@2?% and Aichard ))) >'2@&?5 • Second sta!e# lyric $%&'* ) %6((+: 0he most important 4orks 4ere Dream of a Summer Bight >'2@-.

dressed5 ./0III Paraphrasin! From you ha7e ) 1een a1sent in the spring% ) couldn+t 1e 4ith you% my lo7e% during spring% *hen proud)pied 9pril% dressed in all his *hen 9pril sho4ed off of her 1eauty in front trim% of me% 1ath put a spirit of youth in e7erything% )t has 1rought 4ith it all its youth% 0hat hea7y Saturn laughed and leapt 4ith E7en forcing to the most melancholic% sad him5 #et nor the lays o 2irds nor the s4eet smell and old feeling Doin to it5 Still neither the s4eet melody of 1irdsongs% nor the pleasant smell 8f different flo4ers in odour and in hue% 8f the 7arious aromatic flo4ers% Could make me any summer6s story tell% Could please me 8r from their proud lap pluck them 4here 8r incite me to pick them up from its roots5 they gre45 Bor did ) 4onder at the lily6s 4hite% Bor praise the deep 3ermilion in the rose: 0hey 4ere 1ut s4eet% 1ut figures of deli!ht% Dra4n after you% you pattern of all those5 #et seemed it 4inter still% and% you a4ay% 9s 4ith your shado4 ) 4ith these did play5 • ./0III Sonnet . 4lossary Proud)pied: 4ell.0he rape of Lucretia% 4hich is 1ased on a narrati7e of Li7y% 4e see the cause of the fall of the last king of Aome and the origin of the repu1lic that follo4ed5 0he Sonnets% seEuence of poems% are the most cele1rated of English literature5 • )n '/'(% after the death of his younger 1rother and his mother% Shakespeare mo7ed to li7e permanently 4ith his family% to Stratford >his hometo4n?% after doing some fortune and 1uy a mansion5 • 3o4e7er% he continued to 4rite% as 0he 0empest >'/''?% 4hich reached the highest peak of poetic lyricism and% in '/'&% the historical drama 3enry !)))5 0his 4ould 1e the end of his 4ork as an author and actor5 0hree years later% the day of the anni7ersary of his 1irth on 9pril 2&% '/'/% died at the age of 225 Sonnet . .rim: to decorate5 2 nor ) 4as interested in the lilies ) despised the appearance and the 1eauty color of the roses% *onderful figures of Doy% *hich 4ere nothing compared to you5 *inter seems to 1e% 4ithout you 4ith the image of you% ) shared5 .

. . .fashioned sense of the 7er1 Fha7e+5 5eapt: Dumped5 5ays o 2irds: 1ird song5 6dour: smell5 1ue: color% appearance5 Proud: pleased5 5ap: spin5 Pluck: to remo7e5 5ily: a plant 4ith large flo4ers5 Praise: gi7ing thanks5 0ermilion: ha7ing a 1right red in color5 Deli!ht: great pleasure% satisfaction5 Seemed: appeared5 Despised: disliked5 Poem Analysis • "i!ures o speech / . . .. . . 1ath: old. . . . . . .

pied 9pril dressed in all his trim &5 3ath put a spirit of youth in e7erything% -5 0hat hea7y Saturn laughed and leaped 4ith him5 25 #et nor the lays of 1irds% nor the s4eet smell /5 8f different flo4ers in odour and in hue C5 Could make me any summer6s story tell% =5 8r from their proud lap pluck them 4here they gre4: @5 Bor did ) 4onder at the lily6s 4hite% '(5 Bor praise the deep 7ermilion in the rose: ''5 0hey 4ere 1ut s4eet% 1ut figures of delight% '25 Dra4n after you% you pattern of all those5 '&5 #et seemed it 4inter still% and% you a4ay% '-5 9s 4ith your shado4 ) 4ith these did play5 • . Alliteration Aepetition of the initial consonant sound GpH in line 25 2.'5 From you ha7e ) 1een a1sent in the spring% 25 *hen proud. Aepetition of the initial consonant sounds GsH in line 25 &7 Yet nor the lays of birds. When proud-pied April dressed in all his trim . . nor the sweet smell . Aepetition of the initial consonant sound GlH in line -5 *7 That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him. Aepetition of the initial consonant sounds GmH and GsH in line C5 C .

