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CITY COUNCIL APPROVES FUNDING FOR WILDERNESS PARK MASTER PLAN/PAGE 4
Friday, December 13, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

The The joy joy

of of Christmas Christmas
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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Twelve-year-old Janessa Singley seems to have found the tree she wants on Saturday while shopping at Brockʼs Christmas Tree Farm in north Claremont. Janessa and her family have been shopping at Brockʼs for years.

An international display at Pilgrim Place / PAGE 10

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Claremont’s on the rise/

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Homebuilding boom has residents asking, “Is it too much, too soon?”

Carol Gil, curator of the Petterson Museum, views a modernist nativity from Scandinavia at Pilgrim Place.

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 12

LETTERS/ PAGE 2 CALENDAR/ PAGE 16

All the holiday happenings are described here. Visit our website: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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READERS’ COMMENTS
The envy of the valley
Dear Editor: I was pleased to read that the Claremont Unified School District was able to develop creative and organic ways of raising money by selling unused properties in the district. To my astonishment, and great joy, the money raised garnered more than onethird the money that Measure CL would have collected, without putting undue burden on the taxpayers here in Claremont. I hope our leaders in the district will be judicious with the money. I am sure the community is optimistic that their priorities are to pay down debts and put it in the classrooms to guarantee cutting-edge educational opportunities are abundant in Claremont. Let’s continue the trend of our property values being the envy of the San Gabriel Valley.
Donna Lowe Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Claremont is quiet. College finals start next week. Time for studying.
—Sandra Glass Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter
Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Free-market health care

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Dear Editor: Merrill Ring (“Two cheers for Obamacare”) glosses over ACA’s fatal flaws. President Obama’s promise that we could keep our policies and our doctors was deception and fraud at the highest level, as we now find out that ACA was designed from the very beginning to force every-

one into a government-approved plan. Everyone, that is, except for favored unions and Congress folk. Sooner or later, the rest of us will lose our policies and many will lose their doctors. Politicians and bureaucrats now tell us what we can buy and what we can't, what doctors we can see, and what treatments are approved. When you give everyone the “right” to health care you must restrict the rights of health care practitioners, who become government slaves that receive whatever payment the government deems is right. No wonder so many doctors are opting out. Pretty soon, only the rich will enjoy high-quality health care; everyone else will be at the mercy of a system that is subject to government controls, shortages and sky-high prices. The ranks of the uninsured are already increasing. ACA was poorly conceived, poorly designed and poorly executed. It will prove to be a monumental failure and an expensive lesson for us all: Government is not capable of redesigning one-sixth of our economy and should never ever have tried. There are many ways to improve health care that don’t involve coercion and top-down control. We need to get government out of the business of managing our health and give the free market a chance. Scott Grannis
Claremont

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Monday, December 16 Tree Committee Council Chamber, 6 p.m. Tuesday, December 17 Planning Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 18 Public Art Master Plan Public Meeting Hughes Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, December 24 City Council—Cancelled

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

Intern Ryan Gann

one hundred and fifth year, number 56

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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Will Claremont’s new housing change the face of the city?

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he recent sale of a large piece of surplus property in north Claremont to an Orange County home developer, coupled with progress in multiple housing tracts throughout the city of Claremont, has locals asking a pressing question: Is greater housing density changing the face of Claremont?

Undeveloped land across Claremont has grown scarcer in recent months as a multitude of development projects begin their long-anticipated moves forward. Six different developers are advancing with housing developments that are set to add approximately 694 new housing units to the City of Trees, only 114 of which are detached single-family homes, according to Brian Desatnik, director of community development. The lack of new single-family homes has drawn concern from local realtors as the city moves forward with high-density complexes.   “We are flooding the city way too fast,” said local realtor Ryan Zimmerman. “It’s going to overcrowd the neighborhoods.” Realtors point out that many potential Claremont homebuyers are seniors looking to downsize into single-story homes that are easier to navigate and care for. At the same time, first-time buyers with children might not want a townhouse because such homes typically do not have yards.   “Builders these days are single-family home averse because they are not as profitable for them,” Mr. Zimmerman said. “And if they are for single-family homes, they are building them on little postage stamps, which isn’t okay.” Last week, news over the sale of a 9.7-acre parcel of surplus property at 2475 N. Forbes Ave. to an Irvine home developer sparked further debate on Claremont’s housing future. Dozens of residents posted comments on a Facebook link to the COURIER story, with concerns ranging from overcrowding of the city and its schools to the loss of the neighborhood’s character. The Claremont Unified School District property, once home to the short-lived La Puerta Intermediate School, raked in $18,875,000 for the school district on November 21 from the district’s highest bidder, Brandywine Homes. The transaction is currently underway. Brandywine President Brett Whitehead insists the company has no plans to build a housing complex. Instead, Mr. Whitehead says the company wants to build 62 large homes at around the million-dollar price point. Each would be between 3,000 to 4,000 square feet. “We feel there is a lot of pent-up demand for move-up housing,” Mr. Whitehead said. “It’s a market we feel hasn’t been served for a number of years.” The history of La Puerta is marked by stops and starts, with the school district making several unsuccessful attempts at a purposeful use of the land. La Puerta and the surrounding area was used for agricultural purposes until 1967. Then, in 1968, CUSD purchased the property for a second middle school after El Roble became overcrowded. When La Puerta Intermediate School closed in 1979, the city of Claremont entered into a 99-year lease agreement with CUSD for
DEVELOPING CLAREMONT/page 5

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Traffic on Interstate 210 passes under Monte Vista Avenue adjacent to the Citrus Glen development, which is currently under construction at the corner of Monte Vista and Base Line Road in Claremont. After years of little to no home construction in Claremont, there are several new developments emerging throughout the city.

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger

urvivors of the Abortion Holocaust” demonstrator Kristina Garza, from Rancho Cucamonga, speaks with Claremont High School student Alex Matzavinos in front of the school Tuesday afternoon. This was part of the organization’s ongoing effort to end abortion. In addition to engaging students in conversation, outreach members had an effective attention-grabber: posters with graphic images of fetuses that Ms. Garza described as “victims of abortion.” “I know it’s difficult to take in and I agree it’s graphic, but it’s important to look at these victims and see exactly what abortion does,” she said. The group took to a second location, The Claremont Colleges, on Tuesday morning and again on Wednesday. There were no reports of conflict or unrest.

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CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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City council begins next phase of open space preservation

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s the city moves forward with townhome complexes and housing developments, officials are also taking a step in the preservation of local open space.
The Claremont City Council Tuesday approved a six-figure master plan to comprehensively address concerns at the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park, coming in at just over $200,000. For several years, the city council has been working to address overcrowding, littering and safety issues at the popular north Claremont landmark. While some fixes have been adopted, like restricting visitor hours and charging users for parking, in July the council agreed to move forward with a master plan to address overarching goals at the park. With the council’s unanimous approval, MIG, Inc.—a Berkeley-based consulting company that specializes in recreational areas—will lead the city’s work in analyzing the popular public leisure spot to create an inventory of existing conditions at the park, examine the park’s carrying capacity, evaluate parking, develop a site map and create a public participation plan. Additionally, the council added a resource management plan to the overarching master plan, to discuss ways of protecting and enhancing the park’s natural wildlife. Councilmembers hope the finished product will help the city better manage the park as a recreational destination for current park enthusiasts while preserving

“The number of public meetings and the involvement of the public will allow us to fully evaluate the issues that are at hand for a variety of the stakeholders involved in this park,” Ms. Grill said. “By increasing the amount of public participation, we may gain the most creative solutions that may not be obvious until we engage a number of the public stakeholders.” Not all were on board with the plan. Claremont resident Hugh Wire, who has started a petition with a few other locals who were recently cited for staying in the park after hours, said he would like to see the plan focus more on community outreach. “These people [park users] are not just COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff a problem. They are not just a threat to The Claremont City Council approved funding Tuesday night for a Claremont Wilderness Park master plan, which aims to address environmental and recre- the environment and not just problems to the residents. They are people that are ational concerns related to the popular hillside. making themselves healthy and they are the space for generations to come. Wildlands Conservancy. potential allies,” Mr. Wire said. “Rather “The word is balance,” said CounThough satisfied overall with the pro- than people to be regulated, these are cilmember Sam Pedroza. “It is a balance posal’s scope of work, Ms. Peterson em- sentient human beings that have ideas between the natural resource we have phasized the importance of addressing and willingness.” here and it is a balance between the the park as both a recreational opportuWith park usage close to 300,000 peorecreation amenities…and it is also a bal- nity as well as an environmental resource ple, Councilmember Larry Schroeder ance with the neighborhood. to be protected. pointed out to Mr. Wire that the city has “What we are doing here tonight, I “We don’t want to lose the natural worked hard to communicate with park know it’s a tall order...but I think we do beauty and the natural qualities that are users, through the city’s website, rehave very engaged residents that want to there in our foothills, so preservation is peated public meetings and signs posted spend that expansive amount of time to extremely important to us. This is a great at the park itself. commit themselves to making sure we environmental resource that we have all City officials say they will continue to are doing this right,” he finished. worked to save and that we hope to con- engage the public in finding solutions to After months of city reviews, which tinue to expand.” the wilderness park overcrowding in the included community input, residents Fellow conservancy member Terry months and year ahead, as work on the seem largely pleased with the city’s due Grill also weighed in, thanking city offi- master plan gets underway. The estidiligence in moving the plan forward. cials for employing an open process of mated completion date of the plan is “We have been waiting for this night developing a master plan, and emphasiz- January 2015. for a long time,” said Lissa Peterson, ing the importance of keeping the public —Beth Hartnett president of the board of the Claremont engaged in the work ahead. news@claremont-courier.com parking lot on Sunday afternoon. A woman sitting in her parked car along with a baby and a dog claims a man in the backseat of the car next to her brandished what appeared to be a black handgun at her and her pet, allegedly threatening to shoot if the dog attacked. The car drove off without incident, but not before the woman could snap a picture of the vehicle’s license plate. The driver was stopped and police were able to locate an unloaded BB gun. The minor was cited for exhibiting a firearm. Monday, December 9 On Sunday, November 24, a 47-yearold Claremont man was taken into custody after a several-hour struggle atop California Bank and Trust in the Claremont Village. On Monday, December 9, the man took to the rooftops of the 200 block of First Street once again, appearing agitated and threatening as before to jump off the building and kill himself, according to Lt. Ciszek. Police were again able to take the man into custody without incident. He was transported to a local hospital for a mental evaluation.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

POLICE BLOTTER
Friday, December 6 Activity in the Village got a jumpstart before the scheduled tree lighting ceremony on Friday evening. At around 1:30 p.m., a Claremont police officer observed a vehicle stopped at the intersection of Arrow Highway and Indian Hill Boulevard that was related to a strong-arm robbery reported in Claremont earlier in the day. When the driver saw the police officer, he attempted to flee by driving northbound on Indian Hill Boulevard. The pursuit ended on Oberlin Avenue, north of First Street in the Claremont Village, where the driver abandoned the vehicle and fled on foot. As the driver ran away, he stripped off his T-shirt and a bulletproof vest. A kilo of cocaine was located in the vehicle believed to belong to the suspect. While the driver was not located, a passenger, Sandra Diaz, 20, of Rancho Cucamonga was booked at the Claremont jail for the misdemeanor violation of possessing a methamphetamine pipe. She was later released with a citation The related strong-arm robbery occurred at 7 a.m. in the 1400 block of Morton Circle. The victim alleged that friends of an acquaintance came into her apartment and stole property including cash, keys to her vehicle and electronics. When she attempted to stop them, a television was thrown at her and used to hold her down to the ground. The suspects fled the scene in the victim’s vehicle. Investigation is ongoing. Saturday, December 7 A black-hooded sweatshirt did little to disguise a 28-year-old Rancho Cucamonga resident who was up to no good in the Claremont Village Saturday night. A witness spotted Kevin Pierce rifling through an unlocked vehicle in the back parking lot of Espiau’s Restaurant, 109 Yale Ave., at around 8 p.m. Police caught up with him nearby. Not only was Mr. Pierce found in possession of a black and silver metal case that did not belong to him. He also had on his person a sock filled with hypodermic needles and a bundle of heroin, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. He was arrested for possession of a controlled substance, drug paraphernalia and petty theft. Sunday, December 8 A barking dog was the last straw for a frustrated man in the Super King

Burglars breaking rear sliding glass doors to gain entry
A homeowner in the 400 block of Holyoke Place received an unexpected houseguest Tuesday morning. It started when the resident heard aggressive knocking on the front door around 11 a.m. As he walked toward the door, he heard glass shattering from behind him and spotted a male dressed in a blue nylon jacket and dark pants attempting to enter the home through a broken rear sliding glass door, according to police. The suspect fled on foot and was last seen running south on Mills Avenue. He is described as black male, about 25 years old with short hair, approximately 5 feet 8 inches tall with a stocky build. Four other residential burglaries, including the incident at Holyoke Place, have occurred in the northeast area of Claremont north of Base Line Road between December 5 and December 10, according to police. Each crime occurred between 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and in each case a burglar gained entry by smashing a rear sliding glass window. Any suspicious activity should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at (909) 399-5411.

