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UNM SA+P

TruTh or ConsequenCes, new MexiCo


Building a CoMMuniTy Through design
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university of new Mexico. design and Planning assistance Center. school of architecture and Planning. new Mexico Mainstreet.
June 2011
June 2011
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dpac studio 2011
UNM SA+P
New Mexico Mainstreet program is a grassroots economic development program that assists communi-
ties in revitalizing their traditional commercial neighborhoods. a division of the New Mexico Economic
development department, Mainstreet works throughout New Mexico to help affliated downtown organi-
zations create an economically viable business environment while preserving local cultural and historic
resources.
the program provides resources, education, training and technical services that stimulate the economic
vitality of each participating community while celebrating local heritage and culture. Mainstreet is a con-
sensus-building program that fosters community pride and encourages the growth of small businesses,
consequently enhancing local employment and income opportunities, tax revenues, property values and
general quality of life.
Working with the Mainstreet program and the city of truth or consequences, the design and planning
assistance center (dpac) in the school of architecture and planning at the university of New Mexico car-
ried out this urban design study of the t or c business district. students from the programs of Landscape
architecture, and architecture developed design proposals that demonstrate an approach which identifes
twelve sites that were seen as catalysts for a robust evolution of the business area.
the process began with a session in which students and t or c residents collaborated to generate visions
and ideas for the rejuvenation of the business district and concluded with a public presentation of the de-
sign proposals in the t or c council chambers, and the production of this document.
steven alano
Ryan Bromberg
ana Hilda casado
seth Feriano
sam George
Gina Griego
Jenn Griggs
Joseph Grijalva
Michael Kilroy
Wensong Li
Elham Morovvati
Bailey porter
patrick sinnott
scott sutton
Jonathan sampson
drew seavy
sa+p Graduate students:
alf simon
Michaele pride
tim imeokparia
Rich Williams
Elmo Baca
cREdits
university of New Mexico
school of architecture and planning
design and planning assistance center
New Mexico Mainstreet
Mainstreet program: sa+p Faculty:
JuNE 2011
to the people of truth or consequences, New
Mexico for welcoming us into your community
and allowing us to examine your town. We hope
you fnd many useful ideas within these pages.
tHE tRutH
Furthermore, we appreciate the efforts of the New
Mexico Mainstreet program and the uNM instruc-
tors while directing us on such a large and valuable
project.
thank you,
UNM SA+P
JuNE 2011
artistic. Historic. Water. public. spas. Geothermal water. Groundwater. oxbow bend. Retirement. community building. Emerging. spaceport. Vacant buildings. potential. topography. Flooding. tourism. sunshine. Economic stimulation. Freeway.
1. coMMuNity aNaLysis aNd uNdERstaNdiNG
coNtENts
2. FRaMEWoRK MastERpLaN
3. cataLyst pRoJEct soLutioNs
4. coNcLusioN
pages 1-11
pages 12-19
pages 20-47
pages 48-49
artistic. Historic. Water. public. spas. Geothermal water. Groundwater. oxbow bend. Retirement. community building. Emerging. spaceport. Vacant buildings. potential. topography. Flooding. tourism. sunshine. Economic stimulation. Freeway.
coMMuNity aNaLysis aNd uNdERstaNdiNG
cHaptER 1
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a uNiquE pLacE to ExaMiNE
the town of t or c is one of the more unique places in all of
New Mexico. the distinct topography, geothermal activity,
proximity to the river, abundant sunshine, funky art scene
and out-going community all contribute to a small town rich
in resources and eager to share its exceptional charm. in
fact, as we observed t or c, it became evident that this is
a dynamic town with layers of inherent attributes, that could
represent both opportunities and challenges when
thinking about designing solutions for economic stim-
ulation. thus, as a class we undertook an in-depth
examination in order to better understanding the es-
sence of this peculiar desert town with its deceiving
abundance of water. the following pages illustrate a
little bit of how we got to know t or c.
truth or consequences, New Mexico
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Sierra County
Luna County
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Sierra County
Socorro County
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Spaceport America
Truth or Consequences
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92k visitors/ year
from I-10 and I-25
South Corridors
92k visitors/year
from I-40 and I-25
North Corridors
$250/family of 4/day
4 day average visit
19 existing hotels with 262
rooms in TorC, 1 future
hotel development with
unknown no. of rooms
$250/family of 4/day
2 day average visit
5k registered
visitors/year prior to
Spaceport America
construction
Estimated Spaceport visitors
represent an 1800% increase
in tourism to TorC, possibly
resulting in an additional $22m
of spending/year
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92k visitors/ year
from I-10 and I-25
$250/family of 4/day
2 day average visit
5k registered
visitors/year prior to
Spaceport America
construction
arrival of a spaceport:
one of the most signifcant changes to modern t or c will
be the arrival of spaceport america with a local visitors
center in town. Economic generation through tourism could
be abundant, but it is important to distinguish how the town
could be affected. Growth, it seems, is desirable to t or c
only if it contributes to the existing quality of town, and not
changing it into a spaceport gimmick. t or c offers visitors,
Sierra County
Socorro County Socorro County
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WitH aN EyE oN tHE FutuRE
and those seeking relocation, a respite from the speed
of everyday life: a trait that may be threatened with
thousands of new visitors per year. it is a balance,
we concluded, between maturing historic downtown
for both visitors and locals so that it becomes a viable
place for all while maintaining its special appeal.
