Strategic Five-Year Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and the Wagner-Peyser

Act

“Years Three and Four” July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2009

May 1, 2007 Submitted by the South Dakota Department of Labor 700 Governors Drive Pierre, SD 57501

Table of Contents i. ii. iii. I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. Plan Development ..................................................................................... 4 Plan Implementation................................................................................. 5 Plan Modifications ..................................................................................... 6 State Vision ................................................................................................ 7 State Workforce Investment Priorities ...................................................... 28 State Governance Structure..................................................................... 30 Economic and Labor Market Analysis ...................................................... 37 Overarching State Strategies ................................................................... 47 Major State Policies and Requirements ................................................... 55 Integration of One-Stop Service Delivery ................................................. 61 Administration and Oversight of Local Workforce Investment System ..... 63 Service Delivery ....................................................................................... 77 State Administration ............................................................................... 112 Assurances ............................................................................................ 121

Attachments A. Statewide Performance Indicators and Goals ........................................ 122 B. Program Administration Designees and Plan Signatures....................... 124 C. Adult Education and Family Literacy Plan .............................................. 126

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i. Plan Development
The South Dakota Workforce Development Council (SDWDC) requires local One-Stop boards be composed of a majority of business people. As a result, the business community has not only had ample opportunity to review and comment on the plan, but was an integral part of its development. Education, vocational rehabilitation, communitybased organizations, etc., are represented on the SDWDC and were given complete access to the development and content of the Unified Plan. The Governor and the SDWDC reviewed and approved the proposed plan prior to submission. A draft copy of this plan will be provided to the following partners: • • • • • • • • • • • • South Dakota Workforce Development Council; South Dakota Department of Labor (SDDOL); South Dakota Department of Social Services (DSS); South Dakota Department of Human Services (DHS); South Dakota Department of Health (DOH); South Dakota State Library; South Dakota Even Start Program; South Dakota Department of Corrections (DOC); South Dakota Office of Career and Technical Education; Lutheran Social Services of South Dakota; Black Hills Special Services Cooperative; and Sub-grantees for Adult Education and Literacy and WIA Youth projects.

Persons wishing to review the plan will be given several options to do so. The draft plan will be made available through the SDDOL home page on the Internet for all to see. For persons without access to the Internet, hard copies of the draft plan will be mailed to every South Dakota Career Center (SDCC). Persons wanting a personal copy of the plan can obtain them through SDDOL.

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ii. Plan Implementation
As a single statewide service delivery area (SDA) under JTPA, the leadership and vision for the system has come from the Governor and the the SDWDC. For purposes of Title I of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), the State will continue to be treated as a statewide local service area. The SDWDC has been the driving force behind workforce development since it was first formed under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA). This distinguished group of key State agency heads, employers, and other interested parties has guided the development of today's One-Stop delivery system in our state. The majority of employment and training programs are provided by the SDDOL, which also provides administrative support for the SDWDC. Under this structure, various programs including WIA, Wagner-Peyser, Unemployment Insurance (UI), Job Corps, TANF, and Veterans' employment and training programs are brought together with the interests of economic development, career and technical education, Adult Education and Literacy, and vocational rehabilitation. The SDWDC was formed to maintain the momentum for economic development and vitality by better connecting workforce strategies to economic needs. The 17 member SDWDC is comprised of a majority of private sector members who represent the State's employers, labor unions, community leaders and representatives of five State agencies including the Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Education, Secretary of Human Services, Commissioner of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED), and the Executive Director of the Board of Regents. The SDWDC members share a common purpose: to improve the services to employers and their current and future employees by streamlining the delivery of workforce and training services. The purpose of the SDWDC continues to be to provide planning, coordination, monitoring and policy analysis for the State training system as a whole and to advise the Governor on strategic policies, goals and standards for the development, and implementation of effective programs for the development of talent growth for the economy and business needs of our state. In addition to the key policy decisions made at the State level, a good deal of local control has been built into the system in the form of local workforce boards. These boards, comprised by a majority business membership have been developed in each SDCC location. The boards deal with a variety of local workforce issues ranging from Alternative High Schools to overall long term planning for WIA. A unique blend of stable State agencies and flexible local private non-profit organizations, as well as faith-based organizations, effectively delivers workforce services to our employer and participant customers.

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iii. Plan Modifications

Economic Development Goals................................................................................... 6 - 18 Agency Partnerships ....................................................................................................... 18 Education and Training Opportunities............................................................................. 19 Role of Key Players.................................................................................................. 19 - 20 Governor’s Vision for Youth ..................................................................................... 21 - 26 State Workforce Investment Priorities...................................................................... 27 - 28 Collaborative Cross-Agency Approach ........................................................................... 36 Services to In-Need Youth .............................................................................................. 53 Youth Eligibility Criterion .......................................................................................... 75 - 76 Workforce Information Implementation ........................................................................... 79 Youth Services Strategy....................................................................................... 104 - 105 Funding for Cross-Agency Collaboration ............................................................. 106 - 107 Description of Waivers and Workflex Authority .................................................... 112 - 113 Proposed Levels of Performance.................................................................................. 120

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I. State Vision A. South Dakota’s economic development goals for attracting, retaining and growing business and industry within the State.
The Governor has implemented an exciting effort, the 2010 Initiative. This is an ambitious undertaking that is designed, among other related goals, to focus energy and investment: • • • • • In the creation and development of new business; In the growth and expansion of existing business; In agriculture and natural resource development; In the development of research and technology infrastructure to be commercialized; and To stabilize rural communities.

The 2010 Initiative outlines a series of specific goals for economic growth and visitor spending in the state by the year 2010. When the vision is fully realized, the 2010 Initiative will yield an unprecedented era of opportunity and economic development for South Dakota. Since the submission of South Dakota’s Strategic Plan for Years One and Two, many details of the Governor’s 2010 Initiative have been given substance. The addition of specific goals and strategies to accomplish them clearly show the close working relationship of multiple state agencies in the Governor’s plan to grow the economy and create a talent ready workforce. The following narrative includes the substance that has been added to the Governor’s plan. Goal One: Double Visitor Spending from $600 Million to $1.2 Billion by 2010 1A. Change the way South Dakota is marketed. • • • • • Identify and target niche markets, with emphasis on emerging markets, including international. Reshape and redeploy “Great Faces. Great Places.” slogan and logo. Target advertising to specific audiences. Place an emphasis on destination packaging and call for sales versus call for inquiries. Educate industry people on what today’s visitors want and expect; establish best practices and communicate through regular updates.

These additional goals and strategies have been established:

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Develop new image photography and television commercials promoting South Dakota that will be aired in target markets for the peak 2007 marketing campaign. Incorporate greater diversity of models and locations into the images to broaden the appeal of this advertising effort. Review and reinforce the South Dakota visitor experience on travelsd.com.

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Expand the use of information available through the South Dakota Travel Monitoring System, which collects information (in a confidential manner) on attraction visitation, and occupancy for independent hotels/motels, campgrounds and international guests in South Dakota. The information will be distributed to industry members through sdvisit.com, e-mail notifications, and annual and monthly reports. Research and develop packaging, appropriate content, and distribution of redesigned CD media kit. Implement an industry communication campaign to inform and educate tourism business leaders and partners of the office’s marketing efforts. Develop a cooperative program with the South Dakota Convention and Visitors’ Bureau Association to increase conventions and other group travel to South Dakota. The team will research and implement a marketing plan for a minimum of three new professional or group associations for potential trade sales marketing opportunities. Research opportunities within the target geographic markets identified by the Office of Tourism for training and education of South Dakota key travel agents in the same market. Continue promotion of South Dakota in six international markets. Develop and review strategies and incentives aimed at combating increasing gas prices in partnership with the producers and marketers of ethanol-enriched fuels.

1B. Focus new energy and investment on expanding the fall shoulder season for visitors in order to increase the percentage of tourism revenues for this season to 42 percent. • • • Create a new marketing plan that focuses on vacation packages. Invest in promotions to expand the shoulder season. Attract "reverse snowbirds".

These additional goals and strategies have been established: • • • Create a new marketing plan focusing on vacation packages. Invest in promotions to expand the shoulder season. Attract "reverse snowbirds".

Steps to achieve these goals include: • Increase shoulder season marketing efforts with greater financial resources. Additional resources will be used to enhance peak season fly/drive packages, package advertising for central and eastern South Dakota, Internet key word campaigns, direct marketing to out-of-state hunters, and partnerships with media partners such as ESPN and Pheasants Forever. • Develop and coordinate a media blitz to complement shoulder season paid marketing efforts in defined media markets. • Expand the Giant Step cooperative marketing magazine program to include publications such as Ducks Unlimited Journal, Field & Stream, Outdoor Life, and Pheasants Forever in an effort to reach out to sporting enthusiasts 1C. Expand investment in tourism’s peak season through greater use of partnerships and cooperative efforts.

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Establish partnerships to pool resources (e.g. Rapid City Air Service Task Force, Mickelson Trail, South Dakota Advertising Cooperative, National Park Service). Develop coordinated marketing plans. Continue Governor’s $1 million challenge for 2005 and 2006.

These additional goals and strategies have been established:

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Build and evaluate contracts with regional marketing associations to reflect the shared vision of 2010, Goal 1 and to coordinate marketing efforts across the state. Continue to have Tourism meet with the South Dakota State Historical Society and the South Dakota Arts Council to plan and implement a marketing and educational program for cultural and heritage tourism. Coordinate and host the annual Agri-Cultural Heritage Tourism Conference in partnership with the Southeast South Dakota Regional Tourism Association in November 2006. Enhance relationships between the Visitor and Industry Relations (VIR) team and others with contacts in other state/federal agencies and encourage the creation of “agency roundtables” to openly discuss projects, issues, opportunities, etc. that affect participating agencies. o The VIR team will initiate contact and develop on-going communications with representatives of tribal tourism organizations to meet and openly discuss issues and opportunities. o The team will enhance the visitor information currently provided on travelsd.com. o The team will act as the staff lead who works with the selected event committees to promote the various Great Events. Update and implement changes to the Group Tour Planning Guide in cooperation with partners from across the state. Distribute to international and domestic tour operators through mailing, trade shows, and follow-up.

1D. Develop a statewide “one-click, one-call” reservation system by 2005. • • Work with visitor industry. Make it easy for visitors to purchase packages and make travel arrangements.

These additional goals and strategies have been established: The Office will: • Implement and enhance travelsd.com to provide an interactive Trip Planner, which will enable visitors to create their own South Dakota vacation by dropping and dragging attractions into an interactive itinerary. • Continue to enhance the functionality of the site to make it easy for visitors to purchase packages and make travel arrangements. 1E. Capitalize on the existing outdoor opportunities in our State. • Develop greater recreational opportunities along the State- and Corps-owned land along the Missouri River.

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Recognize the effect of camping, hunting and fishing opportunities on our quality of life. Improve access, signage and mapping of the State’s trail ride opportunities and biking and hiking trails.

These additional goals and strategies have been established:
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Identify travel and outdoor writers and media outlet whose demographics match our target audience. Continue attending outdoor travel writer conferences (AGLOW, OWAA, Pheasant FEST, SHOT Show) to showcase South Dakota's outdoor opportunities with national and regional members. Promote the new hunting and fishing resource websites SD Tourism has developed. Consumers will be directed to specific domain names such as fishing.travelsd.com or hunting.travelsd.com for a one-stop knowledge about SD’s sporting opportunities. Print ads promoting hunting vacation packages will be placed in outdoor magazines and special hunting sections of target market newspapers. Develop and issue a new motorcycle guide to target motorcycle enthusiasts and give them valuable information as they cruise the highways of South Dakota. The publication will include a map of South Dakota highlighting scenic routes, national and state parks, recreation areas, information centers, and the locations of partner factory-authorized motorcycle dealers.

Goal Two: Increase GSP (Gross State Product) by $10 billion by 2010 2A. Promote the creation and development of new businesses that will contribute $6 billion to the GSP. • • • • Launch South Dakota Entrepreneurship Program: o Re-establish Inventor’s Congress with local Chambers of Commerce. o Establish handholding infrastructure. Connect entrepreneurs with handholders, grant-writers, mentors, angel investors. Coordinate with existing entities (e.g. SBIR, SBDC, Enterprise Institute, SCORE). Introduce finance program changes: o Increase MicroLoan lending limit to $50,000 and incorporate into REDI Fund with new legislation. o Loan $3 million from REDI fund to regional revolving loan funds. o Establish high opportunity fund with REDI board. Develop new industry clusters and enhance those already existing (healthcare, biotech, financial, insurance, firearms).

The CEO plan has been re-evaluated and revised. The team is seeking more input from local community development officials and higher education partners. These additional goals and strategies have been established:
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Develop comprehensive plan for entrepreneurial development in South Dakota. Identify community members to lead CEO Center .

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Identify CEO Centers to create local networks that will foster entrepreneurial development and assist in the development of specialized action plans for each. Roll out CEO Centers and begin implementing action plans. Establish entrepreneur service provider tracking system for requests for assistance.

2B. Promote the growth/expansion of existing businesses that will contribute $4 billion to GSP. • • • • • Create Red Tape Task Force to review State statutes. Re-establish Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP). Re-establish Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC). Assist with branding and marketing of products produced in South Dakota: o Re-institute South Dakota Made program. o Help South Dakota companies develop Internet presence. Make finance program changes: o Alter REDI rules to make money easier to obtain. o Raise bonding limit to $5 million.

These additional goals and strategies have been established:
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Make annual selection and present awards for Giant Vision Competition. Promote and provide technical support to the Giant Visions Awards, Innovation Expo and West River Inventor's Congress. Market new MicroLOAN program policies, which include maximum loan amount increase from $20,000 to $50,000 and decreased interest rate from 5 percent to 3 percent. Develop and seek approval for administrative rules for the high opportunity and entrepreneur development funds. Market new high opportunity and entrepreneur programs. Start accepting applications for High Opportunity Fund and Entrepreneur Fund. Research industry development in South Dakota and incorporate into marketing efforts. Continue to pursue opportunities to promote the State's recognized financial service industry cluster. Develop a comprehensive marketing strategy, including a review of geographic and sector targets; message, and message delivery methods. Provide an analysis of market opportunities for identified key sectors and geographic regions. Develop specific goals and tactics to continue research and development of prospect opportunities from identified targets. Assess GOED Finance and Incentive programs compared to Best Practices of regional, competing states. Present recommendations for modifying, creating, or eliminating finance tools.

2C. Promote agricultural and natural resource development in South Dakota. • • Continue to fund feasibility study for value-added projects: o Dakota Prime, Dakota Turkey Growers, Storied Beef, etc. Become a net energy exporter:

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o
o

o

Ethanol Biodiesel fuel Wind energy

These additional goals and strategies have been established:
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Develop a comprehensive strategy to create, implement and inform the public of the SOUTH DAKOTA CERTIFIED™ Beef Program. Develop regulations, forms, and contracts for the processing and marketing of SOUTH DAKOTA CERTIFIED™ Beef. Work with SDBIC and AIB to develop a SOUTH DAKOTA CERTIFIED™ Beef research and graduate assistantship program at SDSU Department of Range Management to improve beef processing and production practices.

2C. Promote agricultural and natural resource development in South Dakota. • • Continue to fund feasibility study for value-added projects: o Dakota Prime, Dakota Turkey Growers, Storied Beef, etc. Become a net energy exporter: o Ethanol o Biodiesel fuel o Wind energy

Goal Three: Become a Recognized Leader in Research and Technology Development by 2010 3A. Secure Homestake Mine for use as an underground science laboratory. • • Establish Homestake Conversion Lab Project. Commit funding to ensure Federal approval.

The Science and Technology Authority works with the Board of Regents and the Department of Tourism and State Development to develop the NSF proposal including a long-term state plan to maximize the research, education, and economic development impact of the state of South Dakota. These additional goals and strategies have been accomplished:

Introduced and passed legislation to establish and fund an underground research laboratory at the 4,850 foot level and initiate related research, education, and economic development activities.

3B. Improve ranking to at least 30th nationally for NSF funding. • • • Work towards graduating from NSF EPSCoR. EPSCoR match. A nanotechnology center.

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A peer review process was used to select the four 2010 Research Centers (2004), NSF EPSCoR research focus area (2005), and Research Seed Grants (2005) awarded to 19 researchers at University of South Dakota (USD), South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSM&T), South Dakota State University (SDSU), and Black Hills State University (BHSU). The 2010 Research Centers established include:
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Center for Infectious Disease Research and Vaccinology (SDSU Department of Veterinary Science & USD School of Medicine) Center for Accelerated Applications at the Nanoscale (SDSM&T Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering) Center for the Research and Development of Light-Activated Materials (USD & SDSU Chemistry Departments, USD School of Medicine & Avera Research Foundation) South Dakota Signal Transduction Center (USD School of Medicine & South Dakota Health Research Foundation)

South Dakota currently has 14 PhD programs with an average of 70 PhD graduates per year. The Board of Regents (BOR) continues to work with the universities to establish additional PhD programs with a goal to double the number of programs and graduates by 2010. Specifically this will:

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Enable the universities to transition from teaching institutions to research universities and engines of economic development through research collaborations with industry and supporting the development of an entrepreneurial culture throughout South Dakota. The BOR is developing a plan for this that will be part of the 2008 budget request. Continue the development of university research infrastructure by supporting the growth of graduate education programs and focused research infrastructure investments that will support interdisciplinary research activities. Develop and maintain the broadband computing and communications network needed by researchers and the private sector to achieve 2010 goals. Expand undergraduate research and internship experiences supporting research and developing a pipeline of students for the expanding graduate programs and South Dakota industry while enhancing undergraduate education. Actively engage communities, industry, and private sector in the development of a research and entrepreneurial culture in South Dakota.

South Dakota plans to use a portion of two 2010 Research Center's funding as the remaining portion of the $1.5 million of the cost-share of the RII proposal. The 2006 NSF EPSCoR proposal research focus area involves the Light Activated Material and Nanotechnology 2010 Research Centers focusing on Photo-Active Nanoscale Systems. This maximizes the effect of the State's 2010 Research Center investment. The Center will become a regional and national leader in focus areas of nanotechnology. The Center will be a key component in the 2006 NSF EPSCoR proposal and is facilitating a five state regional effort to compete for a NSF Research Center. Economic opportunities will be created from the Nanotechnology Center. SDSM&T in collaboration with Zyvex Corporation have created the Nanoscale Semiconductor Testing facility to market and provide testing services at the nanoscale. Additional collaborations and spin out businesses are being developed.

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3C. Develop research and technology infrastructure at our universities and with the private sector (Emphasis on research that can be commercialized and will benefit South Dakota). • Create a Research and Development and Tech Transfer Office: o Cooperative effort between State, Board of Regents, and private sector. o Hire specialized faculty for research. o Coordinate efforts to secure grants. o Change intellectual property procedures to increase the number of patents issued and licensed in South Dakota. Encourage development of tech centers and incubators. Promote further cooperation with EROS. Further develop university research niches (e.g. BHSU with tourism and DSU with technology security). Coordinate cooperative research efforts between private businesses (like Hematech), universities, healthcare providers, and other public institutions.

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These additional goals and strategies have been established:
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Hire postdoctoral research associate at Nanotechnology Center. Hire Fabrication Technician at Nanotechnology Center. Hire the following positions for the Vaccinology Center of Excellence: o Assistant/Associate/Full Professor of Preon. Biology, Assistant Research Professor of Molecular Virology, Research Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Research Associate Biochemistry, Research Associate Imaging Technology, Postdoctoral Research Associate and a Veterinary Care Technician. Hire two chemistry faculty researchers and a medical school researcher in ophthalmology to support the Center. Explore shared research faculty positions between universities and private sector industry partners. Support School of Mines’ goal to establish its South Dakota Tech Development Laboratory that will house several cutting-edge research activities and projects, all designed to expand knowledge of science and engineering, to solve the problems of industry, the military and government; and to create economic development opportunities for South Dakota. o SDSM&T has established the Friction Stir Welding center, Nanoscale Semiconductor Testing, and other research and development activities to facilitate industry interaction and research collaborations. Support the West River Foundation goal, in concert with the Rapid City Area Economic Development Partnership, in its goal of developing a regional incubator/accelerator facility in Rapid City. The incubator will house new and expanding businesses with significant growth potential. State's goal is to pledge $500,000 to the facility. o The Black Hills Business Center was opened on the SDSM&T campus in July 2006. Support the SDSU Growth Partnership goal of creating a Research Park at SDSU. Work with the National Network for Technology Entrepreneurship and Commercialization (N2TEC) to conduct a pilot project in collaboration with Black Hills Vision and expand to a statewide project.

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Continuing goals include:

Tourism and State Development is working with the universities, tribal colleges and economic development organizations to support and coordinate technology based economic development and entrepreneurial activities. The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC), based at SDSM&T, will continue to enhance faculty development through summer faculty fellowships at the EROS center. The South Dakota Center for Biocomplexity Studies will continue to build upon previous EPSCoR support for scientific clusters in Biological Response to Stress and Geophysical Processes of the Northern Plains. The center is a virtual center utilizing the intellectual and physical resources at South Dakota State University, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, the University of South Dakota, and EROS Data Center. South Dakota State University has developed a Geographic Information Sciences Center of Excellence in collaboration with the EROS Data Center. Dr. Matt Hansen has been hired as the Co-Director of the Center. Dr. Tom Loveland is the Co-Director from EROS. Additional researchers have been hired by both partners and a PhD in Geospatial Science and Engineering has been approved at SDSU. Dakota State University continues to move forward with grant applications relative to it's biometric research project. To date, two grant applications have been funded: $125,000 from Great Plains Foundation and $250,000 federal earmark to advance the project, particularly for biometric research for banking and finance. At South Dakota State University, ongoing areas of research emphasis that are continually being developed include: Biocomplexity Studies, Biomass Conversion, Infectious Disease, Alternative Energy, Sensing Devices, Light Activated Material, Human Nutrition/Bone Density, Cellular and Molecular Biology, and Environmental Science including chemical engineering. Developing areas of emphasis are Geospatial Science and Engineering (with EROS) and Health Care Management (with Avera Research) The SBIR program, N2TEC Summer Institute and other activities were implemented to meet the needs of technology entrepreneurs both technically and in business. The program involves public private sector collaborative efforts.

Goal Four: Brand and Develop South Dakota’s Quality of Life as the Best in America by 2010 4A. Enhance South Dakota's image to young people in an effort to retain and import young adults. • Establish Dakota Corps program in 2004.

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Work with South Dakota businesses and post-secondary education to identify needs and broaden internship opportunities. Promote South Dakota in terms of culture, employment and quality of life to young adults.

4B. Enhance History and Arts as a tool for economic development and cultural tourism. • • Quantify the economic impact of arts and history in South Dakota. Advance history and arts as essential to lifelong learning: o Promote State Historical Society’s traveling museum exhibits and educational kits programs. o Expand the Arts in School Program and Arts in Community Programs. o Discover opportunities for expanding other history and arts programs.

4C. Stabilize rural populations through community development. • Build up infrastructure: o Railroad (e.g. DME expansion) o Water projects (e.g. Lewis and Clark) o Communication (e.g. wireless service in every community) Facilitate cooperation between cities and the towns near them. Facilitate the development of community plans. Continue statewide beautification program. Cooperate with statewide and community groups on leadership programs. Develop government resource directory.

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4D. Stimulate affordable homeownership, rental housing and day care facilities in South Dakota communities which evidence a need. • • • • • • Collaborate with our partners to secure and invest $2 billion in private and public capital to provide for affordable owner occupied housing, rental housing and daycare facilities. Expand existing partnerships, programs and services to provide homeownership and rental development opportunities and Federal subsidies to the State's lowincome working residents, the elderly and persons with disabilities. Create service-enriched, permanent housing opportunities for the homeless population to end chronic homelessness in ten years. Support investment of private capital to provide leverage for tribal initiatives which increase homeownership on the reservations. Improve upon the coordination, promotion and marketing of SDHDA programs and capabilities to better serve our partners, individuals and families in South Dakota. Uphold the 2010 Initiative and SDHDA goals as a work in progress.

4E. Improve cooperative efforts with the Native American tribes. • • • Establish lasting tribal partnerships. Assist in developing business infrastructure with the tribes, when invited. Continue to improve rural tourism efforts with tribes.

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Engage in a summit process with tribes, as invited. Increase staffing of the Office of Tribal Relations. Promote the establishment of cultural, non-competitive exchanges between reservation and non-reservation schools, if invited.

These additional goals and strategies have been established to connect with students:
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Conduct a breakout session at the 2007 Governor's Economic Development Conference that focuses on retaining and importing young adults. Attend Boys State to gather input from students on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people. Attend Girls State to gather input from students on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people. Attend YBA to gather input from students on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people. Research statewide youth organizations and their annual conferences to set up new forums to gather input from students on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people. Conduct youth summit with leadership from high school organizations and gather input on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people. Coordinate with higher education and technical institutes to gather input from students on how to enhance South Dakota's image to young people and to present entrepreneurship information and the data on the advantages of living and working in South Dakota.

These additional goals and strategies have been established to connect with employment agencies:

Meet with President of South Dakota Career Planning & Placement Association to discuss partnership opportunities in promoting internships and graduates from South Dakota's universities. Meet with South Dakota Bureau of Personnel to discuss partnership opportunities in promoting internships and graduates from South Dakota's universities. Meet with Career Center manager to discuss partnership opportunities in promoting internships and graduates from South Dakota's universities.

These additional goals and strategies have been established to connect with economic development partners:

Meet with Director of Workforce Development, Interns in Industry program with the Sioux Falls Development Foundation to discuss partnership opportunities in promoting internships and graduates from South Dakota's universities. Promote internships as part of the South Dakota Chamber of Commerce and Industry's Business Day and the Governor's Office of Economic Development Conference. Meet with GOED, Department of Labor, Bureau of Personnel and State Chamber to discuss partnership opportunities in promoting internships.

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Research intern programs in other states and prepare summary and recommendations for funding options that could be used to encourage business participation in internships.

Dakota Roots is a workforce development initiative aimed at South Dakotans who are interested in moving back to the state. Since the October 2006 launch, the program continues to match participants with the state’s leading businesses. Dakota Roots aims to reach out to South Dakotans who live in other states, as well as current citizens who want to take advantage of South Dakota’s economy and quality of life. The current job database at www.DakotaRoots.com has almost 10,000 job openings. Dakota Roots will match participants with available career openings and notify them when openings are appropriate to their skills. If interested, the participants can pursue the opportunities directly with the businesses. The individual’s information remains completely confidential throughout the entire process. Family and friends can also be referred to Dakota Roots – we all know of someone who would like to make South Dakota their home. Information will be shared with them by mail, email, or phone. In addition, information can be provided to progressive businesses interested in starting up, expanding, or bringing some of their business home. Details of the business climate are available, and employers can post their job listings online to receive quality applicants. Dakota Roots will grow the South Dakota workforce by encouraging those with ties to the state to return - to live, grow, and build. It is a joint partnership between the Department of Labor, the Department of Tourism and State Development, and the Governor’s Office. For more information, visit www.DakotaRoots.com or call 1-800-5921882. Goal Five: Uphold Our Commitment to the 2010 Initiative as a Work in Progress 5A. Assign implementation to Department of Tourism and State Development. • • Make department directors responsible for on-going pursuit and development. End first three years with cost savings and existing resources in State government; reevaluate in 2006.

5B. Create ongoing update and accountability structure for 2010 Initiative. • • • • Post regular updates on 2010initiative.com website. Encourage review by groups and committees (e.g. Boys and Girls State, university classes, Chiesman Foundation, business and community leaders). Provide media with updates on a regular basis. Formal annual review.

*As a result of the 2010 Initiative, five industries have been targeted as potential growth industries in South Dakota. Department of Labor efforts for talent development will be developed to prepare individuals for occupations within these industries. Following is a listing of the high growth industries:

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Industry: Bio-Tech Industry: Renewable Energy Industry: U.S. Firearms Industry: Computer Software Industry: U.S. Medical

B. Governor’s vision for maximizing and leveraging the broad array of Federal and State Resources available for workforce investment flowing through the State’s cabinet agencies and/or education in order to ensure a skilled workforce for the State’s business and industry.
When it comes to training, South Dakota is devoted to helping communities. Through the Workforce Development Program, companies have access to dollars to help train new and existing employees. The GOED will provide technical assistance to help develop the Workforce Development Program application. Technical assistance is provided to help identify approaches and ideas necessary to develop a successful project. Collaboration and leveraging of resources is exactly how business is done in South Dakota. The Governor clearly expects and encourages all cabinet agencies to work together to achieve common goals. As evidenced in the 2010 Initiative, Tourism and State Development, Department of Labor, Department of Education, and the Board of Regents all partner closely on efforts to prepare a quality workforce. Examples of the partnership include recent collaborative and joint efforts among multiple state agencies seeking federal, state, private, and philanthropic investment for significant projects in the state. Such partnerships are directed at development of the healthcare workforce, talent development under the WIRED philosophy. Agencies working closely together and committing time, talent and resources are SDDOL, Department of Education, Governors Office of Economic Development, Department of Health, and the Board of Regents. Private sector business leaders are eager to join with this dedicated partnership.

C. Governor’s vision for ensuring a continuum of education and training opportunities that support a skilled workforce.
A skilled labor force waiting to happen. That's how the State describes the more than 35,000 students enrolled in higher education in South Dakota. These students are bright, energetic and ready to go to work for employers. Education is important in South Dakota. In the last seven years, more than $14 million has been committed to the State’s four technical institutes. This money has been used to incorporate technology in all training programs. Universities and private colleges also are rising to the challenge of meeting the unique needs of South Dakota companies. They are constantly reviewing the needs of industries so their curriculums and students are ready for today's workforce.