EDUCATION
DEVELOPING CLAREMONT continued from page 3

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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use of the back portion of La Puerta for a city sports park. In 2003, with their sights set on opening another elementary school, CUSD launched an environmental analysis of the location, which revealed the presence of arsenic and petroleum hydrocarbons, among other contaminants. The toxins were successfully removed in 2004. The plans for La Puerta Elementary School, which would have been the district’s eighth elementary school, never materialized after Measure Y money ran out. The district abandoned the project in late 2004. An amendment to the city-school district lease agreement was made in 2007, after the city council approved a 70-foot-tall cell phone tower on the site. In 2008, Carrie Allen, then CUSD director of secondary education, presented the board of education with a 5-year plan to increase technical education. With the district offices moved to the adult education building on San Jose Avenue, work on the future CHS Career Techinical Center to be located at La Puerta began with a targeted opening of 2010. This second attempt by the district to use the land was also abandoned when lack of funding caused the district to wind down the effort. The CUSD board deemed the site surplus in late 2012. The eminent sale of the property will not impact the lease agreement between the city and CUSD for use of the sports park, which doesn’t generate any money for the district, according to Mr. Desatnik. “Brandywine’s deal will not affect our lease,” he said. City officials have yet to meet with or have any discussions with Brandywine about development plans, according to Mr. Desatnik. The price tag, however, has left many uneasy about what it might mean for the surrounding neighborhood, which is zoned as residential with single-family homes that are required to be situated on a minimum 13,000-square-foot lot. Greg Hohn, who moved to Forbes Avenue in 2000, says he isn’t so much worried about a new housing development as he is about the traffic new housing might generate on his street. “Forbes is a pretty wide street, there are no stop signs from Miramar all the way down to Base Line, and it’s very, very busy. People drive extremely fast,” Mr. Hohn said. “Once [development plans] go through, I will be attending the planning review just to address ways the city can mitigate the traffic in any way they can. It’s already a problem.” Mr. Whitehead and Brandywine hope to meet with the city within a week to move forward with development plans. A zoning change is likely to be among the first topics of discussion. Although the surrounding neighborhood is zoned residential, the La Puerta lot is currently zoned public and does not allow for residential development, according to Mr. Desatnik. “The developer will have to prepare an application to us for rezoning and we will then have to determine how we want to proceed,” Mr. Desatnik said. “After that, [plans] get reviewed by the planning commission and ultimately the city council.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High School Principal Brett OʼConnor reads from the childrenʼs book “How Santa Got His Job” during a Claremont Educational Foundation fundraising event at Barnes & Noble in the Montclair Plaza on Saturday. During the weeklong book fair, 20 percent of proceeds from sales were donated to CEF.

CEF book fair raises funds, spirits

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he Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF) is still tabulating the take from the organization’s first book fair, held in-store at Barnes & Noble Montclair last weekend and continued online via the bookseller’s website through today.

Nonetheless, organizers say the event, which yielded 20 percent of proceeds for Claremont schools, was a rousing success. The in-store sales for Saturday, December 7 have been counted, and they are in excess of $3,100. The in-person portion of the book fair offered community members more than the chance to get some Christmas shopping done while supporting the Claremont Unified School District. There was also a full slate of en-

tertainment in the form of story time featuring readings by various CUSD principals, craft tutorials led by local Girl Scouts and performances by the Claremont High School Chamber Singers and Jazz Combo. Things were certainly hopping at Barnes & Noble on Saturday at 2 p.m. when, following a recital of holiday songs by the chamber singers, several Girl Scouts pulled up a chair—joined by newly-elected school board member Nancy Treser Osgood—to hear CHS Principal Brett O’Connor read two fanciful holiday stories: Snowmen at Night and How Santa Got His Job. “We thought the book fair went extremely well,” said CEF President Richard Chute. “We had a nice following of people from Claremont come down to the store, and we were extremely happy with the readings from the principals and the performances by the CHS groups. It was a great turnout.”
The Claremont High School mascots pretend to read books while waiting for CHS Principal Brett OʼConnor to take the stage on Saturday at Barnes & Noble.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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Lights, twinkle, candles, fire
by Rev. Sharon Rhodes-Wickett, Claremont United Methodist Church

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e are approaching the longest night of the year with the coming winter solstice on December 21. When light is in short supply we humans find ways to supply it, for darkness holds fears that loom larger when there is no hope for light.
Light is a symbol for many things, hope being among them. You will find in most religions references to light or practices that include light. Many of us who are Christian observe the practice of lighting Advent candles as we approach Christmas, the observance of the birth of Jesus, which is followed by Epiphany. Jews recently completed the observance of Hanukkah, which includes lighting candles for eight days remembering the miracle of the oil that kept the lamps lit for eight days during the rededication of the Temple. Hindus, Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists celebrate a festival of lights, a five-day festival called Diwali when everyone rejoices in the victory of good over evil, light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance. It is celebrated by lighting small clay oil lamps and with fire-

Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
works. It is observed in October or November, depending on the year. In Islam, light is a symbol of knowledge and of faith. The Holy Qur'an describes God as the “Light of the heavens and Earth.” In Islam, light is a symbol of knowledge and of faith. After Christmas, some observe Kwanzaa, which includes lighting candles for seven days for seven principles. I’m sure there are many more examples of how the symbol of light is used in various faith practices as well as nonreligious observances. It makes sense. Our ancestors of long ago lived with a stronger connection to Earth than most of us do. They lived in agricultural societies and their very lives depended on their relationship with soil, water, air, fire, light and dark. Without electricity, they planned their lives to accommodate the darkness when it became so prevalent. They knew how to preserve and store their food. Their lives echoed the rhythms of the cycle of Earth. When the nights were long and dark, having a fire or a lantern reminded them of the spring yet to come when barrenness would give way to tiny shoots that grew into food that would allow them to live. Most of us in this part of the world are not limited by darkness because we can turn on a switch and make it light. In fact, we generate so much light that it can be difficult to discern the stars in the sky at night. But we strain our necks and eyes in the dark with hope to find the twinkle of a star that reminds us we are not alone. Most religious expression includes hope. Different traditions will hope for different things, but the state of being hopeful is something we share. Most religious expression includes hope that life will be better for all humanity and for our earth home. We will differ on what actions are needed to try to make progress, but the hope is shared. We long for homelessness to become a memory of the past; we yearn for quality education for all of our children; we hope for good health care for all people; we seek that day when prejudice and discrimination due to skin color or sexual orientation or religious practice will no longer hurt a brother or sister. Oh, we hope.

Hope is not passive, however. Hope leads us to act so that hope, joined with that of others, makes changes for the good of all creation. It’s not easy, for we are beautifully diverse and we must listen to one another and learn from each other. Rabbi Lawrence Kushner, a writer on Jewish mysticism, sees the wintertime urge to turn to the light as an act of hope. “At the darkest time of year,” he says, “the tiniest bit of light reminds us that we are all literally whistling in the dark and hoping, by these rituals of miracles of candle lights and bulbs on evergreens, we remember the divine presence.” It is true that misguided ideas of religion have added to the darkness of our world. There is no perfection in our human behavior or ideas. That’s why listening to each other is so vital to hope. There are many candles burning during these cold dark days and nights of winter. More than just decoration, let them be symbols of hope that light does follow darkness and that our acts of love and kindness are never lost. The smallest act of kindness or thoughtfulness shown to another really does matter. It is a flame, a twinkle, a fire that says there is a way forward for good.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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Adopt a family this holiday season
Inland Valley Hope Partners is searching for volunteers to adopt a family in need this holiday season. About 70 families have sought the help of the local nonprofit. Items needed include toys, clothing and other holiday goods. Those interested in taking part are asked to contact Maria Zuleta at (909) 622-3806, ext. 242 or mariaz@inlandvalleyhopepartners.org.

OUR TOWN
tree giveaway, contact the Community Services Division at (909) 399-5433.

Slain teen features in provocative nativity scene on Foothill Boulevard

City to offer a host of classes this winter
The Winter 2013 Claremont Recreation and Activities Guide is now available. This season’s catalog includes information on a variety of activities and classes in the city of Claremont taking place in December, January and February. Items featured in the latest seasonal guidebook include the lineup of senior excursions for 2014 and youth scholarships. To view the guide online, visit www.tinyurl.com/claremontwinter2014.

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laremont United Methodist Church is developing a reputation for its thought-provoking nativity scenes, and the current holiday season is no exception.
Artist and church congregant John Zachary, who began crafting installations for the church several years ago, has this year incorporated an unexpected character into his scene of the holy family gathered in the manger. A figure of Trayvon Martin—the black high school student fatally shot by George Zimmerman in Florida in February of 2012—is in the foreground of the tableau, wearing his iconic “hoodie” sweatshirt and bleeding to death. This past summer, a jury acquitted Mr. Zimmerman, who claims he was acting in self-defense, of murder. The case, however, has remained controversial, with many saying Trayvon’s death resulted from factors like racism and an overzealous gun culture. “Advent is a very good time to get in touch with something I feel would have been in line with the teachings of Jesus: concern over this gun violence thing,” he said. “It’s raw and it’s hard to look at, but it’s very relevant and it’s something we need to face.” Mr. Zachary is no stranger to his December installations, the first of which depicted a homeless family, stirring controversy. In Christmas of 2011, his rendering of a same-sex couple was

Edison launches reforestation project, offers free trees to residents
In 2011, Claremont experienced a severe windstorm that caused a number of trees to fall. Southern California Edison developed a reforestation program to begin replanting trees throughout the affected region. As part of the program, Southern California Edison has offered a limited number of 15-gallon trees to Claremont residents free of charge. Trees will be made available on a first come/first serve basis on Saturday, December 14 from 9 a.m. to noon at the City Yard, located at 1616 Monte Vista Ave. There will be a limit of three trees per household. Limited supplies of the following species are available: Hackberry, Flame tree, Pepper tree, Camphor tree, Chinese Pistache, Carpentaria tree, California sycamore, Valley Oak and tulip tree. All participants will be required to provide proof of Claremont residency in the form of a photo ID and/or utility bill.  For more information regarding the

Join CHS students at the fourth annual Great Debate
Honors world history and English students from Claremont High School will be debating the effects of imperialism on native peoples of the world in the fourth annual Great Debate to be held on Wednesday, December 18 at Taylor Hall. The students have read Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and have conducted in-depth research on this broad topic. The top eight teams will start the elimination rounds at 12:30 p.m. , with the final two teams wrapping up the debate by 2:55 p.m. The public is invited.

vandalized in what Claremont police deemed a hate crime. When his Trayvon Martin piece was introduced at a reception last Sunday in between Claremont United Methodist Church services, even a few members of the liberally-minded church objected. “There’s mixed emotions. There are some people who don’t like it,” Mr. Zachary said. “Of course, it wouldn’t be provocative if everybody liked it. But I think the overwhelming majority of people are really wanting to do something about gun violence. I think nothing is too much to make that happen.” This year’s nativity, visible on the south side of Foothill Boulevard near Indian Hill, features a holy family made of silhouetted wooden cutouts against a background of stained glass, which Mr. Zachary created in Photoshop and then printed out. His young gun victim, by contrast, is an articulated dummy. He said he conceived of the concept months ago, then ran it by the church leadership. He and a team then took countless hours to bring the scene to fruition. The end result is poignant and disarming. “I think that when you’re driving by, you should be able to look at the scene and feel an impact,” Mr. Zachary said.
—Sarah Torribio storrbio@claremont-courier.com

For a color photograph of the artwork, see page 17 of this edition.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

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Claremont Community Foundation awards grants to nonprofits

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he Claremont Community Foundation’s 2013 Grant Cycle has concluded and the foundation has awarded $15,115 in grant money to a variety of nonprofit charitable organizations serving Claremont and the surrounding communities.