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tHRouGH EyEs oF a coMMuNity
initial research began with a round table discussion and
town walk-through with interested community members.
the towns peculiar one-way road system and vacant build-
ings on Main street seemed to need attention. community
members, of course, had valuable insight into the conditions
leading to inexpensive rent, strange business hours, and
lack of people around downtown. perhaps the most inter-
esting conversations came when residents discussed
their own visions of truth or consequences and their
perception of its charm. unpretentious, funky, friendly,
oasis - these were a few adjectives used to describe
t or c. they were words that symbolized attributes
for which people came to t or c and they were attri-
butes that needed to be preserved. it was challenging,
community charrette:
sustainable. Friendly. Eco-rich. individually diverse. Healthy. clean. Green. oasis. Walkable. River potential. unpretentious. Eclectic. unique. Funky. Vibrant. creative. Relaxing. soothing. peaceful. cohesive. community. Balanced. affordable.
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sustainable. Friendly. Eco-rich. individually diverse. Healthy. clean. Green. oasis. Walkable. River potential. unpretentious. Eclectic. unique. Funky. Vibrant. creative. Relaxing. soothing. peaceful. cohesive. community. Balanced. affordable.
no doubt, to consider the voices of so many in order to in-
terpret a singular vision. instead we distilled the abundant
history, geography, hydrology, and diverse perspectives of
t or c until we began to understand the complicated issues
facing the community and how no single design solution
would be adequate. Rather, it was clear that t or c had
many wonderful things going for it while faced with sub-
stantial environmental and economic hurdles. only
a package of ideas would suffce and further in-depth
understanding would be necessary.
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aRtistic ELEMENts
one major strength in truth or consequences was an
emerging art scene that helped give identity to the old west-
ern outpost. We looked at historic buildings, art galleries,
and studios, identifying key locations or centers of concen-
tration. We also noted building murals, vibrant and colorful
spaces, unique sculptural pieces, signs, and architecture
that contributed to the funky, spontaneous nature of truth or
consequences. it was important to know where and
how art was manifested in town in order to strengthen
or disperse it with design solutions. these moments
of art, after all, represented community expression
and a playfulness with the urban environment.
physical artwork:
Expressive. past and present. Fusion. Visual. spontaneous. Gallery potential. playful. creative. diverse. Eclectic.
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t or c is faced with tremendous hydrological issues in
the form of stormwater runoff and a shallow water table.
though the town sees very little rainfall, it sits on an old
oxbow bend near the river and below signifcant topogra-
phy. this causes it to food, every time it rains. Because
fooding directly impacts Broadway and the towns econo-
my, it was important to understand how surface water fows
across the area. Groundwater, on the other hand,
was a blessing and a curse. though it provides easy
well access for hot springs owners, the high mineral
content and temperature stunted plants, and eroded
buildings. any new project would have to deal with
these issues or alleviate the consequences in some
way.
stoRMWatER issuEs
Water problems:
Multi-use. Rain gardens. Bio swales. Flooding. self-suffcient. Velocity. infltration basin. infrastructure integration.
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coMMuNity iNtEREsts
stimulating the historic district meant that is was important
to understand valuable physical locations in the area. the
class looked at municipal buildings, parks and commercial
areas that already had signifcant concentration or draw.
We also identifed spa/hotel locations that attracted large
numbers of visitors. Generally, it was important to under-
stand the spatial layout of the town determining concentra-
tions and vacancies in order to target places for fu-
ture catalyst projects. Furthermore, mapping public
amenities showed us the type of institutions that were
most used by the community and visitors, helping us
lay groundwork for a masterplan that could play on
existing strengths while utilizing local amenities.
public amenities:
Non-traditional. social connectivity. stimulate activity. Varied focal points. central community living room. Movement. Reduce Barriers. Lively and occupied. Walkable. intriguing. Exposure. animated. play to strengths. access. River use.
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Non-traditional. social connectivity. stimulate activity. Varied focal points. central community living room. Movement. Reduce Barriers. Lively and occupied. Walkable. intriguing. Exposure. animated. play to strengths. access. River use.
Locating areas that could actually be re-purposed or de-
veloped meant fnding a balance between publicly and pri-
vately owned property. on one hand, we envisioned our
catalyst projects contributing to the larger public which
meant city-owned buildings, streets and parks would be
primary sites. However, commercial entities and privately-
owned spas contribute independently to the overall com-
munity and shouldnt be neglected. thus, utilizing a
mapping overlay technique we plotted major munici-
pal areas compared to spas and commercial sites.
an obvious pattern began to take shape. Broadway
and Main street were the commercial avenues con-
nected by Foch street and there was a potential for a
public campus near the center of town.
open spaces and civic spaces:
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EcoLoGicaL aNd ENViRoNMENtaL VaRiaBLEs
Further examination of health and oasis as it applied to
t or c included looking at the environmental health of the
town. certainly people fock to town for its radiant winter
sunshine and rehabilitating geothermal pools, but a health-
ier community should include a deeper understanding of
its living biomes and how they coexist with the urban fab-
ric. taking a cross-section of town from the Rio Grande
to tank Hill, we were able to understand the diversity
of the place and that a living system could be stimu-
lated through increased connections for animals and
humans. the result would be an increased quality of
life for residents and a more desirable place for tour-
ists to visit.