'). you pattern of all those. • . but figures of delight. They were but sweet. Aepetition of the initial consonant sounds Gd >th?H in line ''5 ''. you away. Aepetition of the initial consonant sounds Gd >th?H and GpH in line =5 #. (rawn after you. 0rom you have + been absent in the spring. Anaphora Aepetition of the 4ord GnorH in line 2% @ and '(5 . but figures of delight. Assonance Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GiH in line '5 '. Aepetition of identical 7o4el sounds GeH and GiH in line 25 2.or did + wonder at the lily"s white. (rawn after you. you pattern of all those. Aepetition of the 4ord G1utH in line ''5 ''. . nor the sweet smell -. . $r from their proud lap plu%! them where they grew& . ould ma!e me any summer"s story tell. iː ɪ . Aepetition of the 4ord GyouH in line '25 '2. Yet nor the lays of birds. As with your shadow + with these did play. Yet seemed it winter still.. '/. . Aepetition of the initial consonant sounds Gd >th?H >line '2 and '-?% GyH >line '& and '-? and GsH >line '&?5 '2. .or praise the deep vermilion in the rose& . They were but sweet.7. When proud-pied April dressed in all his trim ɛ ɛ ɪ = ɪ ɪ . . and. • . '*.

Aepetition of identical 7o4el sound GiH in line @5 -.or praise the deep vermilion in the rose& ɔː iː ɪ ɪə ɪ ə . Aepetition of similar 7o4el sounds GeH and GiH in line ''5 ''. They were but sweet. 1ath put a spirit of youth in everything. Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GoH: identical 7o4el sound GeH and similar 7o4el sound GaH in line =5 #.. but figures of delight. ɛ ɛ . ɪ ɪ ɪ . ɪ ɪ ɪ . Aepetition of identical 7o4el sounds GoH and GeH in line 25 . Aepetition of identical 7o4el sound GiH in line /5 2.or did + wonder at the lily"s white. $f different flowers in odour and in hue. . Yet nor the lays of birds. @ . . Aepetition of similar 7o4el sounds GiH and GoH in line '(5 '/. Aepetition of identical 7o4el sound GeH in line C5 7. Aepetition of similar 7o4el sounds GaH and GiH in line -5 *.. That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him. Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GuH in line &5 ). ʊ uː . ə ɪ æ ɑː æ iː ɪ ɪ . $r from their proud lap plu%! them where they grew& ɔː ɔ ɛ ɑ æ ʌ ɛ ɛ ɛ . ould ma!e me any summer"s story tell. nor the sweet smell ɛ ɔ ɛ ɔ ɛ .

o o o . Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GiH in line '&5 '*.enor: 3is lo7e5 0ehicle: Gthose+s pattern5H 4round: 3e is comparing the 1eauty of his lo7e 4ith the flo4ers% referring to the first one as the pattern that the flo4ers ha7e follo4ed5 • .enor: Shakespeare5 0ehicle: 3is a1sence during spring5 4round: 3e has not 1een 4ith his lo7e% that he compares 4ith the spring5 Comparison 1et4een GtheyH and Gfigures of delightH in line ''5 . (rawn after you. o o o Metaphor Comparison 1et4een G)H >Shakespeare? and Ga1sent in the springH in line '5 . you pattern of all those. Yet seemed it winter still. o o o .ɛ . ɜː iː ɪ ɪ ɑɪ Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GaH and identical GuH in line '25 '2. and you away. Aepetition of similar 7o4el sound GiH in line '&5 '). ɪ ɪ iː ɪ • . iː ɪ ɪ ɪ .enor: 0he flo4ers5 0ehicle: Figures of delight and Doy5 4round: 3e says that roses >flo4ers? are 1eautiful and delicate5 Comparison 1et4een GyouH and Gpattern of all thoseH in line '25 . As with your shadow + with these did play. ɑː uː uː æ . Personi ication 9n inanimate o1Dect% in this case GSaturnH% is gi7en of human Eualities as Glaughed and '( .

enor: Saturn5 0ehicle: the spirit of youth5 4round: the melancholy% old and pessimist Saturn got contagious of the Doy of the spirit of youth that 9pril and spring 1rought5 • . .aggeration in line 2% 4here an impossi1le occurrence as a month is gi7en of human Eualities5 25 *hen proud pied 9pril% dressed in all his trim .enor: Shakespeare playing 4ith the flo4ers5 0ehicle: 0he shado4 4hich is caused 1y the a1sence of his lo7e5 4round: 3e is still remem1ering his lo7e5 Alle!ory 9 character% in this case Gthe god SaturnH represents concepts as Gmelancholy% sadness% 1itterness% loneliness and senescenceH5 • .leaptH in line -5 o o o . . 1yper2ole *e can see an e. Simile 9n e. Ima!ery 5ine % y 8: !isual% sense of sight5 5ine *: 0actile% 7isual and aural5 5ine &: 9ural and olfactory5 5ine 6: 8lfactory5 5ine -: !isual and tactile5 '' .ample in line -5 -5 0hat hea7y Saturn laughed and leapt 4ith him • .plicit comparison 1et4een Gyour shado4H and G) 4ith these did playH% signed 4ith the 4ord GasH5 . . Same as line 2% there is another e. o o o • . .