This year’s recipients include AbilityFirst, Center for the Empowerment of Families, House of Ruth, First Street Gallery Art Center of the Tierra del Sol Foundation, Claremont Heritage, Claremont Meals on Wheels, Claremont After-School Programs (CLASP), Foothill Family Shelter, Inland Pacific

Ballet, Claremont School of Theology, dA Center for the Arts and the Inland Valley Hope Partners. Grants ranging from $500 to $2,115 were awarded to the 12 charities to support projects and activities deemed likely to have a significant positive benefit on Claremont and neighboring cities. Examples of projects include a prevention and community education program aimed at teaching local teens about teen dating violence, domestic violence and gender roles being conducted by House of Ruth and an afterschool art enrichment program designed to improved the lives of underserved children in Pomona called ArtLink being conducted by the dA Center for the Arts.

Other programs and projects supported include the Claremont School of Theology’s annual Whitehead International Film Festival, the Foothill Family Shelter’s Stepping Stone Program that provides 120-day transitional housing and comprehensive support services for at-risk homeless families, and the Inland Pacific Ballet’s “Young Person’s Guide to the Ballet” outreach program. According to the CCF, projects are selected in two fields of interest, community impact and the arts. The Community Impact Fund addresses broad areas of need, including health, economic improvement, family and individual services, cultural and educational activities and historical initiatives. The Arts Fund supports projects intended to enhance the visual environ-

ment of the community and projects that increase access to drama, dance or musical performances. Funding for grant awards is generated by both donor-designated as well as unrestricted contributions from caring citizens, businesses and organizations. Amounts available for distribution vary from year to year, according to donations received and CCF board discretion. For more information on CCF and its projects and activities, visit their website, www.claremontfoundation.org. CCF maintains an office at 205 Yale Ave. Call (909) 398-1060 for further information.

Mountainside Master Chorale begins 20th anniversary season
After a successful choral performance tour to Québec, Canada in August, Mountainside Master Chorale is busy rehearsing for its annual winter concert. The concert, entitled “Organ Extravaganza,” will feature music for choir and organ, as well as traditional Christmas carols. “Organ Extravaganza” will feature Ty Woodward, noted southern California organist, accompanying the chorale in pieces by by Holst, Vaughan Williams, Parry, Kirchner, and others. The winter concerts are scheduled for Saturday, December 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, December 15, at 3:30 p.m. at Claremont United Church of Christ, located at Harvard and Sixth Street in Claremont. Mountainside Master Chorale is a community singing group based in the Inland Empire, and is made up of over 80 singers from the area. It is under the direction of Dr. Sébastien Vallée, also the director of Choral Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. Mountainside Master Chorale is celebrating its 20th anniversary season with a number of special events and concerts. In addition to the Canadian performance tour and winter concert, MMC will continue the celebration with its March concert entitled “Yesterday and Beyond.” This concert will feature MMC favorites throughout the years, and will welcome founding con-

ductor Bruce Rogers and former conductor Andrew Crane to return to guest conduct alongside Dr. Vallée. The March concert will also feature the world premiere of a newly-commissioned choral work by Gwyneth Walker. MMC will finish its 20th anniversary season with a performance of Felix Mendelssohn’s choral masterpiece, Elijah, complete orchestra and soloists. The chorale performs a wide variety of choral works each season, including large choral works with orchestra, a cappella motets, folk songs, spirituals, jazz, and Broadway show tunes. Tickets may be ordered online at www.mountain sidemasterchorale.org or by calling (909) 510-6699.

OUR TOWN

Let there be light at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
There is some good news for lovers of light: The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s Luminaria Nights, a dazzling annual celebration that kicked off earlier this month, will continue this and next weekend. From 6 to 9 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, December 13, 14, 20 and 21, guests to the Garden can enjoy the expanded loop trail route on Indian Hill Mesa. Over a half-mile of trails, including the new

Gateways to Containers exhibit in the Container Garden, are brightened by more than 1,000 glowing, candle-lit luminaries. Nights are chilly nowadays, but Luminaria Nights are made warmer by the presence of hot cider and cookies as well as live acoustic music. The musical lineup is as follows: contemporary Native American flutist Steven Rushingwind, High Strung (Appalachian fiddle, swing, folk and blues) and Jill Warhol (folk on the rocks) on December 13; Steve Rushingwind, Modal Tease (music from Appalachia and beyond) and Windsong Canyon (Native American flute and world percussion) on December 14; Steve Rushingwind, Jill Warhol and Remember Then (musical tribute rock ‘n roll) on December 20; and Steve Rushingwind and Windsong Canyon plus holiday tunes by the Claremont Ukulele Club and the Village Pipers (recorder ensemble) on December 21. On Friday, December 13, there will also be a reception for Claremont Museum of Art’s exhibit of Betty Davenport Ford’s sculptures, which are on view at the Garden through March 2014. Admission for Luminaria Nights is $5 per person, free for children under 3. You can purchase tickets online on the Garden’s website (www.rsabg.org) or at the Garden’s Admissions Kiosk in advance or at the door on the evening of the event. The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is located at 1500 N. College Ave. in Claremont. For information, call (909) 625-8767.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

9

‘Fore’ Auld Lang Syne
by Debbie Carini

N

either one of us remembers why we decided to do it, but sometime around 2003, my son and I started to golf together.

I didn’t grow up in a golf family, though sometimes I felt like a groundskeeper—my dad loved his lawn so. I tried golf, once, in high school: Our PE class was bused from Upland to Claremont to practice at the Claremont Golf Course. Once, hand-to-heaven, a classmate killed a bird. She hit it in mid-air on the driving range and it dropped to the ground before our eyes. Of course, we tormented her the whole way back on the bus: “Jeanette hit a birdie!!” But, truth be told, I didn’t even know what a birdie was. After trying to coach Little League and knowing even less about soccer, golf just seemed like a thing a mother and son could do together. I imagined us walking along side-by-side, clad in argyle and jaunty caps. First, I read Harvey Penick's Little Red Book: Lessons and Teachings From a Lifetime in Golf. Harvey’s homespun wisdom helped to assuage the fear I felt each time I drove past the Claremont Golf Course. I also learned how to keep score which, thankfully, is easier than keeping tabs in bowling. Fortuitously, while shopping at a thrift store with my sister, I (she, really) found a like-new Pepto-Bismol-pink bag filled with an array of clubs. For $20, I was the proud new owner of a set that had apparently brought little links pleasure to S.K.Y., the initials stitched on the pleather. I bought my son a starter set of clubs (at a real store) and off to the course we went

to hit balls at the driving range. We were joined by my son’s best friend and the best friend’s father and his set of hand-me-down gear from a grandfather. It was a day of slices, whiffs and pop-ups; my shoulders and neck ached like I was working weed-duty for dad again. “We need lessons,” I told my son as I applied copious amounts of BenGay to the tender spots. And so we embarked on a few weekends’ worth of training with the patient golf pro. In time, we were on the course with the aforementioned friends. And it was an easy course to play, just nine holes, and relatively inexpensive. In our spiffy, two-tone golf shoes, we trod the fairways and rooted in the bushes for lost balls. We also amassed an impressive collection of rare and unusual clubs at second-hand stores and Palm Springs consignment shops, including a two-way chipper and some vintage-looking green drivers. The Claremont Golf Club closed forever on December 3. We golfed there one last time together over the Thanksgiving weekend with our original golf buddies. The little boys who used to don their collared shirts and drive from the “ladies tees” (the forward-most set of tees on each hole) are college sophomores now, at-

Courtesy of Debbie Carini From left, Cooper Weissman, Ms. Cariniʼs son, Debbie Carini, Gary Gilbert and Mark Gilbert enjoy one last round of golf at the Claremont Golf Course over the Thanksgiving weekend.

tending the same school. As I watched my son approach the first hole, I thought about all the happy times we had shared on the course—walking, talking, helping one another and sometimes just being quiet in our togetherness. During this time of year, when we reflect upon the things we are thankful for, I am most appreciative that our town had a little golf course, where a mom and her son could play a sport together.

www.claremont-courier.com • 621 4761

In print and online

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

10

‘Oh, Holy Night’: Petterson Museum showcases nativity sets

I

n most accounts of the Christmas story, the basic elements are the same. On the road and faced with a shortage of accommodations, a heavily pregnant Mary and her husband Joseph spend the night in a stable where, surrounded by livestock, she gives birth to a son named Jesus.
Their surroundings are humble but the origins of the baby are anything but. Three Wise Men, tipped off by the presence of a preternaturally bright star, make their way to the stable to pay their respects to a newborn king. When it comes to nativities or crèches—depictions of the Christmas story erected by believers during the holiday season—however, the details are a bit different. Nowhere is this more evident than at Pilgrim Place’s Petterson Museum of Intercultural Art, where 127 nativity sets from around the world are on view through January 5 in an exhibit titled “Away in a Manger.” These reverential scenes of the birth of Christ represent a wide array of media, ranging from sculptures to prints. They are fashioned from myriad materials, including wood, ceramics, metal, mother-of-pearl and even seedpods. Fifty of the nativities come from the museum’s permanent archives. The rest hail from the personal collections of residents of the community, which caters to retirees who spent years serving in religious or charitable organizations. Many Pilgrims have traveled widely, attending international conferences, serving as missionaries or working in other capacities abroad. Thus, nearly every corner of the world is represented in the show. “What I love about this exhibit is the way it shows the same event through so many cultural lenses,” said museum curator Carol Gil. The result is a veritable kaleidoscope of interpretations. In a wood-carved nativity from Switzerland, the holy family is housed in a forest chalet, while a South American nativity takes place in a flood-defying stilt home. A nativity from the Democratic Republic of Congo is made from banana leaves, while a Russian Matryoshka nativity unpacks from a single wooden nesting doll. A

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff This ornate nativity of cast resin, wood, peat moss and straw was made in Italy circa 1950. This, and other nativities, are on display at Pilgrim Placeʼs Petterson Museum on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. through January 5.

nativity from Thailand features fabric dolls clad in traditional Thai costumes, while a Japanese artist has depicted the miraculous birth via elegant line drawings. A Southeast Asian nativity substitutes water buffalo for the more traditional oxen, while a Pacific Northwestern-themed nativity incorporates bears. A unique nativity from Brazil even has the holy family surrounded by rainforest creatures, including an anteater, a tapir and a fierce caiman. A few of the nativities on view are also Pilgrim-made, including ceramic pieces and a couple nativities made of carved stone housed within halved geodes.

Pilgrim Place resident Ward McAfee, who showed up on Tuesday during the museum’s off-hours to take in the exhibit, said he is impressed by the obvious care his fellow Pilgrims have put into amassing their nativity collections. “You see the same names over and over,” he said. “I’ve been told that in some cases, when [residents] moved they left behind their furniture, but they insisted on taking their nativity sets.” Like the famous stable, the Petterson Museum, currently enlivened with Christmas lights, is humble in size.
PETTERSON MUSEUM/continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

11

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff A stylized set of figures hand-formed in Colombia from terra cotta clay was made some time in the1990s. Below, Pilgrim Place resident Ward McAfee, left, and his friend Gil Bisjak view the exhibit. PETTERSON MUSEUM/ continued from the previous page

It is, however, full of treasures from across the globe, including a concurrent exhibit on the knives and swords once carried by men every day as a sign of power and fighting prowess. At the other end of the spectrum are the peaceful nativity scenes, which Ms. Gil and her crew will take down in time for the Epiphany, a traditional Christian feast day celebrating the revelation of Jesus’ divine origins. Ms. Gil hopes the community will stop by to see the “Away in the Manger” exhibit this holiday season, becoming familiar with a museum that’s not as well known as she’d like it to be. “We’re Claremont’s best-kept secret,” she said. The Petterson Museum, located at 730 Plymouth Rd. in Claremont, is open to the public on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For information, call (909) 399-5544.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