Varied Environments:
pools. Rehabilitation. Health. identity. Riparian connectivity. Nutritional balance. shade and sanctuary. Ecology and biomes. Land and sky. universal ecology. pathways. Water. community Garden. Wayfnding. use of minerals. Habitat. systems.
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pools. Rehabilitation. Health. identity. Riparian connectivity. Nutritional balance. shade and sanctuary. Ecology and biomes. Land and sky. universal ecology. pathways. Water. community Garden. Wayfnding. use of minerals. Habitat. systems.
as analysis continued we began thinking about how these
many small pieces made up the whole. We understood
that there was no way to completely connect independent
places with one another. instead, areas of concentration
helped identify destination nodes that generalized certain
areas without deteriorating the individuality of t or c. We
thought that connecting high value nodes, either visually or
physically, could help strengthen pedestrian move-
ment while revealing the highlights to visitors. con-
necting the random dots would help us determine
where catalyst projects were needed and what form
they might take during design.
NodEs aNd patHWays
connections, Nodes and destinations:
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FRaMEWoRK MastERpLaN
cHaptER 2
sites with overlapping characteristics create opportunities to celebrate uniqueness and nourish a rich civic space.
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sites with overlapping characteristics create opportunities to celebrate uniqueness and nourish a rich civic space.
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EVaLuatioN
strengths:
overcome. Nevertheless, each location was valued as
an opportunity for a project intervention. strengths
included Ralph Edwards park, the Rio Grande, his-
toric buildings, Geronimo springs Museum, and some
of the more eclectic spas across town. interestingly,
many tourist-oriented destinations were located on
the east or north side of the historic district.
as the class began to develop a framework master plan,
specifc sites were evaluated for potential contribution to
new developments. this included drawing upon existing
buildings for inspiration and thinking about how to expand
upon the successes of local programs or businesses. de-
pending on how you look at it, existing locations could be
considered a strength of the community or a challenge to
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concerns, on the other hand, included the abundance of
vacant buildings in the area. Missing teeth were detri-
mental because they break up the pedestrian commercial
experience along Broadway and Main street. Furthermore,
the condition and location of historic sidewalks needed to
be addressed as did the lack of formalized signage around
town. it also became evident that two major areas on the
East and West sides of town would need to be de-
veloped in order to give more distinct identity to the
district. they could act as gateways or bookends for
a dense urban center. combining challenges with
opportunities revealed potential solutions directly rel-
evant to vacant lands and deteriorated buildings.
challenges:
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physical concentrations:
municipal buildings. the southeast part of town was
rich in art, while Ralph Edwards park was disconnect-
ed from Broadway. the west side was a bit neglect-
ed, but an important gateway for visitors to downtown.
With major elements distilled, a question remained:
how do we connect these target areas so that they
help serve t or c in a more cohesively way?
our analysis concluded with a meeting of the minds. Each
student brought the knowledge they had gained of t or c
to the table in order to resolve some of the most important
issues and physical sites. Map upon map was layered,
looking for relationships between places, concentrations of
strengths, and areas in need of attention. Foch street, was
an important connection to the center of town, as were the
distiLLiNG pHysicaL coNNEctioNs
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coNcEptuaL oRGaNizatioN
it was apparent that a large scale overhaul was not a viable
recommendation for revitalizing t or c. it was simply un-
feasible to universally redevelop even a single city street.
More importantly, we wouldnt want to because the strength
of truth or consequences as a place comes from its unique
individual character and eclectic elements. Embracing the
funky qualities was the answer, not homogeneity. We ad-
opted the metaphor of seeds and shoots for our plan.
By contributing thoughtful small catalyst projects in
precise locations, these would blossom and stimulate
nearby growth. this process would help preserve in-
dividuality, by allowing projects to be diverse, but it
would also promote future entrepreneurship and de-
velopment.
starting small, Growing Large:
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MastER FRaMEWoRK
this conceptual framework addresses historic downtown t
or c by stimulating unique points within the historic district,
thus contributing to the vitality of the whole while maintaining
individuality. Like a constellation, individual neighborhood
interventions connect in order to illustrate a bigger picture
of adaptable, multi-functional places. an analysis of exist-
ing conditions, desires of the community, and points
of overlapping conditions help determine a road-map
for catalyst sites within the town. By embracing t or
cs inherent eclecticism, this framework helps build
a unique sense of place in order to promote commu-
nity health and economic vitality. the Master plan was
a Framework For ideas:
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created to develop areas already rich in intrigue and artis-
tic value. some places address vacancies. some projects
target strategic locations in order to attract tourists. oth-
ers deal with environmental problems. primarily though,
interventions focus on the east-west corridor with gateways
on either end. North to south, Foch street is the focus,
connecting Main street to Broadway and solidifying
a town center. together the projects accentuate the
unique identity of t or c, promoting economic oppor-
tunity for residents and enriching the collective urban
landscape for both locals and visitors alike.