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Determination of workforce needs has traditionally been done through evaluation of Labor Market Information historic data. While this method is still a valuable tool in determining future areas of potential job growth, the SDDOL is also looking to our partners to help determine areas of workforce need based on industry and resource growth possibilities. The Governor’s Office of Economic Development is an invaluable resource for this type of information as they work daily on the feasibility of business growth within our state. As future needs are established, universities, private colleges, technical schools, and secondary schools will all be part of the workforce talent development planning strategy. South Dakota recognizes the importance of partnering education and business. The end result is a better workforce for all businesses. Transitioning students in the Alternative Schools and Adult Education and Literacy program to post secondary and skill training emerged as a more prominent focus during the past few years. Career pathway development for these students helps to develop their talents and skills supports and contributes to meeting the economic development needs in each community. There are many Alternative High Schools in South Dakota. The SDDOL has partnered with 17 schools to provide approximately 1,000 students an opportunity to participant in a joint employment and education program. Such activity in addition to earning credits toward graduation includes in-depth research and planning for transition to postsecondary education. The out-of-school youth attending the Adult Education and Literacy program in PY05-06 breakdown shows 635 students in the 16-18 age category and 1,136 in the 19-24 age. Of GED completers, 252 were 16 and 17-years-old which is 20 percent of the total candidates passing the GED. These students are looking for workforce skills and talent development which has an impact on the economic growth of each region.

D. Governor’s vision for bringing together the key players in workforce development including business and industry, economic development, education, and the public workforce system to continuously identify the workforce challenges facing the State and to develop innovative strategies and solutions that effectively leverage resources to address those challenges.
The SDDOL WIA youth program specialist began encouraging awareness and exploration of the healthcare industry approximately five years ago. Summer academies were held on college campuses for WIA eligible youth. A website was developed and currently is hosted by SDDOL. There is information for students and lesson plans for teachers and industry representatives to use in classrooms. All the lesson plans are cross referenced to State standards. Maintaining and updating the information will be an important joint effort between SDDOL and DOH. The promotion of the website will also be ongoing. The website is: http://www.sdjobs.org/sdhott From the WIA Youth program beginning, both the youth and adult programs evolved into a much larger project. This resulted in collaborative planning between SDDOL and DOH staff in the Office of Rural Health. This effort produced the first statewide Healthcare Workforce Summit which was held in August 2006. The Departments of Labor, Health,

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Education and Board of Regents all submitted mailing lists for inviting a wide cross section of individuals throughout South Dakota to the Summit. Over 250 individuals attended representing the various healthcare professions, providers (long term care, hospitals, critical care centers, clinics, county health, etc.), training providers and teaching staff from all levels (secondary, short term training providers, community / technical colleges, and universities), economic development, etc. attended. Breaking into six focus groups, the individuals reviewed current and projected healthcare workforce needs, educational and training needs, perceptions and awareness needs, and recruitment and retention needs. Those attending were asked for commitment and assigned to meet again to create a plan of action for solutions to addressing the needs. Task groups were formed to work on specific issues with a culminating activity the scheduling of the 2nd Annual Healthcare Workforce Summit. One consistent message brought out at each meeting was the success of partnerships with SDDOL. The endorsement of SDDOL’s successful involvement for supporting education/training opportunities and staffing at facilities caught the interest of other training providers and healthcare industry. For the next two years, the healthcare workforce plan of action will become criteria for all new SDDOL talent development. One such action/solution will be for better recruitment of individuals who left our state for healthcare positions to return to practice in South Dakota. Another priority solution of the Summit workgroups that SDDOL will play a major role in will be the recruitment of youth to the healthcare field, promoting underemployed to access training in healthcare, assisting current healthcare workers in need of more training, or refocusing healthcare skills (due to age or health) to other ways to use their skills, etc. From the meetings, SDDOL and DOH are truly developing a unified message of how the healthcare workforce can be developed in South Dakota. Both departments understand the need to provide education and career progression opportunities. New education models of delivery (simulators, distance learning through web and video, traveling subs workers and teachers, etc.) are being researched. With this training for workforce members, SDDOL sees a need for developing leadership training for employers around alternative scheduling, job sharing, benefits, options for leave for training, etc. This Healthcare Workforce Development Initiative will continue to promote: • • • • Raising awareness of opportunities in healthcare; Developing a pipeline of training opportunities; Increasing training and internship opportunities at all levels of education; and Recruitment and retention of healthcare professionals.

E. Governor’s vision for ensuring every youth has the opportunity for developing and achieving career goals though education and workforce training, including the youth most in need, such as out of school youth, homeless youth, youth in

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foster care, youth aging out of foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents, migrant and seasonal farm worker youth, and other youth at risk.
The Governor, with the Department of Education, announced the 2010 Education Initiative ensuring a roadmap to guide public education. 2010E establishes specific goals, objectives, and action steps with a time frame and the individuals responsible for execution. The Governor’s 2010E plan has three major initiatives: • Starting Strong targets youth from age 3 to grade 3 • Finishing Strong focuses on high school and postsecondary • Staying Strong target teachers, Native American issues and financial resources The SDDOL plan will highlight a few of the 2010E goals directly relating not only to the WIA age group for youth, but understanding that third initiative has impact on adult learners as well. Starting Strong Goal 1: By 2010, all third grade students will be proficient - or on a learning plan to become proficient - in reading and math. Finishing Strong Goal 2: By 2010, South Dakota will be first in the nation for the percentage of students going on to college, technical school or advanced training. Objective 2A: Graduate 95 percent of high school students. Initiatives: a. b. c. d. e. f. Require compulsory attendance to age 18 Implement personal learning plans for students Create senior project models Implement internship programs Increase use of advanced placement/dual credit courses Create a state scholars program that connects schools to businesses

Objective 2B: Enroll 75 percent of high school students in the "advanced" or "distinguished" graduation path. Initiatives: a. Implement rigorous graduation requirements b. Create end-of-course exams and grade level tests c. Monitor student enrollment in South Dakota postsecondary institutions by creating a tracking process using unique student identifiers Objective 2C: Increase 21st century skills using advanced technology to enhance learning.

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Initiatives: a. Create a statewide virtual high school program b. Implement a one-to-one laptop initiative for high school students c. Implement an e-mentoring program Goal 3: By 2010, the postsecondary education system will fully meet the needs of the state's changing economy and its citizens. Objective 3A: Offer transferable general education courses from Board of Regents' institutions at all technical institute sites, and establish up to 250 program-specific transfers for technical institute graduates at regents' institutions. Initiatives: a. Approve institutional agreements with the technical institutes b. Increase the number of program-to-program articulation agreements from four to 250 c. Prepare marketing plan to promote program Objective 3B: Expand the number of citizens with postsecondary education and training by 20 percent. Initiatives: a. Increase the number of graduates from Board of Regents' associate degree programs by 10 percent b. Increase the number of graduates from bachelor degree programs by 20 percent c. Double the number of persons ages 25 and older engaged in postsecondary education d. Increase retention of students in public higher education by 8 percent Objective 3C: Support postsecondary education programs designed to enhance the state's long-term economy. Initiatives: a. b. c. d. Double the number of Ph.D. programs Double the number of Ph.D. graduates Enhance Ph.D. program support infrastructure Achieve the national average of people with graduate degrees, moving from 6.5 to 9.4 percent e. Double technical institutes' market penetration Objective 3D: Recruit and retain quality faculty and staff. Initiatives: a. Complete the Board of Regents' salary competitiveness program by reaching surrounding states' average salaries for faculty/staff at public universities

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b. Develop faculty/staff development plan for technical institutes Objective 3E: Double the number of students receiving South Dakota Opportunity Scholarships. Initiatives: a. b. c. d. Implement rigorous high school graduation requirements Strengthen South Dakota CollegePrep program Develop approved high school course inventories Standardize scholarship application process through single point of review

Staying Strong Goal 4: By 2010, South Dakota will build its educator base through targeted recruitment, retention and training. Objective 4A: Increase the number of certified teachers teaching in high-need areas by 25 percent. Initiatives: a. Promote alternative routes to certification for high need areas (targeting professionals in other careers) b. Promote teaching through high school internships c. Promote more Native American teachers teaching in Native American schools through alternative certification programs Objective 4B: Increase the retention of teachers across the state by 20 percent. Initiatives: a. Create mentoring model for first- and second-year teachers and administrators b. Create academy for teachers completing first year of teaching Objective 4C: Increase the number of teachers that obtain advanced degrees or advanced certification from 20 to 40 percent. Initiatives: a. Continue support activities for National Board Certification b. Create a statewide master's degree program Objective 4D: Establish a teacher compensation assistance program. Initiatives: a. Create the framework for a teacher compensation assistance program

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Goal 5: By 2010, South Dakota will increase educational outcomes for Native American students. Objective 5A: Implement a Native American Education Act to address critical education issues related to South Dakota students, staff and schools. Initiatives: a. Establish the Native American Education Act b. Produce an information packet for South Dakota schools to use as teacher training materials Objective 5B: Improve graduation rates of Native American students. Initiatives: a. Provide summer school academies for Native American high school students b. Provide access to Native American language and culture through distance learning and other delivery methods Goal 6: By 2010, South Dakota will target financial resources to improve classroom instruction and educational opportunities. Objective 6A: Conduct a review and implement any necessary changes to the funding formula for K-12 education. Initiatives: a. Establish a taskforce of school officials, legislators and business leaders to advise the Department of Education as it reviews current funding formula b. Study all aspects of current formula including sparsity, small school factor, fund balance and other revenue c. Make final recommendations to the Governor by November 15, 2006

The SDDOL has focused their employment and training programs on the out-of-school, or at risk of dropping out of school, for many years by contracting WIA funds to Alternative High Schools focusing on preparing youth for the transition not only to adulthood but into the workforce. This collaboration with Department of Education and local school districts has ensured on an average an additional 450 youth annually completed their high school education and obtained a diploma. Ten of the alternative schools are operated by community or faith-based organizations. The Alternative High Schools affiliated with SDDOL’s WIA program must meet all the state’s educational standards as recognized by Not Child Left Behind. This is just one of the ways to ensure the youth that have dropped out of the traditional system can reenter educational programs and obtain the strong foundation for entering the changing workforce.

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One indicator of the dedication to ensuring the neediest youth receive the best education possible is through assisting the Alternative High School teachers to obtain their National Certification. The National Board Certification offered by NBPTS is geared to teachers who seek higher levels of professional growth and a process to critically examine their teaching practice against high, rigorous standards. The standards measure what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do. Obtaining National Board Certification is a rigorous process including a two-part assessment based on standards and reflecting varied aspects of teaching. For South Dakota, one of the leading mentors in this process is a teacher at a SDDOL affiliate alternative high school. Due to the mix of funding sources, the SDDOL affiliate Alternative High Schools serve not only WIA students, but dropouts whose individual or family income is above the WIA guidelines. The second part of WIA eligibility, the barriers, provides the criteria for those above the economic guidelines to enter the alternative schools. Just a few of the recognized barriers the 911 students for the first half of the 2006 program year include: • • • • • 702 had dropped out of the traditional school 489 were below the 9th grade reading comprehension and/or math computation according to the Test of Adult Basic Education 158 had a recognizable disability they were willing to admit to (many dropouts do not want to admit to being in need of special education plans) 159 were with youth in state recognized foster care programs 283 were offenders

Starting in 2009, youth 18 and under without a high school diploma, will have required attendance at an educational setting. The Departments of Education and Labor will be further developing their linkages and educational opportunities to ensure youth have high quality secondary and postsecondary linkages. The Alternative High Schools affiliated with the SDDOL are very familiar with the need for performance accountability such as entering advanced training and earning certificates of national distinction. Another unique situation for a third of SDDOL’s affiliate Alternative High Schools is the co-location with SDCCs, social service programs, vocational rehabilitation programs, etc. The changing WIA funding levels have probably put an end to bringing other alternative schools under the same roof of one-stops, but SDDOL is implementing a new requirement for the SDCCs to demonstrate integration of services. Each SDCC will be required to submit a ‘calendar of events’ at their regional affiliate Alternative High School. The employment representatives will play an integral role in utilizing the workforce information to ensure youth know what talents are important in entering the workforce. SDDOL also addresses the needs of out-of-school youth in need of a high school education by providing Adult Education and Literacy classes throughout the state. In ’05-’06, AEL served: • • 635 youth between the ages of 16 though 18, and 1136 individuals between the ages of 19 through 24.

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The Adult Education and Literacy state program specialist just completed a statewide regionalized training with the WIA staff. The state program specialists were reviewing the similarities of data collection and reporting. Attendees included field staff from Vocational Rehabilitation, TANF, WIA, alternative schools, Job Corps, and AEL. The attendees broke into community “teams” to develop local connections and processes for referrals, program support, client supports, and information sharing. The response to the involvement of such a wide range of partners in planning was such a success; it will continue to be a model for continuous state-led strategic planning at the local level. For 2005, 975 youth between the ages of 16 and 24 obtained a GED diploma in South Dakota. The federal funding levels for SDDOL programs are impacting the way services are delivered. By bringing all adult WIA funding back into the Career Centers starting July 2007, the impacts on WIA youth and Adult Education and Literacy creates a need to shift and reengage the partners. This does impact the ability of various faith and community based partners’ delivery of services. In hopes of maintaining talent development for regional economic development, key players for each delivery area will need to be reorganized to devise new strategies for talent development in the next two years. Over the last two years, SDDOL has consistently reached out to state level representatives of the federal partners recognized in the shared vision for youth collaboration. At the 2004 regional meeting in Arizona, youth programs associated with youth in and exiting foster care, existing youth correctional sites, Job Corps, Adult Education, and, of course, WIA youth programs. Over the last couple of years, SDDOL has often, and will continue to be, the first introduction to the vision that other state agencies have among the federal agencies listed as partners. Attending and presenting at statewide trainings and regional trainings is one of the best ways to reach out to field staff of the various partners. Providing community development time with targeted delivery of service projects has proven to be an effective communications and program development process. The SDDOL will continue to offer presentations and strategic development planning sessions at all opportunities. The opportunities for developing a standardized policy with regional direction are vital during this time of shifting economies.

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II.

State Workforce Investment Priorities
The SDDOL and GOED made revisions in the Workforce Development Training Program. Under this partnership, they now will fund two types of training: new and current employee. New employee training continues to be only for jobs that are newly created. Current employee training is for the outof-the-ordinary training such as new equipment or certifications and must provide the trainee with an increase in the wages. The wage requirement has been increased. Companies must pay the higher of $10.00 per hour or the 10th percentile of that job classification as determined by LMIC. Companies must provide their employees with a benefit package which includes health insurance. The company must contribute a portion of the premium for the health insurance. The application was updated to include a list of possible benefits. Applicants will need to check off the benefits they provide. This has always been required in the application but the list was not provided in the past. 2007 legislation was passed to update and modernize the REDI (Revolving Economic Development & Initiative) Fund. By incorporating the intent of the various sub funds back into REDI, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development intends to refresh the 20-year-old intent of REDI and better serve the needs of modern business. The new legislation incorporates the entrepreneur support program, value-added tourism sub fund, and the capital investment program into the REDI Fund’s primary mission. In 2006, the APEX loan program’s lending limit was raised from $150,000 to $237,500. The program was also extended to manufacturers and exporters of non-agricultural products that export 75 percent or more of their product outside South Dakota. The skills of a company's workforce are critical to a company's overall success. The Workforce Development Program provides grants to assist companies with up to one-half of their eligible training expenses to ensure their new and current employees have the skills they need. In 2006, the program: • • • • • Awarded 59 grants totaling $2.7 million. Trained 4,054 employees Provided assistance to seven companies who were new to South Dakota. Helped, both directly and indirectly, more than 60 companies in 17 different communities.

In 2007, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development is taking its sales plan to the next level. Building on the marketing plan the office unveiled in 2006, this year’s focus industries will each have a business development representative who will specialize in the industry. “Using the GOED business representatives as industry specialists rather than generalists maximizes our impact with the target industries,” said Bill Even,

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director of the GOED. “Each business representative will work with GOED’s marketing, research and finance professionals to develop a sales strategy specific to his industry.” • • • • • • • Industry: Bio-Tech Industry: Renewable Energy Industry: U.S. Firearms Industry: Computer Software Industry: U.S. Medical

The industries were chosen by the GOED after researching South Dakota’s strengths and weaknesses. This approach makes luring business a state-wide effort, and will allow teams to really dig in to a specific industry – learning the industry challenges, what South Dakota can offer it, networking with people throughout the field, and obtaining technical knowledge that will make a difference when recruiting these companies to our state. Targeted Industry Research • • • • • • • • Industry definition by NAICS Codes Growth of industry – national outlook Industry concentration by state for employment and # of establishments Current issues facing industry Largest companies in target states All South Dakota companies in the industry South Dakota advantages for industry Post-secondary degrees/majors supporting the industry in South Dakota

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III.

State Governance Structure

A. Organization of State agencies involved in the public workforce investment system in relation to the Governor 1. Organizational Chart

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Office of the Governor

SD Worforce Development Council

Dept. of Education (DOE)

Dept. Tourism & State Development (TSD/GOED)

Board of Regents (BOR)

Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Services to the Visually Impaired

Services to the Deaf

Vocational Rehabilitation

Dept. of Labor (DOL)

Workforce Services

Field Operations

Unemployment Insurance

Workforce Training

South Dakota Career Centers

Workforce Investment Act Career Learning Centers

Alternative High Schools

Job Corps

ABE/GED

Labor Market Information Center

Technical Services

Food Stamp Employment & Training

Work Opportunity Tax Credit Experience Works

Veteran Training Programs

Migrant & Seasonal Farmworker

Temporary Assistance to Needy Families

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2. The agencies involved in the public workforce investment system interrelate on workforce and economic development issues and the respective lines of authority.
The Governor’s 2010 Initiative Economic Plan strongly ties economic development with the need to increase training for the workforce in targeted industries. The SDWDC established by Executive Order 95-14 requires State Agency membership on this council. Those agencies as required members are: • • • • • Secretary of Labor Secretary of Education Secretary of Human Services Executive Director of the Board of Regents Commissioner of the GOED

These agencies in conjunction with the SDWDC work collectively to improve the economic stability of the State. During quarterly SDWDC meetings, the members have the opportunity to discuss economic issues particular to their local areas with the members of the Governor’s Cabinet.

B. State Workforce Investment Board 1. Organization and structure of South Dakota Workforce Development Council.
As a single statewide service delivery area under WIA, the leadership and vision for the system has come from the Governor and his appointed SDWDC. For purposes of Title I of the WIA, the State will continue to be treated as a statewide local service area. The SDWDC has been the driving force behind workforce development since it was first formed under the Governor’s Executive order 95-14 on June 19, 1995. This distinguished group of key State agency heads, employers, and other interested parties has guided the development of today's One-Stop delivery system in our State. The majority of employment and training programs are provided under the umbrella of the SDDOL, which also provides administrative support for the SDWDC. Under this structure, key employment and training programs WIA, Wagner-Peyser, Job Corps, Adult Education and Family Literacy, UI, Veterans' employment, training programs, and Labor Market Information Center (LMIC) are brought together with the interests of economic development, vocational technical education, basic education, and vocational rehabilitation. The SDWDC was formed to maintain the momentum for economic development and vitality by better connecting workforce strategies to economic needs. The SDWDC members share a common purpose: to improve the services to employers and their current and future employees by streamlining the delivery of workforce and training services. The purpose of the SDWDC continues to be to provide planning, coordination, monitoring and policy analysis for the State training system as a whole and to advise the Governor on policies, goals and standards for the development and implementation of effective programs.

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2. Organizations and entities represented by SDWDC
SDWDC is a 17 member council comprised of a private sector majority that reflects the composition of the pool of local employers; which are large employers and employers in growth industries. According to Executive order 95-14 other members must represent local labor organizations, community-based organizations, the Secretary of the Department of Labor, the Secretary of the Department of Education (DOE), the Secretary of the GOED, the Secretary of Human Services, and the Executive Director of the Board of Regents are also members of the board. One of our private sector members is also a member of the South Dakota Rehabilitation Board. The board consists of • Five representatives of small (fewer than 100 employees) employers. • Four representatives of large (100 and more employees) employer. • One representative of employers organizations/labor • Secretary of Labor • Secretary of Education • Secretary of Human Services • Secretary of Governors Office of Economic Development • Executive Director of the Board of Regents • Two community-based organizations SDWDC also serve as Youth Councils under WIA. In Section 111 there is no requirement for a state with a grandfathered council to involve all other nonmembers from Section 111 in the planning and implementing of the State’s workforce investment system. However, the planning and implementing of the State’s Unified Plan is made available for public comments though SDDOL website, which provides those interested with information prior to enactment of the plan, July 1, 2007. On request the public can receive minutes of the formal meetings of the SDWDC which are also posted on the SDDOL website.

3. South Dakota’s process to identify Board members.
South Dakota is a single state workforce investment area with a “grandfathered” State WDC on Workforce Services that is responsible for planning and oversight. The SDWDC was created by the Governor’s executive order 95-14 on June 19, 1995. The members are appointed by the Governor. They are composed of a private sector majority that reflects the composition of the pool of local employers; included are an area’s largest employers and employers in growth industries. Administrative authority is uniform statewide, with resource allocations determined at the state level.

4. The Board’s membership enables achievement of visions.
The Governor’s office strongly supports and led the State’s effort in WIA. Direct involvement has been largely delegated to the four Cabinet members and other WDC members that are appointed by the Governor. The SDWDC have quarterly meetings that serve as a forum for discussion of policy, regulatory issues, performance measurement and management concerns, and special initiatives, and serve as a vehicle for building consensus among state and local workforce interests.

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5. Functions of the Board.
The SDWDC is committed to the development of a workforce system that promotes a higher quality of life through economic, employment and educational success. The goals of this system are to: • • • • • • • • • • Develop a globally competitive workforce. Ensure an employer driven workforce system. Support current and future worker employment needs. Provide employers ready access to potential workers. Support a wide range of sustainable employment opportunities for South Dakota. Provide relevant educational and training opportunities for current and future workers. Support life-long knowledge acquisition and skills development Develop and coordinate partnership among business, education, labor, government and other communities of interest. Ensure system partners are accountable for the successful execution of their respective workforce development system objectives and the continuous improvement of the workforce development system. Provide the governance for the Adult Education and Literacy program since DOL is the eligible provider.

6. Public access to Board meetings and information.
Information is available to the public on Board meetings through the SDDOL website, www.sdjobs.org, as a public service. SDDOL is responsible for checking the accuracy, completeness, currency and/or suitability of all information on the website. Individuals needing assistance, special accommodations, or materials in an alternative format pursuant to the American Disabilities Act should notify SDDOL at least ten (10) days prior to the public meeting by calling 1-800-952-3216.

7. Conflicts of interest.
A member of the SDWDC may not vote on a matter under consideration by the Council regarding the provision of services by such member (or by an entity that such member represents); or that would provide direct financial benefit to such member or the immediate family of such member; or engage in any other activity determined by the Governor to constitute a conflict of interest. Example: If the SDWDC would be voting on a funding request that financially benefits a member, a member's immediate family, a member's business partner, or an organization which employs a member, that member would abstain from the vote.

8. State-provided resources to carry out functions.
The State provides the SDWDC with staff consisting of an Executive Director and clerical support with an administrative assistant. The State also provides all travel and per diem as well as maintaining the SDWDC website.

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C. Structure/Process for State agencies and State board to collaborate and communicate with each other and with the local workforce investment system. 1. Description of the steps South Dakota will take to improve operational collaboration of the workforce investment activities and other relate activities and programs outlined in section 112 (b)(8)(A), at both the State and local level (e.g., joint activities, memoranda of understanding, planned mergers, coordinated policies, etc.). The State board and agencies eliminate any existing State-level barriers to coordination.
The South Dakota statewide planning document articulates a systematic and sustainable plan for workforce and economic development based on customer needs, labor market based allocation of resources to continue economic expansion for South Dakota. The State leaders expect that all customers, both job seekers and employers, will be served through the South Dakota One-Stop delivery system that capitalizes on the use of the latest technology and effective customer service providers. The majority of employment and training programs are provided under the umbrella of the SDDOL, which also provides administrative support for the SDWDC. Under this structure, key employment and training programs like WIA Title 1 – Workforce Investment System including adult and youth, Job Corps, UI, Veterans employment and training programs, LMIC, WIA Title II Adult Education and Literacy (AEL), and Title III Wagner Peyser are brought together. Adult Education and Literacy is developing a transition to college and post secondary training programs to act as a catalyst in reshaping talent development strategies for greater success. The SDWDC was formed to maintain the momentum for economic development and vitality by better connecting workforce strategies to economic needs. The 17 member SDWDC is comprised of a majority of private sector members who represent the State’s employers, labor unions, community leaders and representatives of five State agencies including the Secretary of Labor, Secretary of Education, Secretary of Human Services, commissioner of the GOED, and the Executive Director of the Board of Regents. The SDWDC members share a common purpose: to improve the services to employers and their current and future employees by streamlining the delivery of workforce and training services

2. Description of the lines of communication established by the Governor to ensure open and effective sharing of information among the State agencies responsible for implementing the vision for the public workforce system and between the State agencies and the State workforce investment board.
The State of South Dakota proposes to eliminate unnecessary and duplicative steps in the administration of the programs identified in this Unified Plan in order to meet the needs of its customers, ensure there is no overlap or duplication among the programs, and ensure collaboration with key partners. This endeavor will be accomplished in this manner:

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• •

Since South Dakota is a statewide local service area, the coordination of integrated services is greatly simplified. The SDDOL will act as administrator under the guidance of the SDWDC for WIA implementation. Under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) process in which mandatory partners are identified, the services, processes, and referral methodology is outlined. In the MOUs, one of the main objectives is that each One-Stop Partner be aware of what every other Partner has to offer in the way of services to the customer. Once this is accomplished, duplicative steps and/or unnecessary administrative steps will be eliminated. SDCCs will serve as the ‘hubs’ for workforce participants. Once a plan is developed for a customer, the appropriate referral(s) to a Partner(s) will take place. The overall objective is to allow the customer to receive the services they need in a timely manner without having to go through a series of unnecessary steps. Furthermore, technological advances will be made available to allow many customers to be ‘self-served’. The customer, however, will always be made aware that they may have access to a SDCC representative whenever they may need one.

3. Description of the lines of communication and mechanisms established by the Governor to ensure timely and effective sharing of information between the State agencies/State Board and local workforce investment areas and local Boards. Including types of regularly issued guidance and how Federal guidance is disseminated to local Boards and SDCCs.
The lines of communications for the Governor begin at the cabinet level Secretaries, and continue to the State and local staff. The Governor’s cabinet typically served as a forum for partners to meet regularly and discuss how to work better together at SDCCs and to discuss specific issues regarding management of centers. The collaboration continues with the SDWDC. Membership on the board is directed through the Governor’s Executive Order 95-14. In addition to industry representatives, State agency representation for workforce investment and human resource investment is well embodied in the make up of the SDWDC for our State. State agency representation includes the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), DOE, DSS, and the GOED in addition to the SDDOL. The Council is kept well aware of the evolving USDOL vision for collaborative youth programming. The Council is responsible for authorizing the annual Request for Subcontractor Proposals for services. The need for collaborative programming in a community or region is strongly identified in the overview of required programming. Locals’ written application must demonstrate a strong community/region partnership base. The highly integrated programming in each community helps restrict siloed programs and aligns activities within regions. While the Governor’s cabinet tended to meet monthly and the SDWDC quarterly, the center-level teams were likely to meet more often, because of the need for more regular communication between co-located staff. This opportunity for regular communication was described as critical for more seamless services, because it allows partners to regularly communicate about changes to their programs.

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One important determinant of how effectively the partners work together is State agencies guidance and policies that encouraged or mandated increased coordination. This is done by active involvement with the local level programs, providing training and keeping the staff informed by use of the Internet and Intranet.

4. Description of any cross-cutting organization or bodies at the State level designed to guide and inform an integrated vision for serving youth in the State within the context of workforce investment, social services, juvenile justice, and education. Description of the membership of such bodies and the functions and responsibilities in establishing priorities and services for youth. How the State is promoting a collaborative cross-agency approach for both policy development and service delivery at the local level for youth.
The collaboration starts with the SDWDC. Membership on the board is directed through the Governor’s Executive Order 95-14. Even though South Dakota is a huge geographic area, the members of the statewide board are well connected with the role each member plays in not only representing their region of the state, but also their representation of their agency or industry. State agency representation includes vocational rehabilitation programs, social services programs, economic development, education on the K-12 level and on the postsecondary level, and WIA youth programs. A youth program update is given at every quarterly meeting. Often the update includes a local community- or faith-based organization showcasing their youth integrated system. The youth collaborative vision is played a vital role in development of the competitive grant process. Applicants, which must be a faith- or community-based organization, must describe the youth most in need of services in their area. The application must describe the alignment of economic and workforce programs for their region and how youth can access and participate in the various programs to ensure their access and success in the region’s workforce. As outlined in the last state plan, SDDOL had aligned services for youth in and leaving correctional facilities, dropouts, and in or transitioning out of foster care prior to the announcement of the federal shared vision for youth. The Perkins funding for careerrelated information was utilized by LMIC for excellent materials in the K through adult systems. Decreasing funding levels and changing funding streams are causing many state and local agencies to shift and streamline their programs. In preparing for adjusting the models of career programming for linkages to career fields, training, and meeting the workforce needs, the time needed to expand our state’s youth vision partners has been slowed. But the vision is still a guidance is finding ways to allow more entry and exits for educational and career progression.