12

Ashlyn Gardner
An angel with a new assignment
Ashlyn Faye Gardner, the 9-year-old daughter of Shauna Borland Gardner and Jared Gardner and granddaughter of longtime Claremont residents Robert and Cynthia Borland, died on Wednesday, December 4, 2013 in a tragic accident when she was struck and killed by a truck in a crosswalk at her Rancho Cucamonga school. Ashlyn was born on August 10, 2004. With a twinkle in her eyes and a smile that captured the heart, she had a profound influence on her family, friends and everyone she met. Ashlyn loved to play soccer, attend church and school and play with her brothers, friends, cousins and other family members. “All who have known her have been blessed by her infectious, impish humor, her sweet singing and dancing and her artwork,” her family shared. There has been a tremendous outpouring of love for Ashlyn and her family, with a memorial fund in Ashlyn’s name drawing 1,097 supporters and receiving 1,039 Facebook shares as of Wednesday. She is survived by her parents, Shauna Borland Gardner and Jared Gardner of Rancho Cucamonga; by her two brothers, Bryce and Landon Gardner; and by her grandparents, Bob and Cynthia Bor-

OBITUARIES

land of Carlsbad, Renee and Jonathan Starr of Covina and John A. and Jacquelyn F. Gardner of Alpine, Utah. She also leaves behind a large extended family. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, December 14 at 11 a.m. at the chapel of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, located at 6829 Etiwanda Ave. in Rancho Cucamonga. For more information or to donate to the memorial fund in Ashlyn’s name, visit www.youcaring.com/memorialfundraiser/memorial-fund-for-ashlyngardner/113803.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
accounting Christiansen Accounting
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For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
architect attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
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architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
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Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

13

Asfar Emad
Persian matriarch, American diva
Afsar Emad, a longtime Claremont resident, died peacefully at home on Tuesday, November 26, 2013. She was 97. She was born on March 6, 1916 in Tehran, Iran. She grew up in Tehran, manifesting her unyielding strength and fierce independence early on. When she reached the age of majority, she decided to live on her own and pursue a career. Living alone, unmarried and having a career was an extremely rare and unacceptable lifestyle by the standards of the thousand-year-old customs in that traditional country. Women were not supposed to be independent. They were supposed to live in their parents’ home until they got married and moved to their husband’s home. Young Asfar broke that rule. She also broke the rule of arranged marriages. She found her own husband, a colleague at work, whom she encouraged to propose. She married her husband, Moheb Ali Sedaghat, when she was 24 years old and continued with her career with various governmental agencies while raising her three daughters. She instilled the same spirit of independence in her three daughters, not just by teaching and preaching (which she did until the end) but also by being an excellent role model. After Mrs. Emad retired and lost her husband, who predeceased her 45 years ago, she moved to the United

OBITUARIES

States and made Claremont her second home. Until her late 80s she continued to live in both continents, traveling tirelessly back and forth between Claremont and Tehran. When her health no longer permitted it, she stopped traveling and Claremont became her permanent home. She lived independently until age 94, when she reluctantly gave up her independent living quarters and moved in with her daughters. Mrs. Emad was both a Persian matriarch and an

American diva, according to her family, who noted that she moved effortlessly between the two personas, demanding and receiving proper notice in both roles. “She was the belle of any party or family gathering,” family shared. “She loved the spotlight and knew how to get it. She loved life and with her quick wit, her sharp sense of humor and her killer smile, shined like a star until the end.” Her loved ones recalled that at her 95th birthday bash, with the aid of her walker, Mrs. Emad danced and managed to steal the spotlight again. Mrs. Emad is survived by her three daughters, Homa Khalatbary (husband Shokry), Zeeba Emadi (husband Mansour) and Shahla Sabet, all of Claremont; by four grandchildren, Makan Emadi (wife Bonnie) of Claremont, Babak Emadi (wife Estella) of Irvine, Leyla Khalatbary (husband Dezi) of Seattle, Washington and Mele Wood of Claremont; and by five great-grandchildren, Dillon and Jazmyn Emadi of Irvine, Luka and Annika Emadi of Claremont and Nicole Wood of Claremont. Private services were held on December 6 at Oak Park Cemetery.

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SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

14

Defense takes over in blowout for girls basketball

A

stiff defensive effort and an efficient shooting performance carried the Claremont girls basketball team to a 57-24 victory over Ontario Christian on Wednesday in the Claremont Tournament.
The win gave the Wolfpack their fourth-consecutive SPORTING victory to move to 40 on the season. LIFE Claremont’s 57 points marked the highest scoring output for the Wolfpack this season. Claremont opened the game on a 6-0 run after senior Katie Porter connected on her first three shots. The Wolfpack held Ontario Christian to just four points in the opening quarter and led 16-4 heading into the second. Claremont’s fast start set the pace for the entire game and put the Knights in a hole they were never able to dig out of. Claremont tacked on 12 more points in the second quarter, while holding the Knights to just six, to take a 28-10 lead into halftime. After a lethargic first-half performance, Ontario Christian showed some life in the third quarter by doubling their first-half point total. The Knights’ defense was not able to keep Claremont off the board, however, as Claremont added 17 more points in the third to
SPORTING LIFE/next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff CHS senior Danna Robles guards Ontario Christianʼs Shadi Ebrahimi, who attempts to keep the ball inbounds during the first half of their tournament matchup on Wednesday at CHS.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

15

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

Claremont High School senior Jessica Abrolat, left, tries to steal the ball from Ontario Christian junior Anna Spykstra on Wednesday at CHS. The Pack easily handled the visiting Knights, outscoring their opponent in every quarter for a final score of 57 -24. Claremont High School senior Infinity Johnson tries to pull in a rebound with Ontario Christianʼs Madison Paige on Wednesday during girls varsity basketball action at CHS. SPORTING LIFE/continued from the previous page

cling to a 45-20 lead after three quarters. Behind another stellar showing of team defense, the Wolfpack outscored the Knights 12-4 in the final frame of action to seal their largest victory of the season. Head coach Darryl Kennedy said Claremont had to alter their defensive scheme early on by using manto-man, which allowed the Wolfpack to dictate the flow of the game. “We started out in a half-court trap and it wasn’t as effective as I wanted it to be, so we switched to manto-man,” Coach Kennedy said. “We tried to put some pressure on them and it seemed to work really well.” Porter led all scorers with 16 points and finished with three rebounds and two assists. Senior Jessica

Abrolat finished second on the team with 12 points while leading the team with seven assists. Junior Janay Hepburn totaled 11 points and was tied for a team-high five rebounds. “Jessica played well tonight,” Coach Kennedy said. “She was a little sluggish [on Tuesday], but she played well. Katie shoots well and she shot well again for us [on Wednesday], too.” CHS faced Diamond Bar yesterday (results were not available at presstime) and will compete in the final game of the Claremont Tournament tonight. Boys hope strong outings ready them for tournament play The Claremont boys basketball team is off to a 3-2 start this season after going 2-0 in their first two matches. The Wolfpack’s most recent action came on Saturday when they beat Walnut, 67-59. On Friday they fell to Diamond Ranch by a mere three points, 68-65. Claremont will take to the court again on Monday against Villa Park in the North Orange Country Championships.

Boys soccer looking for more consistent effort The boys soccer team is 2-2-2 in its first six matches of the 2013-14 season. Claremont is outscoring their opponents 11-0 in its victories, but has only scored six goals in their other four matches. The Wolfpack took on Chino yesterday at home, however, results were not available as of presstime. Claremont’s next match will be on Tuesday at Etiwanda. Girls soccer competition heats up this weekend The Wolfpack have started the season 2-1-1. After opening the season with a 2-0 loss at Diamond Bar, Claremont has either won or tied in the last three contests. They topped Rialto 5-0 on Friday and tied Royal 1-1 on Saturday. The Wolfpack’s most recent match was against Alta Loma on Tueday, whom they defeated 2-1. Claremont will have a doubleheader against Los Osos and Canyon on Saturday.
—Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

Friday, December 13 to Saturday, December 21

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

16

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

CALENDAR
13

Nightlife
The Woolly Bandits to perform at The Press Saturday, December 21.

Galleries
“Cisneros Art - Three Generations” at Ginger Elliott Exhibition Center.

Page 21

Page 22

December Friday

HOLIDAY PET PHOTOS Pet owners are invited to bring their pets to the shelter and step into Santa’s workshop where the perfect holiday scene is set for a commemorative photo. Photography services are provided by Nancy Wiegenstein. Each portrait is $10 and will be framed and available to take home the same day. Additional copies can be sent by email. Pet owners are asked to bring small animals in carriers for their safety and to keep larger dogs on leashes. Each participant will receive a goody bag and other giveaway items. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and again Saturday, December 14 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds from this event will benefit Friends of Upland Animal Shelter and Upland Animal Services in their efforts to care for homeless pets at the shelter. 1275 San Bernardino Rd., Upland. For more information, call the Upland Animal Shelter, (909) 931-4185. LUMINARIA NIGHTS See the new, expanded loop with over a half-mile of luminaria-lit trails featuring the new “Gateways to Containers” exhibit in the Container Garden. Illuminated evening walks feature live acoustic music, cook-

ies and hot cider and more than 1000 glowing, candle-lit luminarias lighting an accessible route on Indian Hill Mesa. Performances for tonight’s event include Steve Rushingwind (contemporary Native American flutist), High Strung (Appalachian fiddle/swing/folk/blues) and Jill Warhol (folk on the rocks). 6 to 9 p.m. $5. Tickets may be purchased at www.rsabg.org. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont or at the kiosk at the entrance. LIVING NATIVITY Bethlehem comes to life in The Living Nativity at Granite Creek Community Church in Claremont. Bring the family to this free, walk-through experience. Wheelchair accessible and handicapped accessibility with drive-through option available. Go back in time and witness the pivotal moments surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ. Seven elaborate sets, a life-sized manger, Roman soldiers on horseback, live animals including Abu the camel, sheep, donkeys and a petting zoo. Food trucks and a Christmas boutique with local artists and crafters will also be available. 6 to 9 p.m. December 13, 14 and 15. All ages are welcome. Free to the public. Granite Creek Community Church, 1580 N. Claremont Blvd., Claremont. Visit www.granitecreek.org for more information or call (909) 625-4455.

December Saturday

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HOLIDAY MUSIC El Roble and Claremont High School music groups will perform at city hall from noon to 5 p.m. and Moultrie Academy of Music, Voice and Dance will perform at the Public Plaza from 1 to 4 p.m. ORGAN EXTRAVAGANZA and Christmas program performed by the Mountainside Master Chorale including sacred music for choir and organ featuring Ty Woodward, organist. 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, December 15 at 3:30 p.m. Claremont United Church of Christ, Sixth Street and Harvard Avenue in Claremont. General admission $20, seniors/students, $17. For information, visit www.mountainsidemasterchorale.org FOOD TENT Southern Fried Vegan is setting up at Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. LUMINARIA NIGHTS See the new, expanded loop with over a half-mile of luminaria-lit trails featuring the new “Gateways to Containers” exhibit in the Container Garden. Illuminated evening walks feature live acoustic music, cookies and hot cider and more than 1000 glowing, candle-lit luminarias lighting an accessible route on In-

dian Hill Mesa. Performances for tonight’s event include Steve Rushingwind (contemporary Native American flutist), Modal Tease (Appalachia and beyond) and Windsong Canyon (Native American flute and world percussion). 6 to 9 p.m. $5. Tickets may be purchased at www.rsabg.org. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont.

December Sunday

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CONCERT The Claremont Concert Orchestra and the Claremont Chorale celebrate the 50th anniversary of Garrison Theater and the 10th anniversary of the Scripps College Performing Arts Center by performing Beethoven, “Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125” and other works at 3 p.m. in Garrison Theater of the Scripps College Performing Arts Center, 241 E. 10th St. Scripps College Assistant Professor of Music David Cubek conducts the orchestra, while Associate Professor of Music Charles Kamm conducts the Chamber Choir and the Concert Choir of Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Pitzer and Scripps Colleges. Gregory Norton directs the Claremont Chorale.
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ACOUSTIC CHRISTMAS The Michael Beatty Band with special guest Tracy G. will play to benefit David & Margaret Youth and Family Services. While the concert is free, attendees are encouraged to bring a donation of cash or a gift card to help make the holidays brighter for the children in David & Margaret’s foster care program. All ages. 7 to 9:30 p.m. Beer Belly Deli, 590 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. (909) 596-5921, ext. 3180.

December Thursday

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THOMPSON CREEK TRAIL Get Walking Claremont will meet at Thompson Creek Trail, located at 2471 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. For ages 50 and over. 8 to 9 a.m. Free to the public.

December

Friday

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December Monday

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COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger The Claremont United Methodist Church is known for its nativity scene that sits outside the church during the holidays each year on Foothill Boulevard in Claremont. This yearʼs scene, which includes a likeness of Trayvon Martin after being shot, focuses on a message: Violence will not rid the world of violence. “So let us commit ourselves to Peace this Christmas season,” reads of the tablet sitting in front of the scene. For more on the display, see page 7 of this edition.