MastERpLaN
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cataLyst pRoJEct soLutioNs
cHaptER 3
Broadway street
Parking spaces
Vacant lot
community building projects. art as a resource. community participation. Nodes of activity. place making. For Visitors and locals. sense of identity. shade. Refuge. public art. community events. Recreation. corridor development. Key destinations.
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community building projects. art as a resource. community participation. Nodes of activity. place making. For Visitors and locals. sense of identity. shade. Refuge. public art. community events. Recreation. corridor development. Key destinations.
PROJECT LOCATIONS
EFFECTIVE AREA
SCALE 1 - CONTEXT MAP
SCALE 3 - CONTEXT MAP
DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
SALE 2 - CONTEXT MAP
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SCALE 2 CONTEXT
this map represents the neighborhood scale of the historic area of truth or
consequences. within this region, storm water is shed from urban spaces that are
impenetratable: including roof tops, parking lots, roadways and gravel lots.
complicated by a strong north-to-south elevation loss, the urban center has few water
mitigation spaces and little exposed soil accessible to storm water. with such a
minority of runoff allowed to infiltrate at the site-level, the water discharge increases
into nearby make-shift collection systems. once collected and traveling the
north-south elevation drop, the water gains significant force and momentum. historic
buildings and sidewalks act as the mitigation devices. at the furthest, southern end of
the historic area (broadway) the water rests, flooding the residences and businesses.
FACTS
the elevation change within this urban watershed, covering north-to-south, is roughly
45 vertical feet
annual rainfall is roughly 9 and follows the typical hydrologic cycle of the
southwestern u.s. (may-sept rainfall)
a square, quarter mile (1,742,400 sq ft or 40 acres) is identified within the field as the
limits of the storm water runoff system
field observations indicate storm water runoff coefficient is an average of .90,
indicating a heavy urban center with little grass or infiltration structures
ESTIMATES
the urban center discharges roughly 2 million gallons on any given 2 storm event (2
used as an average)
1,742,400 sq ft x 0.17 storm intensity x .90 runoff coeffiencent x 7.48 cbt ft to gallon
cnvt= 1,994,071 net gallons of stormwater runoff per event


SIDEWALK INFILTRATION PLANTERS
landscape plantings are typical urban street improvements. utilizing these
infrastructural sidewalk improvement to infiltrate storm water runoff from the adjacent
roadway means, collectively, a significantly lower volume of storm water will exist. a
secondary drainage system is faciliated through an elevated inlet that conveys water
to a french drain. ultimately this system would daylight within the final component of
the storm water system: the infiltration park.
ESTIMATES
20 ft x 5 ft x 2 ft (200 cb ft) x 7.48 cb ft to gallon cnvt = 1500 gallons per buffer
POCKET INFILTRATION PARK
as a medium scale storm water infiltration area, the pocket park performs as a
parking lot, vacant land, public garden, and mitigation effort. local building and
impermeable surface runoff is absorbed in the planting area while roads and
sidewalks can be crowned to absorb excess runoff from other, non-treated locations.
ESTIMATES
5100 cb ft x 7.48 cbt ft to gallon cnvt = 38250 gallons of storage per parking lot
SCALE 1 CONTEXT
truth or consequences is located within the southwestern quadrant of the state of new mexico. the historic area of
the city is located within an abandoned rio grande river oxbow. this affords the city with an abundance of spring
water from the unique geological condition. however, hydrologically the town is typical of a rural new mexico town:
naturally occuring arroyos exist northwest of the city center and channel percipitation to the river bank. since truth
or consequences is in position between those arroyos and the river front, two large detention basins have been
previously established along the corresponding watersheds north and northwest of the city. these infrastructural
installations shield the historic area from the larger water runoff issues normally associated with urban
development on a desert environment. within the older development areas, no dedicated storm water collection
system (curb & gutter) exists.
SCALE 3 CONTEXT
at the site-level, truth or consequences holds many opportunities to develop its public realm. historic sidewalks built by the w.p.a.
within the 1930s are currently employed as the primary pedestrian circulation infrastructure. these walks are in poor shape with
many missing, cracked, or buckling. though the preservation of this element presents as a constraint, the reuse of these pieces
within a historic capacity may serve the community better than as infrastructure. replacement provides the opportunity to develop
wider, high performance walks with infiltration basins. additional areas for infiltration include parking lots under utilized and small
vacant lands that could be developed as a pocket infiltration park.
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sidewalk
overflow drain
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native soil
planter/reservoir box curb cut
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permeable paving
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factor .25
2550 sq ft.
factor 2 = 5100 cubic ft
factor 7.5 = 38250 gallons
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pLacE MaKiNG tooLKit
Ryan Bromberg + Bailey porter
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this design proposes a visual element that is expandable
and alterable, which serves to unify and create connectivity
throughout the backbone of t or c. the materiality acts as a
graphic wayfnding device that cues into t or cs amenities,
businesses, landmarks and institutions. it is a collaborative
project that is achievable through the joint efforts of both the
public and private realm. its ability to adapt and morph into
urban amenities with a focus on seating, screening, plant-
ing, and gallery spaces, serve to activate the street culture
as a toolkit of parts. as the unifying element changes
planes, it creates spaces for pedestrians, businesses,
gatherings and shelter from the elements. this adds
a funky and modern contextual layer to the city that
becomes an urban artifact as t or c itself, evolves
and changes.
a Malleable character:
playful. Visual. creative. diverse. Vibrant. Eclectic. artistic. spontaneous. dynamic. unifed. Funky. Expressive.