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IV.

Economic and Labor Market Analysis

A. South Dakota Gross Domestic Product by Industry
Gross domestic product (GDP) is the measurement of the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in an area. Total GDP for South Dakota has increased almost eight billion dollars since 2000, an increase of 40 percent. This is significant growth compared to the national rate of 27 percent for the same time period. Current data for the year 2005 show South Dakota’s output is led by the finance and insurance industry, followed by manufacturing and the real estate, rental and leasing industry. The other top industries include heath care and social assistance, retail trade and agriculture.
South Dakota Gross Domestic Product
(millions of current dollars)

Industry All Industries Private industries Finance and insurance Manufacturing Real estate, rental, and leasing Health care and social assistance Retail trade Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting Wholesale trade Construction Information Accommodation and food services Transportation and warehousing, excluding Postal Service Professional and technical services Other services, except government Utilities Administrative and waste services Arts, entertainment, and recreation Management of companies and enterprises Educational services Mining Government
Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, US Department of Commerce

Value $30,919 26,912 5,366 3,068 2,813 2,699 2,206 1,808 1,713 1,267 886 820 819 785 752 564 465 298 222 222 138 4,007

Percent of Total 100.0% 87.0% 17.4% 9.9% 9.1% 8.7% 7.1% 5.8% 5.5% 4.1% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 1.8% 1.5% 1.0% 0.7% 0.7% 0.4% 13.0%

The agricultural industry is a significant component of the State’s economy compared to the nation. The ratio of farm income compared to total personal income in South Dakota was ten times the national rate in 2005. The agricultural industry is very important for the survival of many small communities in the State. A lot of rural families have both farm and nonfarm jobs. In many cases, the nonfarm jobs provide most of the income; however the farm job is what ties the family to the rural community.

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South Dakota has a significant number of self-employed and unpaid family workers because of the large number of farmers and ranchers and small nonfarm businesses in the State. The following table shows South Dakota employed persons by class of worker. The class of worker data is from the Current Population Survey, which measures the employment status of each resident. The agricultural workers category includes both self-employed and unpaid family workers and wage and salary workers.
2006 South Dakota Employed Persons by Class of Worker Class of Worker Agricultural Workers Nonagricultural Wage & Salary Workers Nonagricultural Self-employed & Unpaid Family Workers Total Employed
Source: 2006 Current Population Survey; US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Number of Workers 37,000 351,000 29,000 417,000

The nonfarm sector is also a significant part of the South Dakota economy, especially with respect to the creation of wage and salaried jobs. As exhibited in the class of worker table, the number of nonagricultural wage and salaried workers is significantly larger than the number of workers in the other classes. Nonfarm wage and salaried workers is a measure of workers at jobs by place of work, regardless of place of residence. The 2006 annual average nonfarm wage and salaried workers was 398,800, which was 2.3 percent higher than the previous year. The 2006 percentage growth was quite a bit higher than the historical annual average growth rate of 0.7 percent from 2000 to 2006. Historical nonfarm wage and salaried worker levels and growth were impacted by layoffs that started in the second quarter of 2004. The private nonfarm industries in South Dakota that employ the most workers include education and health services, retail trade, leisure and hospitality, and manufacturing. The importance of health services is a result of regional medical centers that serve outof-state residents. Education is impacted by the large number of rural school districts and small class sizes. The leisure and hospitality industry is tourism related, and South Dakota has many tourist attractions hiring workers throughout the State.
2006 South Dakota Nonfarm Wage & Salaried Workers Industry Statewide Government Education & Health Services Retail Trade Leisure & Hospitality Manufacturing Financial Activities Professional & Business Services Construction Wholesale Trade Number of Workers 398,800 75,100 58,600 49,300 42,500 41,500 29,600 25,500 22,000 18,300 Percent Distribution 100.0% 18.8% 14.7% 12.4% 10.7% 10.4% 7.4% 6.4% 5.5% 4.6%

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Other Services Transportation & Warehousing & Utilities Information Natural Resources & Mining

15,600 12,700 7,000 900

3.9% 3.2% 1.8% 0.2%

Source: South Dakota Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Center

As mentioned previously, nonfarm wage and salaried workers are counted by their place of work. So, workers employed at multiple establishments of work are counted more than once. Many workers in this State have multiple jobs. In fact, South Dakota has one of the highest rates of dual job-holding in the nation. Wage records research shows a decline in multiple job-holding as the economy slowed. In 2000, the ratio of jobs to workers peaked at 1.182. By 2003, the ratio had dropped to 1.156. It is apparent from the declining rate that fewer jobs were available, especially for workers looking for a second (or third) job. Current data indicate the level of multiple job holding has slightly decreased, with a ratio of 1.116 in 2005.

B. Projected growth and decline of South Dakota industries and occupations.
Among the fastest growing industries, health care and social assistance, accommodation and food services, construction, and finance and insurance are projected to require the largest number of workers from 2004 through 2014. The healthcare and social assistance industry alone will need an additional 15,410 workers during the projections time period.
South Dakota Projected Fastest Growing Industries 2004 Workers 50,900 6,120 8,650 12,460 19,950 34,570 6,130 9,460 3,630 24,210 2014 Workers 66,310 7,710 10,890 15,330 24,360 40,350 7,090 10,800 4,140 27,290 Worker Growth 15,410 1,590 2,240 2,870 4,410 5,780 960 1,340 510 3,080 Percent Growth 30.3% 26.0% 25.9% 23.0% 22.1% 16.7% 15.7% 14.2% 14.0% 12.7%

Industry Title Healthcare and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Professional, Scientific & Technical Services Administrative & Support & Waste Management Services Construction Accommodation & Food Services Educational Services Transportation & Warehousing Real Estate & Rental & Leasing Finance and Insurance

Source: South Dakota Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Center

The agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting industry is the only industry expected to decline, with an estimated loss of 1,590 workers during the projections period. The 2004 estimate of 30,260 workers is expected to decrease by 5.3 percent, to an estimated level of 28,670 workers in 2014. Declines in this industry will be due mainly to technology improvements, as well as the outsourcing of some farm activities. This outsourcing trend will have a negative impact on the number of self-employed farmers and ranchers.
S

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C. Industries and occupations in demand for skilled workers and available jobs projected over the next decade.
Industry trends have a large impact on the future demand for workers in both the agricultural and nonagricultural industries. The short-term prospects for workers are currently mixed. While some businesses continue to experience lay-offs, others are starting to add staff. Since short-term occupational projections for 2006-2008 are not yet available, job openings can be used to provide a picture of short-term demand for workers. The following table shows the occupations with more than 1,000 openings registered with SDCCs in 2006.
2006 South Dakota Jobs with the Most Openings Occupational Title Laborers and Freight, Stock and Material Movers, Hand Freight, Stock and Material Movers, Hand Customer Service Representatives Retail Salespersons Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Slaughterers and Meat Packers Cashiers Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers Construction Laborers Production Laborers Waiters and Waitresses Nursing Aides, Orderlies and Attendants Janitors and Cleaners, except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Bill and Account Collectors Office Clerks, General Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, including Fast Food Cooks, Restaurant Registered Nurses
Source: South Dakota Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Center

Number of Openings 5,077 3,719 2,915 2,497 2,467 2,384 2,026 1,962 1,724 1,670 1,598 1,582 1,526 1,448 1,416 1,087 1,053 1,045

Other than the registered nurses, none of the jobs in the SDCC list of most job openings require postsecondary education. These types of jobs have higher turnover and require a large number of workers to keep them staffed. The long-term demand for workers is captured through occupational projections, which provide information about the future need for workers by occupation. Projections estimate the demand for new workers needed to fill jobs because of growth or replacement of working leaving the work force. The South Dakota 2004-2014 occupational projections indicate that the fastest growing occupations will require post-secondary education. Many of the fastest growing occupations in South Dakota are in the healthcare field. Other fastest growing occupations are found in the computer science, social assistance and the personal assistance fields.

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South Dakota Projected Fastest Growing Occupations Occupational Title Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts Personal and Home Care Aides Computer Software Engineers, Applications Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Physician Assistants Medical Assistants Dental Hygienists Social and Human Service Assistants Physical Therapist Assistants Dental Assistants Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors Registered Nurses Network and Computer Systems Administrators Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors 2004 Workers 470 989 278 232 190 324 961 423 607 257 652 633 8,885 990 433 2014 Workers 743 1,486 411 341 276 466 1,383 597 848 360 906 873 12,005 1,324 581 Percent Change 58.1% 50.3% 47.8% 47.0% 45.3% 43.8% 43.9% 41.1% 39.7% 40.1% 39.0% 37.9% 35.1% 33.7% 34.2%

Source: South Dakota Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Center

With respect to the occupations needing the most workers yearly, there are 38 occupations that will require more than 100 workers per year through the year 2014. These occupations lead the list of occupations needing the most workers yearly that require some postsecondary education: • • • • • • • • • • • • Registered Nurses Teacher Assistants Carpenters General and Operations Managers Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers Accountants and Auditors Farmers and Ranchers Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics

Although the number of farmers and ranchers is expected to decline, new workers are needed each year to replace farmers and ranchers leaving the labor force. Comparing the demand for workers (new workers needed) and the supply of those workers is important because it identifies where there are potential shortages in meeting the need for future workers. A job outlook rating can be used to compare the demand and supply of workers. Based on the 2004-2014 occupational projections, there are 167 occupations which have a favorable or very favorable job outlook. Although the job

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outlook rating does not directly measure shortages, it shows the occupations that will present the best job opportunities for workers. Within the list of occupations with a favorable or very favorable job outlook, almost all require some type of postsecondary talent development.

D. Potential growth industries and occupations
Economic development in South Dakota is focusing on industries compatible with the South Dakota economy and likely to expand in the future. Some of these industry clusters include Bio-Tech, Renewable Energy, Firearms, Computer Software and Medical. All of these industry clusters have staffing patterns that depend on workers with high levels of talent development, including management, research, healthcare, engineering, computer, and skilled production occupations. Planned expansion in the healthcare industry alone will have a significant effect on the regional economy, with an estimate of over 9,000 added jobs.

E. Jobs and occupations critical to South Dakota’s economy.
Critical jobs/occupations will include most of the healthcare practitioners, technical and support occupations, as well as some education occupations. Registered nurses, medical assistants, medical records technicians, dental assistants, pharmacists, medical and clinical laboratory technologists, medical transcriptionists, radiologic technologists and technicians, and pharmacy technicians are all on the list of occupations with a favorable or very favorable job outlook and all are projected to need 30 or more new workers per year. Medical and health services managers, special education teachers, postsecondary vocational education teachers, kindergarten teachers and selfenrichment education teachers have a favorable or very favorable job outlook rating and will require 10 or more new workers per year. There are specific areas within other teaching occupations that can be considered critical, including K-12 music, special education, or foreign language in a public, private or parochial school, or teaching high school math or science in a public, private or parochial school. Based on foreign labor certifications in the State, there is a shortage of American workers available to fill a variety of openings, including postsecondary teachers, research assistants, medical doctors, computer software engineers, mechanical and electrical engineers, and a few secondary school teacher positions.

F. Skills needed for available, critical and projected jobs.
The following table shows the projected occupational growth by development level. Occupations that require no postsecondary education are projected to be slower growing than those that require postsecondary education. Occupations that require on-the-job development will be growing at 11.9 percent, generating about 100,000 new jobs from 2004-2014. Occupations requiring some postsecondary education will be growing 14.2 percent over the projections period, creating around 65,000 jobs. Even though many of the fastest-growing occupations require college degrees, the greatest demand for jobs will be for occupations that require basically no postsecondary education.

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South Dakota Occupational Projections by Talent Development Level 2004 Workers 248,440 123,580 43,120 15,230 12,510 2014 Workers 277,940 139,525 49,790 17,790 14,975 Percent Change 11.9% 12.9% 15.5% 16.8% 19.7% New Workers Needed 100,110 39,425 15,850 5,315 4,785

On-the-Job Development Some Postsecondary Education Bachelor's Degree Bachelor's Degree & Work Experience Master's Degree & Higher

Source: South Dakota Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Center

G. Current and projected demographics of the available labor pool now and over the next decade.
State residents participate in the labor force at a very high rate. The latest annual Current Population Survey figures show the South Dakota labor force participation rate was 73.7 percent in 2004. In other words, almost 74 percent of all residents age 16 years and over were in the labor force, either working or looking for work. This compares to a 2004 national average of 66.0 percent. Only two other states (Minnesota and Nebraska) had higher labor force participation rates than South Dakota during the reference period. The youth in the State were also active participants in the labor force. In 2004 approximately 64.7 percent of South Dakota’s youth (age 16-19 years) were in the labor force. Nationally, 43.9 percent of the youth (age 16-19 years) participated in the labor force. Since the labor force participation rate is very high in South Dakota, it is not unexpected that the unemployment rate would be low. In 2006, the annual average unemployment rate was 3.2 percent. The unemployment rate has been quite low for the past several years. Because of the rural nature of the State and close connection to the agricultural economy, South Dakota typically enjoys low unemployment rates. Despite rising worker levels and an improving economy in 2006, layoffs continued among a few employers related to global competition.

H. South Dakota’s “in-migration” and “out-migration” of workers.
The 2006 population estimates show that there are 781,919 State residents. The following table has population projections from 2000 to 2010. The 0-18 years of age group will decrease in size and will become a much smaller share of the total population, accounting for only 24.5% by 2010. Conversely, the 65+ years age group will increase substantially and account for 16.7% of the 2010 population. So, the future workforce will be made up of fewer younger workers and more experienced and older workers.
South Dakota Population Projections Age Group 2000 % of Total 2010 % of Total 0-18 years 214,988 28.5% 195,080 24.5% 19-24 years 65,295 8.7% 68,212 8.6% 25-64 years 366,430 48.5% 400,087 50.3% 65+ years 108,131 14.3% 132,625 16.7% Total 754,844 100.0% 796,004 100.0%
Source: South Dakota State Data Center

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The 19-24 years age group represents residents who are transitioning from high school and postsecondary education into the workforce. During their first years in the “real world,” many workers in this age group take a job that is temporary, lower paying, and at the bottom of the career ladder to their chosen occupation. As their talent development progresses and they become more experienced, they will probably move on to “better” jobs. As the population ages, it is apparent more employers will need to look at older workers to meet their workforce staffing needs. Older workers have a high level of developed talent and have proven their dependability. Many of these older workers have the skills needed by employers and will be looking for flexible, part-time jobs. A factor that impacts population trends is the migration of residents into and out of the State. From 2000 to 2006, South Dakota gained 2,731 residents due to net migration. This net migration statistic includes the migration of 1,951 foreigners and 810 national residents that migrated into the State. Based on migration statistics by age, it is interesting to note that the age distribution of the in-migration is basically the same as out-migration. Younger workers (19-24 years of age) comprise about one-fifth of both the in-migration and out-migration. As expected, older residents 65+ years of age make up a very small share of migrants.

I. Gaps South Dakota is experiencing today and gaps projected over the next decade.
The slow-growing and aging state population means fewer workers will be available to take lower skilled jobs. Many of these jobs are filled by new workers who are taking first jobs or by workers with no postsecondary education. With respect to jobs that require postsecondary education, the key will be to retain graduates trained in the State. If a large number of these graduates can be retained, and the labor pool keeps growing as forecasted, there should be no major skills/talent development gaps. The only areas of concern are identified in the following sections.

J. South Dakota’s workforce development issues identified, and K. Workforce development issues of South Dakota critical to economic health and growth.
There will be two great challenges with respect to preparing workers for future jobs and meeting the business demand for new workers. One will be to provide trained, skilled workers for occupations that require postsecondary education. The second challenge will be to ensure an adequate supply of good workers are available to fill jobs that require no postsecondary talent development, but tend to be entry-level, lower paying and have higher turnover. There are three factors that will determine whether or not an adequate number of workers are available for occupations requiring postsecondary education. Making sure there are enough workers prepared for these higher-skilled occupations jobs is important, since some of these jobs are critical to the State’s economy.

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First, there have to be enough students enrolled and graduating from these postsecondary programs. Second, it is important that graduates who have to be licensed or certified for their chosen occupations can pass the required licensing test or meet the certification requirements. Third, enough graduates have to remain in the state and take jobs related to their education. Because all three factors impact the supply of workers, the number of enrolled students in and graduates of educational programs will have to be higher than the projected demand for new workers. In some cases, the enrollment and graduate levels have to be substantially more. The South Dakota Follow-up Project provides information on the placement outcomes for public educational and talent development programs. Based on the 2005 graduate report, 80 percent of the public university graduates originating in South Dakota were still found in the state six months after graduation; 36.0 percent of the university graduates who were not from South Dakota remained in the state. Just about 90 percent of the diploma degree program completers found jobs, with almost 68 percent of those with jobs finding work related to their talent development. Over 92 percent of associate degree graduates had a job placement, and almost 69 percent of the graduates with jobs found jobs in occupations related to their education. With respect to graduates of bachelor’s degree and higher degree programs, around 84 percent found jobs; almost 68 percent of those with jobs were in occupations related to their educational program. As mentioned previously, occupations that require only on-the-job development are expected to grow 12 percent, generating about 100,000 new jobs from 2004-2014. Jobs in these occupations tend to be lower paying and experience high turnover because workers think of these jobs as stepping stones to better paying jobs. Many of these jobs are taken by younger workers or workers that want part-time jobs. The state population is relatively slow-growing and is getting older. These factors have a negative impact on the supply of workers, especially the supply of younger workers. The supply of new workers entering the labor market has slowed in the last few years. However, it is very likely a slow-growing economy in recent years has lowered the number of new workers entering the workforce. According to wage record research (using administrative records) conducted in the state, there were about 66,693 new workers appearing on company payrolls in 2005 who were not on payrolls in 2004. Those workers come from many different sources, including workers moving to the state, residents previously unemployed, residents of other states commuting to South Dakota to work, and new entrants and reentrants to the workforce. The new entrants would include high school students, college students, recent graduates, etc. Workers returning to the work force after absences because of long-term illness, family responsibilities, etc. would make up the reentrant category. Since the number of residents in the younger worker age group is projected to decline, the supply of younger workers will probably also go down. Besides the declining total pool of younger workers, there is another factor which impacts the number of younger workers available. A large share of young high school students are no longer thinking of jobs right after high school, but are selecting college, regardless of their interest or aptitudes. This trend also has a negative impact on the supply of workers for certain types of jobs that do not require postsecondary education.

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In addition to the issue of declining number of younger workers, some occupations face problems with job turnover. Job turnover represents the labor flows into the labor market and also between businesses. The job turnover picture has two perspectives-job entries and job exits. Research data on South Dakota job turnover shows a fairly high level of job turnover in certain business sectors. Job turnover has both a seasonal pattern and a cyclical pattern. Exits rise during the fall and winter quarters as many businesses staff down for the winter and students return to their classes. Also, entries increase in the spring and early summer as seasonal businesses ramp up for their busy time of the year. As with other types of demand, job turnover tends to drop during business slowdowns because the opportunity for a better job has decreased. Job exits peaked in the fourth quarter of 1999, but had dropped to the lowest level in years by the fourth quarter of 2004, then increased slightly for the fourth quarter of 2005. Although some of the turnover can be explained by the seasonal nature of the business sector in the state, some of the turnover is related to job mismatches and/or because those industries staff many jobs that are considered entry-level or stepping stones to better careers. Thus, it is very important that students and other career decision-makers have access to career information so they can make informed choices about occupations they are interested in and have the aptitude for. Related to the importance of career information to helping eliminate career choice mismatches is the use of career ladders to move workers to their highest potential. It is important workers with the potential for career advancement be given access to education and talent development which allows them the move to a higher-level job. For example, a worker hired as a nursing assistant but with the interest and aptitude for a practical nurse career should be provided with that opportunity. In addition, it is very important workforce development and economic development be a joint strategy. Workforce development should aim to provide workers with the education and skill sets needed by businesses. Economic development efforts should concentrate on businesses whose staffing needs match the demographics, education and skill sets of the South Dakota workforce, as well as improve career opportunities for South Dakota workers whose education and skill sets are underutilized. Such opportunities may also draw more skilled and educated workers from bordering states, further boosting the South Dakota workforce. Implementing an effective workforce development strategy will be a primary requirement for continued economic growth in the state. Effectively matching worker skills to employer needs will be a key step in that strategy. Worker mismatches and the resulting turnover are counter-productive during low population and labor force growth. The need for an efficient labor market exchange that will match workers to jobs is critical.

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V.

Overarching State Strategies

A. How the State will use WIA Title I funds to leverage other Federal, state, local and private resources in order to maximize the effectiveness of such resources and to expand the participation of business, employees, and individuals in the statewide workforce investment system.
As a statewide local service area, decisions regarding distribution of SDDOL administered funds rest with the SDWDC. Voting members of the Council include decision makers from private sector business and State agencies. State agencies include Labor, Education, Human Services, Board of Regents, and the GOED. These representatives bring their specific resources, Federal and State, to the Council when appropriate to maximize the effectiveness in building a successful workforce system. For many years, the State has integrated various Federal funded training programs under the SDDOL umbrella. These programs include WIA, AEL, Trade, Food Stamps Employment and Training, TANF, and Job Corps, along with UI and ES services. Combining these services under one administrative and delivery agent provides for a common approach to the business community and individuals alike. This system more than meets the intent and letter of the national strategic goals, in particular for increased flexibility, integration for a stronger one-stop, and streamlined governance, and greatly reduces any duplication of effect. Just one example of other leveraged funds is the South Dakota Workforce Development Program. Three State agencies have joined resources to make funds available to train/retrain the State's workforce. The SDDOL, Education’s Office of Workforce Development and Career Preparation, and the GOED have obligated funds from their respective resources along with a larger state pool of funds to assist local businesses in training and retraining their workforce. SDCCs and other local resources assist businesses in designing training programs specific to their needs. Applications for funding are reviewed and approved by all three agencies. Retrained workers must receive an increase in pay as a prerequisite for state funding. Employers are required to match state funds on an equal basis. Another example of leveraging resources is the joint effort of SDDOL WIA Youth program and the DSS foster care program. Following the Chaffee model, the combination of WIA and DSS resources has established a linkage at the State and local level that truly responds to the need of foster care youth. Included in this partnership is the opportunity for youth, as they exit foster care, to continue service under WIA.

B. Strategies in place to address the national strategic direction discussed in Part I of this guidance, the Governor’s priorities, and the workforce development issues identified through the analysis of the State’s economy and labor market.
The Governor’s priorities are specific to the State’s economy and labor market. The State will mobilize all appropriate resources to respond to the workforce development issues in all regions of the State. National and State initiatives will be evaluated and a plan of action set forth. Consideration is given to the impact (both local and statewide), costs, required resources, and related information. The issue may be presented to the

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State council for recommendation and action. The issue may, at the Governor’s discretion be directed to other appropriate entities for action, such as the GOED. SDDOL is well aware of the WIRED philosophy and is preparing a grant submission to support the implementation of WIRED in a specific region in our state. Further, the concepts intrinsic to WIRED are being applied to workforce training and talent development efforts under the direction of SDDOL statewide to the extent practical.

C. Based on the State’s economic and labor market analysis, South Dakota has developed these strategies to implement or plan to implement to identify and target industries and occupations within the State that are high growth, high demand, and vital to the State’s economy. The State has considered: 1. Industries projected to add a substantial number of new jobs to the economy; or 2. Industries that have a significant impact on the overall economy; or 3. Industries that impact the growth of other industries; or 4. Industries that are being transformed by technology and innovation that require new skill sets for workers; or 5. Industries that new and emerging and are expected to grow.
The Governor has implemented an exciting effort, the 2010 Initiative. This is an ambitious undertaking that is designed, among other related goals, to focus energy and investment: • • • • • In the creation and development of new business; In the growth and expansion of existing business; In agriculture and natural resource development; In the development of research and technology infrastructure to be commercialized; and To stabilize rural communities.

The challenge has been set by the Governor for the State to identify and target such industries, as listed, for meeting the projected employment opportunities. This requires a system that is grounded in specific skills, educational competencies and work experiences. This system will provide employers with a skilled educated workforce and will provide workers with an opportunity for economic security and self-sufficiency. The workforce will be expected to have sufficient basic academic skills, specific occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and most importantly skills that provide for thinking and creative problem solving. Steps taken by the entities under this Unified Plan will provide workers with the necessary tools to develop and build upon these various skills. This emphasizes talent development and lifelong learning. Key partners in meeting the goals of the 2010 Initiative include the Governor, State and local economic development, Board of Regents, Labor, Education, as well as private sector business leaders. South Dakota, with a largely agricultural based economy, is developing and changing to meet the challenge as laid out in the Governor’s 2010 Initiative. Truly we are setting a course for developing a workforce that will meet the business and industry needs of today and tomorrow.

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Economic development in South Dakota is focusing on industries compatible with the South Dakota economy and likely to expand in the future. Some of these industry clusters include Bio-Tech, Renewable Energy, Firearms, Computer Software and Medical.

D. Strategies to promote and develop ongoing and sustained strategic partnerships, including business and industry, economic development, the public workforce system, and education partners for the purpose of continuously identifying workforce challenges and developing solutions to targeted industries’ workforce challenges.
At the request of the SDDOL, all SDCC offices have implemented customized Business Outreach Plans during the fall of 2004. The goal of this endeavor is to become better service providers to the business community. In order to meet this goal, SDCC managers and staff will concentrate on marketing the programs and services offered, establish new business contacts, and maintain and expand existing contacts throughout the communities served. The Business Outreach Plans’ initiative will assist the SDDOL in successfully meeting the needs of the business community. The following highlights the ideas and implementation taking place in SDCC offices throughout the state. SDCC offices have, for years, done an outstanding job of providing a high level of quality service to both businesses and job seekers of South Dakota. The Business Outreach Plan initiative transforms a well-working system into the most optimal system. The following list of unique and innovative concepts will be used in making the transformation. 1. Develop and strengthen new and existing partnerships with entities engaged in business development and worker supply. These entities include local economic development boards, the state GOED office, state agencies such as DSS, Vocational Rehab and Revenue, Education, Health, Board of Regents, local Chambers of Commerce, and state universities and technical schools. The networks established with these entities provide an invaluable tool in meeting the needs of businesses. The SDCC offices would be involved with economic development that may come about due to a WIRED grant that is being applied for by SDDOL. This would expand the opportunities in the state in the bio fuel and bio medical fields. 2. Actively listen to the needs of employers. The SDDOL listens to employers through the use of in-person contacts, telephone, email, and surveys. The SDCC system is sensitive to the needs of employers by focusing on and asking “What can we do to better serve you?” Researching each business is critical for providing better services. 3. Provide businesses with resource rooms at the local SDCC. Business resource rooms allow businesses to interview applicants, research materials to help them expand, and review information to assist new entrepreneurs in starting their own business. Materials supplied include Business Resource Directories

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and other marketing tools that refer an employer to various agencies to help them get started quickly and easily. 4. Assist businesses in filling their staffing needs. Several offices have adopted a ‘bulletin board’ technique to promote businesses in their area at the SDCC office. These boards highlight what the employer does and discuss the type of employees the business wants to hire. This has been successful because it markets the business and makes potential employees more comfortable and knowledgeable of what the business makes or what service the business supplies. 5. Emphasize SDCC customer service continuously. The emphasis is to provide friendly, efficient, and effective service to all customers, including both businesses and job seekers. By doing so, the SDCC truly does supply ‘Jobs for People. People for Jobs’. 6. Train the workforce for today’s business needs. In cooperation with businesses, CLCs, vocational schools and other partnering agencies, the SDCC offices help develop training programs needed to meet businesses’ demands. Whether healthcare, truck driving, welding, construction or other occupations, various employee training programs have been developed around the state to fill the employment needs of businesses. These types of training will continue to be developed to improve the quality of today’s workforce. SDDOL is currently working with its partners the, SD Department of Health, SD Department of Education and SD Board of Regents, by already completing meetings with healthcare facilities from around the state to discuss the shortage of healthcare workers. Out of these meetings come the recommendations to the leaders of these agencies so they can bring them to the Governor to look at steps to resolve this issue. The SDDOL, in particular WIA, will continue working with their partners on a resolution. 7. Working more closely with business to address youth employment issues. The greatest resource of any state is its youth because they are the wage earners of the future. By creating better relationships with businesses to improve opportunities for youth through training and career enhancement, the probability of keeping youth in South Dakota increases. While these are just some of the creative ideas SDCC offices have developed in their plans, the strategies will continue to expand and/or change as the business community’s needs change. SDCC managers provided monthly Business Outreach Plan progress reports to SDDOL administration. The Business Outreach Plans have re-energized office managers and staff members because specific details are outlined, along with a ‘road map’ of how to accomplish the goals. As the Business Outreach Plans develop, more exciting ideas and enhanced performance from the SDCC offices will begin to show. The Dakota Roots program was specifically designed to meet the workforce challenges of existing, growing, and new businesses in the state. Recruitment of a high-skilled workforce is an on-going issue for both well-established and expanding businesses. The

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marketing efforts of Dakota Roots are specifically geared to attracting former South Dakotans back to the state to live, grow, and build. This on-line job matching tool is the sole responsibility of SDDOL and is utilized by other SDDOL programs under the name SDWORKS. Marketing of Dakota Roots, however, is done through a partnership consisting of the Governor’s Office, GOED, and SDDOL. Added value comes from Dakota Roots as an economic development tool. When recruiting new businesses or working with those wishing to expand, it is essential to show the potential skilled workforce available to meet the businesses’ needs. The Dakota Roots database allows SDDOL to track how many individuals with a specific skill set would be willing to relocate or return to South Dakota given the right job opportunity. When these numbers are combined with the current available workforce indicators, a business can better determine whether or not it can meet its staffing needs.