WALKING MEDITATION Qigong Energy from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Four sessions per month. Visit www.rsabg.org for admission details. (909) 625-8767, ext. 224.

LUMINARIA NIGHTS More than 1000 glowing, candle-lit luminarias illuminate a half-mile, accessible loop on Indian Hill Mesa. Performances for tonight’s event include Steve Rushingwind (contemporary Native American flutist), Jill Warhol (folk) and Remember Then (tribute rock and roll). 6 to 9 p.m. $5. Tickets may be purchased at www.rsabg.org. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont.

December Tuesday

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December

TUESDAY WALK Get Walking Claremont gathers at the corner of Bonita and Yale in the Village at 7:50 a.m. for a onehour walk. For ages 50 and over. Free to the public. 8 to 9 a.m. CITRUS COLLEGE Christine Garcia will speak about the impact of community college education on workforce development and important new programs at Citrus. Buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. for $12 or dessert and coffee for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. YOGA for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has more than 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her

classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. The Colony at Loft 204, 532 W. First St. #204, upstairs in the Claremont Packing House.

Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and doing in-depth research on this broad topic. The top eight teams will start the elimination rounds at 12:30 p.m. at Taylor Hall, 1775 N. Indian Hill Blvd. The final two teams will finish debating by 2:55 p.m.

Saturday

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HOLIDAY MUSIC Claremont High School Band and Orchestra perform at city hall from noon to 2:30 p.m. Michael Bennett performs at the Public Plaza from 1 to 3 p.m.

December Wednesday

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THE JAM The Jam is a music event that takes place every third Wednesday at Hip Kitty Jazz and Fondue. For tonight’s show, the musicians take the stage for a once-a-year Christmas special. You’ll hear some of your favorite Christmas tunes along with original music. Hip Kitty is located at 502 W. First St., Claremont. For reservations, call (909) 447-6700. GREAT DEBATE Claremont High School honors world history and English students will be debating the effects of imperialism on native peoples of the world. The students are reading Things

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DeAnthony Williams gets a ready-made letter to Santa Claus from Stamp Your Heart Out owner Joan Bunte on Friday in the Claremont Village. All thatʼs left is for DeAnthony to fill out his wish list and mail it to the North Pole. Colored lights on the trunk of Claremonʼs holiday tree. Vice chair of the community and human services commission Bob Miletich, below, emceed the tree lighting ceremony on the center stage Friday night. Sierra Van, 5, smiles as she is photographed by her parents while sitting on Santaʼs lap at Claremont City Hall. The visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus is the most popular attraction at the annual Holiday Promenade and Tree Lighting Ceremony.

in Claremont
COURIER photos by Steven Felschundneff

Lighting up the night

Local children assist Claremont Mayor Opanyi Nasiali, far right, as they flip the switch to light the cityʼs holiday tree on Saturday during the 2013 Holiday Promenade and Tree Lighting Ceremony in the Village. The annual event featured Christmas carols, Frosty the Snowman, a live reindeer and, of course, a visit from Santa and Mrs. Claus.

A variety of colored ornaments hang from the bottom of the city of Claremontʼs holiday tree.

Karl Johnson, of Claremont, holds his daughter Alex as they wait for their chance to visit with Santa Claus on Friday during the 2013 Holiday Promenade and Tree Lighting Ceremony in the Village.

A family poses for a photo with Flo the reindeer outside of Claremont City Hall on Friday during the annual tree lighting. The reindeer returned to the celebration after being absent for the last few years.

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NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. —Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, December 19: All Tito’s Vodka drinks

$2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Mick Rhodes Band. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —Friday and Saturday, December 13 and 14: Jimmy Shubert, a Philly native, began performing stand-up right out of high school. After he moved to Los Angeles, Sam Kinison included him as one of the original Outlaws of Comedy. His hour-long stand-up comedy special won Punchline’s top 10 comedy DVDs for 2010. A plethora of television credits include recent appearances on Two Broke Girls and Off Their

Rockers. He also has been seen in a recurring role (17 episodes), his character appropriately named Jimmy, on CBS’s King of Queens for five seasons. —Thursday, Friday and Saturday, December 19, 20, 21: Preferred Parking Comedy Tour featuring Samuel J. Comroe. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: Two-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, December 13: Lounge O Rama “Xmas Show” (big band). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, December 14: The Kid and Nic “Xmas Show” (oldies/blues/swing) 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, December 15: Solid Ray Woods (roots/R&B/soul). 7 p.m.
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—Tuesday, December 17: Technopagan (electronic). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, December 18: Jaxx Sessions presents The Jam Christmas Special with host Sean Amato (blues). 8 p.m. —Thursday, December 19: Skirt & Suit. 7 p.m. —Friday, December 20: The Lindy Sisters Xmas Show (swing/jazz/1940s). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, December 21: Santa Baby Live “Xmas Show” featuring Cheryl Conley (jazz/vocal) 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21 and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, December 13: The Herbert Bail Orchestra (folk/international). 10 p.m. —Saturday, December 14: Corima (progressive rock). 10 p.m. —Sunday, December 15: Piano Sunday featuring Patrick Vargas at 6 p.m., followed by Cinema Sundays featuring They Mighty Boosh (2003) at 9:30 p.m. —Tuesday, December 17: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, December 18: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. Joe Atman performs at 9:30 p.m. —Thursday, December 19: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band (jazz) at 8 p.m. followed by KSPC DJ “Ike Rhythm” at 11 p.m. —Friday, December 20: Diamonds & Rust (cello/ guitar/electro). 10 p.m. —Saturday, December 21: The Woolly Bandits (garage/rock). 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic

PERFORMING ARTS
BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges. —Through December 15: Inland Pacific Ballet presents The Nutcracker. Show times are December 14 at 1 and 7 p.m. and December 15 at 1 p.m. —Sunday, December 22: Christmas in Ireland, one special performance this holiday season. $25. Discounts available for children, seniors and military. 2 p.m. —Sunday, January 19: New Shanghai Circus. Fearless performers with boundless energy bring you more than 2000 years of Chinese circus traditions. $25. Discounts available for children, seniors and military. 2 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Sunday, December 22: The annual Messiah Sing-along, George Frideric Handel. Claremont Symphony Orchestra. 1:30 and 4 p.m. —Saturday, January 25: Claremont Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition winners Gaeun Moon (violin) and ShihZan Yao (cello) present a “Concert for Young People” at 10:30 a.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through December 28: Because it’s Christmas. DRINKWARD RECITAL HALL: 320 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont at Harvey Mudd College. —Sunday, December 15: Student computer music concert. 7 p.m.
38. Original "Monty Python" airer 39. Trough site 40. Col. Sanders feature 42. Bearer of a dozen roses, maybe 44. Indian bread? 45. Friend in the ‘hood 46. Put a dent in 48. Goofs it up 49. U.N. labor org. 50. ____ up: on edge 52. Talented 10 year old sprinter who is at school at Chaparral Elementary, Alex 55. Sense of humor 57. Overly 58. Study of language 61. “I’m not sure” 62. Like many donkeys 63. Blood line 64. Victorious shout 65. Nicely served 66. Bleak, to Blake

Image courtesy of The Woolly Bandits Rock band The Woolly Bandits are set to play at The Press on Saturday, December 21 at 10 p.m.

or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. 767-2255. —Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. —Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Coronas and $3 nachos. —Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. —Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. —Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. —Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.
Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #241 Across
1. Nickel, e.g. 6. Stop 10. Neighbor of Wash. 13. Refugee 14. Punch 15. Put in stitches 16. Rich person 18. Formal must 19. N.Y.C. clock setting 20. One of the CHS cross-country captains who ran for charity in the summer heat, Kylee ____ 22. Musical speed 25. Sooner than, in poetry 26. Bee colony 28. Tossed cube 29. “___ you nuts?” 30. Gave a value to 31. Negotiating goals 33. Expressing delight 34. A lot, in verse 37. Tintern Abbey's river

COURIER CROSSWORD

Down
1. Internet ___ (viral phenomenon) 2. Have real being 3. Not on the level 4. One hundred percent 5. Luau souvenir 6. Lions 7. One who leaves his country to live in another one 8. Indulgent episode 9. “___ He Kissed Me” (1963 hit) 10. Bone inflammation 11. Be original, but not first 12. Lamb ma’am 14. "Between My Head and the Sky" musician 17. It sees across the border 21. --- Jahan (Taj Mahal builder) 23. “___ pleasures and palaces . . . “ 24. Little fellow 27. Irritable 29. Pub provision 30. Inflorescence on a stem 32. I homophone 33. Hematological classification letters 34. Jack’s giant 35. Group for golf 36. Watering holes, so to speak 38. React to a bad performance 41. Sample 42. Did an injustice to 43. “The Illustrated Man” author Bradbury 45. One who's gone platinum 47. Make electrical repairs 49. Hipbone-related 50. Ornamental Japanese carp 51. Fiats 53. Clay water crock 54. Race starter’s aid 56. Rimsky-Korsakov’s “The Tale of ___ Saltan” 57. Commandment pronoun 59. Like Emmett Kelly’s clown face 60. Mountain sight

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #240

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GALLERIES
AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through December 29: “Icheon: Reviving the Korean Ceramics Tradition,” an exhibition organized by Icheon, South Korea. Icheon has a history of ceramic culture that began over 5000 years ago and has a reputation for its internationallyrenowned ceramics cultural events. Now, Icheon has reached out to an American institution for the very first time. In the premiere exhibition of its kind in the United States, Icheon will present more than 230 objects never before seen on American soil that exemplify the revival of the ceramics tradition in Korea, from antique techniques to contemporary innovations. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.buddhamouse.com. 626-3322. —Through December 31: “PermaDirty Takes Over Buddhamouse!” The PermaDirty Collective continues their mission to take over every art related site in the Inland Empire. These core collective artists will exhibit small work that exemplifies their individual aesthetic visions. From the delicate needlework of Monique Villanueva to the throwback attack of color and texture in the paintings of Efrain Torres, PermaDirty Collective offers artistic quality, variety and depth. Curated by Cynde Miller. BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. 624-7238. —Through December 31: “Tanks & Bombs” featuring Patrick Merrill and Juan Thorp. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through December 31: Original oil paintings by Linda Brown. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. 6263066. —Through December 31: “For Such a Time as This” featuring Carrie Todd, a local mixed-media artist. CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: www.clare montmuseum.org. —Through March 30: “Betty Davenport Ford: Capturing the Animal Spirit,” an exhibit of sculpture presented by the Claremont Museum of Art, is on view in the gallery of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden through March 2014. One of Claremont’s most prolific sculptors, Ms. Ford is well known for her unique style and honest craftsmanship. Working in clay and bronze for over 60 years, she simplifies form to abstract the natural essence of the wild creatures she depicts. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The exhibit is open FridaySunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Garden admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, $4 for children and free for CMA and RSABG members. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at 626-224-7915 or 626963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. —Tuesdays: Yoga class for all levels. Instructor Jasmin Iskandar has more than 400 hours of teacher

Image courtesy of PermaDirty Project Space “PermaDirty Collective Takes Over Buddhamouse” continues through December 29 at Buddhamouse Emporium, located at 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. The exhibition features Andrew Thomas, Cynde Miller, Bob Hurton, Efrain Torres, Elizabeth Jasso Flores, Eriko Bijeljic, John Leitmeyer, Roger Tilton, Danielle Wallis and Monique Villanueva Bejarano.

training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. She was first trained in the Krishnamacharya lineage by Shiva Rea at Exhale Center for Sacred Movement in Venice Beach. Later, Ms. Iskandar traveled to India to study the Sri Sivananda Saraswati lineage of Hatha yoga. Her classes offer the dynamism of Vinyasa with the science of Hatha. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more about Ms. Iskandar. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesdays: Belly dance class for all levels. Instructor Adina Dane performs at many locations in the area including Mediterranean restaurants and community events. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Through December 31: Noted artist Fariad presents “Urban Landscapes” featuring his painting “The Claremont Depot” in celebration of Claremont history. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 626-5455. —Through February 14: “Joe Zaldivar: Glimpse of a Street View” and holiday show. By using his tablet, Mr. Zaldivar uses Google Maps Street View to access street level vantage points around the world, which he uses as source material for his paintings/drawings. This show will include “Street View” renditions of the intersection of Hollywood and Vine in Los Angeles and the original Starbucks location in Seattle, a piece in which he incorporated coffee as a painting medium. Also on display is the annual holiday show. This First Street Gallery tradition will include at least one piece from every one of their 52 artists. Works purchased from the show will be available to take home immediately, just in time for the holidays. GALERIA DE PÉROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211, Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment. —Mondays: “Mindful Beauty Meditation Gathering.” Connect, listen, share, create, be, meditate and love. Meditation sessions every Monday evening from 8 to 9:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Contact Nichoel