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BRoadWay BacK aLLEy
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Green Concentration Variety
Commercial
Artistic & Cultural Residential
Sport
RiverWalk
Current Pictures Zones : Section-Diagrams
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slag, recycled concrete and/or
Subbase containing
recycled concrete
Pavement produced using
ground tire rubber
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Broadway Back Alley
Downtown Driveways
T or C Downtown
T or C solid and void
-
-
Broadway Back Alley
Creating a pathway bordered with gardens open to pedestrians and
bicyclists. There would be collapsible bollards at both ends of the gre-
enway restricting vehicular traffic. Buildings setbacks give us the op-
portunity of making the current alley more useable and integrated.
Design Zones and Functions
A beautiful pathway open to pedestrians and bicyclists to travel to and
from businesses and residences in the neighborhood. It makes the
neighborhood more walkable and rideable by providing safe and
attractive thoroughfares for people to visit businesses and residences.
At the same time, it helps to promote business expansion by trans-
forming them into a place people want to be. Vibrant, multi-use pedes-
trian alleyways can be an integral part of TorC.
Permeable Pavement
Recycled Construction Materials Benefits:
Benefits:
- Reduces the arte and quantity of stormwater
runoff
- Reduces stress on the sewer system
- Recharges ground water
- Filters silt, pollutants and debris
- Reduces waste hauled to landfills
- Reduces the need to extract virgin natural
resources
- Develops new technologies and saves money
Elham Morovvati
24
sustainable. diverse. Key destinations. secure. integration. public art. Gathering spaces. social connectivity. shade.
this beautiful pathway is open to pedestrians and bicy-
clists to travel to and from businesses and residences in
the neighborhood. Vehicles can also use the route. inject-
ing different functions and green zones, makes the envi-
ronment unique and helps calm traffc. a green alley helps
manage stormwater, reduces the urban heat island effect,
promotes recycling and conserves energy. the design has
three main attributes: the use of permeable pavements to
reduce stormwater runoff, highly refective pavements to re-
duce the generation of heat from the surface, and the
use of recycled material such as concrete aggregate,
slag and recycled tire rubber. additionally, alleys will
include diverse activities for people of all ages with a
diversity of functions. the alley begins at the new eco-
logical center, connects to the proposed plaza and
ends at the Riverwalk. this makes the alley a func-
tional, attractive and diverse pathway!
using overlooked spaces:
25
ana Hilda casado
MaiN stREEt stoRE FRoNts
26
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snaoe e|emenr.
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mak|ng rn|s e|emenrs o|gger ano rransparenr.
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un|que ano can oe use ro p|ace s|gnage.
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lmprove rne lacaoe ol rne ou||o|ng o, repa|nr|ng, cnang|ng r||es,
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Walkability. identity. infrastructure. integration. Expressive. Fusion. Visual. Vibrant. diverse. attractive. Eclectic.
the objective of the storefront design is to enhance the ap-
pearance of the commercial area. the goal is to maintain
the existing eclecticism on Main street. this is achieved by
improving or adding single elements to buildings in order to
update the feeling of the place while maintaining its charm.
street trees provide continuity along the corridor and will
work as an important shade element. signs should be inte-
grated in the storefront design. Windows and doors provide
a clear thru-way and visual connection. awnings empha-
size the store or restaurant entrance and should be
unique to the building. container gardening creates
an appealing entrance and increases green space.
contemporary materials improve the facade of the
building. simple changes such as re-painting, chang-
ing tiles and re-fnishing wood can make a striking dif-
ference. the street edge of empty parking lots may be
addressed by installing a unique fence or other ele-
ment to maintain continuity and enliven the street.
updated Materials:
27
WatER oN tHE stREEtscapE
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sam George
28
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Water. public space. connection. Wayfnding. Beauty. infrastructure. secondary use. public art. Geothermal.
this project endeavors to build a public identity by introduc-
ing a system of art. this is accomplished by un-burying a
piece of civic infrastructure, the mineral water pipes leaving
the spas, and providing them with an artistic expression. it
also provides an opportunity for local ceramics artisans to
showcase their skill and supports sustainability by revealing
the towns water resource which is usually hidden. it builds
up the public sphere and aids in way-fnding by creating
public art and paths. the system facilitates access, pro-
viding places to sit and relax, and leads pedestrians
across town. it provides function by serving as wa-
ter infrastructure, while the fowing water has a psy-
chological cooling effect. Furthermore, it helps create
commodity by advertising the abilities of local artisans
and reveals the location of local spas. Finally, it cre-
ates delight by providing beauty through its color and
form, providing Kodak points for tourists and an iden-
tity for the town.