E. State strategies in place to ensure that sufficient system resources are being spent to support training of individuals in high growth high demand industries.
A reminder, we are a minimally funded state. This poses a great burden on the capacity of the state to provide adequate training resources to meet individual and industry needs. As a single statewide service area the State can easily mobilize the limited resources available to the areas of the State that do have high growth and high demand occupations. The SDWDC ensures funds are distributed to maximize the benefits to individuals, communities, and industry. Limited resources require the State to partner with any appropriate resource to provide suitable training opportunity. Just one example this coordination of effort and resources is the South Dakota Workforce Development Program. SDDOL, Education’s Office of Workforce Development and Career Preparation, and the GOED have obligated funds from their respective resources along with a larger state pool of funds to assist local businesses in training and retraining their workforce.

F. State workforce strategies to support the creation, sustainability, and growth of small businesses and support for the workforce needs of small businesses.
South Dakota Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) are located in seven communities of the State. All seven of these communities are also home to a SDCC. In developing their local Business Outreach Plans, the local SBDC representative was invited to be a part of this important initiative. The majority of businesses in our State are small with fewer than 20 employees. One of the most critical needs identified by these businesses is the need for assistance in Human Resources services. Most of these businesses do not have full time Human Resources managers. The SDCCs can help to fill this gap. With assistance from the SBDCs, appropriate guidance materials and one-on-one consultation can ensure that our new and existing small businesses are able to meet State and Federal employment requirements.

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Several resources have been developed and made available to support the growth and sustainability of small businesses in South Dakota. The State’s Internet homepage contains a link to The Resource Directory containing all relevant Federal, State, and local information for businesses regarding required licenses, state tax and unemployment information, financial assistance, etc. The SBDCs have also published a Small Business Development Guide. The SDCCs have taken this concept one step further and developed a “resource directory” containing localized information to assist new startup businesses. In 1987, the State of South Dakota initiated the REDI. As the name implies, this revolving loan fund makes low-cost loans available to new and existing South Dakota businesses to expand.

G. The funds reserved for Statewide activities are used to incent the entities that make up the State’s workforce system at the State and local levels to achieve the Governor’s vision and address the national strategic direction identified in Part I of this guidance.
South Dakota uses WIA Statewide Activity Funds to carry out required and allowable statewide employment and training activities prescribed in WIA §134(a)(2)(B) and (3)(A). Statewide Activities: • • • • Rapid Response/Additional Assistance: South Dakota has provided effected communities included as a part of their Dislocated Worker allocation, to provide this WIA-required activity. South Dakota provides funding to support the SDWDC. Dakota Corps: A college program to address the needs for South Dakotans to stay in our State and fill the high demand, high growth occupations. Inmate Carpentry Apprentice Program (ICAP): This project is the result of collaborative efforts by several representatives from the DOC (SDDOC), the State Housing Authority (SDHDA), the SDDOL the Federal Department of Labor (USDOL) and Southeast Job Link (SJL), who are committed to the successful transition of inmates back to society. The project that would ensure an uninterrupted housing production project at Mike Durfee State Prison, while introducing a general carpentry apprenticeship program to selected inmates. Enhancement/development for the local one-stop delivery system: These funds are made available to develop, maintain, and enhance their delivery network through further integration of services and increased customer service. State-Level Administration: Includes disseminating the Eligible Training Providers List, conducting evaluations and developing reports, providing technical assistance to workforce development areas that fail to meet performance, and operating a fiscal and management accountability information system. Apprenticeship: South Dakota allocates a portion of the WIA Statewide Activity Funds to have the flexibility to use these funds on allowable statewide activities, such as apprentice worker training, without the restrictions placed upon formula funds. Training for AEL: This grant supports the training need of individuals in the AEL program.

• •

• •

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H. State’s strategies to promote collaboration between the public workforce system, education, human services, juvenile justice, and others to better serve eligible, most in-need youth with significant barriers to employment, and to successfully connect them to education and training opportunities leading to successful employment.
SDWDC has always been progressive with promoting youth programming. Summer youth programs requiring an educational component, incorporating community service projects, incorporating learning styles and interests, and career awareness activities, sending youth to summer programs at postsecondaries, etc. They have encouraged joint programming for youth in and exiting youth correctional settings for years. When approached about developing programming with youth in foster care and transitioning out of care, the Council fully endorsed both agencies (DSS and SDDOL) flexibility in service delivery. This collaborative effort was admired by other states at the Arizona Stakeholders Meeting in December 2004. Due to the strong linkages demonstrated at the state level, the locals have enjoyed a great flexibility in developing career and education progression alternatives that have carried over from one program to another. SDDOL foresees major changes in the faithbased and community-based agencies able to afford to be involved in the PY07 delivery. A primary focus for the Council and the Department will be to cultivate new strategies for collaboration and local delivery. The dropout population has, and will continue to be, one of the primary focuses for youth programming for SDDOL and collaborating with other agencies. Utilizing WIA funds and state general funds for 19 alternative schools, the Department has demonstrated administrative efficiencies for years. Collaboration between the Departments of Education and Labor exists regarding certification of teaching staff and alternative learning locations. Together, the Departments require curriculum to be standards based. Current exploration for Career and Technical Education is under development linking to Perkins Leadership funding. Over the next two years, SDDOL will be working with DOE as the mandatory school attendance for youth 18 and under is implemented. SDDOL affiliates Alternative High Schools have experience allowing for open entry and exits for educational experiences. Many of the traditional school districts do not. Who is often hurt by the lack of flexible scheduling, but youth leaving correctional settings, foster care youth changing homes, dropouts, etc? Meeting the unique challenges of these youth is something SDDOL can provide replicable models to traditional districts. SDDOL programs include not only a quality educational experience but provide transitional linkages to employment opportunities for learning and earning experiences.

I. Description of the State’s strategies to identify State law, regulations and policies that impede successful achievements of workforce development goals and strategies to change or modify them.
Under WIA, South Dakota has a great deal of flexibility in deciding how we administer our workforce development programs and in the policy guidance provided to local service providers. The Governor determines the composition and leadership of the

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SDWDC designated as a single delivery provider, allocate formula funds, develop performance indicators, apply for Federal waivers (if necessary), and develop statewide data collection systems, The Governor and SDWDC has also set the tone for WIA implementation through policy development and guidance: SDDOL has developed guidelines concerning service design, vendor certification, the Individual Training Account (ITA) system, service priorities, and program improvements. South Dakota has not enacted any additional legislation to govern workforce development services. Taken together, these various state-level actions significantly influence the shape of our State’s workforce development system.

J. Description of how the State will take advantage of the flexibility provisions in WIA for waivers and the option to obtain approval as a workflex State pursuant to § 189(i) and § 192.
In this document, South Dakota has requested and is awaiting USDOL approval of a waiver that will allow South Dakota flexibility under WIA. The actual waiver is found on page 110 of this plan. The SDWDC, SDDOL and our partners will continue to explore methods to balance support for economic growth while helping to meet the needs of disadvantaged populations; to identify and to focus on those interventions with a maximum long-term impact and at the same time to serve short-term objectives of heterogeneous businesses and job seekers; to build and reinforce partnership among business, labor, government, education, and other workforce interests; and to measure performance in meaningful ways at the State level, as well as in the communities served by the one-stop center. They anticipate that the Federal government will support these efforts.

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VI. Major State Policies and Requirements A. State policies and systems are in place supporting common data collection and reporting processes, information management, integrated service delivery, and performance management.
The SDDOL has developed a web-based data collection, management, and reporting system known as SDWORKS. The system is loosely based on the first version of the One Stop Operating System developed by the State of Utah. As a single statewide service area, the SDDOL requires local service providers to use SDWORKS for data collection, case management, and reporting. Since all providers are connected to the same system, reports are simply generated at the State level and need not be created at the local level and forwarded to the State. A single statewide system also allows for easy access to client records from anywhere in the State or the world since the system is now Internet-based. Upgrades to the system in 2006 allowed for the movement from an Oracle-based to Microsoft-based platform. SDWORKS is the primary data management system for WIA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs as well as the Wagner-Peyser and VETS programs. All Federal reports for these programs are generated through the SDWORKS system. SDWORKS also provides Internet access to the SDDOL. Job Seekers can register and perform job searches online. Employers can list job openings and review unsuppressed applicant resumes. SDDOL administers the employment and training components of South Dakota’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps programs under contract with DSS. Appropriate staff in our SDCCs who work with participants in these programs are given access to the DSS Client Information System. Although the two management systems appear in separate “sessions,” they are both accessed on the same desktop computer.

B. State policies are in place promoting efficient use of administrative resources.
In late 1997, the SDDOL initiated a three-year plan to develop the various employment programs into a convenient, customer-oriented One-Stop shopping center of services for employers and job seekers alike. The plan included the collocation of State agencies with local organizations, and a considerable investment in technology. All DHS Vocational Rehabilitation district field staff has been collocated into SDCCs. Computer servers in these locations are shared, and Vocational Rehabilitation staff have been given access to SDCC listings including information concerning employers. Vocational Rehabilitation staff also contribute to the system by inputting job openings and registering clients. Vocational Rehabilitation “Job Shops” that teach employability skills to clients have been collocated with SDCC sites in two communities. Throughout the State, TANF program staff are now available in SDCCs as a part of the Welfare Reform initiative. Staff were reclassified or transferred from the DSS and became SDDOL “Employment Specialists.” All welfare program applicants must now

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apply at their local SDCC. Those who are work- ready are counseled and placed directly into jobs. An employment plan that may include training is developed with program participants needing more intensive services.

C. State policies are in place promoting universal access and consistency of service Statewide.
The existing network of SDCCs is the cornerstone of the new One-Stop system. Local SDCCs must submit proof that certain standards are met in order to be “certified” by the SDWDC as a SDCC. Today, the following programs and services are available at SDCCs:* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Job Matching and Placement Veterans’ Employment Services Unemployment Insurance TANF Food Stamps Employment and Training WIA Training Programs Job Corps Enrollment and Placement Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers Training Experience Works (SCSEP) Labor Market Information Business Resource Centers WOTC Rapid Response Assistance Trade Adjustment Act Assistance Wage and Hour Regulation Assistance Job Search Assistance Classes Career Counseling Self-Assistance Resource Rooms Unemployment Tax Representatives Unemployment Quality Control Unemployment Investigation Vocational Rehabilitation Visually Impaired Services CLCs training programs Alternative High Schools GED Training/Testing Federal Bonding Program Adult Education and Literacy GED Testing

* Not all services are available in every community.

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D. Policies support a demand-driven approach, as described in Part 1.
All SDCC offices have created customized Business Outreach Plans. This goal was reached by every SDCC in the state by the fall of 2005. The ongoing goal of this endeavor is to become better service providers to the business community. SDCC managers and staff continue to concentrate on marketing the programs and services offered, establish new business contacts, and maintain and expand existing contacts throughout the communities served. SDDOL must be prepared to respond to the ever-changing economic conditions of the state. To accomplish this effectively and with consistency, SDDOL partners with the business community is developing strategic planning for communities and regions of the state. This will provide a collaborative approach to decision making and business networking. The following highlights the ideas and implementation taking place in SDCC offices throughout the state. SDCC offices have, for years, done an outstanding job of providing a high level of quality service to both businesses and job seekers of South Dakota. The Business Outreach Plan initiative transformed a well-working system into the most optimal system. The following list of unique and innovative concepts initiated, already have proven their worth to the Department and the Career Centers. 1. Develop and strengthen new and existing partnerships with entities engaged in business development and worker supply. These entities include local economic development boards, the state GOED office, state agencies such as DSS, Vocational Rehab, Education, Health, Board of Regents, Revenue, local Chambers of Commerce, and state universities and technical schools. The networks established with these entities provide an invaluable tool in meeting the needs of businesses. The SDCC offices would be involved with economic development that may come about due to a WIRED grant that is being applied for by SDDOL. This would expand the opportunities in the state in the bio fuel and bio medical fields. 2. Actively listen to the needs of businesses. The SDDOL listens to businesses through the use of in-person contacts, telephone, email, and surveys. The SDCC system is sensitive to the needs of businesses by focusing on and asking “What can we do to better serve you?” Researching each business is critical for providing better services. 3. Provide businesses with resource rooms at the local SDCC. Business resource rooms allow businesses to interview applicants, research materials to help them expand, and review information to assist new entrepreneurs in starting their own business. Materials supplied include Business Resource Directories and other marketing tools that refer an employer to various agencies to help them get started quickly and easily. 4. Assist businesses in filling their staffing needs. Several offices have adopted a ‘bulletin board’ technique to promote businesses in their area at the SDCC office. These boards highlight what the employer does and discuss the type of employees the business wants to hire. This has been successful

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because it markets the business and makes potential employees more comfortable and knowledgeable of what the business makes or what service the business supplies. 5. Emphasize SDCC customer service continuously. The emphasis is to provide friendly, efficient, and effective service to all customers, including both businesses and job seekers, has not been compromised and is an ongoing objective of every Career Center. Whether providing job information, labor market information, job-training options, or assisting people by referring them to another partnering agency, the goal of customer service is strongly maintained. 6. Train the workforce for today’s business needs. In cooperation with businesses, CLCs, vocational schools and other partnering agencies, the SDCC offices assists in the development of training programs needed to meet businesses’ demands. Whether healthcare, truck driving, welding, construction or other occupations, various employee training programs have been developed around the state to fill the employment needs of businesses. These types of training will continue to be developed to improve the quality of today’s workforce. SDDOL is currently working with its partners the, SD Department of Health, SD Department of Education and SD Board of Regents, by already completing meetings with healthcare facilities from around the state to discuss the shortage of healthcare workers. Out of these meetings come the recommendations to the leaders of these agencies so they can bring them to the Governor to look at steps to resolve this issue. The SDDOL, in particular WIA, will continue working with their partners on a resolution. 7. Working more closely with business to address youth employment issues. The greatest resource of any state is its youth because they are the wage earners of the future. By creating better relationships with businesses to improve opportunities for youth through training and career enhancement, the probability of keeping youth in South Dakota increases. While these are just some of the creative ideas SDCC offices have developed in their plans, the strategies will continue to expand and/or change as the business community’s needs change. SDCC managers provide monthly Business Outreach Plan progress reports to SDDOL administration. The Business Outreach Plans have re-energized office managers and staff members because specific details are outlined, along with a ‘road map’ of how to accomplish the goals. As the Business Outreach Plans develop, more exciting ideas and enhanced performance from the SDCC offices will begin to show. The LMIC is housed within the SDDOL. The local SDCCs have direct access to labor statistics through LMIC staff and the LMIC Internet data pages. Every SDCC manager is a part of the community economic development groups in their respective areas. They are frequently asked to provide specific localized labor supply and wage data for businesses considering locating to that community. We are pleased to be able to provide accurate and timely information to local economic development corporations.

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Periodically, the LMIC staff provides workshops to SDCC staff and the staff members of partner organizations regarding the availability and correct usage of labor market data.

E. Policies are in place to ensure resources available through the Federal and/or State apprenticeship programs and the Job Corps are fully integrated with South Dakota’s One-Stop delivery system.
The State of South Dakota is a “right to work” state with very limited presence of organized labor entities. The State of South Dakota itself does not have an apprenticeship division. The Federal Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (BAT) has made linkages with the SDCCs around the State of South Dakota and with the WIA Division of the SDDOL. There are no formal policies in place but sharing of information between the agencies and divisions does occur. South Dakota is currently a Pilot Site for developing Apprenticeships for Certified Nurse Assistants (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) to address the State and nations shortage of qualified health care providers. SDCC staff assist in promotion of this program by referral of clients to the program. The contact for B.A.T. in South Dakota is: Donald Reese, State Director USDOL/ETA/OATELS-BAT Room 204 2500 West 49th Street Sioux Falls, SD 57105. SDDOL has the Job Corps contract for Outreach and Admission services into Job Corps, as well as the contract for Career Transition Services upon completion of Job Corps training. Each SDCC has a minimum of one staff that is fully trained in Job Corps and a portion of that staff’s full-time employee (FTE) is funded through the Job Corps contract for services. An Employment Specialist with specific responsibility for Career Transition Services is based on site at the Boxelder Job Corps Center. The remaining percentage of each staff’s FTE is funded through either WIA, or WegnerPeyser funding streams so coordination of programs is inherent by design. These staff work in conjunction with schools, CLCs, Alternative High Schools, other WIA service and other providers to try to blend services, if appropriate, to best meet the needs of the particular youth. The SDCCs are responsible for the outreach and admission of 425 South Dakota youth ages 16-24 per year in accordance with specified requirements of the Job Corps Policy and Requirements Handbook (PRH). SDDOL employs a Job Corps Program Specialist within the State Workforce Services Division to provide management and oversight of the Job Corps program. This provides a natural coordination of WIA services and Job Corps. The Rapid City Career Center currently houses the Job Corps Program Specialist within the State Workforce Investment Division, providing a natural coordination of WIA services and Job Corps as well as being in close proximity to South Dakota’s only Job Corp facility, Boxelder Job Corp, in Nemo, South Dakota. Job Corps Admission Counselors, as part of the application process, interview every individual youth, conduct an assessment and review labor market information with the

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client. If Job Corps can meet the individuals’ needs, their application is completed and submitted for approval. If, however, during the interview process it is determined that Job Corps may not be the right training option, the youth may be referred to another program such as WIA, Vocational Rehabilitation Services, tribal entity, social service or other referral sources. Every attempt is made to connect individuals with the proper agency to get him or her on the right track with the least amount of inconvenience as possible. Upon completion of the Job Corps program (regardless of center location) the SDDOL has the contract to serve all South Dakota youth with Career Transition Services. Through the SDCCs across the State returning youth are assigned to a Job Corps Placement Specialists (by zip code) caseload for placement activity services. These services include, but are not limited to: job development, job referrals, resume writing assistance, job search skills training, and potential of accessing supportive services through WIA if needed. The Regional Office of Job Corps has estimated that the SDDOL will provide career transition services for 212 Job Corps graduates per contract year. SDCC Placement Specialists seek, in a proactive manner, employment opportunities in the local job market that match the students’ skills gained through the Job Corps program. Visits will be made to employers, academic institutions, military recruiters and other personnel agencies to enhance placement opportunities for graduating students. Upon placement of a Job Corps graduate there will be a full 12 months of follow up services provided. Monthly calls will be maintained with the student to ensure placement success, or to provide additional services if needed. Record of these contacts is maintained on the Job Corps Career Transition Services (CTS) computer system. This system is also where all placements will be recorded for performance measures and contractor effectiveness. SDDOL shall provide direction, management and administrative support to all functions and activities of the outreach, admissions and career transition services. This will include establishment of short and long range plans to ensure effectiveness and optimum allocation of resources, and ensure that all staff understands Job Corps contractual policies and procedures sufficient to prevent fraud and abuse. Job Corps, along with other youth programs, will continue to be promoted within each local SDCCs’ service delivery area as well as statewide by the contract manager. Coordination of activities produces the best plan of further training for each individual South Dakota.

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VII.

Integration of One-Stop Services Delivery

A. State policies and procedures are in place to ensure the quality of service delivery through SDCCs.
When the One-Stop system was organized in 1997, the SDWDC established a certification process containing certain standards that must be met by each SDCC. All of the current SDCCs have submitted an application and have achieved certification by the Council. SDCCs are continuously reviewed for the quality of the services they provide through a follow-up survey of the users of our services. Random employers, job seekers, and WIA program participants are selected monthly to complete a questionnaire designed to measure their satisfaction with the services received at their SDCC. The results of these surveys are included in the required performance standards for the WIA program. The satisfaction results of employers and job seekers are used in the annual performance review of the local SDCC.

B. South Dakota has issued policies and guidance to support maximum integration of service delivery through the One-Stop delivery system for both business customers and individual customers.
As is the case for most small states; there are few resources available to support the functions of our workforce development system. The efficient use of those limited resources dictates maximum integration of services through a single delivery system. That system includes all WIA programs, AEL, Employment Services, LMIC, VETS, Job Corps recruitment/placement, UI, Wage and Hour information, TANF employment and training, Food Stamps employment and training, among other employment related activities. Our vision is for the SDCC network to be the single point of contact for the employment needs of both job seekers and employers of South Dakota. We believe we have achieved that vision and are the state’s workforce experts.

C. South Dakota has taken actions to promote identifying One-Stop infrastructure costs and developing models or strategies for local use that support integration.
The State of South Dakota has actively pursued a policy of collocation of services for more than a decade. As existing leases expire, a conscious effort is made to locate as many state-sponsored services as possible in a single location. One State agency leases the entire building with other agencies paying their share of the cost based on the square footage they occupy. Such arrangements have allowed agencies to share reception staff and some equipment such as copier machines, mailing machines etc. Private non-profit contracting agencies that offer training services like CLCs also share these locations whenever possible.

D. South Dakota’s use of reserved funds for statewide activities.
The WIA statewide activities are used to support the operations of the SDCC and allowable statewide employment and training activities. Reserved funds are also used to

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support program and administrative functions including the support of the State’s case management information system (SDWORKS). Services to enhance customer support and training activities, apprentice worker programs, staff training and development, capacity building and technical assistance to the SDCC and contractors are other activities supported by reserved funds.

E. The State ensures the full spectrum of assets in the One-Stop delivery system supports human capital solutions for businesses and individual customers broadly.
The State ensures the full spectrum of assets in the SDCC system supports human capital solutions for businesses and individual customers broadly through the initial certification process and through regular on-site reviews of each certified center.

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VIII.

Administration and Oversight of Local Workforce Investment System

A. Local Area Designations 1. South Dakota’s designated local workforce investment area.
In 1995, the Governor designated South Dakota as a Single Service Delivery Area. This designation is expected to remain the same over the next two years.

2. Description of the process to designate the Single Service Delivery Area.
The Governor made this decision after consulting with the SDWDC and taking into consideration geographic areas served by local service providers and the funds available to provide quality services to South Dakota.

3. Description of South Dakota’s appeals process.
Not applicable.

B. Local Investment Boards
South Dakota is a statewide local service area and has combined the WIA requirement for both State and local boards under the responsibility of the SDWDC. The SDWDC was created by the Governor’s executive order 95-14 on June 19, 1995. There is no consideration for designation of other local areas based on the requirements of sec. 116.

C. The State will build the capacity of Local Boards to develop and manage a high performing local workforce investment system.
SDDOL capacity building efforts have primarily taken the form of training and technical assistance. Most specifically mentioned providing training or workshops to the local staff, and providing technical assistance. Technical assistance has taken the form of onsite sessions or sometimes guidebooks on specific topics. Technical assistance includes one-to-one help, on-site training, regional training and web-based and handout materials on specific topics. Training is being provided on a broad range of topics. Some of the most commonly mentioned by SDDOL are specific computer systems, performance accountability, financial management, and partnership building. The SDDOL provided a spectrum of WIA topics, such as WIA itself, quality, resource rooms, partnerships, administration, planning responding to complex customer barriers, nondiscrimination, continuous improvement, customer flow, grant writing, and many more. Local capacity building efforts are targeting all levels of WIA personnel, including SDCC staff, and local service provider staff. Training is the most common capacity building method, the SDDOL training programs are one method of building capacity. The SDDOL determined training needs through a needs assessment process, such as a training needs survey. SDDOL has created a

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network of peer trainers to train on issues relating to quality. Some of the most common staff training topics include WIA itself, performance measures, customer service, stress management, case management, client flow, ITA’s, computer skills, and serving or providing access to disabled customers. SDDOL also offer advanced training opportunities, certification program at the State universities, and provides training through the Bureau of Personnel and the universities program on topics such as leadership, supervisory skills, or process evaluation and change. Partner programs were involved in capacity building through cross training or all staff training efforts for SDCC staff. This cross training typically covered partner services, client follow, coordination, or common functions like job registration and labor exchange. Other capacity building efforts included attending or co-sponsoring conferences, creating technical assistance manuals, taking part in State taskforces, holding regular meetings at which staff or providers can discuss problems or issues, and conducting retreats.

D. Local Planning Process 1. Oversight of the locals planning process provided.
Because South Dakota is a single delivery area designation, a yearly SDWDC strategic meeting is held between SDCC and SDWDC to outline statewide goals; these goals are incorporated within this plan. SDWDC provide oversight for the goals and discuss issues quarterly.

2. How does the local plan approval process ensure that local plans are consistent with State performance goals and State strategic direction?
Not applicable.

E. Regional Planning 1. Description of any intra-State or inter-State regions and their corresponding performance measures.
Based on our Single Service Delivery Area, South Dakota negotiates one set of performance measures.

2. Discussion of the purpose of these designations and the activities that will occur to help improve performance.
Same as E-1 above.

3. For inter-State regions (if applicable), describe the roles of the respective Governors and State and local Boards.
Not applicable.

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F. Allocation Formulas 1. Description of the methods and factors South Dakota will use to distribute funds to local areas for the 30 percent discretionary formula adult employment and training funds and youth funds pursuant to §§128(b)(3)(B) and 133(b)(3)(B)
As South Dakota is a single service area state, a local distribution formula is not required. Adult and Youth funds will be used for core, intensive and training services. The Adult and Youth intensive and training services funds will be utilized as outlined in the Act. Youth funds will be used to provide activities as outlines in section 129 of the Act. All costs will be allocated in accordance with the State allocation plan.

2. Description of how the allocation methods and factors help ensure that funds are distributed equitably throughout the State and that there will be no significant shifts in funding levels to a local area on a year-to-year basis.
As South Dakota is a single service area state, a local distribution formula is not required. It is the intent of SDDOL to target resources to regions of the state to meet specific workforce needs. This allows the state to build a talent development process in partnership with local business, educational institutions and local government.

3. Description of the State’s allocation formula for dislocated worker funds under §133(b)(2)(B).
As South Dakota is a single service area state, a local distribution formula is not required. Dislocated Worker funding for SDDOL will be used for core, intensive and training. For each program year, service providers will be allocated funds based on active dislocated workers enrolled with the rest of the funds maintained in a state pool to be allocated to areas of need, on an as needed basis.

4. Description of how the individuals and entities on the State Board were involved in the development of the methods and factors, and how the State consulted with chief elected officials in local areas throughout the State in determining such distribution.
SDWDC is continually involved in funding discussions through regular meetings and through Performance Reports. The yearly allocations are presented along with the recommended distribution formula. Budgets are reviewed each month with the SDCC. Obligations and expenditures are discussed, along with the potential of transferring funds between Adults and Dislocated Worker programs. Recommendations are presented at quarterly SDWDC meetings.

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G. Provider Selection Policies 1. Policies and procedures to be applied by local areas for determining eligibility of local training providers, how performance information will be used to determine continuing eligibility and the agency responsible for carrying out these activities.
South Dakota, designated as a statewide service area, has combined the WIA requirements, for both state and local, with the SDWDC. The council is the responsible entity for setting policies and procedures as may apply to provider selection. The SDWDC has established a process to identify eligible training providers. The SDWDC has contracted the SDDOL to administer and implement these policies and procedures. Initial eligibility is extended to providers that are: • • A post-secondary educational institution that is eligible to receive Federal funds under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965; and provides a program that leads to an associate degree, baccalaureate degree, or certificate, or An entity that carries out programs under the National Apprenticeship Act.

This includes universities, colleges, community colleges, some proprietary schools, technical institutes, and programs registered with BAT within the USDOL. The SDWDC will consider initial eligibility for: • • • Other public and private providers of a program of training services; A post-secondary educational institution wishing to receive training funds for a program not eligible to receive funds for programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act; and An apprenticeship program wishing to receive training funds for a program not registered with the BAT.

Initial eligibility process is publicly available through the SDDOL website, www.sdjobs.org, for training providers. This site includes specific instructions on how to electronically submit applications for consideration. Such instructions include requests program content; performance information; cost information and any additional appropriate requirements the Governor may wish to include. The SDDOL maintains a list of providers submitting an application that are determined automatically qualified for initial eligibility, providers determined to be initially eligible consistent with the Governor’s policy and providers retained on the list that have been determined to be subsequently eligible. The list will contain performance and program cost information on providers determined to meet initial eligibility according to the Governor’s policy and all providers that are determined to be subsequently eligible. All training providers, whether covered or exempt from the initial eligibility process, are subject to subsequent eligibility. Consideration for subsequent eligibility includes performance and program cost information as well as a requirement to meet established performance levels.

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Consideration for subsequent eligibility is based on: Program information • Program completion rates for all individuals in applicable programs; • Percentage of individuals participating in applicable programs who obtained unsubsidized employment (also to include training related employment rates); and • Wages at placement in employment of all individuals in the applicable program. Participant information: • Percent of participants that completed the applicable program who are placed in unsubsidized employment; • Retention rates in unsubsidized employment six months after the first day of the employment; • Wages received six months after the first day of employment; • Where appropriate, rates of licensure or certification, attainment of academic degrees or equivalents, or attainment of other measures of skills of the graduates of the applicable programs. Cost information: • The cost of the training program (tuition, fees, books, supplies, tools, etc.) for participants in the applicable program. Performance information is made available through verifiable data submitted to SDDOL by the training provider and data from the SDDOL Division of LMIC.