Ann at nichoel.ann@gmail.com or visit www.face book.com/mindful.beauty. —Tuesdays: “Tribe Tuesday,” an open studio session for artists to share the space and work on their pieces. Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space is limited to 10 people per session. Call 236-1562 or visit www.facebook.com/galeriadeperolas. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Ongoing: Visitors welcome, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GINGER ELLIOTT EXHIBITION CENTER: 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont in the Garner House at Memorial Park. Open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or by appointment. Claremont Heritage, 621-0848. —Through December 24: “Cisneros Art - Three Generations” represents one of Claremont’s most prolific art families. Parents Helene and Natividad Cisneros, who met at Pomona College over 60 years ago, have produced little seen paintings and drawings that will be featured in the show. Three of their children are represented in the show: Alba Cisneros, who is a master mosaic artist who worked with Millard Sheets; Barry Cisneros, who majored in studio arts at Pitzer College and has produced an array of paintings and drawings; and their brother Tony, who works in ceramics having been mentored by some of Claremont’s finest ceramics artists. The siblings’ younger nephew Andy Cisneros will show multi-media work created from sketches he has produced over the last year. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@malooffoundation.org or www.malooffoun dation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to
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limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. PEGGY PHELPS GALLERY & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —Through December 20: “Blind Threesome” featuring Andre Goeritz, Liz Nurenberg and Ian Trout and “Plus Ones” featuring Andre Goeritz + Kim Alexander, Liz Nurenber + Gala Porras-Kim and Ian Trout + Stephen Aldahl. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Rd., Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through January 6: “Away in a Manger” featuring 127 nativity sets from the museum’s collections and lent by Pilgrim Place residents. Consisting of many different media such as prints, ceramics, wood, metal and various unusual organic materials from around the world, they will illustrate how the Christmas story is visualized in different countries and cultures. —Through January 31: “Cutting Edge Technology,” mini-exhibit featuring swords, knives, daggers, axes, spears and many different kinds of international cutting tools and weapons—both ancient and modern. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Open through December 5; closed Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College

RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu or call 621-8283. —Through December 22: “David Michalek: Figure Studies.” Mr. Michalek’s work applies the technology of high-speed HD video to the recording of human movement. —Through December 22: “John Divola: As Far As I Could Get.” This exhibition is a collaborative project led by Santa Barbara Museum of Art and shown simultaneously at SBMA, LACMA and the Pomona College Museum of Art. —Through December 22: “Resonant Minds: Abstraction and Perception.” The exhibition includes a range of abstract art, from pivotal works of early European Modernism to key examples of Minimal-

ism in the United States. —Through December 22: “Project Series: Krysten Cunningham: Ret, Scutch, Heckle.” The 47th installment of the Pomona College Museum of Art’s Project Series will present sculpture and drawings by Los Angeles-based artist Krysten Cunningham. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks. Call 621-9091 or email info@squareigallery.com. —Through December 31: Fourth annual 11x11 Christmas Show. Over 100 works of art from over 38 artists.

Pomona College Museum of Art announces spring 2014 exhibitions
Pomona College Museum of Art is set for spring 2014 with exhibitions running from January 21 through April 13. An opening reception will be held Saturday, January 25 from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibition “Mowry Baden: Dromedary Messanine” includes immersive, large-scale sculpture Dromedary Mezzanine represents the first showing of this artwork in the western United States and the first time the work has been on view since becoming part of Pomona College's permanent collection. One of Canada's most accomplished artists and one of Pomona College's most distinguished alumni, Mr. Baden has been creating kinesthetic sculptures and public artworks for four decades. Mr. Baden graduated from Pomona College in 1958 and returned 10 years later to take on the roles of professor of art, department chair and gallery director. Mr. Baden's works, which invite viewers to physically operate the sculpture, have always involved a more collaborative approach to viewers that prefigures much contemporary work today. The exhibition “Andrea Bowers: #sweetjane” includes new work by Los Angeles-based artist Andrea Bowers that examines the notorious Steubenville, Ohio high school rape case. In addition to a new series of drawings, “#sweetjane” includes a video based on Ms. Bowers's three trips to Steubenville that documents the protest surrounding the trial and activities of “hactivist” group Anonymous. Her return to Ohio to document the Steubenville case is a form of personal mapping of 30 years of violence against women. The exhibition unfolds over two campuses and is the second collaborative project between the Pomona College Museum of Art and the Pitzer College Art Galleries. At the Pomona College Museum of Art, this exhibition is “Project Series 48” and is supported in part by the Pasadena Art Alliance. “Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley: Portraits, Abstractions,” and “In-Between: Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley” present a selection of drawings, paintings and prints drawn from Pomona College's collection. The late Frederick Hammersley taught painting for several years at Pomona College. He came to prominence in 1959 in the landmark exhibition “Four Abstract Classicists,” which brought together the witz, who lived and worked in the midst of tremendous political and social upheaval. “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features works in several graphic mediums—wood block, lithography, etching, and drypoint—drawn from Pomona College's collection. The exhibition includes self-portraits from the 1920s and 1930s alongside images that unflinchingly depict death, poverty and violence against women. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with the West Coast premiere of the song-cycle “Kollwitz-Konnex” (...im Frieden seiner Hände), composed by Ralf Yusuf Gawlick and performed by Scripps faculty member Anne Harley and internationally-renowned guitarist Eliot Fisk. The performance, which will be held on March 27, 2014, is co-sponsored by the Pomona College Museum of Art, Scripps Department of Music, Intercollegiate German Studies and the Scripps O’Brian Fund. The gallery is located at 330 N. College Ave., Claremont. Hours are Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours takes place on Thursdays from 5 to 11 p.m. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum.

Image courtesy of Pomona College Käthe Kollwitzʼ “Arbeitslosigkeit (Unemployment), 1909” will be on view at Pomona College Museum of Art this spring.

work of Hammersley, Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson and John McLaughlin. In over 60 years as an artist, Mr. Hammersley produced a wide range of drawings, from naturalistic portraits to computer-generated drawings. This exhibition showcases the range of Mr. Hammersley’s work and is made possible in part by the generous donation of art works from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation. It is curated by Hannah Pivo, Josephine Bump, Shayda Amanat, Graham “Bud” and Mary Ellen Kilsby. The exhibition “Witness: Käthe Kollwitz” features German artist Käthe Koll-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

24

Claremont family has the holidays in mind, 365 days a year

S

preading holiday cheer is business for the Brock family, a longtime Claremont clan. For the last 52 years, Brock’s Christmas Tree Farm, a Mountain Avenue destination, has continued to provide southern California families the firs and fresh scents that bring merriment to the yuletide season.
More than 300 pines stand elegantly in the north Claremont lot under the watchful eye of David Brock, who took over caretaking duties after his father’s passing in 2002. The late Rene Brock was so inspired by the spirit of Christmas, he chose to keep the holiday magic alive 365 days a year. Today, David ensures that his father’s beloved Christmas tree farm remains a holiday tradition for families throughout the Inland Valley. “All of us look at a Christmas card or a picture of a holiday scene with a cabin in the woods and snow and smoke coming out of the chimney and wish we could put ourselves in that picture. I think the Christmas tree farm allows people to do that,” Mr. Brock said. “It may not be a snowy cabin in the woods, but it’s as close as we can get in southern California.” After his parents’ divorce and an upbringing in boarding schools, Rene Brock made it his mission to make the holidays about bringing his family together. This usually meant rigging up his own family Christ-

mas tree. But after reading a few articles in Sunset Magazine, he took this task to another level. With the purchase of a vacant lot on Mountain Avenue above Base Line in 1961, Mr. Brock began making plans to open up a Christmas tree farm where families could come and cut down their own tree to take home to decorate. When the elder Mr. Brock first purchased the land, North Mountain Avenue was nothing but a dirt road, and the Thompson Creek trail that ran next to the Brock’s property was not just the name of a paved trailhead but an actual creek. the lot from wasteClaremont Turning land to winter wonderland was an adventure for the boys, who often accompanied their father to ride the tractor and catch frogs at the creek in between raking rocks and clearing land, for which they were paid 25 cents an hour. The boys had their work cut out, as the terrain was rugged and covered in cactus. On more than one occasion, David returned home with cactus needles in his palms, but other perks of the job kept him coming back “to the land,” as the family called it. “We would shoot arrows and slingshots, and I remember my dad riding the tractor with a cultivator all around and we would take turns on the back of it,” he recalled.

Mom & Pop

Photo courtesy of the Brock family The late Rene Brock, founder of Brockʼs Christmas Tree Farm in Claremont, purchased the Mountain Avenue land in 1961 with plans for developing the Christmas tree farm. Within in four years the business was up and running.

CLAREMONT MOM & POP/next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Steve Singley, center left, speaks with Brock¹s Christmas Tree Farm owner David Brock on Saturday. Mr. Singley¹s family, including his daughter Janessa, 12, at left, son Seth, 10, and wife Debbie are longtime customers of the farm, which opened for business in 1965. Mr. Brock took over running the farm after his father Rene died in 2002.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

25

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff David Brock, right, helps longtime customer Mario Martelli load a Leyland cypress on Saturday at Brockʼs Christmas Tree Farm in north Claremont. According to Mr. Brock, the Martelli family, who live a short drive away, have been buying trees at the farm for two decades. CLAREMONT MOM & POP continued from the previous page

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etting into the Christmas tree business was not necessarily lucrative work, but the Brocks weren’t motivated by money.
Rene, a full-time accountant in addition to tree farm-entrepreneur, loved the lay of the land and took pride in his seedlings, watering each by hand. David recalls his father carrying water to the farm from his home in a basin he fashioned from an airplane fuel tank. In years since, his son has become equally crafty, coming up with creative solutions to manage the southern California drought. This usually means diligent watering year-round, and handling the occasional spider mite, which David discovered can be combated with a special mix of baby oil and dish soap. The Christmas tree farm is much more than a family trade. Over the years, the tree-lined lot has become a home-away-from-home for many of the Brock children. A trailer located at the Christmas tree lot is the perfect overnight getaway, and even provided a temporary home for David when he moved home in his 20s to attend graduate school.   “No matter what has happened in my life—school or moving away, family or relationship issues—this property has always been here. It’s always been a place where I can recharge and get a grip on what is going on and find balance again,” he said. “And of course after my dad died, I would come up here and think, ‘What would dad do?’” Despite also working a full-time job, David happily stepped into his father’s shoes to carry on the proud

David Brock says the four-decade-old family farm does not make much money, but has been a great way to stay connected with the Claremont community. Brockʼs is located on Mountain Avenue at the base of Claraboya and is open Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Brock family tradition. Just a year after his father’s death, however, the businesses’ future was all called into question. The Grand Prix Fire engulfed the foothills in 2003, and along with it the Christmas tree farm. David remembers walking up to survey the damage at the farm, bypassing the police barricades that were blocking off cars. The lot’s metal trailer was burnt to a puddle, the Eucalyptus trees surrounding the property were all but destroyed and only a few dozen pines remained as a reminder of what the fire had taken. “I was speechless. I had never seen the farm look like that. It would have been the most heartbreaking

thing for my dad to see,” David said. “But again, I had to ask myself, ‘What would dad do?’ The answer was simple: He would rebuild.” And so they did. Ten years later, the only signs of the devastating fire are a few black spots on the ground and charring on the trunk of an otherwise unharmed giant Italian stone pine, a fitting symbol of the farm’s longevity. With a green thumb inherited from his father, Mr. Brock has relished refilling his father’s land with Monterey pines and Leyland cypresses for the families that frequent the farm. Though one might assume that the owner of a Christmas tree farm might have the pick of the litter when it comes to Christmas trees, Mr. Brock argues it’s actually quite the opposite. “I’m usually so tired by the time I get home from the farm, the last thing I want to do is hassle with putting up my own tree,” he laughed. While his busy schedule doesn’t always allow him the time to deck his own halls, like his father, Mr. Brock doesn’t mind the busy work at the farm. Though working a full-time job at the University of La Verne, Mr. Brock has no qualms leaving behind his classroom duties for the great outdoors. “There’s nothing quite like digging in the soil and planting things, whether fruits and vegetables or Christmas trees,” he said. “There are few things more rewarding.” Brock’s Christmas Tree Farm is open Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and can be found on the left side of Mountain Avenue, north of Base Line at the base of the Thompson Creek Trail. Choose and cut a cypress tree for $34.95 or a classic pine for $49.95.