Denotation 5ine %: Ga1scentH is used in its literal meaning5 /onnotation 5ine 8: G*hen proud. J. J.J.J.he type o rhyme From youI ha7e ) 1eenI a1sentI in the springI >iam1ic? >anapest? >trochee? >anapest? J.JJ.J.. '2 .J.. . • 5ine '# %(# %%# %8# %9: !isual5 5ine %*: !isual y tactile5 Diction )n summary% this poem is 4ritten in a formal 7oca1ulary5 • .J.J. *hen proudI.J.J.JJJ..J.JJ. • .J.J.J. J.pied 9Ipril dressedI in allI his trimI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? 3ath putI a spiIrit of youthI in eI7erythingI >iam1ic?>iam1ic?>anapest?>iam1ic?>iam1ic? 0hat heaI7y SaIturn laughtI and leaptI 4ith himI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? #et norI the laysI of 1irdsI nor theI s4eet smellI >iam1ic?>iam1ic?>iam1ic?>trochee?>spondee? J.J.pied 9pril dressed in all his trimH% this line has a dou1le sense% 1ecause it can+t 1e taken literally5 • .J.

J.J.J.JJJ.pied 9pril dressed in all his trim B &5 3ath put a spirit of youth in e7erything% A -5 0hat hea7y Saturn laughed and leapt 4ith him5 B 25 #et nor the lays of 1irds nor the s4eet smell / /5 8f different flo4ers in odour and in hue D C5 Could make me any summer6s story tell% / '& J.J. J.J.J. .J. J.J.J.J.JJ.JJJ.J.J.J.JJ.JJJ.J.8f diIfferent floI4ers in oIdour and in hueI >iam1ic?>iam1ic?>anapest?>anapest? Could makeI me aIny suImmer+s stoIry tellI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? 8r fromI their proudI lap KpluckI them 4hereI they gre4I >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? Bor did )I 4onder atI the liIly+s houseI >dactyl? >dactyl? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? J.J.J. J.JJJ.JJ.J.J. Bor praiseI the deepI 7ermiIlion in the roseI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >anapest? 0hey 4ereI 1ut s4eetI% 1ut fiIgures of delightI >iam1ic? >iam1ic?>iam1ic? >anapest? Dra4n afIter you% you Ipattern ofI all those5I >iam1ic? >anapest? >dactyl? >trochee? #et seemedI it 4inIter stillI% and% youI a4ayI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? 9s 4ithI your shaIdo4 ) I4ith theseI did playI >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? >iam1ic? '5 From you ha7e ) 1een a1sent in the spring% A 25 *hen proud.JJ.J. J.. . J.J J.J.J.J.

stanzas 4hich contain .lines >e.cept the last stanza that contain Dust t4o lines? and a structure of end rhymes in each line5 oreo7er% in terms of meter 4e can find some coincidence in some lines 4ith an iam1ic pentameter >e5g5% lines 2% -% C%=%'& and '-? and some others 4ith e.heme o the poem 0he theme in the Shakespeare+s sonnet @= refers to a person 4ho is separated from his lo7e% so he is hurt% neither the 1eautiful spring nor the songs of 1irds or the s4eet smell of the great Euantity of flo4ers that had in the place could make him happy ho4 the author mentioned in stanza num1er 2% lines '% 2% and &5 0he place 4as perfect% it 4as hot% it 4as sunny% the flo4ers 4ere 1looming e7ery4here% so there 4as no reason to 1e sad% 1ut he felt that 4ay5 0his is% 1ecause a melancholic feeling surrounded him% 4e ha7e to mention that 9pril refers to a time 4hen many things appear and change% the spring season is perfect to 1e accompanied% 1ut he felt ho4 if he 4as in 4inter% ho4 he mentioned in stanza num1er -% line ' so this man is unlucky for not ha7e the opportunity to enDoy the time 4ith her5 9lso% the author mentioned the missing of his youth% he sa4 all those young people 4ho enDoyed their youth and he remem1ered his o4n5 )n the stanza num1er '% line -% he talked a1out Saturn% no4adays% 4e kno4 Saturn as a planet 1ut in those times Saturn 4as kno4n as a God >a God of pessimism and melancholy?% and he said that e7en Saturn 4as cheerful% this means% that only him did not enDoy the 1eautiful spring and could not admire it% he had a '- .=5 8r from their proud lap pluck them 4here they gre4: D @5 Bor did ) 4onder at the lily6s 4hite% : '(5 Bor praise the deep 7ermilion in the rose: " ''5 0hey 4ere 1ut s4eet% 1ut figures of delight% : '25 Dra4n after you% you pattern of all those5 " '&5 #et seem6d it 4inter still% and% you a4ay% 4 '-5 9s 4ith your shado4 ) 4ith these did play5 4 0his sonnet 4as made up for fourteen lines% .ceptions in their rhythm5 Finally% the rhymes in the sonnet ha7e the Shakespeare+s common patron >9B9B% CDCD% EFEF% and GG? in other poems5 • .