2. Description of how South Dakota solicited recommendations from local boards and training providers and interested members of the public, including representatives of business and labor organizations, in the development of these policies and procedures.
The SDWDC, as the board for a single statewide service area, develops policies and procedures for selection of training providers. SDWDC has a diverse representation, including private sector business and organized labor. This gives the board opportunity for various local or statewide entities to be involved in the process. The Council gives all due consideration to recommendations and suggestions. The process is available to the public though open SDWDC meetings. On request, the public can receive minutes of the formal meetings of the SDWDC. Minutes of the formal meetings are posted on the SDDOL web site, and the public can receive copies of the minutes of the SDWDC meetings.

3. South Dakota will maintain the eligible provider list.
The SDDOL is responsible for maintaining the eligible provider list. The list is reviewed and updated periodically. The official eligible provider list is an electronic posting on the SDDOL’s website.

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This site includes many training providers, as well as those approved for WIA. The site is interactive so providers can request certification or update provider or program information online. The submitted request sends an email to designated SDDOL staff. The email prompts a review of the information submitted. If there are no questions or concerns on the electronic application, SDDOL staff will accept the program and publish to the website. This in turn generates an email to the provider signifying acceptance to the eligible provider listing. If there are questions or concerns by the SDDOL staff, an email is generated stating the issues that need to be resolved. If sufficient information is made available to satisfy the concerns the provider will be accepted to the ETPL. If provided, information is not to the standards for WIA a denial of WIA certification is emailed.

4. Description of the procedures the Governor has established for providers of training services to appeal a denial of eligibility by the local board or the designated State agency, a termination of eligibility or other action by the board or agency, or a denial of eligibility by a One-Stop operator.
An adverse determination by SDDOL may be appealed. A training provider may appeal the determination within 30 days of the denial or termination of eligibility. The appeal must be in writing and state the reason for appeal. The Executive Director of the SDWDC will conduct the appeal process. The process may require the training provider to supply additional information relevant to the appeal. The process will allow a training provider to present their appeal through a hearing with the Executive Director. This typically would be through a telephone hearing. A decision on the appeal will be provided in writing. The decision will be final.

5. Description of the competitive and non-competitive processes that will be used at the State level to award grants and contracts for activities under title I of WIA, including how potential bidders are being made aware of the availability of grants and contracts.
Solicitation for competitive proposals for provision of services will be open on an annual basis. Typically, this would be in early spring with commencement of services to coincide with the beginning of a program year. However, there may be circumstances that would require solicitation for specific projects at other times of the program year. The State will issue public notice for potential bidders to submit proposals for provision of services. Public notice will be printed in at least two newspapers of general circulation that jointly cover most, if not all, of the State. In addition to the print media, public notice will also be available through the SDDOL website. Current contractors, and potential bidders who have asked to be on a mailing list, will be notified of the solicitation. The public notice will include a brief descriptor of the Request for Proposals (RFP). Public notice will also include contact information and specific time frame and process for submission. The notice will direct potential bidders to the SDDOL website for the complete RFP. Bidders may also request the RFP to be mailed. Sole source procurement will be limited as much as practical. Sole source will be permitted when the provider is truly the only source for the service or product; when

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there exists an emergency or exigency and the competitive process would be impractical for the situation; or when a provider has a unique capacity to economically provide the requested service or product. In all cases of sole source procurement complete documentation will be maintained. This will include justification and approval prior to entering into the arrangement. The SDWDC will have final approval of the grants being awarded. The awards are to be made to organizations possessing the demonstrated ability to perform successfully under the terms and conditions of a proposed subgrant or contract. Where comparable proposals have been received from an offeror which has demonstrated performance and a high risk recipient/subrecipient, and a determination has been made that both proposals are fundable, the award should be made to the offeror which has demonstrated performance, unless other factors dictate a contrary result. Determinations of demonstrated performance shall be in writing and take into consideration such matters as whether the organization has: • • • • • • • Adequate financial resources or the ability to obtain them; The ability to meet the program design specifications at a reasonable cost, as well as the ability to meet performance goals; A satisfactory record of past performance (in job training, basic skills training, or related activities), including demonstrated quality of training; reasonable dropout rates from past programs; and performance indicators. The ability to provide services that can lead to the achievement of competency standards for participants with identified deficiencies; A satisfactory record of integrity, business ethics and fiscal accountability; The necessary organization, experience, accounting and operational controls; and The technical skills to perform the work.

The State has implemented policies, procedures and standards to ensure fiscal accountability and to prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of programs administered under WIA. The State WIA administrative entity will follow those procurement procedures as set forth by the State of South Dakota under the provisions of SDCL 5-23 and 1-24. Purchasing needs will be processed through the State Bureau of Administration Purchasing and Printing Office whose bidding procedures meet or exceed procurement regulations. Subgrantees will be allowed to operate under their existing procurement procedures if those procedures meet Federal and State guidelines. If subgrantees do not have procurement procedures or those procedures do not meet Federal and State guidelines, the administering entity will prescribe acceptable procurement practices. In accordance with Section 112 of WIA, the State has adopted and implemented procurement standards, and arranged for monitoring to ensure compliance with the standards. WIA procurement requirements shall include provisions to ensure: • Procurements shall be conducted in a manner providing full and open competition;

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• • • • • • • •

The use of sole source procurements shall be minimized to the extent practicable; Procurements shall include an appropriate analysis of the reasonableness of cost; Procurements shall not provide excess program income or excess profit; Procurements shall clearly specify deliverables and the basis for payment; Written procedures shall be established for procurement transactions; No grantee, contractor, subgrantee, or subcontractor shall engage in any conflict of interest in the selection, award, or administration of a contract or grant under WIA; Grantees and subgrantees shall conduct oversight to ensure compliance with the procurement procedures; Procurement transactions between units of State or local governments, and any other entities organized principally as the administrative entity for SDA, shall be conducted on a cost reimbursable basis.

The State ensures that efforts will be made to secure compliance with the procurement procedures. If, as a result of monitors, it is determined that a substate grantee is not in compliance with the procurement procedures, the State shall require corrective action to secure prompt compliance. Appropriate sanctions shall be imposed if timely corrective action is not implemented.

6. Criteria identified to be used by local boards in awarding grants for youth activities, including criteria that the Governor and local boards will use to identify effective and ineffective youth activities and providers of such activities.
The SDWDC develops criteria for youth programs and services. To be considered as acceptable providers new applicants will have to describe how they will implement the bulleted activities effectively to meet the needs of youth participants. In the following years, the State will also have performance indicators identifying if the activities led to quality performance for repeat applicants. Criteria to identify effective and ineffective youth activities and providers would include: • • • • • • • • • • Develop relationships between youth and caring adults; Develop youth citizenship and leadership skills; Provide appropriate services based on age and individual youth needs; Employability skills training; Improve educational achievement, to include offering preparation for postsecondary opportunities and employment; Demonstrate the connection between of work and learning; Provided comprehensive career guidance and counseling; Demonstrate knowledge of community resources available; Demonstrate current or proposed linkages with community organizations, State agencies, employers, etc. Reach out to the neediest youth in the area as well as programs serving youth in foster care, correctional programs, etc.

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H. One-Stop Policies 1. Services provided by each of the required and optional One-Stop partners will be coordinated and made available through the One-Stop system.
The services made available through the SDCCs are coordinated locally. As indicated earlier, not every community has the full list of services available. The smaller communities in particular are unlikely to offer all programs due to limited resources. Regular meetings are held locally to develop and update joint case management plans for “shared” clients. Program managers also meet regularly to plan joint outreach and promotional efforts such as open houses and business seminars. There is no duplication of core services between Wagner-Peyser Act funds and WIA funds, nor has there ever been any duplication of such efforts in South Dakota. Since WIA and Wagner-Peyser funds are both administered through the SDDOL, the SDCC delivery system is designed and administered in the most efficient manner possible. Local staff is cross-trained to provide more than one program. A time allocation system is used to ensure that the appropriate program is charged for the time spent delivering the services authorized under that program. This reduces the need to refer applicants to multiple service providers and reduces the need for several staff persons to become familiar with an individual’s case.

2. Description of how South Dakota identifies areas needing improvement and how technical assistance will be provided.
The State administration reviews statewide performance each month. If a local service provider is identified as needing improvements, a State specialist will schedule a time to meet with the local service provider to assist in identifying the root cause, to problem solve and identify solutions. In addition local service providers (SDCCs and CLCs) are scheduled for an on-site review of all WIA programs. In order to provide consistent services, it is critical for all local service providers to implement and follow State approved policies and procedures. It is the responsibility of all service providers to examine process to continually improve and provide cost effective services while still maintaining adherence to State policy and procedure. In a continuing effort to provide quality services, training is provided on an on going basis at regional training around the State and by the annual WIA Conference. Also, local service providers are given the opportunity to take part in BOP training programs on a broad base of topics.

3. Additional state mandated One-Stop partners
As stated earlier, there are several other partners in the SDCC system. The TANF and Food Stamp employment and training programs are administer by the SDDOL in nonreservation counties under contract with our DSS. The VETS employment program is administered through the SDCCs as is recruitment and placement of Job Corps youth. At least one person is trained to deliver Unemployment Assistance in every SDCC and

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each center has a person trained in the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) certification requirements.

I. Oversight/Monitoring Process
Because the State has a central computerized system, reports of each SDCC’s activities and performance can be generated on demand. Administrators and supervisors can review program progress. A written report of all WIA/VETS/TANF/Food Stamps/Employment Security progress by local office is issued monthly. The report shows negotiated goals and progress toward meeting those goals. Additionally, each SDCC manager submits a written monthly narrative report to the Deputy Secretary highlighting the month’s accomplishments and outlining next month’s goals. Finally, a performance review is conducted with State of South Dakota employees by their supervisor annually. Program performance is one of the key elements of this procedure. WIA Program Specialists and administration review outcome and operational data to monitor program performance outcomes and efficiencies. All data reviewed is statewide and can be determined down to the SDCC, CLC, Alternative High School, and individual customer level. In addition, the State WIA program staff performs on-site monitors for program and service delivery. An onsite monitoring schedule is established, with a minimum of one half of the SDCCs, CLCs, and Alternative High Schools receiving onsite reviews. Services delivery by a contracted vendor, are monitored yearly. All contracts contain performance requirements. In 2005-2006 SDDOL implemented a redesign of our case management system (SDWORKS). The additional data available as a result of this process will allow us to continually evaluate and improve our services. SDDOL’s case management system (SDWORKS) tracks specific data elements and performance criteria for local and state review.

J. Grievance Procedures
The State of South Dakota complies and will continue to comply with the requirements of 29 CFR Part 37 related to discrimination complaint processing procedures. The SDDOL has established the procedures that will provide for the prompt and equitable resolution of discrimination complaints, as well as the resolution of non-discriminatory agency and non-agency related complaints, to safeguard the confidentiality of the complaint and any actions resulting from it. The orientation and refresher training provided by the EO Officer for SDDOL staff and grantee/sub-recipient staff identifies the difference between programmatic complaints and complaints based on discrimination. It is against the law for recipients of Federal financial assistance to discriminate on the following bases: • Against any individual in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief; and

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Against any beneficiary of programs financially assisted under Title I of the WIA of 1998, on basis of beneficiary’s citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States, or his or her participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity.

In accordance with 20 CFR 658, a standardized, statewide Employment Security (ES) Complaint System has been implemented. More specifically, Part 658- Administrative Provisions Governing the SDCC System, Subpart E, 658.400 through 658.426, outlines both State and Federal guidance for actions to be taken on specified complaints. Furthermore, Subparts F, G, and H of 658 outline discontinuation of services to employers, review and assessment of State agency compliance with ES regulations, and Federal application of remedial action to State agencies, respectively. It is the SDDOL State Monitor Advocate’s duty to ensure that these regulations are known and carried out by State SDCC offices and that each office is aware of the procedures in handling any complaint or grievance that is brought to the office’s attention. All SDDOL State employee complaints are submitted to the South Dakota State Bureau of Personnel (BOP) for processing. The SDDOL Employment Opportunity (EO) Officer has the following discrimination complaint procedures printed and available to all grant recipients, applicants, participants, staff, and applicants for employment. Technical assistance and training for service delivery staff on the complaint procedures are arranged for and conducted by the EO Officer and/or the EO Coordinator as a part of regular staff training. The State Monitor Advocate assures compliance in handling non-EO complaints. Filing Procedures A. Who may file: Any person may file who believes that he or she or any specific class of individuals has been or is being subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, political affiliation or belief and, for beneficiaries only, citizenship or participation in any SDDOL or WIA Title-I financially assisted program or activity. The complaint must be in writing and filed by the complainant or by an authorized representative. Those who may file include but are not limited to the following: • • • • • • • Applicant/registrant for aid, benefits, services or training; Eligible applicant/registrants; Participants; Employees; Applicants for employment; Service providers (the organization involved is one which may be attributed a racial, national origin or other characteristic entitled to protection under WIA); and Eligible service providers (same definition applies).

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K. State policies and procedures have been developed to facilitate effective local workforce investment systems. 1. State guidelines for the selection of One-Stop providers by local boards.
Not Applicable. SDDOL is the One-Stop provider for South Dakota based on appointment of the Governor and the SDWDC.

2. Procedures to resolve impasse situations at the local level in developing MOUs to ensure full participation of all required partners in the One-Stop delivery system.
As a Single Delivery Area, SDDOL MOU serves as statewide agreements. Regions form Local Area Agreements for pathway delivery.

3. Criteria by which the State will determine if local Boards can run programs inhouse.
Not applicable.

4. Performance information that on-the-job training and customized training providers must provide.
The State is committed to establishing education and training resources that provide South Dakota with a well trained and highly skilled workforce. Customized training and on-the-job training have been identified as successful methodologies that result in such skills development. These training programs are widely promoted to the business community as well as job seekers. An increased rated of success results when a training program is tailored to a specific need of a particular business. This success is beneficial to the business as well as the participants in the training program. The States’ approach is to promote OJT training and customized training to both employers and job seekers as a viable means of building needed skills. An OJT will be arranged by the local SDCC on behalf of an eligible individual. An agreement will not be written with an employer who has exhibited a pattern of failing to provide OJT participants with continued long-term employment with wages, benefits and conditions equal to those provided regular employees similarly situated. The local SDCC also will determine the suitability of any employer for an OJT agreement on an individual basis. Consideration will be given to the training need of the worker, the benefit to the worker, the skill sets to be learned, earnings and benefits, and a commitment of long-term employment.

5. Reallocation policies.
As South Dakota is a single service delivery area state, a reallocation policy is not necessary. Obligation and expenditure requirements must be met at the State level. At the end of each program year, any remaining local funds are de-obligated back to the

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state to be carry over and reallocated to local service provider (SDCC-CLC-Alt School) for the next year.

6. State policies for approving local requests for authority to transfer funds between the Adult and Dislocated Worker funding streams at the local level.
As South Dakota is a single service delivery area state, fund transfer between the WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker program will take place at the state level. The SDDOL will approve any transfer of funds between funding streams. Through this plan, the state is requesting a waiver to the 20 percent transfer limitation. The state is requesting authority to increase the amount of transfer up to 100 percent of available funds between the WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs. See rationale for transfer on page 112.

7. Policies related to displaced homemakers, nontraditional training for lowincome individuals, older workers, disabled individuals and others will multiple barriers to employment and training.
It is South Dakota’s intention to adhere to all laws and requirements pertaining to discrimination and equal opportunities. Refer to the Certifications and Assurances. An individual customer driven approach is available to all individuals through the State’s network of SDCCs. An initial assessment of skills, aptitudes, abilities and support needs will guide customers to selection of appropriate services. SDCC staff will assist and refer eligible individuals for intensive and training services. This approach will be used to determine the needs of all workers regardless of their distinct situation. Customers are empowered to work through their identified barriers to achieve employment and career advancement.

8. South Dakota’s definition regarding the sixth youth eligibility criterion at section 101(13(C)(iv).
It has been the experience statewide that many youth “in need” of education, training, or employment typically have multiple barriers impacting their lives. Good programming encourages the youth to identify all the barriers and assists in developing skills to appropriately deal with each barrier or even overcome the barrier. For some youth, being a single young parent or a youth in foster care does not mean they do not have a great support system and the skills to compete high school and advanced training needed for holding a good job. But for others with some of the recognized WIA barriers, it is the related implications associated with the barriers that fall into the sixth barrier that the programming must be prepared to address. Issues around food, shelter, appropriate hygiene and clothing, appropriate communications, transportation, daycare, are just a few of the issues impacting the lives of the youth providers serve. The South Dakota data management system not only documents the barriers, but allows for the providers to record the activities completed with the youth in learning how to deal

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with or overcome the barrier. Youth associated with the WIA program are often very transient and cycle in and out of systems. The notes in the data management system allows for providers statewide to see what the youth has been dealing with in another area.

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Service Delivery A. One-Stop Delivery Strategies 1. Strategies provided by each of the required and optional One-Stop partners will be coordinated and made available through the One-Stop system.
The partner agencies are co-located with the SDCC which maximize the coordination of the services for participants. SDDOL serves as a catalyst in reshaping talent development strategies in order to build a demand driven system. Since the onset of the One-Stop System in South Dakota the array of siloed programs was all but eliminated and a highly integrated system promoting seamless services took its place.

2. Youth formula programs.
In South Dakota, the career centers are an integrated component in the services provided by the competitive programs also. The SDCCs, as workforce experts, refer youth to faith-based, community-based agencies and/or educational training providers for in-depth services addressing the WIA recognized barriers. The SDCCs actively monitor the progress of the youth participants while engaged in the various services and programs. This process is based on the fact of the more positive role models encouraging a youth to take a positive path, the better the chances of the youth being successful. The SDCCs have been very cooperative with implementation of local programming for youth. They provide excellent guidance and partnering of services to community agencies wanting to implement youth activities. Youth involved in various WIA funded activities are also encouraged to participate in career related activities funded by other agencies both on the State and local level. Employment Representatives at the SDCCs focusing on youth, are encouraged to participate in all the State training targeting youth activities and are often the leaders of the trainings. The Employment Representatives are very good at dedicating the SDCCs’ funds for youth training between training education, work-based training, support services, etc. They are an excellent resource to their communities and the youth of South Dakota.

3. Minimum service delivery requirements.
The State mandates that each SDCC offer the services administered by the SDDOL in order to become certified as an SDCC. Those programs include WIA, Adult, Dislocated Workers, and Youth programs, Employment Services, UI, Job Corps recruitment/placement, WOTC program, VETS services, among others. Under contract with the DSS, the TANF program, and the Food Stamps Employment and Training programs aer also available at the SDCCs. Vocational Rehabilitation, Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker training, and Experience Works programs are not available at all 16 locations in the state.

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4. Tools and products to support service delivery in all SDCCs statewide.
A primary tool used by the SDCCs is SDWORKS. This tool provides both a management information system needed to administer the WIA and Employment Security programs, and also provides the platform for the Internet-based self-service website for applicant and business customers. Each SDCC has their own web page (linked to the State web page) where they can focus on local employment needs and allow localized searches of the statewide job listings.

5. Models/templates/approaches South Dakota recommends for service delivery in SDCCs.
All SDCCs have developed open areas near the entrance that are equipped with public browsers (computers) where applicants can review a real-time list of all job openings in the State at their leisure. Each SDCC has also developed an applicant Resource Center where job seekers can create his or her own resumes or use a fax machine and telephone, and may conduct a job search on a computer. Applicants can set up an email address on these computers in order to communicate with potential employers. All SDCCs have also set aside one room for testing. These rooms contain computers with programs to assess keyboarding and ten-key capabilities and the CHOICES interest/aptitude assessment. Business Outreach plans in each center include a Business Resource Center in each location. These centers contain computers and helpful software videos and publications for new and expanding businesses. These Business Resource rooms are also used to conduct interviews and as temporary operations offices for startup businesses.

B. Workforce Information
The overarching state strategies for workforce development in South Dakota include (1) increase participation by businesses, employees and individuals in the statewide workforce system, (2) identifying industries and occupations that are high growth-high demand and vital to the State economy, (3) assist with the implementation of Governor Rounds’ 2010 Initiative, (4) promote collaboration between the public workforce system, education, human services, juvenile justice and other agencies to better serve in-need youth with barriers to employment, and (5) identify and change State laws, policies and regulations that impede the achievement of workforce development goals. Workforce information will be an integral part of those strategies.

1. Description of how South Dakota will integrate workforce information into its planning and decision making.
South Dakota will integrate workforce information into its planning and decision making at the state level in several ways. This integration is made much easier by the fact there is a ready-made conduit to move the workforce information from the employment statistics agency to the WIA agency and to Statewide Workforce Development Council. Both the employment statistics agency and the WIA agency are located within the SDDOL. The LMIC is the employment statistics agency that produces the workforce information core products and services in the State. The WIA staff and the LMIC staff meet monthly to discuss workforce information concerns and issues. WIA staff are

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updated on new products and services produced by the LMIC. In turn, the WIA Administrator and his staff work with LMIC to develop products and services that may be needed. Annually, the SDWDC will meet with LMIC staff to review the core products and services to be produced and provide input to them on workforce information needs. SDWDC meetings provide a forum for the discussion of local issues and provide a venue for businesses, government agencies and individuals to provide input on their needs. As new products are developed, LMIC staff will attend the SDWDC and local board meetings to make presentations on the new products. These meetings provide excellent opportunities to identify workforce information that should be integrated into the workforce information system plans. The SDCC managers are members of the local boards and relay customer needs to the State board through the WIA Administrator. Expanded workforce information is the foundation for strategic planning and career guidance. Through the SDDOL, LMIC workforce information is readily accessible by state government as well as regional business leaders, economic development agencies, educational institutions, and the general public. LMIC is constantly gathering and analyzing workforce and economic data to assist the state and regional economies planning efforts for growth opportunities. Timely and accurate workforce information is critical to guide and support decisions by regional and state leaders. Such information is a valuable tool for educators, counselors, students, parents, job seekers, workers, and local business concerns. This information is widely accessible by the public through the SDDOL web site. This can and does serve as the basis for empowering our customers in career planning and lifelong learning so essential to today’s global economy.

2. Description of the approach South Dakota will use to disseminate accurate and timely workforce information to businesses, job seekers, and employment counselors.
South Dakota will utilize various methods to deliver workforce information to each of the three principal customer groups. First, the LMIC will provide core products and services directly to customers, such as businesses, schools, teachers, counselors, workforce professionals, individuals, etc. The workforce information is provided either in a hardcopy format, through an electronic information delivery system on the LMIC website, or through presentations/training sessions. Customers contact the LMIC directly with information requests or to request publications they produce. When publications are completed, they are sent to businesses who have requested them. Workforce information is also delivered to customers through the LMIC website. Most of the hard copy publications are also available on the LMIC website in either pdf format or html files. Economic indicators and trend information can be found on the LMIC website from interactive databases or html files. The great thing about the electronic distribution of workforce information is that even residents in remote rural locations can access it. In addition to the hardcopy publications and electronic information dissemination, LMIC presentations to business groups are used to provide workforce information to

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employers. Businesses contact the LMIC directly or through the SDCCs with requests for information. LMIC professionals deliver workforce information through presentations at conferences, training sessions for workforce professionals, other State agencies, local economic development groups, local boards, and local human resources groups. Workforce information is also provided to SDCC customers through the resource centers at the offices and through one-on-one meetings with customers. In addition to the workforce information core products and services developed by the LMIC, the State is able to provide other types of information to residents. The LMIC is an affiliate of the State Data Center and provides Census information free-of-charge to customers.

3. Description of how South Dakota’s Workforce Information Core Products and Services Plan is aligned with the WIA State Plan to ensure the investments in core products and services support the State’s overall strategic direction for workforce investment.
The workforce information core products and services will be used to identify industries and occupations that are high growth-high demand and vital to the State economy. South Dakota LMIC staff will produce and disseminate State and sub-state industry and occupational projections, using the methodology, software tools, and guidelines developed by the Projections Workgroup and the Projections Managing Partnership. The LMIC will produce statewide and sub-state long-term industry and occupational projections. They will provide sub-state projections for the Sioux Falls MSA, the Rapid City MSA and three Balance of State areas. The LMIC will also work on developing statewide short-term industry and occupational forecasts. From the long-term industry and occupational projections, workforce information about emerging industries and occupations can be produced. In addition, job trends and job opportunities can be estimated. The LMIC will use annual openings data from projections to determine occupational demand for workers. The demand information can be used to determine the specific skills and educational competencies needed for a future workforce that will meet the needs of new and expanding businesses. The long-term occupational projections provide demand information that is needed to determine if additional training programs are needed or if training programs should be continued. This is a very important part of the training goals of WIA and workforce development in South Dakota. The demand information will be distributed to students and adults in career magazines and Internet applications. The short-term occupational forecasts can be used by workforce development boards, workforce development staff and educational planners to determine the types of shortterm training programs needed to meet the needs of businesses in the State. The shortterm occupational forecasts will be used to answer questions related to the need for short-term training and demand for workers in occupations that do not require postsecondary education or training.

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Since training is such an important part of workforce development, good information about training and educational outcomes is critical. The SDDOL cooperates with other public agencies to gather information about training and educational program graduates. This cooperative effort is called the South Dakota Follow-up Project. The LMIC has responsibility for the South Dakota Follow-up Project, which includes gathering and reporting job placement by program and institution for public post-secondary education, adult education and WIA training programs. Wage records are used to identify where graduates and completers have found work. South Dakota employers are sent a survey and asked to provide a job title, a start date, starting pay, current pay, work location and benefits provided to the worker. The Follow-up Project placement data has been used to determine job placement and placement wage standards for WIA programs. Information about training and educational job placements is distributed through the LMIC training provider and program performance system. The training provider and program performance application is the most comprehensive source of training programs in the State. The training provider and program performance application has three purposes. The primary purpose of the training provider and program performance system is to provide a procedure for the certification of WIA training providers. This purpose meets a program operations need and the third meets an analysis need of the workforce development system. Educational institutions and training providers go into the application and add, delete or maintain information about themselves and their programs. The onus is on them to keep the data current. Each new or changed provider and/or program is reviewed by LMIC staff before it is approved for publication on the site. The second purpose is to provide a comprehensive list of training providers and programs to students and adults making decisions about educational and training programs. The information on the site includes training provider name, program name, location, program length, program costs, tuition costs, percent of graduates finding jobs, and placement wages. WIA certified providers and programs are indicated. A majority of the program performance data will come from the South Dakota Follow-up Project. The third purpose is to provide information about both public and private training providers. This comprehensive list of training providers is also very important for analyzing the need for new or additional training programs in the State. The economic indicators and trend information produced by the LMIC website can be used to measure the impact of industries on the overall economy. Industry distribution and trends are available for nonfarm wage and salaried workers and workers covered by UI. One of the workforce information core products that align workforce information with the workforce development strategic plan will be the Community Labor Profiles website application. A key part of the 2010 Initiative is economic development and stabilizing rural communities. Businesses need to know there will be adequate labor to staff new and expanding companies. To meet the need for labor supply information, the LMIC will provide Community Labor Profiles for economic development groups and businesses on a request basis. Customers can either use the website application or by requesting a CLP from LMIC staff. The profiles provide information about the available labor supply by community. The web-based application makes this activity more efficient and timely.

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4. Description of how State workforce information products and tools are coordinated with the national electronic workforce information tools.
The national electronic workforce information tools will be integrated into the State workforce information products and tools. The LMIC has integrated those tools into several of their products and tools. Their website has links to many related websites, including national electronic workforce information tools such as America’s Career Information Network and Career Voyages. The Career InSite website application has incorporated information from the O*NET Online application. Career InSite users can click on an occupation and then go to the O*NET application for skills information. Career InSite is designed to provide career information to student and adult career decision-makers. It is used by students, teacher, counselors and adults.

C. Adults and Dislocated Workers 1. Core Services a. Description of South Dakota’s strategies and policies to ensure adults and dislocated workers have universal access to the minimum required core services as described in Sec. 134(d)(2).
The SDDOL is committed to providing core services for job seekers. This commitment is realized through the State’s network of SDCCs. These offices have co-located all SDDOL employment and training programs, including Wagner-Peyser, UI, WIA, as well as other key employment programs. This single point of contact for job seekers ensures adults and dislocated workers have access to all appropriate services, including core services. South Dakota truly has a one-stop approach to the delivery of SDDOL employment and training services. Core services are accessible to the public through the network of SDCC offices. Information on core services is also available electronically through the department’s website. The use of the Internet has expanded the delivery of core services immensely. The website is user friendly with links to many related sites. The SDCCs are part of the State’s Rapid Response team. This allows for the provision of core services to workers facing layoff. This is an integral component of a successful response to worker dislocations.

b. Description of how South Dakota will ensure the three tiered service delivery strategy for labor exchange services for job seekers and employers authorized by the Wagner Peyser Act includes (1) self service (2) facilitated self help service and (3) staff assisted service, and is accessible and available to all customers at the local level.
South Dakota delivers basic labor exchange services through the network of SDCCs. Job seekers will have access to self service, facilitated self help service, and staff assisted service. Job seekers will be able to access initial assessment, job referral, job search assistance, self help resource rooms, and labor market information. Employers

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will be assisted with recruiting services, and technical information on a variety of regulatory topics. The use of technology has greatly expanded access to services. Each SDCC has staff trained to meet the needs of our customers. The State will ensure that services will be made available on an equitable basis to all individuals. Appropriate accommodations to provide accessibility to self-help, facilitated self-help, and staff assisted services will be made as necessary to allow individuals full access to service through the One-Stop system.

c. Description of how South Dakota will integrate resources provided under the Wagner Peyser Act and WIA title I for adults and dislocated workers as well as resources provided by required One Stop partner programs, to deliver core services.
Key partners of the One-Stop system include all SDDOL entities operating under a single administrative structure. As such, the provision of core services with the integration of resources is easily accommodated. These entities include WagnerPeyser, WIA, UI, Veterans Employment and Training, as well as contracted services for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, and Food Stamps Employment and Training. Allocations to the State will be used to support the delivery of core services which include workforce skills and lifelong learning activities.