—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, December 13, 2013

26

The Kiwanis Club is sweet talking again
The Kiwanis Club of Claremont is helping locals heed their need for chocolate this holiday season without searching for a parking spot at the local shopping mall. The Sees Candy holiday sale is back, with proceeds benefitting the Kiwanis’ community service projects, many of which support local youth and education. The chocolate sales’ headquarters are located in the Sprouts shopping center at 911 W. Foothill Blvd., open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. everyday. Other locations include in front of Vons at 550 E. Base Line Rd., open Friday evenings and Saturday and Sunday all day, as well as at Sonja Stump Pho-

OUR TOWN
tography Studio, 135 W. First St. For hours, call (909) 626-1147. For more information on the Sees sale, contact Tirzo Tec at (909) 973-4008.

provements through a Housing-Related Park Program with the state of California. Claremont city staff would like the community’s input to gather ideas for additional improvements at Wheeler Park. A survey is available on the city’s website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us.

Wheeler Park gets playground upgrade
As part of the city’s 2014 Capital Improvement Program budget, new play equipment will be installed at the north side of Wheeler Park. In addition to this project, the city has the opportunity to apply for funding for additional im-

City calls for residents to join Sustainability Committee
The city of Claremont is looking for residents interested in serving on the city’s Sustainability Committee. The Sustainability Committee was established to provide broad oversight of the Sustainable City Plan by reviewing annual grade cards and making recom-

mendations on the scope and timing of future updates to the plan. Members should be supportive of the goals of the Sustainable City Plan and be knowledgeable in sustainability matters and/or represent a significant stakeholder group that is directly impacted by sustainability measures. Interested Claremont residents are encouraged to file an application with the city clerk by 6 p.m. on Monday, January 6. Applications and information are available in the City Clerk’s office at 207 Harvard Ave., Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on the city’s website, www.ci.claremont.ca.us. For more information, call (909) 3995461 or (909) 399-5463.

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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals..............27 legals..............28 services...........30 real estate.......33
RENTALS
Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT: Three bedroom, two bathroom apartment. $1400 monthly. $800 security deposit on approved credit. 624-9958.

REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
NORTHWEST Arizona Mountain Ranch. $260 monthly. 36 heavily wooded acres ringed by wilderness mountains at cool 5700 ft. Hilltop cabin site with beautiful mountain views, borders 640 acres of state trust. Maintained road, free well access. $26,900, $2690 down. Free brchoure includes maps and area information. First United, 602-478-0584. Arizonaland.com. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.

MARKETPLACE

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

House For Rent
921 BERKELEY Ave. Village area! Two bedrooms, one bathroom. Interior laundry, one-car garage. $1650 monthly, at least one year lease. Gardener and trash included. Jeannette@realtyagent.com. 670-0322. 480 University Cr. Two bedrooms, one bathroom. One car garage. One year lease. $1800 monthly. 670-0322. Jeannette@realtyagent.com QUAINT three bedroom, two bathroom home in Village. Living room features fireplace and hardwood floors. Two-car carport. $2200 monthly. CBTC 621-6761.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: Owner Operator. Dedicated home weekly! Solos up to $175,000 yearly, $2500 sign-on bonus! Teams up to $350,000 yearly, $5000 sign-on bonus! Forward Air, 888-652-5611. (Cal-SCAN) NEED Class A CDL training? Start a career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best In-Class” training. New academy classes weekly. No money down or credit check. Certified mentors ready and available. Paid while training with mentor. Regional and dedicated opportunities. Great career path. Excellent benefits package. Please call 520-2264362. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVER: Top one percent. Home at Christmas. Full benefits and quality hometime. New trucks arriving. CDL-A required. 877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (CalSCAN)

Estate Sales
SATURDAY, December 14, 9 a.m. to noon at 416 Taylor, Claremont. Sofa, chairs, desks, artwork, dishes, clocks, etc.

Financial
GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN) CUT your student loan payments in half or more, even if late or in default. Get relief fast, much lower payments. Call Student Hotline, 855589-8607. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 1-800291-0350. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
DO you take Cialis or Viagra? Save $500! Get 40 pills for only $99! Buy the blue pill! Call 888-547-7975, Satisfaction guaranteed. (Cal-SCAN)

Townhome For Rent
TWO bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Living room with laminate flooring and fireplace. Two-car garage, community pool. Includes refrigerator, washer and dryer. $1650 monthly. WSPM 621-5941. GATED courtyard with pool. Two bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Washer, dryer. Central heating and air. Gas fireplace. No pets, smoking. $1595 monthly. Water and trash paid. 605 Colby Cr. 455-3612.

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

Want To Buy
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime, 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

ANIMALS
Animal Shelters
Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E. Upland 1800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

BULLETINS
Business

MARKETPLACE
Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 6216628. REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (CalSCAN)

Vacation Rental
SIX day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1175. Yours today for only $389! You save 67 percent. Plus one week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-9856809. (Cal-SCAN)

Education
AIRLINE careers begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM, 877804-5293. (Cal-SCAN)

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES
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PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $10 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing.
All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 234927 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Little Village Child Care, Aberin Family Child Care, 1405 Regis Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 1405 Regis Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Jeanette Aberin, 1405 Regis Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Jeanette Aberin Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/13/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 22, 29, December 6 and 13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013223643 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CESARSPLUMBING, 907 E. Olive St., Pomona, CA 91766. Registrant(s): Cesar Quezada, 907 E. Olive St., Pomona, CA 91766. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Cesar Quezada Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/28/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 22, 29, December 6 and 13, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: REBECCA LEE AKA BEKKI LEE CASE NO. BP147150 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of REBECCA LEE AKA BEKKI LEE. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DAVID E. HANSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DAVID E. HANSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The WILL and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act . (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 01/13/14 at 8:30AM in Dept. 9 located at 111 N. HILL ST., LOS ANGELES, CA 90012 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner PAUL D. HELD SHEA & HELD 414 YALE AVE # C CLAREMONT CA 91711 11/29, 12/6, 12/13/13 CNS-2560909# CLAREMONT COURIER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013237882 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE VILLAGE MUTT, 665 East Foothill Blvd., Suite G, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 9257 Pepperidge Lane, Alta Loma, CA 91701. Registrant(s): April Bank, 9257 Pepperidge Lane, Alta Loma, CA 91701. Brian S Bank, 9257 Pepperidge Lane, Alta Loma, CA 91701. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Brian S Bank Title: Co Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 22, 29, December 6 and 13, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 242040 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as P.C.H. CONSTRUCTION, 610 Charleston Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Jason Christopher Humason, 610 Charleston Drive, Claremont, CA 91711 . This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 10/24/2013. /s/ Jason Christopher Humason Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 29, December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 242155 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as PREMIER REAL ESTATE CONSULTING, PREMIER MANAGEMENT GROUP, 310 N. Indian Hill Blvd., #420, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Marlena Regina Monroe, 741 W. 1st St., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 11/04/2004. /s/ Marlena Regina Monroe Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 29, December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 238996 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as COTC SERVICE COMPANY, 332 Westpoint Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Aaron Burch, 332 Westpoint Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 10/22/2013. /s/ Aaron Burch Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/19/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 29, December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 232998 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as WFTW, Word For The World, Word For The World Ministries, 2058 N. Mills Avenue, #356, Claremont, CA 91711-2812. Registrant(s): Word For The World Church, Inc., 2201 N. Central Expressway, Suite 225, Richardson, TX 75080-2718. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/01/2013. /s/ Nickolas Popoff Title: Vice President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/12/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 29, December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 233018 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as PUFC, Peter Popoff Ministries, 2058 N. Mills Avenue, #356, Claremont, CA 91711-2812. Registrant(s): People United For Christ, Inc., 550 College Commerce Way, Upland, CA 91786-4377. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/01/2013. /s/ Nickolas Popoff Title: Vice President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 11/12/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: November 29, December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA13-542171-VF Order No.: 130024932-CA-MAI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/20/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): DELLA JOAN SACKS, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 9/29/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2173610 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 12/27/2013 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $492,309.59 The purported property address is: 4120 BOGAN DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8302-032-012 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, December 13, 2013
2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-13-542171-VF . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 6457711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-13-542171-VF IDSPub #0058875 12/6/2013 12/13/2013 12/20/2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LARRY LEE TEAL CASE NO. BP146979 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of LARRY LEE TEAL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ALISHA ANN TEAL in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ALISHA ANN TEAL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: December 24, 2013 at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. 5 located at: Superior Court Of California, County Of Los Angeles, 111 North Hill Street Los Angeles, CA Central IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Sal Briguglio SBN: 93562 Law Office Of Sal Briguglio 9333 Baseline Road, Suite 230 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909-980-1100 Publish: December 6, 13 and 20, 2013

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20120015004378 Title Order No.: 120404841 FHA/VA/PMI No.: ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY APPLIES ONLY TO COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR, NOT TO THIS RECORDED ORIGINAL NOTICE. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/15/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 12/27/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2868060 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: ARUNA D SHARMA, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/06/2014 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 958 MARYMOUNT LN, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8669-016-030 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $932,597.96. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120015004378. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 11/27/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 750019013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4430612 12/06/2013, 12/13/2013, 12/20/2013

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 225079 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ARTIST TRAIT, SQUARE I GALLERY, WAW ALLAP, MUSEUM STORES ONLINE, MUSEUM ARTIFACT, 110 Harvard, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): ETANA INC, 5050 Arrow Hwy, Montclair, CA 91763. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 10/09/08. /s/ Walter Ebrahimzadeh Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/04/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: December 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013247236 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CINEGATE MEDIA, 449 Marygrove Road, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Robert Anthony Perez, 449 Marygrove Road, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Robert Anthony Perez Title: Owner This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/03/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: December 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2013 T.S. No. 13-24504 APN: 8671-050-041 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/7/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: WILLIAM FORESTER, AN UNMARRIED MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Law Offices of Les Zieve Deed of Trust recorded 6/14/2011 as Instrument No. 20110805997 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale:12/31/2013 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $255,123.13 Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 412 MIDDLEBURY CT CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Described as follows: See attached Legal Description as Exhibit "A" A.P.N #.: 8671-050-041 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 848-9272 or visit this Internet Web site www.elitepostandpub.com, using the file number assigned to this case 13-24504. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 12/4/2013 Law Offices of Les Zieve, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (714) 848-9272 www.elitepostandpub.com _________________________________ Christine O'Brien, Trustee Sale Officer THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. EPP 9082 12/6, 12/13, 12/20/2013. ORDER NO: 8334796 REFERENCE NO: 1324504 TITLE OFFICER: MARIE CRUZ PRODUCT TYPE: LTSG54B EXHIBIT "A" THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS GUARANTEE IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 1: LOT 41 OF TRACT 52260, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1226 PAGES 16 TO 21 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPTING THEREFROM, ALL OIL, OIL RIGHTS, MINERALS, MINERAL RIGHTS, NATURAL GAS RIGHTS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBONS BY WHATSOEVER NAME KNOWN, GEOTHERMAL STEAM AND ALL PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM ANY OF THE FOREGOING, THAT MAY BE WITHIN OR UNDER THE LOT, TOGETHER WITH THE PERPETUAL RIGHT OF DRILLING, MINING, EXPLORING AND OPERATING THEREFOR, AND STORING IN AND REMOVING THE SAME FROM THE LOT OR ANY OTHER LAND, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO WHIPSTOCK OR DIRECTIONALLY DRILL AND MINE FROM LANDS OTHER THAN THOSE HEREIN ABOVE DESCRIBED, OIL OR GAS WELLS TUNNELS AND SHAFTS INTO, THROUGH OR ACROSS THE SUBSURFACE OF THE LAND HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED, AND TO BOTTOM SUCH WHIPSTOCKED OR DIRECTIONALLY DRILLED WELLS, TUNNELS AND SHAFTS UNDER AND BENEATH OR BEYOND THE EXTERIOR LIMITS THEREOF, AND TO REDRILL, RETUNNEL, EQUIP, MAINTAIN, REPAIR, DEEPEN AND OPERATE ANY SUCH WELLS OR MINES, WITHOUT, HOWEVER, THE RIGHT TO DRILL, MINE, STORE, EXPLORE AND OPERATE THROUGH THE SURFACE OR THE UPPER FIVE HUNDRED (500) FEET OF THE SUBSURFACE OF THE LOT. EXCEPTING THEREFROM, AS APPLICABLE, AN EXCLUSIVE SIDEYARD EASEMENT OVER A PORTION OF THE LOT FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE ADJACENT LOT, AS SHOWN IN, AND SUBJECT TO SUCH CONDITIONS AS ARE SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION. FURTHER EXCEPTING THEREFROM, NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR ACCESS, INGRESS, EGRESS, ENCROACHMENT, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR, DRAINAGE, SUPPORT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES, ALL AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION DEFINED BELOW AND THE