Revealing Water:
29
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CONCRETE PAVING
water conveyence
TREE PLANTING BEDS
passive water infiltration
PLANTING RESERVOIRS
active water infiltration
ELEVATION CHANGE
D
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WATER MOVEMENT
1. looking south
2. looking east
3. looking north
CIRCULATION
PLANTING ZONES
iNFiLtRatioN paRK
DESIGN STATEMENT: mitigation of the destructive urban element of storm water within an artistic manner that works both functionally and aes-
thetically: serves both as a necessity and an ammenity; creates infrastructure and enhances the public realm; labels the notion of seperate land
uses within an urban context as antiquated and inefficient; and focuses on performance of land and how diverse requirements can be harmonized
within a small parcel.
ACTIVE-DRAIN PATHWAY
at-grade primary planting bed doubles as drainage system but is the high point within
the system to prevent root deterioration and direct water to suitable locations
throughout the park. the surface is made up of fine grade aggregate and subsequent
levels are traditional planting methods with the addition of a drainage cell to alleviate
any standing water.
TOOLED CHANNELS
creates a low-flow water conduit to convey low volumes of water to local infiltration
basins and acts a first-pass system for penetration into the regional soils. channels
are made up of open, enlarged expansion joints. within a concrete paving system.
WATER RESERVOIR
high volumes of water need area to disperse. these heavily vegetated areas detract
from the harsh, formal edges of the rectalinear site while providing increased water
storage. the primary channel covers the edges of the site and is systematically
connected through culverts underneath prepared tree planting beds.
WATER STAIRCASE
controls high-flow water through action of stepping. this allows the replacement of
forward momentum with downward force to mitigate the erosive nature of water on
land. noise and sight would be enhanced by the contrasting elements of hard
concrete lines with the soft movement of water.
NATIVE SHRUBS
commonly found in arroyos and natural channels in new mexico, efficient
southwestern plantings demonstrate the flexibility to withstand periods of dought as
well as high intensity hydration. new mexico hydrologic cycle is paralleled within the
infilitration park thus making native plants ideal.
T

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INFILTRATION PLANTING BASINS
collects, holds, and mitigates water at high intensity storm events absorbing debris
and toxic contanmenants. water is utilized by native, showy plantings eliminating the
need for long-term irrigation systems. strategic channels connect infill basins.
fast
natural
reservoir
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DETAIL - SECTION
1
3
0
3
8
stone aggregate
native soil
slow
fill
I
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DETAIL - SECTION
0
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4 native soil
ammended
aggregate
natural
medium
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DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
DETAIL - SECTION
37
2
0
factor 0.66 = 4375 sq. ft
factor 7.5 = 65,000 gl. capacity
water staircase on river torrens
in south australia
39
2
1
0
force of water
concrete 0
1
1
aggregate
factor 2 = 8745 cbt. ft
p
la
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ie
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2
DESIGN STATEMENT: mitigation of the destructive urban element of storm water within an artistic manner that works both functionally and aes-
thetically: serves both as a necessity and an ammenity; creates infrastructure and enhances the public realm; labels the notion of seperate land
uses within an urban context as antiquated and inefficient; and focuses on performance of land and how diverse requirements can be harmonized
within a small parcel.
ACTIVE-DRAIN PATHWAY
at-grade primary planting bed doubles as drainage system but is the high point within
the system to prevent root deterioration and direct water to suitable locations
throughout the park. the surface is made up of fine grade aggregate and subsequent
levels are traditional planting methods with the addition of a drainage cell to alleviate
any standing water.
TOOLED CHANNELS
creates a low-flow water conduit to convey low volumes of water to local infiltration
basins and acts a first-pass system for penetration into the regional soils. channels
are made up of open, enlarged expansion joints. within a concrete paving system.
WATER RESERVOIR
high volumes of water need area to disperse. these heavily vegetated areas detract
from the harsh, formal edges of the rectalinear site while providing increased water
storage. the primary channel covers the edges of the site and is systematically
connected through culverts underneath prepared tree planting beds.
WATER STAIRCASE
controls high-flow water through action of stepping. this allows the replacement of
forward momentum with downward force to mitigate the erosive nature of water on
land. noise and sight would be enhanced by the contrasting elements of hard
concrete lines with the soft movement of water.
NATIVE SHRUBS
commonly found in arroyos and natural channels in new mexico, efficient
southwestern plantings demonstrate the flexibility to withstand periods of dought as
well as high intensity hydration. new mexico hydrologic cycle is paralleled within the
infilitration park thus making native plants ideal.
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INFILTRATION PLANTING BASINS
collects, holds, and mitigates water at high intensity storm events absorbing debris
and toxic contanmenants. water is utilized by native, showy plantings eliminating the
need for long-term irrigation systems. strategic channels connect infill basins.
fast
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DETAIL - SECTION
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DETAIL - SECTION
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2
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factor 0.66 = 4375 sq. ft
factor 7.5 = 65,000 gl. capacity
water staircase on river torrens
in south australia
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water conveyence
TREE PLANTING BEDS
passive water infiltration
PLANTING RESERVOIRS
active water infiltration
ELEVATION CHANGE
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WATER MOVEMENT
1. looking south
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3. looking north
CIRCULATION
PLANTING ZONES
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CONCRETE PAVING
water conveyence
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ELEVATION CHANGE
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WATER MOVEMENT
1. looking south
2. looking east
3. looking north
CIRCULATION
PLANTING ZONES
stormwater mitigation. Bio swales. sustainable. infrastructure integration. Bio-infltration. Water expression. sound.