lines% the '.ample% the structure of this poem follo4s the Shakespeare+s common pattern in terms of end rhymes >9B9B% CDCD% EFEF% GG?% in rhyme the use of iam1ic pentameter% the .stanzas that contains .ception5 3o4e7er% many characteristics of this sonnet can sho4 us multiples ideas of the author+s life: as 4e can see% a life 4ith melancholy% sadness% pain% etc5 0hey are feelings 4hich are depicted in his 4ork5 oreo7er% the analysis of this poem% gi7e us interesting details a1out the form of carry out a 4ork like poetry 1ecause seemingly% some patterns of this 4ork% are usually used in others: for e.or '/ lines in the poem% the theme that is related 4ith sadness and the specific things that are referenced to other cultures in the case of the personification of Saturn: considered 1y romans as a 7ery old god% and the pro1a1le reference that he made in the C line a1out the summer 1ecause he 4as not in summer 1ut in 4inter% or another possi1ility% is the reference to an old 4ork of him called 9 night+s dream 4hich is made up as a romantic comedy5 '2 idsummer .strong 4ish to come 1ack to those times5 0he atmosphere in this sonnet is mainly sad% despite of the spring% the a1sence of his lo7e and youth makes he feel sad5 /onclusion )n conclusion% 4e can say that most of the time% Shakespeare 4rote 7ery sad stories considering their past 4orks5 0his 4as not the e.

• • • • • • 97aila1le inL httpLII4445icarito5clI1iografiasIarticuloIsI2((@I'2I222.&'-C. 97aila1le inL httpLII4445nos4eatshakespeare5comIsonnetsI@=I For7o5 9ll the 4ords in the 4orld5 Pronounced ><une 2'st% 2((=? Sha!espeare 4Several pronun%iations6 97aila1le inL httpLIIes5for7o5comI4ordIshakespeareI BordEuist% Aichard5 0op 2( Figures of Speech5 97aila1le inL httpLIIgrammar5a1out5comIodIrhetoricstyleIaI2(figures5htm Collins C8BJ)LD >2((/? 9d7anced Learner+s English '/ onolingual Dictionary on CD.@. 97aila1le inL httpLII4445shakespeares.4illiam5shtml Gallardo Auiz% Eduardo >2('&? William Sha!espeare 3oems 45oo! Synthesis6 5 97aila1le inL httpLII4445a7anza1ooks5comIpoemas5html Shakespeare+s Sonnet5 Sonnet 7 8+++.)n addition% the metaphors that 4ere sho4ed in this poem had a relation 4ith a lo7e that he cannot reach for some reasons of destiny or disgrace5 )n our point of 7ie4% the poem 4as 7ery nice 1ecause not al4ays can 1e easy to represent feelings and emotions in a paper 4ith a lot of de.terity in 4riting% and not Dust feelings that he e.pressed in the poem 4ere right% 1ut the correct use of figures of speech 4hich you can see a1ility% dedication% de7otion% sensiti7ity and skillful5 Bi2lio!raphy . the inspirator of the modern theatre. sonnets5comIsonnetI@= Bo s4eat Shakespeare5 Sonnet -#9 0rom You 1ave + 5een Absent +n the spring. . We2lio!raphy • Biographies )carito ><anuary &rd% 2(''? William Sha!espeare. shakespeare.

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