2. Intensive Services
The State has assigned the statewide network of SDCCs as the primary delivery agent for the provision of intensive services. The SDCCs are the single point of contact for job seekers for all employment services through the SDDOL. These centers with staff from Wagner-Peyser, UI, and WIA are quick to identify adults and dislocated workers who may have a need for services beyond core level services which include workforce skills and lifelong learning activities.

3. Training Services a. Description of the Governor’s vision for increasing training access and opportunities for individuals including the investment of WIA funds and the leveraging of other funds and resources.
The Governor has led the State in the expansion of education and training opportunities for the citizens. The State has focused on working with the business community and postsecondary education to broaden opportunities for developing a well educated and trained workforce. Building on the Governor’s 2010 Initiative, the state is embracing partnerships among private sector business, local entities, and various state agencies to improve the quality and strength of local and regional economies. This envisions a true working relationship that mobilizes the state’s workforce investment system, civic, business, investor, education, government, entrepreneurial, and philanthropic organizations. This is consistent with the administrations goal to expand employment and advancement opportunities and catalyze the creation of high-skill and high-wage opportunities for the economy.

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Several initiatives have been set by the Governor. One of the most successful efforts is Dakota Corps. This program is designed to encourage individuals to obtain a postsecondary education, to remain in the State on completion of the training, and to contribute to the State by working in a critical need occupation. The Great Plains Education Foundation, created by the Governor, is directed to promote and aid education in South Dakota. This foundation coordinates the Dakota Corps Program with the assistance of Education Assistance Corporation. Resources for this initiative come from a true partnership of the private business sector, non-profit corporations, the Governors office, and the SDDOL. The Dakota Corps Scholarship Board, a board appointed by the Governor, selects scholarship recipients.

b. Individual Training Accounts: i. South Dakota has provided policy direction for ITA’s.
Training services authorized under this plan shall be through the use of individual training accounts (ITA) provided to eligible individuals by the SDCCs. The ITA is established by a SDCC on behalf of an eligible individual. ITAs are funded with adult and dislocated worker funds authorized under title I of WIA. Individuals may use ITAs in exchange for training services for skills in demand occupations from training providers on the approved list of eligible training providers. ITAs place training resources in the hands of the consumer. To be considered eligible for an ITA individuals must have received at least one intensive service and have been determined to have a need for training. This determination will be based on an interview, an evaluation and assessment process, and case management. A list of eligible training providers is published by the SDDOL. Consumer information about eligible training providers will be made available to all training seekers through the SDDOL website and the SDCC system. Individuals with disabilities will have full access to this information. The State will ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communications with others. Appropriate auxiliary aids or services, where necessary, will be made available to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate and enjoy the benefits of the State’s Individual Training Accounts. The ITA policy and management process is included in the operations manual for local delivery staff. This policy includes: • • • • How participants will receive assessment, counseling, and an individual development plan through intensive services prior to issuance of an ITA. How participants will learn of the demand occupations or skills for which an ITA may be issued and how exceptions to the list will be handled. How the ITA policy will be communicated in simple, understandable language to customers of the SDCC. How the participant will have access to the list of eligible providers.

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Whether the ITA covers books, fees, and other education materials in addition to tuition. How the value of each ITA will be determined; if there will be a cap on value. A process documenting how other sources of funding were sought (e.g., Pell grants, other programs at the SDCC). The internal procedure for issuing and processing an approved ITA. The process for tracking expenditures of all resources paying for the individual's training, including WIA funds. How the participant will be kept informed of the status of the ITA. The method for disbursement of funds. Only training providers that are WIA approved providers are able to redeem an ITA for payment.

The foundation of a successful training program is built on customer choice. Participants, prior to approval of training services, will receive an assessment, counseling, and development of an individual employment plan through intensive services. Participants will be provided assistance in an exploration of the labor market and demand occupations. The customer, taking full advantage of intensive services and consumer report information will have a sound basis for good decision making in selecting the most appropriate training provider. The SDDOL will widely disseminate WIA program, participant, and cost information. This data results in an accountability that will be used as a basis for continuing certification of training providers. The data also provides participants with dependable facts in making well-informed decisions as to the most appropriate provider of training. A market driven system will ultimately produce better training and greater participant success in the labor market, which will be reflected in local performance.

ii. Description of innovative training strategies used by South Dakota to fill skills gaps.
Successful training programs meet the needs of business and industry. The State strives to identify the current skills need and to project future needed skills. This can only be accomplished with a partnership among business, education, State and local economic development, and the SDDOL. The department’s division of LMIC has the lead in the endeavor. LMIC has established close connections with education, business, and industry. This partnership identifies the skills necessary for today’s and tomorrow’s labor force. LMIC disseminates this information to the public and through the network of SDCCs. This information becomes a most useful tool for WIA case managers as they assist job seekers with designing employment and training plans. The use of an ITA is predicated on consumer choice. However, it is the responsibility of WIA to provide the consumer with the best available information that can be used to establish a successful employment plan and choice of training programs. By using LMIC data in addition to other intensive services the job seeker can seek training for the skills that will lead to gainful and suitable employment that meets their need and that of business and industry.

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iii. Discussion of South Dakota’s plan for committing all or part of WIA Title I funds to training opportunities in high growth high demand, and economically vital occupations.
The State is committed to assisting eligible individuals to prepare for occupations in high growth, high demand, and economically vital occupations. These sectors provide the best opportunity for stable employment with greater potential for higher earnings and advancement within the specific occupation. WIA funds are utilized to further this commitment, including statewide as well as adult and dislocated worker resources. The most prominent use of statewide funds, for this discussion, is support for the Governors Dakota Corps initiative. This is an effort to expand opportunities for individuals to access training that responds to the needs of high growth, high demand and economically vital occupations. The use of WIA adult and dislocated worker funds is predicated on the individual need of the participant. Through comprehensive intensive services participants are able to make well informed decisions as to setting an occupational goal. The emphasis of the WIA program is to encourage individuals to move into the high growth high demand occupations. However, for some individuals other career directions may be most appropriate. As such, the State does not set aside adult or dislocated worker funds specifically for particular occupations.

iv. Description of South Dakota’s policy for limiting ITAs.
SDWDC has established the framework for the use of an ITA. Eligible individuals may utilize their ITA for training programs that are certified by WIA. Approved programs must reasonably be able to be completed within two years or less. An ITA is limited to a maximum of $3,000 per school year. Individuals must apply for all appropriate financial aids which will be coordinated with the ITA to avoid duplication of payment. An ITA may be revoked for specific reasons as approved by the SDWDC, such as the participant failing to make satisfactory progress.

v. Description of South Dakota’s current or planned use of WIA Title I funds for the provision of training through apprenticeship.
South Dakota has established productive linkages with the USDOL BAT programs. This connection is enhanced with the use of WIA funds. SDWDC has authorized the use adult and dislocated funds to assist eligible individuals and employers with apprenticeship programs. Working with the BAT State director, the SDDOL is coordinating WIA funds with apprenticeship employers to provide the required job related instruction, and if appropriate with limited on-the-job training.

vi. State policies identified that were developed in response to changes to WIA regulations that permit the use of WIA Title I financial assistance to employ or train participants in religious activities when the assistance is provided indirectly.
The State will fully comply with WIA regulations concerning financial assistance to employ or train participants.

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c. Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). Description of South Dakota’s process for providing broad customer access to the statewide list of eligible training providers and their performance information including at every SDCC.
The SDDOL has published program, performance, and cost information of each program receiving WIA eligibility certification. The State’s consumer report system is beneficial to the customer in their decision making. This information identifies approved programs and includes cost and performance data. This information is widely disseminated throughout the South Dakota network of SDCCs and other public venues. The State has prominently included the ETPL in the SDDOL website. The provider listing is available in the resource room of each SDCC. The State has informed all partner entities of the availability of the ETPL. School counselors and administrators have been provided information on the ETPL and the website.

d. On-the-job training (OJT) and Customized Training i. Description of the Governors vision for increasing training opportunities to individuals through the specific delivery vehicles of OJT and Customized Training.
The State is committed to establishing education and training resources that provide South Dakota with a well trained and highly skilled workforce. Customized training and on-the-job training have been identified as successful methodologies that result in such skills development. These training programs are widely promoted to the business community as well as job seekers. An increased rate of success results when a training program is tailored to a specific need of a particular business. This success is beneficial to the business as well as the participants in the training program. The States’ approach is to promote OJT and customized training to both employers and job seekers as a viable means of building needed skills.

ii. Description of how South Dakota: • • • • • Identifies OJT and customized training opportunities; Markets OJT and customized training as an incentive to untapped employer pools including new business to the State, employer groups; Partners with high growth high demand industries and economically vital industries to develop potential OJT and customized training strategies; Taps business partners to help drive the demand driven strategy through joint planning, competency and curriculum development; and determining appropriate lengths of training; and Leverages other resources through education, economic development and industry associations to support OJT and customized training ventures.

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In keeping with the State’s commitment to a developing a well trained and highly skilled workforce, the effort to promote OJT and customized training is continuous. A key component of the Governor’s “2010 Initiative” centers on education and training. The Governor makes special effort to bring this awareness to business and industry groups. The primary resource for identifying OJT and customized training opportunities is through the State’s network of SDCCs. These centers are charged with the responsibility of maintaining contact with area business and industry in order to meet local employment needs. SDCCs have developed local business outreach plans as a framework to promote and expand SDDOL services to benefit the community. These plans are specific to the local business community. An integral component is the dissemination of information on the availability of services such as OJT and Customized Training. This information is available through Business Resource Rooms at the SDCC, on the Internet at the SDDOL website, in-person employer visits, and advertisements in local media. SDCC managers and select staff are members of various local community organizations. These include Chambers of Commerce, local economic development entities, local industry and business associations, human resource organizations, and many more. This allows for immediate and personal contact with the business leaders to promote SDDOL programs and services. In addition to local efforts, the State continually promotes such service with statewide organizations. These include manufacturing associations, contractors associations, business groups, USDOL Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, GOED, and many others. A key element of marketing is the coordination of effort. SDDOL is represented on the review committee of the GOED. This committee evaluates the need for training for new or expanding businesses in the State and recommends appropriate strategies. This allows OJT and Customized training to be an integral part of the State’s marketing of training programs. SDDOL utilizes data from the State’s LMIC to identify high growth demand industries and economically vital industries. This provides the starting point for partnering with this particular sector of the business community for the development and implementation of appropriate training strategies. The coordination of effort as described in the previous question provides the mechanism for the establishment of successful partnerships. Included in these partnerships are the GOED, local development groups, industry and business associations, local training providers, as well as SDDOL and local SDCCs. Successful training strategies require the involvement of business. This connection is essential for planning and development of programs that meet the need of the business community and program participants.

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This partnership begins at the State level. The SDWDC, comprised of private sector business professionals, is the cornerstone for this partnership. The SDWDC provides the guidance for planning and development of appropriate training strategies, including the length of training. The SDWDC engages other entities such as the GOED, local development groups, industry and business associations to further enhance the partnership with business.

4. Service to Specific Populations a. State’s strategies to ensure the full range of employment and training programs and services delivered are accessible to and will meet the needs of all individuals, including dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, low-income individuals such as migrants and seasonal farm workers, women, minorities, individuals training for non-traditional employment, veterans, public assistance recipients and individuals with multiple barriers to employment.
The State of South Dakota acts to include members of varying demographic groups in its SDDOL and WIA Title I-financially assisted programs and/or activities through universal access principles in accordance with 29 CFR Part 37. The SDDOL is committed to ensuring that all citizens of South Dakota benefit from opportunities available in any and all programs administered by the department. The State, through the network of SDCCs, has developed a system that is customer oriented and makes maximum use of current technology to reach the greatest number of customers. Employers and job seekers have direct access through Internet technology or personal contact with SDCC staff to assist in the employment and training process. With the help of a USDOL One-Stop Implementation Grant, South Dakota has made considerable strides in utilizing technology to link related workforce services and bring them closer to the public. A broad range of information is currently available to customers through Internet access located on the SDDOL Internet homepage at www.sdjobs.org. Job seekers have ready access to labor market information, employment opportunities, UI, employment guidance and counseling, training, as well as a single point of contact for employment and training information. The SDCC system is able to access the expertise of partner entities such as education, rehabilitation, economic development, social services and others as may be appropriate to make referrals to SDDOL programs and services. Through collaborative efforts with these partner entities, SDDOL will continue to broaden the composition of the pool of individuals considered for participation and employment. SDDOL looks for such efforts to be directed at including members of both sexes, of the various racial and ethnic groups and of various age groups, as well as individuals with disabilities and Limited English Proficient (LEP) persons. Adult Education and Literacy has developed four levels of employment readiness which match language competencies in our English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Competencies are attached. The EO Officer works with the SDDOL State staff, the SDDOL Public Information Officer, local SDCC managers, CLC directors and other WIA service providers to ensure that all

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segments of the population are aware and informed of the programs and activities available under WIA. This includes providing information to various agencies and organizations for the promotion of SDDOL programs and activities; providing press releases to appropriate news media throughout the State on the availability of SDDOL programs and activities; and conducting outreach efforts throughout the State to inform and recruit participation. SDDOL encourages recipients to develop written policies and procedures for assisted core, intensive, and training services. These policies and procedures are based on analysis of employer and job-seeker needs and analysis of adequacy of resources, from all local funds. In general, the criteria includes the availability of other funds for providing SDDOL and WIA type services in the local community and the needs of the specific groups within the local area. Recipients must develop maximum outreach to all entities in need of core services. The SDDOL has established guidelines that give priority for intensive and training services to the recipients of public assistance and other lowincome individuals and, if sufficient funds are available, also serves other individuals who meet eligibility requirements and/or priority of service guidelines. If sufficient funds are available, the outreach efforts for adults receiving WIA intensive and training services are extended to those individuals who are under-employed. Recipients’ strategic and operation plans outline how they will improve universal access for all populations. Specifically, these plans include how efforts, including outreach, to broaden the composition of the pool of those considered for participation or employment in SDDOL and/or WIA Title I-financially assisted programs and/or activities are extended to include members of both sexes, the various racial/ethnic and age groups, and persons with disabilities. To ensure that training and placement services are provided, recipients’ plans include how to: • • • • Identify and address barriers to participation; Inform customers of nontraditional career options; Identify and refer individuals to supportive services depending on individual need; and Assess aptitude for the required skills to compete for in-demand jobs.

Recipients will seek assistance from state-level program staff in the development of recruitment strategies, marketing efforts, and outreach plans that include at least two aspects: • • Identification of the populations to be served including members of both sexes, the various racial/ethnic and age groups, and persons with disabilities; and Development of strategies to involve the various resources, seeking, when appropriate, assistance from community based organizations and advocacy groups.

The stream of multiple funds and multiple partners and the continued improvement of recipients’ outreach efforts for universal access will provide the broadest possible menu for access to all job seekers, including those with special needs, such as: • • Public assistance recipients; Migrant and seasonal farm workers;

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Women and minorities; Older individuals; Individuals training for nontraditional employment; Veterans; Low income adult learners who are educationally disadvantaged; Limited English proficient persons; Individuals with disabilities; Displaced homemakers and single-mothers (parents); Individuals with multiple barriers to educational enhancement; Offenders in correctional institutions; and Underemployed individuals.

To ensure recruitment services are provided on an equitable basis to all individuals including those with disabilities, appropriate accommodations to provide accessibility to self-help, facilitated self-help, and staff assisted services are made as necessary to allow individuals full access to SDDOL services. Program staff will work with all appropriate SDCC partners and other entities, as appropriate, in providing services for eligible individuals. Special efforts will be made to coordinate services with other partner agencies to assist the SDDOL in ensuring that communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communications with others. For those individuals needing interpreter services, contracts with community-based service providers are established. Interpreters for the deaf are available to assist in the delivery of services to customers with hearing impairments. For brochures and other materials that contain a telephone number, the SDDOL provides a Voice/TTY number or relay service used by the recipient for communication with individuals with hearing impairment. All recipients must ensure that all recruitment brochures, publications, and broadcasts include a TDD/TTY number or provide an equally effective means of communication with individuals who are hearing impaired. Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals must be able to access and participate in job training activities in a manner equally consistent and effective to that offered to non-LEP persons. Although South Dakota has a limited number of LEP individuals, SDDOL must ensure that LEP persons have access to its programs and activities on an equal basis to those who are proficient in English. The SDDOL and its grantees must take reasonable steps to ensure that such persons receive the language assistance necessary to afford them meaningful access to the programs, services, and information, free of charge. Universal access efforts include coordination with LEP community programs to identify and refer individuals who face barriers to employment and training to SDDOL programs and services. The SDDOL contracts with Language Line Services to provide over-the-phone interpretation services in the event that a local service provider is in need of immediate help with a person that speaks little or no English. Through assessment and review of available South Dakota data, Spanish is the primary language for which assistance may be needed. Front line staff who are proficient in Spanish are accessible to provide services when the need arises. Endeavors are made to identify whether a concentrated population of LEP customers exists in a specific area and if equal services are being provided to the LEP population. Service providers use existing staff whose bilingual ability is known and documented to interpret for LEP customers. If bilingual staff

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sufficient to deliver equal services to LEP customers are not available, qualified interpreters are contracted. To broaden the composition of the pool of those considered for participation and employment and to ensure that all LEP persons can also avail themselves of the services provided, SDDOL and its grantees must take reasonable steps to provide services and information to these groups. To accomplish this, recipients are asked to follow a model language assistance program that is potentially useful for all recipients, but is particularly appropriate for recipients that serve a significant and diverse LEP population. The model plan incorporates a variety of options and methods for providing meaningful access to LEP beneficiaries including: • • A formal written language assistance program reviewed annually; Identification and biennial assessment of the languages that are likely to be encountered and estimating the number of LEP persons that are eligible for services and that are likely to be affected by its program or activity through a review of census, customer utilization data and statistics from school systems, community agencies and organizations; Outreach to LEP communities, advertising program eligibility and the availability of free language assistance; Outreach to LEP communities, advertising program eligibility and the availability of free language assistance; Posting of signs in lobbies and in other waiting areas, in languages other than English, informing applicants/customers of their right to free interpreter services and inviting them to identify themselves as persons needing language assistance; Use of “I speak cards” by intake staff and other client contact personnel so that applicant/customers can identify their primary languages; Requiring the intake staff to note the language of the LEP person in his/her record so that all subsequent interaction will be conducted in the appropriate language; Employment of sufficient number of staff, bilingual in appropriate languages, in applicant and client contact positions. These persons must be qualified interpreters; Contracts with interpreting services that can provide qualified interpreters in a wide variety of languages, in a timely manner; Formal arrangements with community groups for qualified and timely interpreter services by community volunteers; An arrangement with a telephone language interpreter line; Translation of application forms, instructional, informational and other key documents into appropriate languages other than English. Oral interpretation of document for persons who speak languages not regularly encountered; Procedures for effective telephone communication between staff and LEP persons, including instructions for English-speaking employees to obtain assistance from bilingual staff or interpreters when initiating or receiving calls from LEP persons; Notice to and training of all staff, particularly applicant and client contact staff, with respect to the recipient’s Title VI, Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 37 obligation to provide language assistance to LEP persons, and on the language

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• •

• • •

assistance policies and procedures to be followed in securing such assistance in a timely manner; Insertion of notices, in appropriate languages, about the right of LEP applicants and clients to free interpreters and other language assistance, in brochures, pamphlets, manuals, and other materials disseminated to the public and to staff; Notice to the public regarding the language assistance policies and procedures, plus notice to and consultation with community organizations that serve LEP persons regarding problems and solutions, including standards and procedures for using their members as volunteer interpreters; Adoption of a procedure for the resolution of complaints regarding the provision of language assistance, and for notifying and education customers of the right to file a complaint of discrimination under Title VI, Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 37; Appointment of a senior level employee to coordinate the language assistance program and ensure that there is regular monitoring of the program; and Consideration of LEP needs when implementing new programs or activities, publishing new forms or notices, etc.

Adult Education and Literacy has developed four levels of employment readiness which match language competencies in our English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Competencies are attached. The EO Officer is responsible for monitoring all SDDOL and WIA recipients and ensuring compliance with the universal access element of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of Section 188 of the WIA and 29 CFR Part 37. The EO Officer evaluates the success of recipient efforts to broaden the composition of those considered for participation and employment in their SDDOL and/or WIA Title Ifinancially assisted programs and/or activities through review of data. SDCCs have access to the largest labor pool in the State -- more than 100,000 of which more than 12,000 are veterans seeking jobs. These veterans receive more than 65,000 various services from our veterans' representatives. Employment listings receive free national exposure through SDCC affiliation with America's Job Bank. Employers can also register and list their job openings electronically with the SDCC SDWORKS (Internet based) system from their home or office computer. WIA, as an employment and training program, will increase skills for veterans, which result in employment and an increase in earnings. The education and job training programs that WIA offers can help in overcoming employment barriers. Veterans receive priority to Adult WIA services, as defined in TEGL 5-03 and TEGL 22-04. In addition to these training programs, veterans may be able to take advantage of CLCs. These are local non-profit organizations that assist with work readiness, education programs, skill training, and employment counseling. CLCs work very closely with participants and SDCCs in designing a job-training program. South Dakota's CLCs work closely with SDCCs and the SDDOL to provide education and training services that meet the needs of local employers. In addition to services supported through the WIA, most CLCs also offer services for which they charge. These may include writing resumes, computer-training courses, providing customer training services, or providing some type of training for businesses. The CLCs work with other organizations and agencies including, Social Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Corrections, local school districts,

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state technical institutes, higher education, court services, Experience Works, AARP, mental health agencies, and local businesses. Each local SDCC provides maximum employment and training opportunities for eligible veterans and eligible persons with priority given to special disabled/disabled veterans, veterans who served on active duty during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized. Adults who qualify to work in the State of South Dakota who are limited in their Englishspeaking ability will be referred to the English as a Second Language (ESL) program for instruction in English provided by the AEL program in their area. ESL classes are useful and appropriate for LEP populations. Classes do not necessarily obviate the need to provide meaningful access for LEP persons in other programs and services that the SDCCs provide. All of the SDCCs are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with physical disabilities and meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Interpreters are utilized to provide information to individuals with limited English-speaking proficiency and sign language interpreters are available for individuals who are deaf. Written materials are available in alternative formats and languages for those with vision or reading disabilities and customers with limited English-speaking proficiency.

b. Re-employment services for unemployment insurance claimants
UI claimants that are not job attached and those identified by Worker Profiling as likely to exhaust benefits are referred to their local SDCC for reemployment services. All profiled claimants have an orientation interview to determine their need for further reemployment services. These services, depending on the need identified, may include a job search strategy workshop; job development and referrals; job counseling to determine the individual’s goals and/or barriers to employment; a formal assessment including testing; referrals to other service agencies; and referral to training programs. Claimants that are not profiling, but not job attached, are registered for employment services and offered referral to any suitable job openings. Other reemployment services are also made available, particularly the job search workshop, depending on the needs of the applicant. Reemployment services are also offered to job attached claimants in the event they wish to seek alternative employment.

c. State administered unemployment insurance work test and how feedback requirements are met.
UI claimants that are not job attached are referred to their local SDCC during the claim filing process. The work test is administered through several mechanisms. The first is that in-person reporting at the SDCC and registration for reemployment services is mandatory. A hold is placed on the claim and payments stopped if the claimant does not complete this requirement. UI services, other than initial claim filing, are also provided at every SDCC. Claimants are scheduled for in-person interviews approximately every six to eight weeks. During this interview the claimant’s continued eligibility is reviewed,

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including their compliance with the requirement of making contacts for suitable employment every week. Cases of failure to make the required work search are referred to Central Office adjudication and benefits denied as appropriate. Review of available job openings is also done during the eligibility review and instances of failure to apply or accept suitable employment also referred to Central Office adjudication for a decision on whether denial of benefit is warranted. Finally, a random verification of the claimant’s work search contacts are done during the interview.

d. Description of South Dakota’s strategy for integrating and aligning services to dislocated workers provided through the WIA rapid response, WIA dislocated worker, and Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) programs.
Services for dislocated workers are easily coordinated in South Dakota. The SDDOL, dislocated worker unit, is responsible for responding to worker dislocations. This unit is responsible for Rapid Response, WIA dislocated worker, and Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) programs. Having a single agency to administer and deliver services for eligible workers provides a consistent approach to the needs of dislocated workers throughout the State. Notices of layoff submitted to the unit will be evaluated for possible Trade Act certification. The unit will assist the company or workers in submitted petitions for TAA. The State will coordinate all available resources, including TAA and WIA, in providing reemployment services. Workers will be co-enrolled when appropriate and feasible.

e. South Dakota’s workforce investment system is working collaboratively with business and industry and the education community to develop strategies to overcome barriers to skill achievement and employment experienced by the populations listed in paragraph (a.) above to ensure they are being identified as a critical pipeline of workers.
Refer to paragraph a.

f. One-Stop Services are available to individuals with disabilities.
All SDCCs are physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities meeting standards specified in the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Alternative formats are available for individuals with visual or reading disabilities and interpreters are available upon request for individuals who are deaf.

g. Role of LVER/DVOP staff in the One-Stop Delivery System
Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) Utilization The duties of South Dakota's DVOP Specialists (South Dakota refers to this position as Veterans' Outreach Representative or VOR) are strictly adhered to in accordance with VPL 11-02 and VPL 09-03. These duties include: (as defined in VPL 11-02 and corresponding functions under Title 38) 1. Provision of intensive services;

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2. Outreach (including but not limited to Job Development); and 3. Labor Exchange services. There are no conflicts with assigned duties of VERs or other SDCC staff. Veteran job seekers are identified through intake when they enter an SDCC. The veteran is then further referred to the veterans' representative for verification, veteran status, if disabled what percentage and if service-connected, campaign badge awarded, newly separated, etc. Disabled (including special) and newly separated veterans are provided the opportunity to receive intensive services. In addition, any veteran who is having problems with vocational choice, vocational change, or job adjustment (or any other barrier) is suggested for intensive services. All chapter 31 (VR&E) veterans within 90 days of graduation are given intensive services. If a veteran is already receiving intensive services through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or WIA, we follow the veterans' progress and will aid the respective TANF/WIA program manager or representative as needed. Cross referrals between VOR, WIA, TANF, and Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) program staff is ongoing and very common. Often times, they will meet and discuss a plan for the veteran, and determine what service will best help the veteran. The program staff also compares rosters of veterans enrolled to ensure no one is overlooked. South Dakota strictly adheres to current preference policy for hiring VORs, with the following order of priority: 1. Qualified service-connected disabled veterans; 2. Qualified eligible veterans; and 3. Qualified eligible persons. A qualified VOR candidate is required to submit an application along with a certified copy of their DD214. SDDOL also asks for a copy of their VA disability form if applicable. Following the closing date for a VOR position, all applications are forwarded to the Deputy Secretary of Labor for review including review by the State Veterans' Coordinator to ensure qualification and preference policy adherence. A determination on which applicants to interview (all veterans are guaranteed the opportunity to interview) for the position is made. The position is advertised through the State's website, which lists all State job openings. It is also posted within all local SDCCs and SDWORKS for veteran job seekers. Additionally, South Dakota transmits job openings to AJB. Positions are also posted in local newspapers and VSO newsletters/bulletins. Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) Utilization The duties of South Dakota's LVERs (South Dakota refers to this position as Veterans' Employment Representative or VER) are strictly adhered to in accordance with VPL 1102 and VPL 09-03. These duties include: (as defined in VPL 11-02 and corresponding functions under Title 38) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Capacity Building of Other Service Providers; Advocacy for Veterans' Employment and Training; Employer Outreach; Labor Exchange Services; and Reporting.

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There are no conflicts with assigned duties of VORs or other SDCC staff. Each local SDCC has a designated Employment Representative (ER), who conducts regular employer outreach. The office manager of the respective office keeps record of when the last employer outreach was conducted and utilizes that record to create a regular schedule. The State Veterans' Coordinator conducts monthly audits to ensure each office is adhering to this schedule, and routinely meets with the manager to discuss what information is given regarding employing veterans. Generally the veterans' representative is included in and conducts employer visits, but when this is not feasible the ER who makes the visit presents the same material to the employer as the veterans' representative would. In other words, information regarding all services the SDCC offers is shared with the employer including veterans' services. As mentioned previously, throughout the year SDDOL routinely holds employer seminars at various locations in the State. During these seminars the SDDOL State Veterans' Coordinator speaks to employers about the services offered at our SDCCs and explains why hiring a veteran is good practice. The veterans' representative makes available to their respective office manager a quarterly Managers’ Report, per VPL 09-03. This report is in narrative form but also includes data generated from SDWORKS using Discoverer (previously mentioned). Included in this report: 1. 2. 3. 4. Number of veteran job seekers registered or re-registered; Services provided to veteran job seekers; Veteran job seekers entered employment; and Chapter 31 (VR&E) activity.