this design mitigates destructive urban stormwater run-
off by creating a space that is both a functional solution to
seasonal fooding and an aesthetically unique place for the
community. this new type of park serves both as a necessity
and an amenity combining infrastructure and place. Water
is collected throughout town and then dispersed in a sys-
tem of cascading runnels that direct storm water to thirsty
plants. a water staircase controls high-fow water through
the action of stepping. this replaces forward momentum
with downward force in order to mitigate erosion while
turbulence introduces oxygen, helping clean runoff.
the sound and sight of fowing water are desirable
consequences that may be enhanced by contrasting
hard concrete with the soft movement of water. the
fowing basin enhances the area and antiquates ideas
of strict engineering for stormwater. Rather, the focus
is on how diverse requirements can be harmonized
within a small parcel.
a stormwater amenity:
31
coRNER oasis
Main Water Flow
Secondary Flow
Proposed Designed Stormwater
Capacity of Approx. 250,000 Gallons
Secondary Flow
Michael Kilroy
32
attractive. oasis. affordable. artistic. playful. Bio-swale. unique. Multi-use. amenity. stormwater mitigation. shade.
t or c lacks basic stormwater infrastructure that can chan-
nel, flter and collect runoff. a moderate rainstorm of per
hour produces approximately 170,000 gallons of water on
the street surfaces in the water tank hill area. after care-
ful analysis the corner of Foch and Main street became
an important site for storm water management due to the
unique surrounding topography. this design transforms
the existing corner into an oasis with the ability to hold ap-
proximately 250,000 gallons of run-off utilizing a series of
swales along the edges of the site. unique land forms
also reveal areas of interest that people can enjoy.
Natural topography and the constructed berms direct
water into the collection areas. due to the high ve-
locity of water, vegetation is used to reduce erosion
and help strengthen soil conditions. With these simple
practices the once fat site is transformed into a func-
tional storm water system as well as place of interac-
tion for the community of t or c.
a Foch street solution:
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taNK HiLL oasis
by scott sutton
drew seavy
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spontaneous. Water celebration. Micro-climate. accessibility. intrigue. Refuge. Event. cooling. identity. Views.
this project is an opportunity to reclaim a critical area in
t or c that currently lies in disarray, dotted with trash and
eroding slopes. the proposed design takes the extreme
topography above downtown and accentuates it by creat-
ing places of refuge within the landscape. paired with geo-
thermal water, an extension of what one experiences in
palomas park below, this site is speckled with moist con-
ditions, shade, and wind protection. the walkway up to the
terrace is ada accessible, at a 1:16 slope with landings at
30 feet. if one wishes to continue to the top of the hill
to a proposed lookout structure and water feature,
there is a primitive switch-back trail above the public
terrace. above, views of the caballo Mountains add
to the vista. thus, the hill will be transformed into
an accessible, clean, erosion-resistant environment
that fosters plant life and connects to the Geronimo
springs Museum and the town below.
Hillside Microclimates:
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aRt aNd oasis
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Nodes
Current Spas
Historic Spas
Parks
River & Wetlands WW
Buildings & Roads
Site Interventions
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Water Tank Hill Oasis
Pocket Oasis
Bus Stop Shade Structure
Shade Structure
Rio Grand Pedestrian Bridge
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scott sutton
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oasis. Wayfnding. Nodes. spas. Environment. culture. History. Material. Economical. Refuge. shade. connectivity.
these site interventions are sculptural art forms that re-
veal the history, culture and environment of truth or con-
sequences. For centuries the healing waters have been a
destination of past cultures seeking refuge from the desert.
apache tribes and mining spectators were drawn to the
area because of the mineral rich hot springs. it is within this
context that these sculptural forms are inspired while pro-
viding multi-functional elements specifc to t or c. these
installations provide shade and refuge for locals and visi-
tors, as well as reveal the nature of the hot springs by
allowing grey water of the spas to re-emerge. By cre-
ating engaging sculptural elements that act as way-
fnding devices and pockets of oasis, these solutions
strengthens the identity of health and oasis in t or c.
the waters and mineral resources become the foun-
dation on which these designs are inspired, creating
a direct connection to the essence of the place that
refects upon the past.
Mico-oasis:
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aRBoREtuM aNd coMMuNity couRtyaRd
patrick sinnott + Joseph Grijalva
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Scale 1:10
Scale 1:10
central location. Market spaces. activates Broadway. private and public use. Economic generator. identity. Multi-use.
this project seeks to retain the essence of t or c as an
environmentally conscious funky town that celebrates art
and agriculture, by creating a central community courtyard
that is framed by a tree specifc greenhouse. it becomes a
destination for visitors and tourists, but more importantly,
directly stimulates downtown as a market and gathering
place. design components within the space serve multiple
functions in order to more completely serve the community.
stormwater, solar energy, and geothermal energy are used
to create a protected retreat for the community while
maintaining t or cs unique character. the site acti-
vates Broadway, attracts people, and connects to the
larger historic district. But it also functions as a storm-
water basin capable of holding hundreds of thousands
of gallons until it is needed for plants on site. this
space acts as a central town plaza; fexible for differ-
ent events, iconic to t or c, and locally relevant.