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, December 13, 2013
MAP. PARCEL 2: AN EXCLUSIVE SIDEYARD EASEMENT OVER A PORTION OF THE REAL PROPERTY ADJOINING THE LOT, AS SHOWN IN, AND SUBJECT TO THE CONDITIONS AS ARE SET FORTH IN THE DECLARATION. PARCEL 3: NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR ACCESS, INGRESS, EGRESS, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR, DRAINAGE, ENCROACHMENT, SUPPORT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES, ALL AS DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR THE BUNGALOWS ("DECLARATION"), RECORDED ON FEBRUARY 27, 1998, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 98316410, AND ANY AMENDMENTS. EPP 9082. Publish December 6, 13 and 20, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20110015004771 Title Order No.: 110429485 FHA/VA/PMI No.: ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY APPLIES ONLY TO COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR, NOT TO THIS RECORDED ORIGINAL NOTICE. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/07/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 07/08/2005 as Instrument No. 05 1608614 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: BERNADETTE B KENDALL, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/02/2014 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 872 W HIGHPOINT DR, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8669-029-072 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $468,996.09. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this

29

property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20110015004771. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/04/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4431380 12/13/2013, 12/20/2013, 12/27/2013 ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO: 2013 137625 Current File No: 2013 250506 The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s): Pat’s Alterations, located at 445 W. Foothill Blvd., #102, Claremont, CA 91711. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on 07/02/13 in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant(s): Maximiliano Ruiz , 437 Eucalyptus Dr., Redlands, CA 92373 The business was conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/06/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Maximiliano Ruiz Title: Owner Publish: December 13, 20, 27, 2013 and January 3, 2014

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SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 12-13-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

30

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

Fences & Gates
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243 THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
Shirley's Cleaning Service 28 years in business. Office/residential No job too small. Free estimates. We do spring cleaning! 909-730-8564 EXPERIENCED cleaning lady will clean offices, homes, apartments. Great worker with references! Free estimates. 909-618-5402. ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20

Girl Friday

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

TOP notch care. Errands, pet and house sitting. Bonded, experienced, reliable. References. Call Colleen 909-489-1862. I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Contractor
PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951640-6616.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Garage Doors

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.
SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. ROSIES House Cleaning. 12 years experience, references. House, offices, apartments. Senior discount. 24hour service. 909-983-5834. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care, day or night. Call Lupe, 909452-1086.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Claremont Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.
Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

909-621-5388

SERVICES
Irrigation
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Friday 12-13-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

31

Landscaping

Painting
COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plumbing
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Sprinklers & Repair
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Upholstery

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Tile
PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960. Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Learn Japanese

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

Party Staffing

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909-626-3066.

Professional Servers and Bartenders Set-up, serve, clean-up 25 years experience 909-628-2866

Rain Gutters
INLAND Empire Sheet Metal, Rain Gutters, Down Spouts. Clean, repair, installation. Senior discount. 909-600-4874. 760-902-2556.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Window Washing
Always Cleaning Windows Residential-Screen & Tracks Commercial Buildings Free Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. BL00080998 909-287-6693 NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Personal Driver
PERSONAL driver. I can drive you to the airport, a doctor’s appointment, or to visit family anywhere within California. 909-205-3247.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Pruning of your small and medium perennials. 909-624-8238 www.bauertreecare.com

Tutoring
USC graduate. Tutoring K12 English, math, SAT in the convenience of your home. Experienced, references. $20 hourly. cdelabeg@usc.edu. 909-983-5834. CLASSROOM teacher, formerly of Lindamood-Bell, available to tutor all subjects, K-8. Specializing in literacy for those with learning issues. Upland, Claremont, surrounding areas. Gina 510-301-6004.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

We can publish your LA County legal.

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858 Lic.778506

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151

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Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

legalads@claremont-courier.com

Call Vickie 621-4761

909.621.4761
Friday 12-13-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?
Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS
Do you know if your service provider can pass a background check? We do! REAL Connections provides quality service providers, vetted through the Department of Justice. Looking for a painter, roofer, plumber, electrician? Call us, we’ve got the best!
Looking for more? We’ve got that too! We offer social events to connect with your community, and vetted volunteers to help with all of life’s to-do’s!

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Call us to find out more! 909-621-6300 www.realconnections.org

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

SPECIALTY SERVICE

SPECIALTY SERVICE

REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most widely read real estate section in the area.

CALL JESSICA,

909-621-5626

621-4761

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We can publish your LA County legal.

Call Vickie, 621-4761
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
1-4 p.m. 561 Baughman Ave., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 116 Hope St., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 600 N. White Ave., Pomona. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 4185 Oak Hollow Rd., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 2-5 p.m. 844 Yuba Ln., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15

REALTORS! Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate section in the area.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds Call JESSICA at 621-4761

We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, professionalism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential – Investment – Historical – Green – Short Sales CARLOS, 909-964-7631 PAT, 909-214-1002

www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com

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Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

in the COURIER’s Best of the Best Contest

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner
BRE# 00545647

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

I can't say enough about Mason's easy-going professionalism. I have worked with many real estate agents—buying and selling a home—some good and some not so good, but Mason stands above the rest. Although a busy agent, he made us feel like we were his only clients. It is obvious that Mason takes pride in his work and helped us through what has usually been a very stressful process. We were always informed, updated and met personally when needed. There was never pressure, unnecessary stress or unanswered questions. I will recommend everyone I know to Mason!

—Rosie V.

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, December 13, 2013

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Homes for the Holidays
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May your hearts and homes be filled with love, happiness and joy during the Holiday Season and throughout the New Year!
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM

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OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 1-4 PM

561 BAUGHMAN AVENUE, CLAREMONT Claremont Village Mid-Century Modern Circa 1950 • sparkling pool • separate studio Claremont Schools • Claremont Colleges

4185 OAK HOLLOW ROAD, CLAREMONT Piedmont Mesa Craftsman Inspired Ranch Quality upgrades • landscaped grounds Claremont Schools • Claremont Colleges

4736 WILLIAMS AVENUE, LA VERNE Live Oak Canyon Sanctuary Walls of Glass • Old World Charm La Verne and Claremont Schools

824 QUEENSBURY AVENUE, LA VERNE Traditional Two-Story Home 5 bedrooms • 2.5 bathrooms • bonus room Bonita Unified School District University of La Verne

3636 SUMNER AVENUE, #213, POMONA Mountain View Sumner Condominiums Spacious 1 bedroom • 1 bathroom HOA $330/mo Claremont Unified School District

18139 BONNIE LANE, FONTANA Beautiful Single Story Home Open Floor Plan • Hardwood Floors Well maintained inside and out!

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B.R.E. #00997900

Bernadette Kendall, REALTOR®

500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, California 91711 BRE 01223109 909.670.1717 bernadette.kendall@sothebysrealty.com

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

November
Number of Homes Sold Number Sold > $750,000 Number Sold < $750,000 Highest Sale Price Lowest Sale Price Average List Price Average Sold Price Average Days On Market

2013 20 4 16 $3,600,000 $320,000 $744,460 $728,868 58

2012 29 5 24 $1,450,000 $165,000 $569,565 $553,548 76

Change From Previous Year -31 -20 -33 +148 +94 +31 +32 -24 percent percent percent percent percent percent percent percent

BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF HAMILL

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

909.621.0500
NEW LISTING!

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM. - $575,000 116 HOPE ST., CLAREMONT. PREMIUM UPSCALE VILLAGE WALK END UNIT. Newly-built, duplex-style property is one of only eight units that own their own patio and share only one common wall. Three bedrooms with closets, built-ins plus loft/office with closet that could be a fourth bedroom. Hardwood flooring, granite counters in kitchen, cabinets, granite in bathrooms and indoor laundry. Custom lighting, art niche and built-in banquette with storage in dining room.T wo-car attached garage. (H116) OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM. - $245,000 600 N. WHITE AVE., POMONA. HISTORIC WILTON HEIGHTS SPANISH COTTAGE Built circa 1927 with two bedrooms and one bathroom. Shows light and airy with lots of character plus numerous recent updates. Located on a shady tree-lined street in one of the more desirable areas of Pomona. Close to the Fairplex, 10 Freeway, Ganesha Park, Pomona Valley Hospital, Pomona Catholic High School and shopping. (W600) COMMERCIAL/PROFESSIONAL - $415,000 Blocks away from the downtown. Prime Arrow Highway frontage, just west of Indian Hill. Built circa 1932, this beautiful home/professional office offers classic charm. Bright and airy! Living room with fireplace and adjacent dining room. Two bedrooms plus a tandem room off second bedroom. Kitchen with eating area. Inside laundry room. Covered porte cochere parking plus detached converted garage. (A445) PRIME CLAREMONT LOCALE - $600,000 Indian Creek near foothills, trails and wilderness park. Southwest Mediterranean contemporary style with a secluded private entrance.Approximately 2000 sq. ft. Formal living room with fireplace, dining room area with refreshment center. Updated kitchen opens to formal living room with vaulted ceiling. Nearly 1/3 acre corner lot with a sunken racquetball/sports court, patio and yard plus mountain views! Coveted Condit Elementary School locale. (K2691)

November followed a yearly real estate tradition by being relatively slow for home sales. Homes are still selling quickly, but new inventory has dropped drastically, thus impacting sales of all makes and models. The high sale price for the month, however, pulled averages unrealistically high. Removing the highest sale from the data, average list/sale prices were $582,000/$577,000 respectively. Buyers are still out there and want to purchase their next home. They are just waiting for it to hit the market.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty. Contact Ryan at ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com.

NEW LISTING!

(909) 625-6754 (909) 973-5582
www.bjnichka.com email: bj@bjnichka.com

NEW LISTING!
Broker Associate
D.R.E. #00961915

Elegant circa 1930 estate in northwest Upland. Sweeping corner lot studded with magnificent, stately oak trees. Approximately 4000 sq. ft. with five bedrooms and fourand-a half bathrooms. Great room consists of family room with fireplace, billiard room, wet bar plus a large country kitchen. Beautiful hardwood floors. Spacious, handsome living room, formal dining room and sunny breakfast room. Picturesque backyard with two patios, pool, spa, BBQ and patio furniture. Extra large two-car garage plus gated driveway. Great RV pad. $3900 monthly, includes water, gardener and pool maintenance. Immediate availability.

SAN ANTONIO HEIGHTS LEASE

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2 – 5PM 844 YUBA LN., CLAREMONT
One-of-a-kind statement home. European-style with timeless finishes and materials.The open single-level floor plan has a great room with soaring twelve-foot ceilings and spectacular windows offering views of San Antonio Peak. Clean lines and extensive use of stone and wood make this home a work of art. www.844Yuba.com. (Y844) Sally Tornero www.sallytornero.com - 909.447.7718

NEW LISTING! CELEBRATETHE UNIQUE - $1,600,000
A beautiful one-of-a-kind estate in a prestigious neighborhood. Eight bedrooms, five-and-a-half bathrooms. Perfect for entertaining. Beautiful gardens and breathtaking mountain views. (H3763) Ryan Zimmerman www.rrzimmerman.com - 909.447.7707

NEW LISTING! STUNNING NORTH UPLAND ESTATE
Quality-built by Lewis Homes on approximately half an acre at the end of a cul-de-sac. Dramatic entry with twenty-foot ceilings and oversized windows lets in an abundance of natural light. Newly renovated kitchen opens to the family room, making casual entertaining a breeze. Four-car attached garage. Pool and spa, waterfall and BBQ. (S2242) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

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