In addition to providing this report to the local SDCC manager, the State Veterans' Coordinator is also in receipt. The State Veterans' Coordinator then makes a quarterly report to the State Director of Veterans Employment and Training (DVET) and Deputy Secretary of Labor, utilizing local SDCC report information. Additional information Included in this quarterly report: 1. SDCC processes and activities; 2. Outreach activities; and 3. Any additional information significant to veterans' services activities. Employment/hiring of VER positions follow the same format, criteria and preference as the VOR position.

h. The State ensures access to services through the One-Stop delivery system by persons with limited English proficiency and will meet ETA Training requirements.
Universal Access is allotted to all individuals regardless of race, creed, color, sex, or national origin. Additionally, access is granted to LEP individuals through arrangements with various partner agencies to assist them in speaking and reading English through ESL classes and assisting the individual to the fullest extent possible through the use of interpreters and/or telephone interpretive services.

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Department of Labor regulations at 29 CFR 37, require all recipients of Federal financial assistance from USDOL to provide meaningful access to LEP persons. Federal financial assistance includes grants, training, equipment usage, donations of surplus property, and other assistance. Sub-recipients are also covered when Federal DOL funds are passed through from one recipient to a sub-recipient. The State will ensure access to services through the State’s One-stop system by persons with limited English proficiency. Oral Language Assistance Services (interpretation) will be utilized when it is needed and reasonable and in a timely manner. Written Language Services (Translation). Written materials could include: • • • • • • • • • • • • Applications to participate in a recipients program or activity or to receive recipient benefits. Written tests that do not assess English language competency but test competency for a particular license, job, or skill for which English language proficiency is not required. Consent and complaint forms. List of partners at a SDCC and services provided. Letters containing important information regarding participation in a program or activity. Notices pertaining to the reduction, denial or termination of services or benefits and of the right to appeal such actions. Notices that require a response from beneficiaries; Information on the right to file complaints of discrimination; Information on the provisions of services to individuals with disabilities; State wage and hour and safety and health enforcement and information materials. Notices advising LEP persons of availability of free language assistance; and Other outreach materials.

The State will develop a new employment representative training to effectively plan for language assistance for LEP persons. 1. Identify LEP Individuals who need language assistance and the frequency of encounters. 2. Language assistance measures which includes how to obtain types of language services, how to respond to LEP callers, how to respond to written communication from LEP, how to respond to in-person contact and how to insure competency of interpreters. 3. Training staff – staff should know their obligations to provide meaningful access to information and services for LEP 4. Providing Notice to LEP persons of language services available. This may include posting signs in intake areas and other entry points. When language assistance is needed to ensure meaningful access to information and services, it is important to provide notice in appropriate languages at initial points of contact. 5. Monitoring and Updating the LEP plan will include determining, on an ongoing basis, whether new documents, programs, services and activities need to be

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made accessible for LEP individuals, and provide notice of any changes in services to the LEP public and to employees.

i. State’s strategies to enhance and integrate service delivery for migrant and seasonal far workers and agricultural employers.
Attention and effort will be given to specific groups of workers. This includes migrants and seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) and the agricultural community serving the MSFWs. Workers will be able to access statewide employment and training programs or locally delivered programs as appropriate to their specific situation. Local delivery of core, intensive and training services is conducted through the SDCCs. Statewide activities, as approved by the Governor, will be made available within the guidelines established under WIA. The State’s program staff will work with all appropriate SDCC partners and other entities, as appropriate, in providing employment and training services for eligible individuals. SDCCs provide the full range of employment and training services to MSFWs. All staff is trained to insure that MSFWs receive equity of service. South Dakota is not a "supply state" nor does it have "significant MSFW offices." Compliance with 20 CFR 653.107 is assured through monitoring by local office managers and through reviews of the planning and technical assistance staff. Services to agricultural employers and agricultural workers will be provided by local SDCC staff and the State Monitor Advocate. Services to the employers will include the placement of job orders and assistance in the recruitment of workers through the intrastate and interstate system. Information and technical assistance will be provided to employers concerning recruitment procedures, protection of workers, employment issues and regulatory changes affecting their business. Services to MSFWs will be provided by local SDCC staff and the State Monitor Advocate. Services will include outreach to identify and inform MSFWs of services, benefits, and protection provided under State and Federal regulations. The Monitor Advocate will be responsible for coordinating with South Dakota Labor and Management and the WIA 167 grantee. The Monitor Advocate, working in close cooperation with these agencies, will ensure that worker complaints are handled correctly, and to see that compliance is being met regarding suitable working conditions, housing standards, and transportation of MSFWs. Additionally, the State Monitor Advocate has, through a MOU with the WIA 167 grantee, negotiated the 167’s assistance in performing outreach duties in South Dakota. It is estimated that there are approximately 75-100 individuals in South Dakota that meet the USDOL definition of an MSFW. Because these individuals are usually passing through the State and/or have already obtained permanent employment, it is necessary to incorporate the use of an outside agency to assist the Monitor Advocate in performing outreach. WIA 167 staff has access to job listings and registration information supplied by the SDCC System to perform these additional duties.

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5. Priority of Service a. Description of procedures and criteria in place under 20 CFR 663.600 for the Governor and appropriate local boards to direct One-Stop operators to give priority of service to public assistance recipients and other low-income individuals for intensive and training services if funds allocated to a local area for adult employment and training activities are determined to be limited.
South Dakota is a single statewide local area operating under the auspices of the State board. The SDWDC shall determine whether funds allocated for adult employment and training activities are limited. Priority among the recipients of training services shall be established in compliance with WIA requirements. In the event the SDWDC determines funds are limited, priority shall be given to recipients of public assistance and other lowincome individuals for intensive and training services. This policy does not apply to dislocated workers. The SDWDC may administer the priority so as not to preclude providing intensive and training services to other individuals. A process for determining eligibility for “other individuals” receiving services will be based on a substantiated need and documentation of employment barriers.

b. South Dakota’s policies and strategies pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act
The WIA as an employment and training program will increase skills for veterans, which result in employment and an increase in earnings. The education and job training programs that WIA offers can help in overcoming employment barriers. Veterans receive priority to Adult WIA services, as defined in TEGL 5-03 and TEGL 22-04. A cooperative agreement between SDDOL and VA Medical and Regional Office is in place, which was revised March 15, 2004. The general objective is being successful in the readjustment of veterans into civilian life. This would include active cooperation and coordination in implementation of programs serving veterans, and providing priority. The ultimate goal is successful vocational rehabilitation, job placement, adjustment to employment, and retention. A MOU between Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) and SDDOL SDCCs is also in place. This MOU, in general, ensures a VOR and/or VER will provide all veterans maximum access to SDCCs and priority of services they provide. These services include but are not limited to: 1. Intake, assessment, and registration. 2. Mediated and non-mediated services in placement, development of jobs and job training opportunities. 3. Availability of contact with VOR/VER in outreach stations (i.e. Vets Centers, and other VA facilities…). 4. Federal Contractor Program and Veterans preference for Federal jobs. 5. Intensive services for targeted veterans (disabled, newly separated, etc.).

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D. Rapid Response 1. Identification of the entity responsible for providing Rapid Response services.
Rapid Response activities are the responsibility of the State. South Dakota is a single statewide service area with the SDWDC serving as both the State and local board. The SDDOL’s Dislocated Worker Unit is charged with providing Rapid Response services. Rapid Response services are coordinated locally through the State’s network of SDCCs. As layoff notices are received, the Dislocated Worker Unit implements an appropriate response. The State coordinates this effort with local elected officials and other community leaders as appropriate.

2. Description of the process involved in carrying out Rapid Response activities. a. Methods involved in receiving notice of impending layoffs (include WARN Act notice as well as other sources).
The State’s dislocated worker unit is the designated entity for receiving WARN Act notices of impending layoffs. On receipt of a WARN notice, contact is made with company officials and the local SDCC manager. This initial contact provides information specific to the situation which is used to determine the extent of the State’s response. Arrangements are then made to implement an appropriate response to the notice. The dislocated worker unit also receives non-WARN related notices of layoff. Often, these notices are given by local SDCC managers as they learn of layoff events in their community. The process followed for these notices is the same as for those under WARN. Contact is made with the company and arrangements are made to implement an appropriate response. An appropriate response, under WARN or otherwise, is based on the significance of the layoff to the community and the workers. The dislocated worker unit teams with the local SDCC, the company, and worker’s representatives to design a response that will be effective for the specific situation.

b. Efforts the Rapid Response team makes to ensure that Rapid Response services are provided, whenever possible, prior to layoff date, onsite at the company, and on company time.
The most effective response to a layoff is implemented prior to the actual layoff date and with the cooperation of the company. Arranging informational meetings, on-site and on company time, can reduce much of the tension and anxiety for both workers and company officials. This concept is promoted to business and industry by local SDCCs and the State’s dislocated worker unit. This effort includes presentations to business and industry groups, SDCC membership and active participation in Human Resource associations, and individual contacts with employers. Program services, including Rapid Response

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services, are included in statewide and local material directed to the business community. Contact with company officials, on receipt of notice of layoff, includes a discussion of the benefit of an on-site response on company time and prior to the layoff. This response effort is encouraged by the dislocated worker unit. However, some situations require an alternative to the preferred response. When this is the case, the dislocated worker unit works with the local SDCC to make appropriate arrangements.

c. Services included in Rapid Response activities.
The SDDOL dislocated worker unit is responsible for implementation of all Rapid Response functions. Other SDDOL technical staff will assist as needed. This includes staff with expertise in UI, training, placement and labor market information. Local SDCCs are involved in all Rapid Response efforts within their service area. The State’s dislocated worker unit is responsible for the delivery of WIA and TAA programs. The unit will work with the company and workers to determine if the layoff may be a Trade impacted situation. The unit will assist the company and workers with the TAA petition process. The functions of the Rapid Response team include but are not limited to: • • • • • • Establishing on site contact with employer and employee representatives to provide information concerning the availability and access of public programs and services; Promoting labor/management committees where appropriate; Collection of information concerning the dislocation, available resources for the affected workers, and survey of the employment and training needs of the workers; Providing or obtaining financial and technical advice and serving as a liaison with other organizations; Dissemination of information on the availability of services; and Assisting the local community in developing a response to the dislocation.

Rapid Response efforts are unique and designed for the specific situation. A basic response provides a general informational service which includes a survey of worker needs. The team utilizes worker surveys, discussions with company officials, local government officials, and the local SDCC to evaluate the impact of the layoff. The findings from the evaluation direct the specific response. Services are arranged to meet the needs of the affected workers. Pre-layoff services are designed to assist workers prepare for transition to other suitable employment. This may include individual and/or group activities such as a job search workshop, financial planning during a period of unemployment, or stress management. Such intervention ensures the dislocated worker, including those with multiple barriers, will have access to all appropriate services as early as possible.

3. South Dakota ensures a seamless transition between Rapid Response services and One-Stop activities for affected workers.

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The local SDCC Manager is a key member of the Rapid Response team. The involvement of the local SDCC early in the Rapid Response effort ensures a seamless delivery of Rapid Response services, one-stop services, and dislocated worker program services. One-Stop activities will be made available to dislocated workers through the local SDCCs.

4. Description of how Rapid Response functions as a business service.
The SDDOL sees Rapid Response as a positive, proactive and business friendly service. A well planned Rapid Response effort helps the company to layout the best approach to dealing with potential layoffs. If enough advance notice is provided, the Rapid Response team has access to resources to help the company research potential alternatives to layoff. If layoff is inevitable the Rapid Response team is able to assist the company in developing the most appropriate process. When a plan for layoff is put together in cooperation with the company and the Rapid Response team, the stress level and tensions are reduced for both the company and the workers. This sets the stage for a more successful strategy for the workers facing layoff. The Rapid Response team partners with State and local economic development agencies to identify similar companies, or those companies that may require the skill sets of the dislocated workers. The team connects with local community leaders to identify other companies that may have a need for the workers facing layoff. Job Fairs may be arranged with specific companies invited to meet the workers from a specific layoff. Letters to selected companies are used to encourage connections with these dislocated workers. At times, some businesses do not provide advance notice. This does not allow for the best response. The dislocated worker unit and local SDCCs continually communicate with the business community to disseminate information on available services, including Rapid Response. The local business outreach plans include local efforts at promotion of SDCC services and identifies the benefits to business. This information is communicated on both the State and local level.

5. Other partnerships Rapid Response engages in to expand the range and quality of services available to companies and affected workers and to develop an effective early layoff warning network.
The SDDOL continually is exploring means to enhance the quality of service to business and industry. Business leaders are asked to serve on local advisory boards, as well as the SDWDC. These individuals assist in promotion of the benefits to business and industry for the use of SDDOL programs. State and local business groups are asked to review and help design programs that will be a benefit to the community. The dislocated worker unit has a close connection with the department’s LMIC and UI. Information on mass layoff data is shared. This data may identify a layoff pattern in a particular industry or possibly the start of significant layoffs in a particular business. The local SDCC or the dislocated worker unit initiates contact with the business to ascertain the significance of the data. This also provides the opportunity to promote program services in a positive manner to a business that may be considering substantial layoff actions.

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6. Systems the Rapid Response team uses to track its activities.
As part of the SDDOL, the Rapid Response team utilizes a common system for tracking data and activities. SDWORKS is the MIS system used. This system includes all activities through Rapid Response, Trade Act programs, National Emergency Grants, and One-Stop activities. This system is comprehensive and is capable of tracking participant data, fiscal data, program activity, and employer data. The system generates management reports for local State and Federal use.

7. Explanation of Rapid Response funds used for other activities not described above; e.g. the provision of additional assistance to local areas that experience increased workers or unemployed individuals due to dislocation events.
South Dakota is a single statewide service area without separate local areas. WIA funds, including Rapid Response funds, are maintained by the State. WIA dislocated worker funds are accessible through local SDCCs to any community experiencing layoffs. Rapid Response funds may be used to provide additional assistance to specific communities.

E. Youth
SDDOL is working with other State agencies to align services for youth most in need (youth out of school and at risk of dropping out of school, youth in foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents, homeless youth, and migrant and seasonal farm workers). Services will take the comprehensive approach to serving youth with basic skills remediation, helping youth stay in or return to school, employment, internships, helping in attainment of a high school diploma or GED, postsecondary training, apprenticeships and enrollment in college.

1. Description of South Dakota’s strategy for providing comprehensive, integrated services to eligible, most in-need youth (including strategies for serving youth with special needs, barriers to employment, pregnant or parenting, or disabled) while coordinating across State agencies responsible for workforce investment, foster care, education, human services, juvenile justice, and other relevant resources are part of the strategy.
SDDOL considers the dropout as “most in need” of WIA services. A basic high school education has been recognized by SDDOL for a long time as the stepping stone to participating in training opportunities (on the job, apprenticeship, coursework, etc.) for skills in a career area. So any time a person enters a SDCC without a high school education, the first step is getting them into an educational completion component. The SDCC with linkages with the SDDOL affiliate Alternative High Schools has been strong and expected to remain so. Beginning in PY07, SDCC will be submitting a calendar of events with their regional alternative school describing their program coordination.

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The State office has made it a priority in this coming year to increase the connections between the SDCCs and the AEL programs. Training and coordination planning time is being developed for communities to share ways to share information on basic literacy testing, areas in need of improvement, and posttesting to ensure the WIA common measures are met for out of school, basic skills deficient youth as well as the performance for AEL programming. As the time periods for testing for each program is different, each situation must be looked at to ensure first that the participant is able to participate and receive services in an educationally sound manner and secondly, the sharing of information ensures privacy and yet shares the data need for each program’s files and data management system to ensure performance is obtained. Generally when a youth has dropped out of school, there are a number of “barriers” that lead to the youth leaving school. Those barriers need to be addressed through an integrated, coordinated group of community service providers. Many are in the one stop such as vocational rehabilitation, food stamps, TANF, Job Corps outreach and placement, state corrections, etc. In South Dakota, we even have Alternative High Schools and AEL programs collocated in a few sites. Most of our competitive sites work closely with the corrections agencies (local and state) with many have grants for to provide corrective thinking programs, drug rehab, community service, etc. programs. The Office of Child Protection (under which the state foster care program is operated) has staff co-located in many of the SDDOL partner agencies. Based on the recent success of the state led community focus group planning sessions, SDDOL will be incorporating more targeted sessions into the professional development plan for SDDOL and affiliate programs.

2. Description of how coordination with Job Corps and other youth programs will occur.
The SDDOL is in the last year of a five year contract to provide Outreach and Admission (OA) services into Job Corps, as well as the contract for Career Transition Services (CTS) upon completion of Job Corps training. Currently, each SDCC across the state has a minimum of one staff fully trained in Job Corps and a portion of that staff’s FTE is funded through the Job Corps contract for services. The remaining percentage of each staff’s FTE is funded through either WIA or Wegner-Peyser funding streams so coordination of programs is inherent by design. These staff work in conjunction with schools, CLCs, Alternative High Schools, WIA service and other providers to try to blend services, if appropriate, to best meet the needs of the particular youth. The SDCCs are responsible for the outreach and admission of 425 South Dakota youth ages 16-24 per year in accordance with specified requirements of the Job Corps Policy and Requirements Handbook (PRH). The SDDOL Division of Workforce Service provides administrative services for WIA and Job Corps. This arrangement provides a natural coordination of WIA services and Job Corps. Job Corps Admission Counselors, as part of the application process, interview every individual youth, conduct an assessment and review labor market information with the client. If Job Corps can meet the individuals’ needs, their application is completed and

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submitted for approval. If, however, during the interview process it is determined that Job Corps may not be the right training option the youth may be referred to another program such as WIA, Vocational Rehabilitation Services, tribal entity, social service or other referral sources. Upon completion of the Job Corps program (regardless of center location) the SDDOL has the contract to serve all South Dakota youth with Career Transition Services. Through the SDCCs across the State returning youth are assigned to a Job Corps Placement Specialists (by zip code) caseload for placement activity services. These services include, but are not limited to: job development, job referrals, resume writing assistance, job search skills training, and potential of accessing supportive services through WIA if needed. The Regional Office of Job Corps has estimated the SDDOL will provide career transition services for 255 Job Corps graduates per contract year. SDCC Placement Specialists seek, in a proactive manner, employment opportunities in the local job market that match the students’ skills gained through the Job Corps program. Visits will be made to employers, academic institutions, military recruiters and other personnel agencies to enhance placement opportunities for graduating students. Upon placement of a Job Corps graduate, there will be a full 12 months of follow-up services provided. Monthly calls will be maintained with the student to ensure placement success, or to provide additional services if needed. Record of these contacts is maintained on the Job Corps Career Transition Services (CTS) computer system. This system is also where all placements will be recorded for performance measures and contractor effectiveness. SDDOL shall provide direction, management and administrative support to all functions and activities of the outreach, admissions and career transition services. This will include establishment of short and long range plans to ensure effectiveness and optimum allocation of resources, and ensure that all staff understands Job Corps contractual policies and procedures sufficient to prevent fraud and abuse. Job Corps, along with other youth programs, will continue to be promoted within each local SDCCs’ service delivery area as well as statewide by the contract manager. Coordination of activities produces the best plan of further training for each individual South Dakota youth.

3. South Dakota utilizes reserve funds for statewide activities to support the State’s vision for serving eligible, most in-need youth. a. Utilizing funds to promote cross agency collaboration.
Each year, activities supported with set aside funds are cultivated and observed for successfully addressing a region’s workforce training needs, a high demand statewide workforce needs, etc. As an activity can become self-supporting, the set aside funds are eased out of the funding streams. SDDOL is currently developing close linkages with several healthcare initiatives, encouraging apprenticeship program development, and alternative fuel development

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projects. SDDOL is providing information to the industries on training programs and funding opportunities through ETA such as High Growth High Demand grants and WIRED. Having a long working relationship with many state agencies and the Governor’s office, the opportunities for collaboration and use of set aside funds for streamlining implementation of talent development training is well documented. The Governor’s office and partner youth agencies are also aware of SDDOL’s commitment to ensuring the out of school youth have the skills needed to enter high growth areas of training and related fields. In the past, when building/carpentry/electrical trades were supported through special set aside projects, youth programs in local communities focused on similar trades at the community level. This will continue to be a patter SDDOL follows as we are reading out to the Bio Technology fields in the health and fuel areas.

b. Demonstration of cross-cutting models of service delivery
As State and competitive service providers become more and more computer literate, the use of the Internet is turning out to be an effective tool minimizing the distance between providers and maximizing the sharing of materials.

c. Development of new models of alternative education leading to employment
SDDOL has a 20-year history of working with Alternative High School education delivery. The programming has proven to be effective for at-risk youth dealing with multiple barriers hindering acquisition of a high school education. The State of South Dakota has dedicated State general funds to Alternatives High Schools endorsing the employment and training components of career development. Dropouts, or youth at risk of dropping out of high school, with documental barriers hindering completion of high school and probably continuing their success at obtaining and maintaining employment are first priority in attending the co-funded alternative sites. The DOE ensures the teacher and subject accreditation and the SDDOL ensures students are developing career plans and addressing the issues hindering their progress at self-sufficiency. Alternative High Schools coursework are approved by the home school districts school boards. The curriculum must meet the State standards. With the SDDOL recently acquiring the management of the State AEL program, any youth entering a local WIA provider will receive encouragement to complete their high school education by the most appropriate means (Alternative High School or GED preparation) for youth. Program representatives for WIA youth programs and for AEL are looking at ways to implement coordinated teacher training, youth transitioning to adult learning skill development, where programs overlap, how materials can be integrated and equipment maximized, etc.

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d. Development of demand-driven models with business and industry working collaboratively with workforce investment system and education partners to develop strategies for bringing these youth successfully into the workforce pipeline with the right skills.
South Dakota’s summer skill programs have proven to be an effective model for helping youth discover career areas and gain entry level skills. Projects teaching advanced web design, photo editing, video production, introduction to A+ and networking, building construction, and health care are just a few of the concepts implemented based on regional/community businesses. The area businesses supported the programs by being speakers and trainers, providing tours and other work-based learning opportunities, ensuring the industry tools were highlighted and providing information on training and work expectations. LMIC produces three tabloids regarding career awareness. Each year, the high school level targets an industry in a South Dakota workforce growth area. Based on the Holland Codes, the career/job areas are described and associated with potential job market based on growth and replacement estimates.

F. Business Services
In the spring of 2004, the SDDOL embarked on an effort to change how we serve businesses. In an effort to keep pace with the needs of the business community, we began developing a more business-driven workforce development system. After providing training to our field staff in April and May of 2004, we began to work with our local SDCCs to create localized business plans to develop a more demand-driven system. By the fall of 2005, all Career Centers in the state had business service plans in place and began implementing the strategies. These strategies are: 1. Develop and strengthen new and existing partnerships with entities engaged in business development and worker supply. These entities include local economic development boards, the state GOED office, state agencies such as Social Services, Vocational Rehab, Education, Health, Board of Regents and Revenue, local Chambers of Commerce, and state universities and technical schools. The networks established with these entities provide an invaluable tool in meeting the needs of businesses. The SDCC offices would be involved with economic developments that may come about due to a WIRED grant that is being applied for by the SDDOL. This would expand the opportunities in the state in the bio fuel and bio medical fields. 2. Actively listen to the needs of businesses. The SDDOL listens to businesses through the use of in-person contacts, telephone, email, and surveys. The SDCC system is sensitive to the needs of businesses by focusing on and asking “What can we do to better serve you?” Researching each business is critical for providing better services.

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3. Provide businesses with resource rooms at the local SDCC. Business resource rooms allow businesses to interview applicants, research materials to help them expand, and review information to assist new entrepreneurs in starting their own business. Materials supplied include Business Resource Directories and other marketing tools that refer an employer to various agencies to help them get started quickly and easily. 4. Assist businesses in filling their staffing needs. Several offices have adopted a ‘bulletin board’ technique to promote businesses in their area at the SDCC office. These boards highlight what the employer does and discuss the type of employees the business wants to hire. This has been successful because it markets the business and makes potential employees more comfortable and knowledgeable of what the business makes or what service the business supplies. 5. Emphasize SDCC customer service continuously. The emphasis to provide friendly, efficient, and effective service to all customers, including both businesses and job seekers, has not been compromised and is an ongoing objective of every Career Center. Whether providing job information, labor market information, job-training options, or assisting people by referring them to another partnering agency, the goal of customer service is strongly maintained. 6. Train the workforce for today’s business needs. In cooperation with businesses, CLCs, post secondary education institutions, vocational schools and other partnering agencies, the SDCCs assist in the development of training programs needed to meet business demands. Whether healthcare, truck driving, welding, construction or other occupations, various employee training programs have been developed around the state to fill the employment needs of businesses. These types of training will continue to be developed to improve the quality of today’s workforce. SDDOL is currently working with its partners, the SD Department of Health, SD Department of Education and SD Board of Regents, by already completing meetings with healthcare facilities from around the state to discuss the shortage of healthcare workers. Out of these meetings come the recommendations to the leaders of these agencies so they can bring them to the Governor to look at steps to resolve this issue. The SDDOL, in particular WIA, will continue working with their partners on a resolution. 7. Working more closely with business to address youth employment issues. The greatest resource of any state is its youth because they are the wage earners of the future. By creating better relationships with businesses to improve opportunities for youth through training and career enhancement, the probability of keeping youth in South Dakota increases. South Dakota would like to streamline administration of the WOTC program, however, the Federal funds made available for the program are not sufficient to effectively complete this. If additional funds should become available, automating this program has been identified as a priority by SDDOL.

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In October 2006, South Dakota launched Dakota Roots. Dakota Roots is a joint vision between the Department of Labor, the Department of Tourism and State Development and the Governor’s office. It is a part of the state's 2010 Initiative, our action plan for enhancing state development. This program joins citizens, business leaders, and state agencies in an effort to make our state stronger. Dakota Roots will grow the South Dakota workforce by encouraging those with ties to the state to return, for anyone interested in making a home in South Dakota and for anyone interested in helping family and friends find a rewarding career in our state. Dakota Roots will match participants with career openings available from the state's leading businesses. Dakota Roots also allows businesses to request additional information about the program, the business climate in South Dakota, and business start-up or expansion details.

G. Innovative Service Delivery Strategies 1. Description of service delivery strategies to maximize resources, increase service levels, improve service quality, achieve better integration and meet other key State goals.
SDDOL will increase service levels by seeking closer alignment with all workforce services and will promote the seamless integration and coordination of services provided under the Wagner-Peyser services provided under WIA. The objective is to align Employment and Training program, thereby providing workers with core and intensive services, including case management training and supportive services. SDDOL has invested much time and resources into a redesign of the electronic date collection system, SDWORKS. SDDOL developed this automated system to provide partners the ability to capture a complete set of customer data that support categorical workforce programs and store the associated data in a central repository. The focus is reducing staff workload by automating repetitive tasks, reducing data redundancy, and increasing data integrity. The system includes the functionality for the sharing of data among Employment and Training programs. Further enhancements were developed to SDDOL’s website on both the supply and demand sides; these enhancements will provide the capabilities expressed by our customers through focus groups and partnerships. SDWORKS is the backbone of South Dakota’s new high-skilled workforce recruitment program, Dakota Roots. By utilizing SDWORKS, an existing tool, partnering state agencies were able to reserve valuable resources for promotion rather than using to create an expensive new tool. Through enhancements made to SDWORKS, an existing tool was made stronger to the benefit of new and on-going programs.

2. ETA Personal Re-employment Account.
South Dakota is not participating in the ETA Personal Reemployment Account (PRA) demonstration.

H. Strategies for Faith-based and Community Organizations

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South Dakota has a long history of collaboration with faith-based and community based organizations for the delivery of workforce investment programs. In addition to innovation of faith-based and community organizations with the SDCCs, they are colocated in the same facility at many locations. This does not reduce the need to communicate and cooperate as partners to meet the shared goals of providing customers opportunities to improve their ability to obtain an employment that provides a living wage. Through capacity building efforts targeting all levels of WIA personnel, including SDCC staff and local service provider staff. South Dakota will continue to improve our programs in increasing opportunities for new and continued partnerships and expanding access of faith-based and community-based customers to SDCCs. Provide to faith-based and community-based organizations a better understanding of the South Dakota Workforce Investment System including the goals, structures and services provided, as well as the resources and funding streams that support the system.

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X.

State Administration

A. Technology Infrastructure and Management Information Systems
The SDDOL has developed a web-based data collection, management, and reporting system known as SDWORKS. The system is loosely based on the first version of the One Stop Operating System developed by the State of Utah. As a single statewide service area, the SDDOL requires local service providers to use SDWORKS for data collection, case management, and reporting. Since all providers are connected to the same system, reports are simply generated at the State level and need not be created at the local level and forwarded to the State. A single statewide system also allows for easy access to client records from anywhere in the State. SDWORKS is the primary data management system for WIA Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Worker programs as well as the Wagner-Peyser and VETS programs. All Federal reports for these programs are generated through the SDWORKS system. SDWORKS also provides Internet access to the SDDOL. Job Seekers can register and perform job searches online. Employers can list job openings and review unsuppressed applicant resumes. Further enhancements to the public user side of SDWORKS are planned for program years three and four. A Users Group will determine priorities to improve ease of use of the system, appearance, and functionality.

B. Description of South Dakota’s plan to use reserved funds for Statewide activities under WIA.
South Dakota plans to continue utilization of the WIA Statewide Activity funds to support the operations of the SDCC and allowable statewide employment and training activities. Other activities that will benefit from these funds are: • • • Continued enhancements to SDWORKS and the Data Warehouse strengthening our ability to effectively use the data in operational and decision making functions. Training apprentice workers in targeted industries/occupations. Activities to assist youth in achieving the goal of becoming a successful adult.