Multi-functional spaces
39
GEotHERMaL GREENHousE
seth Feriano
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sustainable. urban farming. Geothermal heating. year round growing. central location. social. community building.
this geothermal greenhouse promotes sustainability on
multiple levels. the greenhouse utilizes geothermal waters
to heat the interior space radiantly. the direct beneft of this
renewable resource is year round food production. Local
food production would be welcomed by residents, while
offsetting the demand for organic produce that is typically
shipped in from distant places. the size of the greenhouse
is generous (32 spaces @ 200 sq. ft. each) and could pro-
duce abundant food. spaces could be rented much like at
the existing community gardens, promoting communi-
ty involvement. after harvest, sales could occur in the
plaza, in a farmers market style setting, beneftting lo-
cal residents and stimulating downtown activity. utiliz-
ing this central location, t or cs geothermal resource,
and abundant sunshine helps support downtown as a
viable, healthy destination for locals and tourists alike.
Locally Grown Food:
41
RiVERWaLK
Wensong Li
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unifed. Walkable. Friendly. Relaxing. Water amenity. oasis. destination. activity. Renewable energy. public pools.
the purpose of this proposal is to integrate the downtown
with the public lands on the East side of the Rio Grande.
through this process, a recreational and ecological gate-
way resort is developed for both residents and visitors. a
long trail and a two-layer river walk (riverbank walk and
boardwalk) connect three green spaces along the West
side of the Rio Grande with the town. an outdoor hot spring
spa is created close to the river, offering the unique geo-
thermal characteristics of t or c for public use. it is refect-
ed by a meandering trail through public lands on the
East side of the river that could allow natural activities
for the pedestrians and bicyclists to enjoy the desert
environment.
public access:
43
WEst GatEWay: uRBaN EcoLoGy
Jenn Griggs
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Visibility. Water mitigation. Health. community gathering. Refuge. Locally unique. Evening activity. Education.
the design concept for the west gateway is urban ecol-
ogy, or the relationships between various critters, the en-
vironment, and people in an urbanized community. t or c
is a large environmental system of diversity. it is built on
fault lines and hot springs which attract people for retreat
and healing. Healing itself is a process that often requires
upheavals in the way we think about our environment and
ourselves. therefore, upheaval is a metaphor for the proj-
ect: vegetation breaks through concrete in a benefcial
symbiotic relationship between people and their living
ecosystem. the hills formed on site break through the
urban landscape mitigating stormwater speed and by
letting it permeate into the ground. the hills also func-
tion as pollinator habitats becoming a place for people
to enjoy. Located in the vacant bar, a living classroom
demonstrates ecological gardens and how to make
habitats from recycled goods. ultimately, education
aids in species survival and shifts ideas of health.
a Healthy Environment:
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WELcoME cENtER
WELCOME CENTER
PRE-FABRICATED PODS
steven alano + Gina Griego
46
destination. Experience. identity. connections. Retro-futurism. symbiotic. Fusion. Gateway. Funky. Modern.
in a place where the funky is valued, the Welcome center
is a destination that flters visitors to downtown, but also
recalls an era when Hot springs, New Mexico came to be
called truth of consequences. the center connects t or c
to the outside world; acting as a physical gateway to space-
port america but also as a portal to t or c itself. the build-
ing exploits the existing cMu frehouse walls as a shell but
places pre-fabricated modular pods inside to accommodate
the dual programmatic needs of the building.
the design keeps with a retro-futuristic theme, where
the imagined future is seen through the stylized tech-
nology of the past. the prefabricated pods do not in-
tegrate with the existing structure, but rather are to
be perceived as separate objects. Much like the sym-
biotic relationship of local cacti growing out of rock,
the relationship of the Welcome center to downtown
is paramount to create a fusion of past, present and
future.
past, present, and Future:
47
coNcLusioN
cHaptER 4
individually, each project offers thoughtful solutions for
truth or consequences unique town planning challenges
while preserving the towns small community feel and
eclectic character. But the major goal was connecting each
catalyst site to one another in a way that strengthens the
health, quality of life, commercial viability, and safety for the
people who live there. While this package of class projects
presents an overall vision for truth or consequences, it also
represents an acupuncture-like approach for urban renewal.
Because the community is made up of individual
riches, so must any master plan. therefore, it is our
hope that these projects help identify and promote the
wonderful inherent charm of truth or consequences.
We hope that these projects offer helpful suggestions
and creative ideas for how the downtown could evolve
and that the towns character is strengthened, not
changed.
opportunities for change:
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CONCRETE PAVING
water conveyence
TREE PLANTING BEDS
passive water infiltration
PLANTING RESERVOIRS
active water infiltration
ELEVATION CHANGE
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WATER MOVEMENT
1. looking south
2. looking east
3. looking north
CIRCULATION
PLANTING ZONES
INTRODUCTION CONSTRAINTS ANALYSIS GOALS PROJECTS CONCLUSION
OVERVIEW PLN
perhaps, over time, some of these ideas may be put to use
in different capacities. if so, may the community of truth or
consequences fnd as much value within these pages as
we did while exploring their town.
49