C. Description of waivers and workflex authority.
The SDDOL, administrative entity for WIA, recognizes the importance and flexibility waivers afford the workforce development system. The department proposes two requests for waivers to allow the state the flexibility necessary for full development of the goals of WIA and increasing the eligible population. The following waiver requests are submitted for approval: 1. Transfer of funds between WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker programs

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a. Statutory and Regulatory provisions to be waived: WIA Section 133(b)(4) and WIA Regulations at 667.140 state a local board may transfer not more than 20 percent of the funds allocated to Adult and Dislocated Worker employment and training activities. b. South Dakota requests the authority to transfer up to 100% of funds allocated for a program year for WIA Adult and Dislocated Worker employment and training activities between the two programs. c. Goals to be achieved by the waiver request: Granting authority to transfer funds between Adult and Dislocated Worker programs provides the flexibility for improvement of the statewide workforce investment system. Such authority will allow the state to better manage resources in response to the needs of our work force. This flexibility will provide the best use of resources as the state strives for regional economic competitiveness through talent development. Using resources for the eligible population in the region will bring job growth and expand employment and advancement opportunities. d. State of local statutory or regulatory barriers: There are no state or local barriers to implementing this waiver request. e. Description of the goals of the waiver and expected outcomes: Transfer authority will allow the state to better respond to changes in the economy. The flexibility to transfer funds between Adult and Dislocated Worker programs maximizes our ability to meet the economic needs of particular regions of the state for development of talent needed for economic growth. f. Description of Individuals impacted by the Waiver: Adults and Dislocated Workers eligible for the program will be positively impacted by the waiver through the flexibility to move significant funding to reflect actual needs of specific regions of the state.

g. Description of the process to monitor progress: SDDOL is the administrative agent for the SDWDC and will be responsible for approving and monitoring all transfer of funds. h. Opportunity for local boards to comment on the waiver request: As stated previously in this plan, South Dakota is a single local area with the SDWDC serving as the state and local board. i. Public Comment on the waiver request: This request for waiver is incorporated in the submission of the modification to the state plan for years three and four of the five year plan. The public has been invited to comment on the waiver request. The SDWDC have demonstrated support of the waive through a regularly scheduled and public meeting soliciting comments on the waiver and plan.

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2. Expand the population eligible for WIA Youth services Statutory and Regulatory Provisions to be Waived: South Dakota’s Workforce Investment adult and youth programs work closely and this has been beneficial to many families in our state. But the Department feels it is also loosing the ability to serve youth family members under the youth economic eligibility guidelines (section 101(13) and (25)) when we are serving the parent under the priority of services allowable for adult programming (section 133 (b)(2)(A) or (3)). Priority of service in South Dakota for adults would be given to those earning less than $8.94 per hour; thus a single parent with three children could participate in WIA programs, but the children could not. Providing services for multiple family members has a number of benefits from building trust within the whole family, eliminating transportation issues, a common family goal, and building a long term relationship for appropriate youth follow-up services. Waiver Modification Request: It is for this purpose SDDOL requests a waiver to add a third descriptor to the Low Income Individual (section 101(25)(B)). The State would like the locals to have the ability to serve children of adult WIA participants. This would mean youth between the ages of 14 and 22 would be eligible for WIA registration and enrollment into WIA services. Description of Individuals Affected by the Waiver: Providers often have youth wanting to participate in summer career programs and youth year round activities, but the family income is over the economic eligibility guidelines for youth in South Dakota. Often the youth is from a single parent family; the State is ranked as having the largest percentage of working mothers. Unfortunately, the single parent typically has only a high school education with entry level job skills. To try and make enough money to pay for housing, transportation, and typical living expenses, the parent is working two or more jobs and well over 40 hours a week. This takes the parent out of the home when the youth are there needing guidance with school work and gaining basic living skills; i.e. money management, time management, purchasing necessities, etc. Many of the youth could truly benefit from career awareness and exploration activities. The skills to be gained under the WIA leadership activities are especially important for the youth being targeted. The youth could truly benefit from understanding how advanced training can lead to economic stability in their future. It is not unusual for the youth to be struggling in school with basic reading and math scores below average for their age. Not being able to read with ease, the youth struggles in all the subject areas and finds it easier to skip school than attend. As the State’s WIA provides are closely connected to the Alternative High Schools and the Adult Education and Learning programs, the opportunities would be available for remediation. As mentioned earlier, the parent(s) considered to be underemployed are often high school graduates and lack the skills to help their youth seriously plan for postsecondary

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training. The goal would be to have the youth be the first generation to enter a postsecondary training. Goals to be Achieved by the Waiver: It would allow the providers to serve the “family.” The parent could participate in skill training opportunities allowing for advancement in their home community. The youth could learn about their interests and explore career opportunities. The exploration would allow the youth to understand the role education plays in their career choice. With the realization, youth are more likely to complete high school and continue in appropriate advanced training opportunities (Job Corps, apprenticeship, associate and bachelor degrees, etc.). Programmatic Outcomes: The programs will be enhanced by being able to serve the multiple family needs. The parent will be gaining work training to become self-sufficient. The youth would be able to participate in remediation if needed to complete high school and enter post high training. The youth would be better informed and able to make quality decisions about their choice of careers, the required training, and how to manage life factors influencing their work traits. The State sees a benefit to the State’s employers by having a better prepared workforce. Young people with knowledge regarding employer needs and what employers need what job skills will meet the needs of the employers. State or Local Statutory Barriers: The State has not implemented any policies that would hinder this effort. Opportunity for Public Comment: The concept has been discussed with local providers and with various members of the SDWDC. The first announcement of this effort to formally submit a waiver expanding the definition of youth eligibility to include the youth of adult WIA participants will be made at the July 6, 2005, SDWDC meeting. Describe the Processes Used To Monitor the Progress of Implementing the Waiver: The State’s data management system will be able to collect the data. The number of youth enrolled under the proposed additional eligibility criteria could be reported monthly and quarterly. The State believes the additional data and connectivity to more than one member of the family will ensure better customer satisfaction and follow-up data.

D. Performance Management and Accountability 1. State’s performance accountability system
South Dakota is a statewide local service area as defined in the WIA (1998), section 116. Therefore, the core indicators have been established as statewide indicators. The table in Attachment A shows South Dakota’s expected performance goals for each of the Core Indicators and Common Measures. The expected level of performance for this

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current year are included in Attachment A. SDDOL will negotiate PY2007 and PY2008 goals as scheduled by USDOL. South Dakota’s levels of performance are designed to positively impact the level of customer satisfaction, promote continuous improvement, and ensure optimal return-oninvestment. Previous years’ goals and outcomes were a major consideration in determining the statewide indicators. For those indicators where previous performance significantly exceeded the goals, a comparable increase in the goals was established. A continual yearly increase in the goal level was proposed for goals where performance was met, but performance was not significantly higher than the established goal. The established core indicators are intended to set a high, but achievable, standard for each of the 17 performance standards. In establishing the level of performance for each of the Core Indicators, numerous factors were considered including minimal funding and the necessity of reducing the number of current service providers. South Dakota strives to provide quality services to eligible individuals. Standards were set to allow South Dakota to serve the high wage dislocated worker, the underemployed individual, and those with multiple barriers to employment without providing a disincentive by setting the performance standards at unrealistic levels. South Dakota will use the web-based performance management tools developed by the USDOL Employment and Training Administration to identify program strengths and weaknesses and estimate the impact of service to specific groups and services on overall performance levels. South Dakota’s ongoing performance evaluation system will be used to analyze data and modify strategies to improve performance to ensure positive year-end program performance results. The WIA Diagnostic and Planning Tool in addition to on-going assessment and analysis of program performance will be used to promote continuous improvement over the life of the plan. State WIA staff will maintain communication with local service providers to answer questions related to performance data and reports. Regular performance reviews for SDCCs and other service providers ensure that, if necessary, timely corrective actions can be taken to ensure achievement of performance measures. State WIA staff will assist local service providers to adjust their strategies and/or operations to meet required performance. The goals of the employment service under the Wagner-Peyser Act are entirely compatible with the goals and objectives of the One-Stop delivery system and the SDWDC. Standards used to gauge employment service performance at the State level include individuals entered employment, job openings, and UI claimants placed. In addition, the federally mandated preferential service to veterans is weighed against services to non-veterans in the following areas placed in job/obtained employment, counseled, enrolled in training and reportable service. Also, the employment service is judged positively or negatively according to whether it provides equitable or nonequitable service to migrant and seasonal farmworkers. Under WIA, South Dakota will measure customer satisfaction of employers, job seekers, and WIA participants as part of its continuous improvement strategy. South Dakota has developed an easy to use, easy to manage customer satisfaction measurement system that will collect customer satisfaction data, analyze the information, and utilize the information in a continuous improvement process.

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Surveys will be used to determine what is important to customers and how satisfied they are with the services they have received. A process for making changes and program improvements has been designed and implemented. A coding system has been established to distinguish targeted applicant groups as required under WIA Title I, the Wagner-Peyser Act and Title 38. Attainment of core indicators, review of the performance of our various training activities, customer surveys, and the application of the continuous improvement method will enable us to measure how we’re progressing toward our goal of total customer satisfaction.

2. Target applicant groups
Targeted applicant groups under Title 38 Chapters 41 and 42 (VETS) that the State tracks include special disabled veterans, disabled veterans, newly separated veterans, veterans, female veterans, campaign badge veterans, and transitioning service members.

3. Performance outcomes and measures
South Dakota does not prescribe any performance measures or outcomes beyond those stipulated by WIA.

4. State’s common data system and reporting processes
South Dakota’s management information system (MIS) will allow access to a wide range of information about individuals who receive services from SDCCs and various contracted service providers. SDWORKS was designed and implemented in 2001 to track the full range of core, intensive, and training services required by WIA and the services and performance measures required by Labor Exchange. SDWORKS was designed using a web enabled component-based architecture allowing the ability to: • • • • Add local level components to the system, Interface with other systems with well defined Application Program Interfaces, Minimize the impact of a modification to an existing business function by restricting modifications to only the component(s) responsible for delivering the business function, and Adapt more quickly to new business requirements by adding component(s) which will have little or no impact on how the existing system operates.

South Dakota UI quarterly wages and WRIS wages are collected in South Dakota’s data warehouse system and can be matched to recipients of Labor Exchange and WIA services on an individual basis. This data is stored in a secured server with only authorized personnel having access. The wage data is updated each quarter with requests sent to South Dakota UI Division and WRIS. The full manner in which wage record information is used will be defined largely by the performance standard system established by the SDDOL.

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South Dakota is committed to continuous improvement of its information and data systems. SDWORKS is a statewide One-Stop Operating System with enhancements that will acknowledge individuals’ participation in other programs. Through information sharing with the State’s other departments, potential for an even more comprehensive data system exists. SDWORKS focuses on reducing staff workload by automating repetitive tasks, reducing data redundancy and increasing data integrity. The breadth of partners involved in providing services through the State’s service delivery system gives rise to a diversity of interests in the One-Stop Operating System design. South Dakota is committed to supporting an operating system that services the entire system equally and effectively. To this end, State staff worked with other states and nationally recognized system designers to develop a design that could be customized to meet South Dakota’s individual needs. The SDWORKS system assures coordination of and avoids duplication among all entities providing workforce investment activities.

5. Actions the Governor and State Board will take to ensure collaboration with key partners and continuous improvement of the Statewide workforce investment system.
South Dakota’s Governor and SDWDC will continue to encourage the private sector to take a significant rose in public/private partnerships. This will continue to occur as private sector allies increasingly see these partnerships as directly and positively impacting their business operations. Partnerships do and will require frank input and feedback from partners, educating partners on their responsibilities, and clarifying what each contributes to the success of all. The Governor has implemented an exciting effort, the 2010 Initiative. This is an ambitious undertaking that is designed, among other related goals, to focus energy and investment: • • • • • In the creation and development of new business; In the growth and expansion of existing business; In agriculture and natural resource development; In the development of research and technology infrastructure to be commercialized; and To stabilize rural communities.

The challenge has been set by the Governor for the State to identify and target such industries, as listed, for meeting the projected employment opportunities. This requires a system that is grounded in specific skills, educational competencies and work experiences. This system will provide employers with a skilled educated workforce and will provide workers with an opportunity for economic security and self-sufficiency. The workforce will be expected to have sufficient basic academic skills, specific occupational skills, interpersonal skills, and most importantly skills that provide for thinking and creative problem solving. Steps taken by the entities under this Unified Plan will provide workers with the necessary tools to develop and build upon these various skills. Key partners in meeting the goals of the 2010 Initiative include the Governor, State and local economic development, Board of Regents, Labor, and Education, as well as private

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sector business leaders. South Dakota, with a largely agricultural based economy, is developing and changing to meet the challenge as laid out in the Governor’s 2010 Initiative. Truly we are setting a course for developing a workforce that will meet the business and industry needs of today and tomorrow. MOUs have been written and collaboration meetings have resulted in the streamlining of services for customers-in-common and the sharing of information/data between partners. Legal questions about information exchange have been asked and answered. Where individual detailed data about customers cannot be shared, aggregate summaries and outcomes are provided using wage data matching.

6. Description of State and local boards performance evaluations.
Each quarter, the SDWDC meets to evaluate service delivery and approve strategies for improved performance. As part of the agenda, the board reviews quarterly performance reports including Federal measures. As measurements increase and decrease, the Council takes an active role identifying problem areas and scheduling follow up. The Council requests the Department to develop plans to provide technical assistance as needed. Technical assistance can focus on specific program areas, or address general service integration issues, fiscal issues, or other more systemic deficiencies. State staff conduct reviews and site visits so that expertise in all programs is provided. Technical assistance may include: • • • • • • • Program overviews for local service providers Facilitated planning sessions with a specific focus resulting in a specific local action plan; Observation and feedback to assist service providers in refining service delivery techniques; General reviews, including desk reviews, of overall service activity and fiscal accountability; Provision of up-to-date guidance on policy and best practices; Responses to specific programmatic questions; and/or Assistance in accessing, organizing, and interpreting data; and promotion of integration methods in SDCCs.

7. State steps for implementation of new reporting requirements against the common performance measures.
South Dakota has developed an automated system to provide SDDOL partners the ability to capture a complete set of customer data supporting categorical workforce programs and stores the associated data in a central repository. SDWORKS has one central database accessible online to all authorized users. SDWORKS focuses on reducing staff workload by automating repetitive tasks, reducing data redundancy, and increasing data integrity. The system includes the functionality for the sharing of data among different workforce development areas. SDWORKS is a comprehensive automated system meeting the common and unique needs of the partnering programs.

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SDWORKS supports multiple Federal and State programs, including Wagner-Peyser and WIA programs. Trade Adjustment Assistance and NAFTA-TAA are also supported by SDWORKS. With the capacity to accommodate multiple programs, SDWORKS will serve as an excellent tool for implementing the new Common Measures. South Dakota is developing a new Common Measures Performance Reporting System for Common Measures reporting across all Federal and State workforce development programs in accordance with the draft guidance available as stated in TEGL 15-03 and TEGL 28-04, and the accompanying guidance provided by DOLETA. Although the short time frame provided by DOLETA between notice and implementation of these changes creates system issues, South Dakota will be ready to apply these new requirements to their system. As changes occur to these methodologies and as the system is improved, South Dakota is in a position to meet targeted implementation dates.

8. Proposed level for each performance measure for each of the two performance years.
The table in Attachment A shows South Dakota’s proposed performance goals for each of the Title 1 Core Indicators and the Common Measures Performance goals for PY2007 and PY2008. Proposed levels of performance were derived from historical performance, attention to Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), national comparisons, and consideration to economic and demographic variables. The proposed levels of performance demonstrate SDDOL’s commitment to continuous improvement and mark an excellent return on the investment of time, talent, and resources. SDDOL will negotiate performance measures with the USDOL Regional Administrator. Agreed upon goals will serve as benchmarks as SDDOL guides talent development leading to innovation and economic growth.

E. Administrative Provisions
Because South Dakota is a single service delivery area, an appeals process is not necessary. South Dakota ensures compliance with the non-discrimination requirements outlined in §188 based on the SDDOL MOA and 29 CFR Part 37.

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XI.

Assurances

Please see the signed Guidance document, Program Administration Designees and Plan Signatures, which is being sent by mail with Governor Rounds’ original signature. As indicated on the form, the Governor’s signature ensures program operation is in accordance with the assurances as outlined in section XI of the Guidance.

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Attachment A: Statewide Performance Indicators and Goals
The following table shows South Dakota’s WIA performance goals for each of the Title 1 Core Indicators for PY2006 and proposed goals for PY2007 and PY2008.

Performance Indicator

PY2006 Goal

PY2007 Proposed Goal 77.0% 83.0% $9,500 68.5% 85.0% 90.5% $11,500 75.0% 74.0% 84.0% $3,300

PY2008 Proposed Goal 79.0% 84.5% $9,600 68.5% 86.0% 91.0% $11,750 75.0% 75.0% 85.0% $3,500

Adult Entered Employment Adult Employment Retention Adult Average Six Months Earnings Adult Employment and Credential Dislocated Worker Entered Employment Dislocated Worker Employment Retention Dislocated Worker Average Six Months Earnings Dislocated Worker Employment and Credential Older Youth (19-21) Entered Employment Older Youth (19-21) Employment Retention Older Youth (19-21) Earnings Change in Six Months Older Youth (19-21) Credential Younger Youth (14-18) Skill Attainment Younger Youth (14-18) Diploma or Equivalent Younger Youth (14-18) Retention Participant Customer Satisfaction Employer Customer Satisfaction

78.0% 84.0% $9,000 67.5% 85.0% 90.5% $11,350 74.0% 73.0% 85.0% $3,150

52.0% 75.0% 59.0% 68.5% 80.5% 82.0%

53.0% 75.0% 57.0% 70.0% 82.0% 82.5%

53.0% 76.0% 57.0% 71.0% 82.5% 83.0%

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The following table shows South Dakota’s Wagner-Peyser and WIA Common Measures performance goals for each of the Indicators for PY2006 and proposed goals for PY2007 and PY2008.

Performance Indicator

PY2006 Goal

PY2007 Proposed Goal 72.0% 79.0% $9,500 77.0% 83.0% $9,500 85.0% 90.5% $11,500 NA NA NA

PY2008 Proposed Goal 73.0% 80.0% $9,600 79.0% 84.5% $9,600 86.0% 91.0% $11,750 NA NA NA

Wagner-Peyser Entered Employment Wagner-Peyser Employment Retention Wagner-Peyser Average Six Months Earning WIA Adult Entered Employment WIA Adult Employment Retention WIA Adult Average Six Months Earnings WIA Dislocated Worker Entered Employment WIA Dislocated Worker Employment Retention WIA Dislocated Worker Average Six Months Earnings WIA Youth Placement in Employment or Education WIA Youth Attainment of a Degree or Certificate WIA Youth Literacy and Numeracy Gains

72.0% 73.0% $9,000 78.0% 84.0% $9,000 85.0% 90.5% $11,350 NA NA NA

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Attachment B: Program Administration Designees and Plan Signatures

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Attachment C
An extension of this State Plan for the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, may be viewed at http://www.state.sd.us/dol/default.asp?navid=70 under the heading “South Dakota State Plan.”

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Low Intermediate ESL CERTIFICATE – Competencies
Mastery of 80% of these competencies
COMMUNITY LIVING
Orally give and follow directions to a location in a city/town. Use a telephone directory to find residential listings Read classified ads to locate housing Describe health problem in some detail including severity and duration Locate public health clinics and hospitals in the community Read and follow directions on medicine labels

EDUCATION/PARENTING
Ask and answer questions for a simple teacherparent conference
Read sample report cards and discuss grading system Write note to school to explain student’s absence (1-2 sentences)

PRONUNCIATION
Pronounce two-letter consonant blends and digraphs (accent OK) Pronounce long and short vowels in familiar words (accent OK) Correctly pronounce “ed” ending on verb Understand relaxed pronunciation of verb phrases (wanna, gonna, hafta)

CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS
Identify differences and similarities between one’s own culture and US culture Understand American holidays and associated activities Read about and discuss the concept of culture shock Read about and discuss the American family and roles of men and women Read about and discuss American customs regarding dating and romance

VOCABULARY/IDIOMS
Define and use 5 two-word verbs (such as “turn on”) Define and use 5 idiomatic expressions (such as “It’s a piece of cake.”) Use appropriate questioning strategies to discover meanings of unfamiliar words or phrases

EMPLOYMENT SKILLS
Define 10 vocabulary words using in job applications Fill out a job application Read classified ads to locate appropriate jobs Practice job interview skills using culturally appropriate verbal and body language Practice culturally appropriate social interactions at the workplace Identify at least one short-term and one long-term employment goal and steps to achieve them

GRAMMAR
Express habitual actions in the present (simple present) Express current actions in the present (present continuous) Use 4 frequency adverbs such as “always”, “usually”, “sometimes”, “never” Express actions in the past using regular verbs Use 15 irregular verbs in the past tense Express actions in the future using “will” Express more than one action or object using “and”, “or” and “but” Use adjectives to compare using “er” and “more” Using adjectives to compare using “est” and “most” Use the articles “a or an” or “some” to distinguish count vs. non-count nouns Use 5 prepositions of location

LITERACY/READING and WRITING
Read a short article on familiar topics with clear structure (e.g. clear main idea, sequential etc.) Answer literal questions about main points and important details Write a declarative sentence using proper capitalization and ending punctuation Spell one-syllable words with short vowels Spell one-syllable words with long vowels and final “e” Spell one-syllable words with two letter consonant blends (st, br, cl, etc.) and diagraphs (th, sh, ch, etc.)

CONSUMER ECONOMICS
Define vocabulary: checking account, savings account, credit card, debit card, money order, due date Understand a pay stub (gross pay, net pay, benefits, deductions) Discuss taxes – income, sales, and vehicle Read a bill to discover payment amount and due date Write a check/money order to pay bills

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Beginning ESL CERTIFICATE – Competencies
Mastery of 80% of these competencies
COMMUNITY LIVING Dates, Time, Weather
Tell time using terms: half, quarter and prepositions: to, of, past, after Identify months and seasons Ask questions about the current time and date Answer questions about significant times and dates (ex. Time to start work, date arrived in U.S.) Use 10 basic words to describe weather conditions Know temperature in Fahrenheit for freezing and boiling water

EMPLOYMENT SKILLS
Ask and answer questions for a simple job interview Fill out simple (1 page) job application Identify names of 20 entry-level jobs Give and follow two-step directions (ex. First vacuum the floor, and then clean the bathroom) Answer questions about previous and current employer and job Read common safety signs

Make, accept or decline invitations Make apologies

LITERACY/READING and WRITING
Read common words with long and short vowels Read short familiar words (ex. 50% from Dolch primer list and 50% Dolch noun list) Read and understand 6-8 word sentences on familiar topics Accurately spell words in name, address and other personal information

Housing and Transportation
Read housing and utility bill to determine amount and date due Identify home maintenance problems and state need for repairs Read common traffic/pedestrian signs Read and locate simple places on a map Ask for and give directions to a simple location State simple driving laws (ex. Pull over for emergency vehicles) Understand need for driver’s license, registration, and insurance Read a bus schedule

CONSUMER ECONOMICS
Identify and use U.S. coins and bills Write and endorse a check Identify 25 types of food Identify 20 items of clothing Read tags and labels to identify price and size Read store signs to determine days and hours of business Know 5 common weights and measured (pounds, ounces, gallon, quart, cup, bunch, etc)

Accurately spell learned vocabulary words
PRONUNCIATION
Distinguish between long and short vowels Associate consonant blends and digraphs with their usual pronunciation Distinguish between possible pronunciations of “ed” ending on past verbs

VOCABULARY/IDIOMS
Clarify by requesting repetition or asking simple questions

EDUCATION/PARENTING
Identify school personnel: teacher, principal, secretary, and guidance counselor Discuss levels of elementary, middle and high school Identify GED as alternative to high school diploma

Health Care
Identify 25 major body parts State health condition in simple terms (illness and symptoms) Can make a doctors appointment on phone or in person Read time and date on appointment card Read medicine label for purpose and dosage Give own height and weight using U.S. measures Distinguish and report emergency to 911

GRAMMAR
Use nouns and pronouns (subject, object, possessive) Describe items using simple adjectives in standard word order Describe using regular comparative adjectives (ex. big, bigger, biggest) Express habitual activities using present verbs Express current actions using present continuous verbs Express past actions using regular verbs in past Express future actions using “going to”

CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS
Respond to questions about personal information for self and immediate family Use appropriate social phrases to introduce self and immediate family

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Beginning Literacy ESL CERTIFICATE – Competencies Mastery of 80% of these competencies
COMMUNITY LIVING
Personal Information
Name Address Phone Number SS# Country of Origin Language Spoken Age and Birth Date Members of Immediate Family

Health Care
State problem and need for medical help Identify 10 major body parts Identify right and left side Report emergency by phone (call 911, state problem and address) Read time and date on appointment card Identify one’s self and state appointment time upon arrival at medical office

Answer questions about name of school, teacher, babysitter, or daycare of child.

CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS
Use appropriate social phrases for greetings, farewells, please, thank you. Produce one or two word questions using what/where/when/how/much/who Follow one-step directions such as “come in”, “sit down”

EMPLOYMENT SKILLS
Sign name (for time card or paycheck) State and write social security number Give simple excuses (one or two word) for absence or lateness Follow one-step directions such as “follow me” or “start here”

Time and Dates
Identify numbers 1-100 Tell time by hour and minute Identify hours of business (open/closed) Say date orally Write date Identify days of the week Read an appointment card Use appropriate words for today, tomorrow, yesterday, next week

LITERACY/READING and WRITING
Recite and write alphabet Spell one’s own name Match lower and upper case letters Read short familiar words and recognize a few high frequency words (ex. 50% from Dolch preprimer list and 25% Dolch noun list) Read and understand 3-4 word sentences using learned vocabulary Identify 5 common signs and labels (stop, restroom, men, women, exit, no smoking, etc.) Accurately and legibly copy basic personal information onto a form

CONSUMER ECONOMICS
Identify and know value of U.S. coins and bills Count money Endorse a check Identify 10 types of food Identify 10 items of clothing State basic food and clothing needs using one or two-word phrases Identify 8 colors

Housing and Transportation
Distinguish house vs. apartment Name 4 rooms Name 10 objects in a home Name 5 modes of transportation (walk, car, bus, bicycle, airplane) Follow one-step directions using right and left Follow one-step directions using north, south, east and west Use 5 prepositions of location (in, on, next, to, across from, between)

PRONUNCIATION
Associate single consonant letters with their usual pronunciation

EDUCATION/PARENTING
Identify school vocabulary: student, teacher, parent, and homework Identify 5 items in classroom (pen, paper, book, board, etc.)

VOCABULARY/IDIOMS
Express understanding and lack of understanding Ask someone to repeat

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High Intermediate ESL CERTIFICATE – Competencies
Mastery of 80% of these competencies
COMMUNITY LIVING
Read a city map to find location and determine route Write directions to a given location in a city/town Use a telephone directory to find business listings in white and yellow pages Discuss home and renter’s rights and responsibilities Read a sample lease agreement

CULTURAL UNDERSTANDINGS
Read about and discuss the American family and roles of parents and children Read about and discuss the history of immigration in the US Read about and discuss racial, ethnic and religious diversity in the United States Compare American laws to laws in one’s home country Write a paragraph identifying differences and similarities between one’s own culture and US culture

VOCABULARY/IDIOMS
Define and use 10 two-word verbs (such as “help out”) Define and use 10 idiomatic expressions (such as “to pull some one’s leg”) Use bilingual dictionary to look up unfamiliar terms Use an English learners dictionary to look up unfamiliar terms

EMPLOYMENT SKILLS
Define 25 vocabulary words used in employment Practice job interviews for skilled/professional level jobs Generate answers to difficult interview questions Discuss performance evaluations and impact on retention/advancement Discuss culturally appropriate ways to pursue job advancement

GRAMMAR
Distinguish appropriate uses of simple present and present continuous Express actions in the past using regular verbs and markers to indicate when action occurred Use 25 irregular verbs in the past tense Express more that one event in the past and indicate which occurred first Express actions in the future using “going to” Express possible actions using “can”, “could”, and “would” Express necessary actions using “must”, “have to” and “have to go” Give advice using “should”, “had better” and “ought to” Express continued actions using the present perfect Use adverbs with the –ly ending Use 10 prepositions in appropriate sentence structure Write 5-8 word sentences using correct word order

LITERACY/READING and WRITING
Read short article on unfamiliar topic and identify main idea Answer questions that require making inferences of information that is implied but not stated Use context clues to identify meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary Write a short paragraph with complete sentences and proper punctuation Spell one-syllable words with two vowels together Make regular changes in spelling when adding “ed” or “ing”

CONCUMER ECONOMICS
Balance a checking account Define credit rating and discuss how to achieve good credit history Discuss credit and debit cards – uses, pros and cons Read a credit application to determine interest charged Discuss income taxes and become familiar with forms and reporting responsibilities

PRONUNCIATION
Understand relaxed pronunciation of questions (whaddaya, whacha) Pronounce 2-syllable words with appropriate stress Distinguish pitch for declarative sentence versus interrogative

EDUCATION/PARENTING
Define the GED and identify steps to attain a GED Compare institutions of higher education: technical school, colleges, and universities

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